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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00151
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: September 8, 1939
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00151

Full Text






The Star -Florida's fastest grow-
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St Joe;


THE


STAR


Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
est growing little city. In-
the heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


VOLUME II PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY., FLORIDA, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1939 NUMBER 47


Blountstown Club

\Seeks to Conserve

Dead Lake Timber

Lions Believe Removal of Logs
.Will Be Detrimental to South's
Finest Fishing Grounds

The Blountstown Lions club at
its last regular meeting adopted a
resolution petitioning the internal
improvement board of the state
of Florida to cancel a lease now
in effect allowing a sawmill oper-
ator to remove sunken logs and
'fell standing trees in the famous
-_ead Lakes, one of the South's
finest fresh water fishing areas.
The resolution pointed out that
the logs and stamps in the lakes
furnishes underwater protection
for the fish and that the' moss-
Ipfraped trees growing in the lakes
present a most picturesque and
attractive scene to sportsmen, be-
sides furnishing shade on the
lakes. : ,
-- It goes on to point out that
fishermen from other states visit
the lakes in large numbers and
pay in to the state of Florida ap-
proximately $50,000 yearly for
fishing licenses, and in addition
spend many thousands of dollars
for guides, supplies, etc., and that
a large number of people depend
upon the lakes for their liveli-
hood, all of which makes the lakes
not only a refuge for our owin
spo-rtsm-rn. bi4.a most valuable as-
set to -the state and citizens of
Calhoun and Gulf counties.
The Blountstown club states
that according to qualified timber
cruisers, the-state of Florida will
not receive $10,000 stumpage for
"every tree, log, stump and branch
on the lakes, and to remove them
will not only destroy the lakes as
far as fishing is concerned, but
will also cut off the annual reve-
nue received by the state there-
(Continued on Page 4)

Hookworm Is A

Family Disease

Lectures To Be Given In This
Section In Co-operative Drive
To Eliminate Malady

Florida State Board of Health
workers have found that hook-
worm disease spreads rapidly
through whole families, therefore
it is safe to assume that if one
.member of a family is infested
with hookworm, others in the
same family are also infested.
This statement was made by R.
G. Carter of the state board of
health, to employes of the St. Joe
-PRaper company mill and the St.
Joe Lumber & Export companyat
a meeting held. in Masonic hall.
,These two organizations are now
sponsoring Gulf county's hook-
worm campaign, which began last
week. '"
Mr. Carter was speaking in be-
half. of these sponsors' campaign
to wipe hookworm disease out ot
this county. This is the reason,
he pointed out, why public health
officials examine the entire fam-
ily when they find one member
suffering with hookworm. He has
spoken four times before employes
(Continued on Page 3)
---------
DRAKE ATTENDS MEET
Postmaster H. A. Drake at-
tended a meeting of the Northwest
Floiida Association of Postmasters
h.d Monday in Marlanna. A most
interesting program and meeting
'is reported by our local P. M.


Polish Troops Off for the Front


A section of the Polish army's cycling corps as they neared the Polish, frontier to face German soldiers.
Chief of Poland's combatant forces is General Kasimir Sosnkowski, who is outranked in authority 6nly by
President Ignacy Moscicki and Marshal Smigly-Rydz, the Polish strong man.


Heads French Defense Centennial


Gen. Marie Gustave Camelin is in
supreme command of all French
forces in the war with Germany, in-
cluding land, sea and air. Under
Gamelin's orders, 31,000 school
children were sent to the provinces,
and further evacuation orders were
rigidly enforced.
-----3G-----
TO ENTER F. S. C. W.
The Misses Frances Palmer,
Amelia Schneider, Alice Gibson
and Sara VanHorn will leave
Monday to enter Florida State
College for Women at Tallahassee.


Building Safe

Says Foster

Refutes Claim By Residents That
Structure Is Unsafe From a
Construction Standpoint

The editor of The Star has not.
heard it mentioned that the Cen-
tennial building is considered un-
safe; but apparently some resl-
dents of the city believe that to
be a fact and have so stated.
In order to check on this mat-
ter; Henry B. Foster of Pensacola,
WPA area supervisor, last week
made a personal inspection of th,
building which resulted in a ver-
dict that the structure is as strong
from a construction standpoint as
any building in the state.
Following his inspection of the
building, Mr. Foster wrote the
following letter to Mayor J. L.
Sharit:
Hon. J. L. Sharit, Mayor
Port St. Joe, Florida
Subject: Centennial Building
Dear Mr. Sharit-It has been
brought to my attention that cer-
tain citizens of Port St. Joe have
questioned the safety of the above
mentioned building from a con-
struction standpoint. I wish to ad-
vise that accompanied by three of
my engineering staff. I made a
(Continued on Page 3)
-------- -----
B. B. Conklin spent yesterday
in Chattahoochee on business.


Leads Poland's Army


Head of Poland's army of 2,000,-
000 men is Marshal Smigly-Rydz,
second in authority only to Presi-
dent Ignacy Moscicki. Poles term
the war as "holy"-a battle for the
ideal of liberty. Smigly-Rydz was
appointed commander in chief of
the army and successor to Presi-
dent Moscicki in event the presi-
dency should become vacant.
-4(
PORT NEWS
S.S. Dorothy of the Bull Line
sailed Wednesday evening for
eastern ports.


Diver Faces Danger In Salvaging


Of Steamer Tarpon Off Panama


By PERRY W. DuMEZ
Florida News Service
Max Gene Nohl, world's record-
holding deep sea diver, hit the
"jackpot" on his first dive to the
wreckage of the SS Tarpon, sunk
two years ago off Panama City-,
but in the Operation came near
permanent disability through the
"bends," most dreaded danger
faced- by deep sea divers.
The story was revealed when
Nohl and his fellow salvagers
pulled into port at Panama after
bringing to the surface the one-
ton safe of the Tarpon and see-


eral cases of assorted beer ana
liquor which formed part of the
cargo.
Reaching the wreck late on Au-
gust 25, Nohl, enthused over fine-
ing the wreckage within half an
hour after reaching the approxi-
mate location, pulled on his diving
suit and went down, although he
was weary from two days ant
nights at sea.
He stayed down two hours--far
longer than was safe even for a
man not weary-clearing the safe
and investigating the cargo. He
took an hour to reach the sur-


face, but even with that, 20 min-
utes after he reached the deck an
attack of ".bends' struck him ana
the crew dragged on the suit
again, turned on the air and lit-
erally "threw" him overboard.,
lowering his unconscious form to
a 30-foot depth, where conscious-
ness returned.
Again they took an hour in get-
ting him out of the water, but no
sooner had he touched deck when
another attack doubled him up,
and once more he was tossed
overboard to dangle on the end
(Continued on Page 3)


,City Dads Okeh

Cigarette And

Gasoline Tax

Ordinance Imposes Levy of Half
Cent Per Gallon on Gas and
Cent on Cigarettes

The board of city commissioners
met Tuesday evening as a board
of equalization for the purpose of
adjusting assessments. Colonel P.
C. Coombs of Apalar'hi:ola. repre-
senting the Florida Pov.wr corpor-
ation, was the only person appear-
ing. He requested that the board
reduce the $35,000 assessment of
his company to $20,000, pointing
out that that was the total as-
sessed value last year and that
since that time new constructlon
had amounted to but $5,179.1b',
while removals came to $1,666.9f,
making a net increase in value of
their property of only $3,512.22.
The matter was held over by
the board until such time as Mr.
Coombs presents a map of the
company's holdings here.
Following sitting as a board of
equalization the commissioners
took up the matter of the gaso-
line and cigarette tax ordinance
and both were passed by the fow-
lowing vote: Gasoline tax, Eells
and Sharit, yea; Pridgeon., n y.
(.'igar-ite tax, unanimous.. Com-
ruissioner B. W. Eells introduced
'ic-. gasoline tax ordinance, which
impo:-es half a ceot per gallon e't
aill :-;oline sold in the city, andd
Coonii.ssioner B. W. Pridgeon in-
Lrjudli:ed the cigarette tax, whiici
lev:, one cent per package on all
.i-[:i ties sold here.
'IT'l matter of placing a tax on
tlitl.-r tickets again was brought
IIp amti a letter read by Clerk M.
I'. Tomlinson from R. E. Martin,
(Continued on Page 6)


City Schools

Open Monday

Increase In Enrollment Over Last
Year Anticipated; Twenty
Teachers On Staff

Port St. Joe schools will open
next Monday morning, September
11, at 9 a. m., according to Prin-
cipal D. G. McPherson. Students
of the high school will assemble
in the auditorium and receive in-
structions for registering on. the
opening day, And pupils in the
elementary grades will report to
their respective rooms for their
instructions.
Principal McPherson, who an-
ticipates a greatly increased en-
rollment this term over last, re-
minds parents that children who
will be six years of age before
next February 1 may enroll and
that proof of their age must be
furnished for these tots entering
their first year of school. Pupils
in other grades entering the local
schools must present report cards
or other records of their standing
in the last school they attended.
If this is not presented, entrance
examinations will be necessary.
The following teachers, who
(Continued on Page 6)
._.__-----
WELL BABY CLINIC
NEXT THURSDAY
There will be a well baby clinic
held in the Gulf county health of,
fice, this city, next Thursday
morning, September 14, from 9:30
until 12 noon.
All mothers are invited to bring
their babies for advice.








PAGE TWO


Coming To Port


Charles Starrett and Iris Mere-
dith, who will be seen at the Port
theater Saturday in "Texas Stam-
pede," a thrilling western drama.


Jack Holt as he appears in the
picture "Trapped In the Sky,"
which plays at the Owl Show at
the Port theater tomorrow night.


Caro!e Lombard, to be seen Wed-
nesday at the Port theater in
"Made for Each Other."
---------
All parts of the Jimson weed
are poisonous, ndd especially the
geedi.

HAVE YOU TRIED.
LeHARDY'S LITTLE
LIVER PILLS
Hundreds have tried them and
recommend them highly
Unconditionally guaranteed


IT MUST BE GMOD
Any medicine that has been used
for generation after generation
MUST be good. That's the record
behind Wintersmith's over 70
years of continuous demand. Mil-
ions of people have preferred it-
millions both in America and in
21 foreign countries. TRY Winter-
smith's as a General Tonic, and for
Malaria. Then judge for yourself.

WINTERSMHITI'S

TONIC


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GUiF COUNTY, FLORMA:


FRIDAY REPTEMMR~ n. 109


:9 -- ---. -. -,`: L~1


Society Personals Church

LANETA DAVIS, Editor


MISS ERIE GULLEDGE AND
JACK SAMFORD MARRIED
Miss Erie Duke Gulledge ane
Jack Ivan Samford were quietly
married Saturday night at the
home of Rev. D. E. Marietta.
Miss Gulledge is the grand-
daughter of Mrs. M. B. Smith and
has made her home in this city
the greater part of her life. She
is a graduate of Chapman high
school, Apalachicola, and is em-
ployed at Schneider's department
store.
Mr. Samford moved to this city
two years ago from Hodge, La.,
and is an employee of the St. Joe
Paper company.
The Star joins' with the many
friends of this popular couple in
wishing for them much happiness.

SMITH TRIBE ENJOYS
PICNIC AT BEACH
Mrs. M. B. Smith and a number
of her children and grandchildren
motored to Beacon Hill Sunday
afternoon for a picnic supper ana
general good time. Present wedr
Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Graves of
Headland, Ala., Mr. and Mrs. T.
F. Smith and children of Cornella,
Ga., Harold Smith of Dothan, Miss
.Corene Davis of Orlando, Mr. and
Mrs. J. M. Smith and daughter,
Marigene, Mr. and Mrs. D. C.
Smith and Mr. and Mrs. Sammie
Davis and son Carlyle.
Following a refreshing swim In
the surf and catching of crabs by
the youngsters, fires were built
and supper cooked. Delicious fried
chicken, fish, shrimp, crabs, po-
tato salad' and hot coffe was en-
joyed.

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS'
AUXILIARY MEETS
Margie and Dorothy Costin were
hostesses to the Intermediate
Girls' Auxiliary of the Baptist
church Thursday of last week at
their home on Monument avenue.
Florence Fachion led the aevw-
tional, and following a song serr-
ice the meeting was disnrssed
with prayer by Mrs. J. 0. Baggett.
The hostesses served refreshments
to members present.

Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Graves of
Headland, Ala., and Harold Smith
of Dothan, Ala., spent Sunday and
Monday in the city visiting Mrs.
M. B. Smith. Mrs. Smith returnee
to Headland with Mr. and Mrs.
Graves for a several weeks' visit.

School Superintendent C-L. Cos-
tin and Wilbur Wells were busi-
ness visitors in Pensacola Thurs-
day of last week.

Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Hodges of
Marianna were visiting in the city
Tuesday.

Mrs. E. C. Edwards and daugh-
ter Barbara have returned follow-
ing a several days' visit in Mobile.


LeHardy's Pharmacy

PHONE 5 WE DELIVER




IbAC --Only quality chemicals are
used.. No substitution!



-Only registered pharamacists
fill your prescriptions!



jy/ -Only a fair price for
quality work!

For quality work at lowest prices, have your
prescriptions filled at Le-lardy's!


Il
s


WEWAHITCHKA WEDDING
IS OF INTEREST HERE
S A wedding of interest to the
people of this section was that of
Miss Onita Joines, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. L. C. Joines of Wewa-
hitchka, to William Hampton Lin-
ton of Clearwater on Wednesday,
August 30, at the home of Mr. and
Mrs. C. L. Costin in Wewahitchka,
with the Rev. D. E. Marietta of
Port St. Joe performing the beau-
tiful ring ceremony.
An improvised altar with a color
scheme of green and white was
softened by tall white .burning
tapers. The bride wore an attrac-
tive outfit of sheer wine crepe
with black accessories.
Following the wedding, a re-
ception was held, the decorations
carrying out a color scheme of
pink and white. The table in the
dining room was covered with ,
lace cloth and centered with at
arrangement of pink blossoms baa-
anced by tall pink tapers in sil-
ver holders. The three-tiered cake
was topped with a miniature bride
and groom. The mother of the
bride presided at the punch. bowl.
The bride is a lifelong resident
of Wewahitchka and a graduate
of the Wewahitchka high school.
The groom has been employed in
the science department of the We-
wahitchka high school for the past
two years and was in the science
department of the Port St. Joe
high school for two years prior trt
going to Wewahitchka to teach.
Following the wedding the
couple left for Beacon Hill for a.
short honeymoon. Upon their re-
turn they will be at home at tlhe
Satsihmri hotel in Wewahitchka:
This young couple has many
friends in Gulf county who wll!
join with The Star in wishing
them much happiness.

MRS. TOMLINSON HOSTESS
TO BRIDGE CLUB
Mrs. M. P. Tomlinson was hos-
tess last evening to the Thursday
Night Bridge club at her home on
Eighth street. Two tables were in
progression, and following tallying
of scores, prizes were presented.
Delicious refreshments were par-
taken of by those present.

Miss Lillian Ferrell is spending
this week in Jacksonville visiting
relatives.

E. A. Conklin returned yester-
day after a visit of several weeks
with relatives in New York.

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Walters ot f
Tallahassee are guests this week
of Mr. and Mrs. George Patton at
their home in Oak Grove. (

Mr. and Mrs. B. L. Kelly and
children returned Wednesday from
a visit to points in Louisiana.
-o 0 s
E. C. Lewis visited in Tarpoh
Springs last Sunday and Monday.
Mrs. Lewis and baby, who visited d
there for a week, returned with a
him.

Mr. and Mrs. M. D. Walker and a
children of Lloyds returned to c
heir home last Wednesday after t
spending several days here as the D
guests of Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Mur-
lock.

Miss Minnie Ola Pridgeon of D
Wewahitchka is the guest this w
veek of her brother and sister-in- bh
aw, Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Pridgeon.

W. A. Wood and Joe Wood re- th
turned to the city Wednesday fol- st
owing a three-day trip to Jack- ol
onville.


ies


BAPTIST W. M. U.
ELECTS OFFICERS


The Woman's Missionary Unio
of the Baptist church held it
regular monthly business meeting
Monday afternoon at the church
Following the regular opening
and reports received, election (
officers for the new year wa
held and the following named:
Mrs. E. A. McCaskey, president
Mrs. J. O. Baggett, first vice-pre,
ident; Mrs. W. C. Pridgeon, set
ond vice-president; Mrs. E. C. Ca
son, third vice-president; Mrs. D
G. McPherson, recording secret
tary; Mrs. W. H. Howell, corre
spending secretary; Mrs. Charle
McClellan, treasurer. The meeting;
was dismissed with prayer.
The Martha Circle will mee
Monday with Mrs. Kate Harre]
at the home of Mrs. W. H. Howel
and the Lydia Circle will meet a
the home of Mrs. C. G. Costin..

LOTTIE MOON GIRLS'
AUXILIARY MEETS
The Lottie Moon Girls' Auxili
ary of the Baptist Missionary so
city held their regular meeting
Tuesday afternoon at the home oi
Mrs. E. C. Cason. The meeting
opened by singing "We've a Story
to Tell the Nation."
Topic for the afternoon wa:
"Building Bridges of Helpfulness,'
and interesting talks were giver
by Carolyn Baggett, Mary Louise
Wooden, Betty Jo Lane, Frenchl
Wooden, Jimmy Palmer, Wilma
Whoden and Mary Gangnieux.
The meeting was dismissed by
prayer and a social hour followe(x
at which time the hostess served
cookies and lemonade to those
present.

Mr. and Mrs. L. P. Sutton an,
children spent Monday and Tues-
day in Tallahassee.

Miss Ada Robinson of Chipley
is visiting here this week.

Miss Alice Baggett returned yes-
terday following a ten days' visit
to Chicago, Ill., and Gainesville,
Ga.

Mr. and Mrs. B. H. Graves re-
turned Wednesday from Tampa
where they spent several day-
visiting relatives. Mrs. Paul Kirby
and son accompanied them home
and will be the guest of Mr. and
Mrs. W. S. Smith.

Mr. and Mrs. H. Lilius an',
laughter spent several days this
week visiting in Tampa.

Mrs. C. A. LeHardy, Mrs. Ross
Coburn and Mrs. Philip Lovett
pent Wednesday in Cottondale.

Miss Murnice Taunton returnee
Monday from Attapulgus, where
he visited for several weeks.

Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Smith and
daughter, Marigene, spent Monday
afternoon in Panama City.

Miss Corene Davis of Orlando
arrived Sunday to spend her va-
ation with hler brother and sis-
er-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Sammie
avis.

Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Alsip and
on Tommy, and Miss Estelle
ickens returned Thursday of last
eek from Tampa where they had
sen vacationing.

Miss Bernince Beaty will leave
his week for Tallahassee to re-
ume her work as teacher in ons
f the high schools.
*t +r e


MRS. JOHN, .BOUNT .
ENTERTAINS AT BRIDGE
The members of the Thursday
Afternoon Bridge club were enter-
tained yesterday at the home of
Mrs.. John Blount on Seventh
street. An arrangement of fall
flowers was used to decorate the
living room where two tables
n were in progression. Prizes were
ts awarded at the conclusion of play
g after which th'e hostess served de-
h. lectable refreshments.
g l" A *"
g
't Mr. and Mrs. T. F. Smith. and
s children of Cornelia, Ga., returned
to their home Monday after a
; visit of several fays here as the
'- guests of Mrs. M.-B. Smith.

a- Mrs. Hoke Larkin left Saturday
for Bristol to resume her position
'- as teacher in the Bristol school.
e- -a.
Frank Stroud and_ Fred- Phillips
of Union Springs, Ala., visited in
tthis city Saturday.

S Mrs. Lillian Chambers and soi
Sof Tampa are guests of Mr. and
Mrs. B. H. Smith.

Do you need Letterheads and
Envelopes? Let The Star print
them.
i-






y




a


SATURDAY, SEPT. 9
Bullet for Killers!
THRILLS FOR YOU!

Charles Starrett
in


"Texas


Stampede"


"Spider's Web"


Cartoor


Owl Show 10:30






witb, Katherine De Mille It

Will Osborn and Orchestra


SUNDAY and MONDAY
September 10 and 11
Thrills of 90 Miles Per
Hour! ACTION!!


News Paragraphic


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12


S* Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Larkin at-
Mrs. Pete Bernal and the Misses tended the funeral of Larry Sum-
Lila and Brownie Carter spent the ner, Mrs. Larkin's nephew, Mon-
week-end in Kissimmee, guests of day in Bristol. The 16-year-old boy
their sister, Mrs. R. M. Buckles. was drowned while in swin'ming.








A SP ET S PT O U NT RG


DR. 1 C. COE
- DENTIST-
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe



EYES EXAMINED


Glasses fitted when needed
Made In Our Own Laboratory
All Work Unconditionally
Guaranteed
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 6 p. m.

DR. G. T. NEWBERRY
OPTOMETRIST
PANAMA CITY, FLA.




It's Time To

DINE!!

Where the food is of the
best where the service
is prompt and efficient
and where you get

HOME COOKED
MEALS
0

TRIANGLE
RESTAURANT
BEER and WINES -



ERASE the DOUBT
About Your
FRESH WATER FISHING

MIDWAY PARK
Is In the HEART of the
Dead Lakes Fishing Area
Gulf County's north line cuts
the Dead Lakes at the
waistline
Meet Your Friends At
MIDWAY PARK
FURNISHED CABINS
On the Waterfront
J. H. SHOEMAKER, Prop.
Postoffice Address,
WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA


For Your

PROTECTION
This Summer
Our special filtering process
and quick-freeze method as-
sures you ice that REALLY
is pure! It protects your food
therefore it protects you.
There is no substitute for the
value of REAL Ice.
THE WELL-INFORMED
USE ICE
Deliveries by Phone
or Regular Route


PHONE 47


ST. JOE ICE'

COMPANY
MAX KILBOURN, Prop.


WPA Drops 52

From Payrolls

In Gulf County

State Administrator Says Future
Layoffs Under 18-Month
Rule Automatic

The Florida Work Projects Ad-
ministration dropped 52 persons
in Gulf county from' its Dayroll
on August 31 because they have
iad employment for 18 months
without interruption. Total for the
state was 8,510.
In future layoffs due to the 1-*
months rule will be automatic ana
will apply as soon as the indi-
vidual worker has reached his 1l-
months work limit, states Admin-
istrator Roy Schroder. Workers
must then find a job in private
industry or take their place at
the end of the WPA waiting list.
Persons who have been on the
certified roll without jobs will be
hired immediately to take place
of those dropped.
"It is mandatory that no certt-
fied project workers (except war
veterans, who are exempted unf
ler the law) who have been 'on
the certified rolls 18 months work
after tonight," Schroder tele-
graphed all area supervisors.


Speedway Film

Is Thrill Drama

Ann Sheridan and Pat O'Brien are
Stars In Spine-Tingling
Racing Picture

With fast-talking Pat O'Brieh,
Ann "Oomph Girl" Sheridan, the
exotic Gale Page, heart-breaker
John Payne and comical Frank
McHugh in the leading roles,
"Indianapolis Speedway," spine-
tingling drama of automobile rac-
ing, plays Sunday and Monday at
:he Port theater.
Hailed as one of the most e,-
citing and romantic films ever
brought to the screen, "Indianapo-
!is Speedway" forcefully depicts
ill the lure of the great Ameri-
can sport of auto racing on world
famed tracks.
The story concerns the efforts
of Pat O'Brien, champion racing
driver, to make John Payne, his
brother, continue with college and
not follow in his own footsteps.

Hookworm Is A

Family Disease i
k

(Continued from Page 1) I
of both these concerns. Up to c
yesterday 621 persons have been r
examined in this section for hooR- b
worm. More lectures will be giver,
in the next three or four weeks, h
both in the Port St. Joe and We-
wahitchka areas,
Of 3,921 persons examined by
the state board of health, 58.7 per
cent were found to have hoolk-
worm disease. Of the 4,091 fam-
ilies, two or more members were o
infested. q
Furthermore, whe re several J
members of a family have hook- n
worm, each case will be more se- o
vere than it was at the onset of g
the disease when only one mem- u
ber of the family was infested.
This is caused by increased soil n
pollution brought about when a s,
greater number of infected per- a
sons are continually increasing the u
number of hookworms discharged
into the soil beneath surrounding tl
unsanitary privies. w
Because hookworm travels so ti
rapidly through entire families anke A
whole school groups, it is a
health problem which demands a
concentrated attack by the entire
population, and "certainly every th
civic organization in the commun- ti
ity," is the opinion of the spon- d(
sors and their public health a
sistants. ev


'Trapped In Sky'

Stars Jack Holt

Act.on-Packed Drama About Sab-
otage Recently Uncovered
By Government Agents

Timely, action-packed drama is
promised' Port theater audiences
at the Owl Show' Saturday night
when "Trapped In the Sky" plays
with Jack Holt as its star. The
fi!m, concerned with the sabotage.
i: America's munitions industries
recently uncovered by government
agents as the work of foreign
spies, is said to be an exception-
ally thrilling narrative told with
breath-taking power.
In addition to Holt, who ap-
pears as a virile and 'courageous
army officer, the cast includes t..
Henry Gordon, Ralph Morgan,
Katherine DeMille, Sidney Black-
'ner and Ivan Lebedeff.
The picture is concerned wit;
-he efforts to destroy a revolu-
.ionary new bomber being tested
)y the U. S. army. Holt, who has
helped the inventor build a prac-
.ical test ship, is also assigned to
;mash the enemy intrigue.
It
-------^-------

Diver Faces Danger

In Tarpon Salvage

(Continued from Page 1)
)f his lifeline. He stayed under
water until 11 p. m., gradually
easing to the surface, and when
it was found he was able to stay
'ut of "pressure," the Arno pulled
into Panama City and Max was
rushed to a hospital where fur-
ther measures were taken to clear
the nitrogen from his blood.
Sunday the Arno pulled out
again, and by that night the safe
and a quantity of liquor was on
board.
Among the main items aboard
.he Tarpon when it sank was a
large cargo of liquor and aboul
2000 cases of beer, a quantity of
galvanized pipe, rope, oxygen cyl-
nders, anchors, flour and other
teams of general cargo.
The safe and its contents, in.
cludhng a sizeable payroll, are
thought to be the prize, along
with a quantity of jewels placed
n it for safe-keeping.
The Tarpon, owned by the Pen-
sacola and St. Andrews and' Gulf
Steamship company sank on Sep-
tember 2, 1937, and though in full
view of shore, no one saw her go
lown. It wasn't until Adley Baker,
in oiler, reached shore after 25
ours in the water, that it was
mown the ship was wrecked.
The Tarpon's captain, E. D.
arrow, the mate and 18 of the
rew went down with her. Nohl
reported that at least one of the
bodies still lay on the cabin deck,
.nd more may be found close at
hand.

.ABOR UNION ISSUES
WARNING REGARDING
FUNDS SOLICITATION

The International Brotherhood
f Papermakers Local No. 379 re-
uests that if anyone in Po.t St.
oe is solicited for funds in the
ame of the American Federation
f Labor or any other labor or-
anization, to report to the local
union immediately.
If any solicitation is made in the
ame of labor in this city, those
eliciting will be accompanied by
member of one of the local
nions. with proper credentials.
This warning is issued due to
re fact that two strangers last
reek went around asking dona-
ons of $10 in the name of the
merican Federation of Labor.
c--
A GOOD IDEA, ANYWAY
Wife: "Mr. Jones next door
rows kisses to his wife every
me he leaves the house. Why
don't you do that?"
Husband: "Whly, darling, I don't
'en know Mrs. Jones!"


Cel


perso
tion
and
would
build
As
strict
draw
nized'


ntennial TOWNSENDITES ENJOY
DANCE AT AUDITORIUM

Building Safe Thursday night of last weeA
members of the Port St. Joe Town.
Says Foster send club and their friends en.
joyed a dance in the Cente.nniai
auditorium following their regu-
Continued from Page 1) lar meeting. A big time was had
nal investigation and inspec- by all and plans are already un
of this building last week derway for another get-together.
failed to find anything that
d lead me to believe that this Regular meeting of the club :s
ing was unsafe for use. scheduled for this evening at the
you know, it was erected Legion hut and all members anu
ly to plans and specifications friends of the organization are
n by a registered and recog-
architect. I see no reason urged to be present


why this building should not be
as strong from a construction
standpoint as any building in the
state.
Hoping that the above will tend
to reassure the citizens of Por-
St. Joe and assuring you that
should this question arise again
I will be glad to request an In-
spection by competent engineers
from the state road department,
I am,
Very truly yours,
HENRY B. FOSTER.
Area Supervisor Area No. 10.

Airplane pilots are tested for
physical fitness every 90 days.



FISHING--

Spend the week-end in
West Florida's best fish-
ing grounds.


4 ~ ---
4 -4

BOATS With or with-
out guide-at reasonable
rates. Hotel ac-
commodations within the
means of everyone.


SEE-


J. 0. 'Jim' SMITH

SUMATRA, FLA.


MOVING?


PHONE 70


Television is expected to prove
useful in teaching medical stu-
dents, enabling them to observe
clinics and operations more often,
'---


We have the

EXCLUSIVE

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Local Representative


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We have the sub-agency for the

MAYFLOWER VAN LINES
and can move your furniture any place in the
United States, Canada or Mexico ., ,.
Full Insurance Carried At All Times


'Red' Horton's Transfer


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


A ILLIONS enjoy greater freedom from everyday aches and pains
Because they have heard--and believed-Alka-Seltzer an-
nouncements over the air or have read-and believed-printed
statements about Alka-Seltzer.
To these millions the relief obtained from the use of Alka-Seltzer
is worth much more than the genuine enjoyment they get from
Alka-Seltzer broadcasts.
Why don't you try the Alka-Seltzer way to relief from Gas on
Stomach, Heartburn, Headache, Acid Indigestion and Distress of
Colds, "Morning After" and Muscular Aches and Pains?
YOU GET TWO FOLD RELIEF
First-relief from pain, because Alka-Seltzer contains an anal-
gesic, (sodium salt of aspirin).
Second-relief from the over-acid condition that is often associ-
ated with these everyday ailments, because Alka-Seltzer contains
alkalizing agents.
-' Get Alka-Seltzer the next time you pass
a drug store


- - -- -- --- - -~- --


--------- -- t.


-""""^"""""""----'~~~-~~--~--


Rk6E~ E T A Eth


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 19-39


P


>'

>








PAGEFOU TH STR, PRT T. OEGUL COUTYFLOIDAFRIAY, EPTMBE 8,193


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla.,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10, '
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year........$2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months..........65c

--* Telephone 51 }-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

WAR PROBLEM IS UP TO MR. AND
MRS. AMERICA
As residents of Port St. Joe listen to the
war news over their radios, the question is
often heard: "Will the United States be
drawn into the conflict?"
That is entirely up to the people of Port
St. Joe and the thousands of other cities and
towns throughout the nation.
If we all keep our heads, refuse to listen to
the subtle propaganda that will be spread in
an endeavor to draw this country into the
war, and look at the situation in a calm man-
ner, we will not become involved.
The editor of this newspaper has seen all
the horrors of war and knows whereof he
speaks when he says that the coming con-
flict will make the World War look like a
pink tea, what with new developments in
death-dealing machines, gas and bacterial
bombs dropped on defenseless cities.
Stop and consider. If the United Staten
goes to war with Germany the young man-
hood of the.country will be sent overseas to
fight for they know not what. To bring the
matter closer toshome, just go over Port St.
Joe mentally and pick out the smart, strong,
healthy young fellows who are in the neigh-
borhood of 21 years old. Then remember
that if we let Europe drag us into another
war those lads will be the first taken-and!
more than likely the first killed, maimed for'
life and gassed.
We're not talking to the youth of Port St.
Joe, but to the fathers and mothers. Youth
only sees the glory of war, not the suffering
that comes afterward.
The United States must be kept out or
this war that probably will set civilization
back two hundred years, and those who CAN
keep us out of it are the everyday citizens of
Port St. Joe and other cities of the country,
You, Mr. and Mrs. America, will decide
whether we remain neutral or go to war.

We can remember, back in the World War
days, when a member of the flying corps
carried a brick or two to shy at the props of
enemy planes to shatter them. That was be-
fore machine guns were mounted on the
planes, synchronized to fire through the pro-
peller. If any shooting was done, the pilot
used a revolver.

A young friend of ours came staggering
into the office yesterday, and we asked him
what the trouble was. He replied that he
had asked his sweetheart's father for her
hand and he had told her to take all of her.

As we sit here pounding out this editorial
stuff and wiping the dew of labor from out
brow we favor more and more the idea of
nudist camps.

The politicians are going to have a hard
time making the front pages, now that that
fracas has started in Europe.

Some folks were born to worry, and it is,
therefore, vain to worry about them.-Al-
bany Herald.

Looks -like Herr Hitler has over-reiched
himself this time.


AN OLD CHINESE PROVERB
In our youth we knew an ancient China-
man who ran a laundry (as do most Chinese,
it seems). We became quite well acquainted
with this son of the Orient and he endeavored
to teach us Chinese.
We never had much success in learning the
language, but this old boy was full of ancient
proverbs, and one in particular sticks in our
mind. It goes something like this: "Though
the life of a man be short of one hundred
years, he gives himself as much anxiety as if'
he were to live one thousand years."
Isn't it true. Look anywhere you will and
you find hurrying crowds of men and women.
Anxiety in their faces, particularly now that
the situation in Europe is such as it is. The
weight of the universe is weighing on their
shoulders. Strain, fear, worry, rush;
We took this ancient Chinese, Ah Sin by
name, for a ride in our new Model T one day.
We were driving on a highway parallel to
the tracks of the Southern Pacific railroad.
A train was coming and there was a crossing
ahead. We said to Ah Sin: "Unless we beat
that train to the crossing we'll be delayed a
couple of minutes." We stepped on the gas
,and made the crossing ahead of the iron
horse with only seconds to spare.
Ah Sin never batted an eyelash, but when
we were safely across he asked quietly:
"Now what are you going to do with the
two minutes you have saved?"
How would you have answered that? We
couldn't, but from him we learned never to
be in a hurry and never to worry about any-
thing. If something is going to happen it
is going to happen and we can't do a darn
thing about it. We struggle and sweat and
worry and lose sleep about things that are
not nearly as important as they seem. Our
problems are magnified through anxiety until
they look like seven-horned devils ready to
pounce on us.
We quit taking ourself seriously twenty.
years ago. This old"-world will continue toc
go. on long after we are gathered to our
forefathers. It pays to sit back and laugh at
ourselves. We have always worked with a
merry heart,' not a heavy heart, and our work


still intrigues us.
the way to get


We have found that to be
through life and still be


happy, come what may..
We have always accepted life as a Great
Adventure, and regardless of whether things
looked gloomy or bright, we have always
marched forth joyously to meet its problems,
for as old Ah Sin remarked: "What is written
on the scroll of life is writ, and nothing will
alter that."
The happy warriors get the most fun' out
of life.

COMPETE WITH THEM!
Around this time of year the Port St. Joe
postoffice is swamped with mail order cata-
logs, giving their winter business a big send-
off. This isn't objectionable to a lot of peo-
ple here, but you can't blame local merchants
for not welcoming it with a banquet and the
high school band! Port St. Joe has a lot of
folks who buy from these catalogs, and right
there rises the question of loyalty and co-
operation for the fellow citizen who is
struggling to meet your demands and serve
you while making a living for himself. He
may sit beside you in church, greet you on
the streets, his children play in your yard,
your wife belongs to a bridge club with his
wife. And it not only applies to dry goods,
automobile parts and accessories and other
items, but to printing.
We have preached against mail order buy-
ing until we have run out of linotype metal,
but it doesn't seem to do much good. And the
reason is that local merchants don't combat
this evil by advertising in their home town
paper. The Star goes into the same houses
as the mail order catalogs. Give these homes
your message, your line of goods, prices and
guarantee. Tell your story and it won't cost
you nearly as much as these outside com-
panies that are taking anywhere from $900
to $1800 a mohth out of Port St. Joe-money
that will never return here.


THE WATCHMAN ON THE JOB


A Few Pointers driving while drinking.
2. You are not ;convicted of

On Getting Your using a car in any criminal act.
3. You are not arrested-- a
Driver'- License hit-run charge.
i- V C l t 4. You are not guilty of habi-
tual drunkenness.
Suggestions Offered Will Speed 5. You do not forfeit bon6s
Up Work Imposed On three times.
County Judge Otherwise, if you are fouhd
S __ :I guilty of any of these offenses,
County Judge T. R. L. Carter your license may be suspended
this week began- the issuance of for one year.
state drivers' licenses, and in or-' But if you drive a car, although
ler to better inform the public on your license has been suspended,
the provisions and conditions un. you will be liable to six months
der which a driver may secure a in jail- and a ,fine of $500.
license, The Star offers in brief
. few pointers which, if followed Blountstown Club
will speed up the work impose
on the county judge's office. Seeks to Conserve
If you expect to drrve an auto-o
mobile after October 1 this year, Dead Lake Timber
you must:
1. Sign an affidavit that yotu
iave driven a car a year or mo; re (Continued from Page 1I
without an accident, have not from. eliminate the means or
been convicted of using a vehicle earning a livelihood for the guides,
for the violation of any law, are hotels, camp operators and other
.f sound mind. are not a user or persons depending on the lakes
narcoticss, that your sight and for their living and thereby de-


hearing are good and that you
'now the traffic laws of Florica.
2. Pay a fee of 50 cents to the
county judge, who will furnish the
applicationn blank and notarize
your affidavit" without extra cost.
The money will be used to pay
or the state road patrol.
3. Carry your license with you
it all times while operating a no-
.or vehicle.
If you do not make your affi-
davit and secure your license be.
ween now and October 1 you
may qualify, but, in that case, youth
must:
1. Pass a physical and mental
test.
2. Correct eye defects with
suitable glasses.
3. Pay the same license fee,
50 cents.
Under these circumstances you
may drive a car provided:
1. You are 18 years of age o01
over to drive a passenger car.
2. Over 21 years of age to drive
as chauffeur or employed driver.
3. Between 16 and 18 years of
age if vouched for by parents or
guardian.
4. Between 14 and' 16 years of
age on learner's permit if vouched
For by parent or guardian and ac-
companied on all drives by parent
or chauffeur.
5. If over 18 years of age, and
inexperienced in driving, on tem-
porary permit, but accompanied by
licensed instructor or operator.
Under these requirements you
may continue to operate a motor
vehicle, provided:
"T:'-Yon are not convicted of
1-


stroying this natural asset and
eliminate the most picturesque
fresh water lakes in the state."
The resolution further states
that "the state board was in-
formed that this timber was being
maliciously cut and removed with-
out any revenue to the state, and
otherwise misrepresented to them,
and for that reason the lease waa
executed, when in truth and faci.
guards have constantly and regu-
larly watched the lakes to prevent
this."
The club urges the lessees to
abandon their lease and not to
cut or remove any timber from
the lakes nor to go to any expense
to erect a sawmiill. A mill is a'-
ready well underway on the lakes
just below Midway Park.
The Lions call upon all sports
men and residents of Calhoun ane
Gulf counties to voice tneir disap-
proval of the lease and call for
the cessation of operations ana
that a hearing be had before the
internal improvement board at
Tallahassee.
------r-4--
ABSENT-MINDED
There is a real absent-minded
professor at Virginia Tech. He
drove to a nearby town: forgothe
had an auto, and returned homn-
by train. Then remembering his
car, he went by train to get it.
but bought a round-trip ticket.

During the first nine months of
the current marketing season, the
world's eight largest exporting'
nations shipped 7,924.000 bales o?
cotton as compared with 9,250,000
bales last year


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, ,'FLORIDA


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, '1939


PAGE FOUR








FRDY ETEBR8 9. H TR PORT S. JOGL CONY LRDAPGI


War Map of Europe


POSTAGE STAMP WILL
COMMEMORATE PRINTING
INDUSTRY IN AMERICA

Commemorating the 300th anni-
versary of the introduction or
printing in the American colonies,
a special three-cent postage stamp
will go on sale at all postoffices
on September 26.
This is the first time in the his-
tory of the United States govern-
ment that an industry has bees.
honored through the issuance of
a special stamp.
JUDGE CARTER TO ISSUE
DRIVERS' LICENSES HERh


licenses.' "Next Wednesday, froni
3 to 8 p. m., he will be at the of-
fice of the St. Joe Lumber & Ex-
port company for the same pur-
pose.
This is merely an accommoda-
tion to motorists by Judge Carter
and should be greatly appreciated.
------^--S----
TO RETURN FROM HOSPITAL
Mrs. H. H. Saunders is expected'
to return during the week-end fol-
lowing two weeks spent in Do-
than, Ala., at the bedside of her
daughter, Miss Kathleen, who un-
derwent an appendectomy at ft
Dothan hospital. Miss Kathleen
will accompany her home, to re-
cuperate before resuming her


County Judge T. R. L. Carter studies at a Dothan business cor-
announces that he will be in Port lege.
St. Joe next Tuesday and Thurs-
day at the office of the St. Job Some guinea pigs bred for
Land company between the hours show have hair so long the animal
of 5 and 8 p. m. to issue drivers' resembles a mop.


The above map shows nations involved in the present European struggle, with the military, naval and air
strength of each of the contestants. England's navy of 2,079,863 tons is considerably greater than the corm-
- bined navies of Germany and Italy, which total 541,023 tons and 717,920 tons, respectively. France's navy
totals 815,531 tons, larger than that of either of the dictator nations.
! Evacuation of London Children Nazi Army Chieftain


Scene at a London railroad station as many thousands of children
were being taken from the city to places of more security in the country
in anticipation of German air raids. The total population of the designated
evacuation areas is about 11,000,000, but only about 3,000,000 of the resi-
dents fell into the first group that was moved. That group included school
children, their teachers, pre-school children and their mothers, the adult
blind and crippled, and invalids who were in condition to be moved.


Germany's Iron Man


* A recent photograph of Adolf Hit-
ler, the iron man of Germany, who
has led his nation into war. Fre-
quent arbitration and mediation
pleas made by diplomats of leading
nations were ignored by the Reichs-
fuehreri.


Field Marshal Herman Wilhelm
Goering, chief lieutenant to Reichs-
fuehrer Adolph Hitler. Next to Hit-
ler, Goering, former air minister,
wields the greatest power in the
Nazi army. Hitler has announced
that should anything happen to him
in the struggle his first successor
would be Goering.


French Troops on Frontier


French soldiers manning field fortifications on the German border.
'They are equipped with gas masks in anticipation of Germany's use
Sof gas as a weapon against its enemies. France's army of 6,000,000 men
Sis looked upon as one of the greatest armies in the world. Army officials,
in answer to President Roosevelt's plea, guaranteed that French forces
Swill not bombard open cities or civilian populations as long as enemy
Forces do not do so.


A. bakery in Spokane, Wash., The Bask-Ivanhoe tunnel in Coi- Radium in sea water increases
makes colored bread to order to orado, constructed for a railroad, with depth, so that there is al-
mach---the color scheme of the now carries motorists 9,600. feet most 10 times as much at 1300
dining room. I1 through the Rockies. feet as at the surface.
di in ro m ..i 5 ..1., *; e !> l,&UElJi n ..-.


TRAVELING

SALESMEN .#..

When you order printing from a travel-
ing salesman, you are never sure when
you will get it or what it will look like.
We can show you proofs and deliver the
job the same day. .. No letter to
write, no packages to cart from the
postoffice-just a telephone call to our
office and we do the rest.





TH1E STAR

"Your Home Town Newspaper"
PHONE 51 PORT ST. JOE


6% Discount



Money



NOW AVAILABLE

NOT FHA


$2500 Maximum Loan

5 Years Maximum Time

New Dwellings, Stores, Filling
Stations, Repairs, Remodeling


We still handle 5% FHA loans; 3-year
maximum time


SST. JOE LUMBER


COMPANY
Phone 69 Port St. Joe


THE STAR, PORT -ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLOR.10'A


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1939.


PAGE FIVS(:







~- -


SAMMY McCALL TO ORGANIZE CITY SCHOOLS OPEN
BOY SCOUT TROOP FOR CITY
(Continued from Page 1)
Speaking before members of the make up the faculty this year,
Lions c-lub Wednesday noon, will meet at the high school au-
Sammy McCall, who is employed ditorium tomorrow morning at lo
as a chemist at the St. Joe Paper o'clock for instructions and to
company and is a graduate of the make plans for the opening Mon-
University of Florida, told of the day:
necessity of organizing a Boy High School-Tommy Owens,
Scout troop here of which he of- history and athletics; M!ss Er-
fered to take charge as scoutmas- line McClellan, English aid music;
ter. Mrs. Gus Creech, science; Mrs.
The matter was taken under ad- Eula Pridgeon, home economies;


viseme'fit by the Lions. If a troop
is organized here it will meet In
one of the rooms at the Centen-
nial building.
J. J. Darcey, a former scout-
master, who was scheduled to ad-
dress the Lions, could not b'e
present at the meeting.


CLASSIFIED ADS

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

TWO COTTAGES FOR SALE
Waterfront
Five rooms (two bedrooms) and
batht (complete). Front and back
porches screened. Electric lights
annd water.
$1450 EACH
TERMS-$200 down and balance


Miss Lee, English and science;
Miss Eva Meserve, mathematics
and Spanish; Mrs. Brooks Ken-
nington, commercial subjects, E.
C. Parker, mathematics and his-
tory; Dan Farmer, band.
Elementary School-Mrs. Fena
McPhaul and Mrs. Purvis Howell,
first grade; Miss Juanita Gunn
and Miss Avaryee Collier, neconc
grade; Mrs. Calla Perritt and Mrs.
Helen Allen, third grade; Mrs.
Hazel Ferrell and Miss Louise
Solomon, fourth grade; Mrs. Le-
roy Gainons and Mrs. Dorothy Mc-
Lawhon, fifth grade; Mtss Eileen
Arnold, sixth grade.
At a meeting of the county
school board held Tuesday, au-
thorization was given for the con-
struction of a room, separate from


.at $20 month. Interest at 5% present buildings, for use of the
$1350 CASH school band. This will remove
Lot Size 50 by 90 feet noise and confusion from the main
school buildings and aid greatly in
FOR SALE-First 10 lots in Ben- increasing efficiency of the school
'der Addition at 20% reduction. plant..
aInvestigate this before buying! .
3. L. KERR, Realtor WEWAHITCHKA MAN DIES
Port St. Joe, Florida AFTER FALLING FROM POLE
FOR RENT William Taylor, 26, lineman for
the Empire Service company at
jFOR RENT-Two 4-room houses; Wewahitchka, died Saturday as
one 6-room house, at White the result of coming in contact
City; includes water, electricity with a live wire while working on
for lights, modern conveniences, a power line and falling some 30
hot and cold running water. In- feet to the pavement.
quire of C. E. Stebel, Wimico Funeral services were held Sun-
Lodge. 9-15* day at the Wewahitchka Baptist
UN-FURNISHED 9 by 18-foet cab- church, with interment in Jehu
ins; cei:ed overhead and sides; cemetery..
P .id .water; $4 month. Apply St.i It is stated that G. C. Taylor,
S-Joe ILumbe C3. -; 1212tf' father of the young man, climbed
ROOMS FOR RENT the pole while his son lay on the
pavement and made the conneu-
.-F TYOU .have a room for rent, tion which his son had been work-
vwhy not .place a classified adver- ing on. in order that the city
'tisement in The Star. The cost is i oe e cit
Ilow aid returns uaire gratifying. might continue having electric
'Py ti totlay. t, service.


i^ BforrrTo Day s a frg 9 Vo
See Amerifca's Outstanding 1939 Value--


T;~lhe New 10"N


Air-Conditioned FIN-SRII Refrigerator!


- *

S .PLENTY OF TASTE-
FREE 10E C0BEtl

FOODS STAY FRESH
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ST. JOE ICE COMPANY

PORT ST. JOE FLORIDA


Britain Transports Its Troops by Plane


Mobilization of the English army was materially hastened by use of
airplanes in the rush to get troops to the continent., Above photograph
shows members of the Second Battalion of the Rdyal Ulster Rifles board-
ing a plane for the front. The Soviet Union, too, has laid great stress on
its troop carrying planes and its mass parachute leaps from the air. Rus-
sia, in the past few years, has carried on extensive experiments with this
type of air raid and has repeatedly declared,them successful. Many army
officials, however, declare the mass parachute leaps impractical for war.


All Truck Drivers T M1ITARY SCHOOL
Roy Gibson, Jr., left Sunday eve-
Must Get Licenses nling for Gordon Military Colleg.
to enroll for the winter term.


Applies To All Receiving Compen.
station for Driving Motor
Vehicles

The state road department has
notified all truck drivers employe'a
by the department that they must
secure chauffeurs' driving licenses
under provisions of the new Flor-
ida drivers' license law.
Enforcement officials said any
person who drives a motor ve-
hicle for hire is required to have
a chauffeur's driving license. This
'.ill include all truck drivers, de-
livery boys. bus and cal drivers,
wholesale and retail delivery men,
dry cleaning and laundry truck
drivers, drivers of produce and
commercial hauling trucks, and
all drivers engaged in similar oc-
cupations in which they receive
compensation for driving motor
vehicles of any description.
Chauffeurs' licenses cost $1.

GOVERNMENT DREDGE
IS CLEARING CHANNEL
The government dredge Pasce-
goula, with a crew of 50 men, thl
week has been at work in the
harbor dredging the channel. The
dredge, which expects to be here
about three weeks, is getting its
fuel oil from the St. Joe Paper
company.
---- -X----
TO NAPLES AS PRINCIPAL
Nobbie Stone spent part of las-
week in this city as the guest ot
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. T. I,.
Stone. He left last Friday night
for Naples for his second year as
principal of the school there. Mr.
Stone attended Columbia Univer-
sity during the summer session.
----- -
CITY DADS OKEH TAX

(Continued from Page 1)
one of the owners of the Por.
theater, in which he stated: "It Is
unfair to pick out one business
and put the majority of the tax
burden on its shoulders. 1
just don't see how you gentlemen
will have the nerve to place ai
extra burden on us. Why
not be fair with us and every
merchant at the same time ana
place a one or two per cent tax
on every merchant in town?"
Mr. Martin stated in his letter
that either he or his brother
would be present at the meeting
of the commissioners on Septem-
ber 12 to take up the matter of
a theater tax.
The board also ordered that a
pedestrian bridge be built across
the drainage ditch at Tenth street
in order that school children liv-
ing in the Garrison avenue area
can get to school.
^t ^


Mahogany of commercial value
is becoming increasingly limited
in British Honduras, long one of
the principal Anmerican souirce.


CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
WILL ELECT DIRECTORS

President W. W. Barrier stated
yesterday that ballots have been
mailed to all members, of the local
chamber of commerce for election
of new directors.
Following tabulation of the first
ballots, a secofid will be sent out
for the final selection.


Did You Know

That







Y AW. Aicn HUNARy, REAR i1 ce.PUA
014 CAP, ARE MUCH LARGeR THA TE
FRON-I LICENSE PLA-TrE... TO AC/-rATA
"r, V1N 7/" NUM ""ie, R 0/. 4V-A,4y
4AWB,9RA,"*R$

NATIONALLY KNOWN
PARTS FOR ALL
AUTOMOBILES
AND TRUCKS



i MOTOR PARTS
LOUIS EMRICH, Prop.

Phone 54
PORT ST, JOE -:----L4A.


- ---- ------- ---- 1


-:" -f' "Good light is as
SL important a study
tool as pencils and
books. Test after
test proves that
modern LIGHT
CONDITIONING standards take work out of
homework and teaching. Children are more alert
and eager to get ahead in their studies. Failures arg
cut down as much as fifty per cent. And believe it
or not, in every case, good lighting has had an
amazing effect in bettering the grades of both bright
and backward students. *
S "I feel it is one of my first responsibilities t
help provide safer light for the homes and scQI -
in the communities I serve. And remember,*th
more I do the less my rate of pay." ..-'" '

REDDY KILOWATT
-Yeor r Ivcf rk -if S 'tp





FLORIDA POWER

CORPORATION
1./,- as a /


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PAGE SIX


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1939


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