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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00148
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: August 18, 1939
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00148

Full Text





The Star-Florida's 1
ing little newspaper-
the betterment and
the City of Port


astest grow-
-dedicated to
upluilding of
St Joe. H


STAR


Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
est growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center

VOLUME II PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, AUGUST 18, 1939 NUMBER 44



TROG S.TORNSTRIKE$ eiT


St. Joe Lumber Has

Money Available

Now For Building

Can Be Secured For Five Years
At 6 Per Cent for Dwellings,
Stores, Remodeling, Repairs

What we consider the best news
to develop in Port St. Joe for a
long time broke yesterday when
:Dwight Marshall of the St. Joe
Lumber company came, into The
Star office and said he wanted to
place an advertisement announc-
ing that he had money to loan at
6 per cent over a period of five
years for new construction.
If we'd had a hat on, we would
ha6 thrown it to the ceiling, and
S.a it was we uttered an ear-split-
ting "hurrah!" for right now what
this city needs is money made
available to everyone for the con-
struction of new homes, stores:
and the like, and for remodeling
and repairing.
"There are no str;rings attaches
to these loans, outside the usual
security," said Mr. Marshal, "and
the rate is six per cent with a,
anaximum repayment-:,.period of
five-years. However, we must
limit loans to $2500. This -is not
FHA money, but comes from the
outside. We are still handling five
per cent FHA loans, but the ,maxi-
mum time is three years which, in
our opinion, makes the repayment
installments too large."
'Mr. Marshall didt not state, but
we take it for granted that there
is a considerable sum available
fSr these loans, and with five
years to repay, re should see a
considerable nun ,-er of new resi-
dences started 'within the next
month or so.


Grand Master of

Masons Will Visit

Port St. Joe Lodge

Invitation to Attend Is Extendea
To Five Lodges Is This
District

Next Wednesdtay, August 3,,
Port St. Joe Lodge No. 111, Free
& Accepted Masons, will have as
its' guest the grand master of .the
state of Florida, Roger J. Kish-
paugh of West Palm-Beach. .
ilrrind Master Kishpaugh .is
making his yearly visit to all Ma-
sonic districts of the state and
,the Port St. Joe lodge has been
selected in this district, to enter-
tain him.
Invitations have been extended
to lodges in Apalachicola, Panama
City, Lynn Haven and Parker to
gather here that night and pay
honor to the grand .master. It is
'expected that more than 150 M*.
sons. will be .in attendance.
. Many things- of local and na-
tional importance will be dwelt
tupon by- Grand Master Kishpaughl
in his: address, and all Masons are
urged to hear him at this time.
Refreshments will be in charge
of the local chapter: df the East-
ern:. Star,- which in ibsltf should
guarantee a large attendance, as
the, 'ladies are noted "-for theh-
:skill If..ta e culinary.;a>i t


STORM WRECKS NEW WAREHOUSE


End view of the recently-completed brick warehouse of the Port St.
Joe Terminal company showing damage resulting from Saturday's
storm. Both ends of the 300 by 115-foot building were blown out by
the 50-mile-an-hour wind with damage placed in the neighborhood of
$4,000. The mill of the St. Joe Paper company may be seen through
the far end of the building. -Star Photo.


WPA to Lay Off

45 In County

Those Who Have Worked 18
Months Or Longer to
Lose Jobs

According to an announcement
by Roy 'Schroder of Jacksonville,
state WPA administrator, he has
received orders from Washington
to lay off all workers who have
had 18 months or more continuous
employment on relief rolls.
The ruling affects 8,133 workers
in Florida, with Gulf county hav-
ing 45 on the list.
"These c a s e s embrace all
classes of certified workers. In-
cluding supervisory personnel.
earning less than $100 sper month,
whose finance record showed 1i
months of continuous earnings,"
said Schroder.

LEGION CLINIC TO
BE AT PANAMA CITY
Crippled Children Will Be Given
Attention August 24

A clinic for crippled children of


Duck Hunters

Have 45 Days

SSeason for Florida Set From No-
vember 15 to December 29;
Bag Limits Changed

An announcement Tuesday from
Washington by Secretary Ickes
stated that there would be a 45-
day season for duck hunting this
fall under regulations covering
the 1939 migratory bird season.
Hunting season in Florida and
other southern states for du-ts,
geese, snipe and coots will be
from November 15 to December
29.
The daily bag limit for ducks is
placed at 10 in the aggregate, but
the possession limit remains: at 20
in the aggregate. When any daily
limit includes canvas-back, rei-
head, bufflehead and ruddy ducks,
not more than three of any' one,
or more than three in the aggre-
gate of these kinds may be taken,
and possession of these particular
kinds of ducks is limited' to not
more than six of any one kind or
six in the aggregate.


Bay, Gulf, Franklin, Washington, The daily bag limit on geese
Walton and Holm'es counties will and brant of the kinds permitted
be held in Panama City August Ito be killed is four in the aggre-
24, sponsored by the American I gate of all' kinds' and the posses-
Legion Auxiliary. Dr. John P. sion linim is eight in C i' re-
Lovejoy, orthopedic surgeon of sate. Last year the limits siood at
Jacksonville, will be in charge. five anlt ten, respectively.
The clinic will be held in the The daily bag limit on coots re-
basement of the First Baptist mains at 25.
church and the Auxiliary will Waterfowl and coots may be
serve lunch to the children anu hunted only from 7 a. m. to 4
their parents attending. P. m.
It is expected that eight chil- The regulationA forbid taking o?
dren from Gulf county will be ex- waterfowl by means of bait or use
amined. of live duck and goose decoys ana
--- continues the three-shell limit on
POSTPONE DATE OF repeating shotguns, either hand-
FIREMEN'S DANCE operated or auto-loading. Hunters
;in__may ue Edhotguns not larger than
Due tb inclement weather, the No. 10 guage, or how and arrow.
regular monthly dance given by ----
the volunteer fire department, AUDITOR APPOIITED
which was scheduled for this eve-
ning, has been postponed until Governor Cone reappointed Wil-
next Frfday night, August 25. liam M. Wainwright of Tallahas-
'This decision was. made at the see state auditor last weok. Walln-
dinner meeting of the firmen held wright, who assumed office after
Tuesday evening at the St. Joe Cone became governor in 1937,
Restaurant. was named' to a four-year taypm.


Gale auses Concern


Little Damage Results Outside of Port St. Joe Terminal Com-
pany Warehouse; Telephone and Telegraph Communi-
cations Interrupted and Electric Service Cut Off;
Menhaden Company Ship Is Run Aground


A tropical storm originating near Puerto Rico and dis-
covered Tuesday morning, crossed the Florida peninsula to
the Gulf of Mexico at Tarpon Springs Saturday morning and
hit Apalachicola, Port St. Joe and Panama City late Satur-
day afternoon. Weather bureau reports, were that the wind
reached a velocity of 50 miles_ a' n1ur -: h gusts recording
60 miles an hour. Hurricane force is 75 miles.
In Port St. Joe the wind blew strongly out of the north
until about 5 o'clock Saturday afternoon, accompanied by
heavy rain. Then ensued a period of calm for about an hour,
as the storm center passed over this area. The wind then_
reversed and began blowing from the south co'i,-lderably
harder than the first part of the storm.
Warehouse Suffers Considerable Damage
Little damage was reported in the city, outside ofa, few
trees blown-down ahd sIhingles ripped fr.i.m garages ano resi-
dences. The greatest damage was to the recently-completed
warehouse of the Port St. Joe Terminal company, which had
both ends blown out, with damage estimated in the neighbor-
hood of $4,000. Several workmen's houses at the-plant of
the St. Joe Lumber & Export company were blown from their
foundations, but no one was injured.
Telegraph and telephone lines into this city were put out
of commission and the electric service was interrupted for
about three hours, causing business houses to close their
doors shortly after nightfall, although a few catered to an
occasional customer braving the storm by using candles for
*illumination.


Storm Did Not

'Come Back'


MHany residents of Port St.
Joe, who witnessed their first
tropical "blow" last Saturday,
were under the impression that
the storm passed over this sec-
tion and then "came back."
This idea was gained due to
the period of calm for about an
hour when the storm center
hovered over the city.
Storms such as we had visited
upon us Saturday, generally
cover an area of considerable
size with the wind blowing
in a circle, counter-clockwise,
with a dead calm in the center.
Consequently when the first of
the storm struck here the wind
came from a northerly direc-
tion. continuing until the center
of the storm reached us, when
we had a breathing spell. Then
when the venter passed an. the
other side of the storm reached
us, the wind came from the
south.

COAST GUARD AIDS BOATS

The coast guard patrol boat


Vessel Beached
The "pogie" boat Novia of the
St. Joe Menhadlen corporation,
commanded by Captain B. Halri-
son, with a crew of 30 aboard,
was beached by the captain Satur-
day evening in Eagle's Bay and
the crew made shore safely by
swimming through the churning
seas.
Captain Harrison said he did
not have sufficient power in the
boat, a shallow draft vessel, to
buck the steadlily mounting wind.
Officials of the Menhaden com-
pany viewed the wreck Sunday
and found that the waves had
pounded the vessel to pieces, the
wreckage being strewn up and
Clown the beach for several miles,
with only the engine visible above
th'e water. Efforts are being mase
to salvage the propellor, which is
valued at $300, and other fixtures
and equipment of the boat. Loss
is placed by Robert Bellows at
approximately $10,000.
The awning in front of the bus
(Continued on Page 6)
____-((~-------
MARIANNA CAVERNS GET
INDIRECT LIGHT SYSTEM
A complete and beautiful sys-
tem of indirect lighting Is being
installed in the caves at Caverns
State Park, near Marianna. It is


Boutwell, stationed) at Panama expected that the lights will
City, rendered coiiderable as- greatly enhance the natural beauf-
sistance to small craft in this vl- ties of the caverns.
cinity during the recent heavy During the installation work
weather. Among vessels aided the caves will be closed to the
Tuesday was the fislng .boat: public, but the park and the old
Dora W, which was pulld. to original Marianna Cavern will re-
safety in St. Joseph's Bay. main open to visilss.









I T


GUSTAVIS CREECH AND
JULIA O'QUINN ARE WED
Gustavis B. Creech of this cit
and Miss Julia O'Quinn, daughtE
of Dr. and Mrs. C. A. O'Quinn (
Perry, were united in marriage
6 o'clock Sunday evening at tn
Perry Methodist church, the Re
Summers performing the beautiful
ceremony.
Miss Erline McClellan of Perr
attended the bride, while Kennet
Creech, brother of the groon
acted as best man.
The bride has been employed i
the Port ,St. Joe schools as a sc
ence'teacher and the groom is en
gaged in the cleaning business
here with his brother.
The newlyweds, following
brief honeymoon trip, will mak
their home in this city.
The Star joins with the man
friends of this popular youn
couple in wishing them all happ
ness in their wedded life.

LOTTIE MOON GIRLS
MEET AT CHURCH
The Lottie Moon Girls' Auxil
ary of the Baptist church met a
the. church Monday afternoon fo
their regular meeting.
The meeting was opened wit
the G. A. hymn, followed wit.
prayer by Mrs. J. 0. Baggett. At
open review of the Manual wa
held'in place of the regular mis
sion -study. Plans were made a
this time for the coming mission
study and a .social to be held ii
the near future.
The '-Imt ni.etinog will be hel
with Mi-- Blt:, Jo i Lane a
the home of her parents or
Fourth street.

MRS. SPENCE HOSTESS TO
MARIE JiNES CIRCLE
Mrs. H. C. Spence was hostes
Monday afternoon to the MarlE
Jones Circle of the Methodis
church at her home, with Mrs. R
A. Swatts, Bible study leader, i]
charge of the program.
Each member was given a verse,
which was read and discussed,
following which Mrs. Temple
circle chairman, took charge o
the brief business session. Thi
meeting was closed with prayer
and the hostess served refresn
ments to the 13 members present

MARY CIRCLE MEETS
WITH MRS. SISEMORE
The Mary Circle of the Baptist
church met Monday afternoon al
the home of Mrs. J. W. Sisemore
on Fourth street. Mrs. A. L. Ezel,
presided in the absence of the
chairman. The 23rd Psalm was
read, followed with prayer by
Mrs. Sisemore. Following the reg-
ular business session, tea and
cookies were served to, those pres-
ent by the hostess.

Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Reed' and
children of Hosford visited Sun-
day with Mr. and Mrs. H. A.
Drake.

Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Perrit had
as their guest over the week-ena
Henry Haven of Jacksonville.

Mrs. Sally Montgomery had as
her guests Monday Mr. and Mrs.
J. H. Thompson and small son of
Apalachicola.

Miss Alice Ruth Gibson has. as
her guest this week Miss Eliza-
beth Campbell of Birmingham.

Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Taunton had
as their guests Sunday Mrs. J. C.
Howard of Bristol, Mrs. Taunton s
mother, and Mr. and Mrs. B. R.
Bateman and son of Attapulgus,
Ga.

W. C. Forehand left Monday to
spend two weeks visiting in Ko-
\tonmo, Indi.


- Personals


LANETA DAVIS, Editor
/


At the Churches
er
of PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
at Rev. H. F. Beaty Minister
lu 10:00 a. m.-Sunday School.
v. 11:00 a. m.-Preaching service.
ul 8:00 p. m., second and fourth
Sundays-Evening services.
.y Rev. Beaty will preach in We-
a wahitchka the first Sunday night
, at 7:30 o'clock, and in Liberty
county the third Sunday night.
n
I- FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
. Rev. J. W. Sisemore, Minister
9:45 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.-Morning Worship.
7:00 p. m.-B. Y. P. U.
a 8:00 p. m.-Preaching service.
e W. M. U., Monday, 3:00 p. m.
Prayermeeting Wednesday, 7:30 p.
y m. Teachers meeting, Thursday,
g 7:30 p. m.
i-
ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Rev. E. T. Corbin, Pastor
Full-time services
10:15 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.-Preaching Service.
i- 7:30 p. m.-Evangelistic service.
.t Prayermeeting every Wednesday
night.
r
ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL
Rev. Glion Benson, Rector
1 10:00 a. m.-Church School.
Services first and third Sunday
s rights at 7:30.
Communion service fourth Sun-
day mornings at 7:30.
n

METHODIST CHURCH
D. E. Marietta, Minister
Services Every Sunday
it 10:00 a.m.-Churcn School.
n 11:00 a.m.-Morning worship.
7:30 p. nm.-Evening worship.
---- .......

Canapes Are

S Easy to Make
e

Canapes may be made either
n simple or elaborate in appearance.
Canapes are made from toasted
bread cut thin and cut into vari-
ous shapes. There are also excel-
Slent cheese sticks, pretzels, pre-
pared biscuits or crackers. These
e may be purchased at most gro-
r cery stores in Port St. Joe.
SCold Canapes are generally
made of Russian caviar, anchovy
paste, smoked fish, hard cooked
eggs, cheese, sea foods, etc. Mix
with a little mayonnaise. Garnish
Sedges of canapes w:th sieved egg
yolks or whites, minced parsley
or chives, cream cheese, mayon-
Snaise, pimiento, butter, etc. Put
on with pastry tube.
S Hot Canapes generally have a
savory mixture served on hot
toast, such as deviled cheese,
minced ham, broiled tomatoes,
sausages, oysters or fried shrimp.
These should be served very hot.
Canape Combinations
1. Cream cheese with minced
onion, served on crisp crackers.
Garnish with minced parsey.
2. Avocado pea;ts, sliced, and V
served -on toast, garnished with
amonds and cherries.
3 Equal parts of anchovy and i
sardine pastes. Spread on fried I
bread and garnish with pimiento,
butter and lemon.
4. Small new onions rolled in d
bread spread with mayonnaise. o
5. Chutney sauce and minced M
ham spread on toast rounds.
Sprinkle with cheese and toast.
Serve hot. g
6. Potato chips' spread with E
anchovy paste or caviar.
7. Ground chicken and al-
monds seasoned with new onions v
and moistened with mayonnaise, a
Spread on toast. C
8. Cocktail sausages with salted
almonds at each 'end, served as
garnish on platter. te
------------ h
Every ads carries a message- he
a message that will save money. C:


MARTHA CIRCLE IN
MEETING MONDAY
Mrs. A. E. McCaskey was hos-
tess Monday afternoon at her
home to the Martha Circle of the
First Baptist church. The hos-
tess presided over the meeting.
Following the devotional, Mrs. 3.
O. Baggett led in prayer.
A special offering was taken
during the business session to
pay fares of girls from the G. A.
to the camp at Monticello. Mrs.
E. B. Dendly conducted the Bible
study from the first book of
Chronicles.
At the conclusion of the meet-
ing the hostess served punch,
sandwiches and cookies to those
present.
The next meeting of the circle
will be held at the home of Mrs.
W. H. Howell, with Mrs. Kate
Harrell as hostess.

LYDIA CIRCLE MEETS
MONDAY AT CHURCH
The Lydia Circle of the Baptist
church met Monday afternoon at
the church with Mrs. C. M. Palmer
presiding. The meeting was open-
ed with song, followed by the de-
votional taken from the Book of
Chronicle. Mrs. Palmer conducted
an inspiring Bible study period',
after which the meeting was dis-
missed by repeating the Mizpall.
During the business, session a
special offering was taken up for
the Girls' Auxiliary.

PRESBYTERIAN WOMAN'S
AUXILIARY MEETS MONDAY
The Woman's Auxiliary of the
Presbyterian church met Monday
afternoon at the church with Mrs.
Basil E. Kenney, Sr., the presi-
dent presiding.
The meeting was opened with
the devotional given by the presi-
dent, who also delivered an in-
teresting talk. Following disposal
of minor matters the meeting was
dismissed with prayer.
*- **
MRS. DICKENS ENTERTAINS
SUSANNAH WESLEY CIRCLE
The Susannah Wesley Circle of
the Methodist church met Monday
afternoon at the home of Mrs.
B. H. Dickens on Woodward ave-
nue, with Mrs. G. A. Patton in
charge. Mrs. Patton led the de-
votional and gave an interesting
talk. Regular matters were dli.-
pose'dl of during the business ses-
sion, and following dismissal the
hostess served ice cream and cake
to her guests.

Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Guest and
son, Leslie, residents of this city
for two years past, left this week
for Gainesville to make their
home.

Mrs. C. J. Sullivan returned
Sunday from Florala, Ala., where
she visited with relatives.

Visitors Sunday of Mr. and Mrs.
W. H. Howell were Mr. and Mrs.
H-. E. Hall and children of
Blountstown, Mr. and Mrs. W. B.
Shores of Cottondale and Mrs.
Kate Harrell.

The Misses Louise and Geral-
line Smith of Tampa are guests
f their uncle and aunt, Mr. and
Irs. W. S. Smith.

Miss Velma Davis had as her
uest over the week-endl Miss
Iilda Culbreth of Blountstown.

Bob Ferguson of Wachulla is
visiting with his. brother-in-law
nd sister, Mr. and Mrs. Slater
ox.

Mrs. Robert Branton and daugh-
or, Melba, left Sunday for their
ome in Holt, Ala., after visiting
ere with Mr. and Mrs. R. A.
handler.


Society


THEATRE
OPENS
DAILY
2:45
Continuously


~Tj rrg


SUNSET _


"SPIDER'S WEB"
NUTTY NETWORK
CARTOON


FAVORITE

RECIPES


SHRIMP CREOLE


Lee Burke, employed at the St.
Joe Paper company, this weet
moved his family here from Do-
than, Ala.

Mr. and Mrs. Miles Hurlbut
have as their guest Mrs. Hurlbut's
mother, Mrs. E. D. Mouchette of
Corona, Ala.

Mrs. Margaret Sanford has ab-
cepted a -position as stenographer
in the auditing department of the
Apalachicola Northern railroad.

Dick Stepp left last Friday tor
Paris, Ill., where he is visiting
with his grandparents, Mr. and
Mrs. C. W. Stepp.

Mr. andl Mrs. George Wimberly
have as their guest Mr. VWimber-
ly's mother, Mrs. E. M. Wimberly
of Lakeland.

Mrs. C. G. Costin was brought
home Wednesday from a Dothan
hospital where she recently un-
derwent an operation.

Miss Marjorie Stepp left this
week for Jacksonville on a vaca-
tion trip. I


Brown chopped onion in melted
fat. Blend in flour ana seasoning
and stir in gradually the hot to-
mato juice to which the sugar has
been added. Cook for a few min-
uttes. Add the shrimp and pep-
per. Heat thoroughly and serve
with rice.

Mr. and Mrs. Abe Saba and
children, former residents of this
city, were visitors here last week
from Bogalusa, La.

Mrs. 0. Pierce and Mrs. Badon
Jackson of Bogalusa, La., were
week-end visitors here with their
brother, Wood1row Talley.


THEATRE
OPENS-.
Saturday 1:15
Sunday 1:45


OWL SHOW 10:30 P. M.


THE."DEAD END" KIDS
MARGARET LINDSAY RONALD REAGAN
COMMUNITY SING
EVENTS ON STAGE


Sunday-Monday, August 20-21


ANDY WANTS TO GET MU'V

...b iU e ftIdS it's only Spring. -


TUESDAY
RITA JOHNSON
TOM NEAL

"THEY ALL

CAME OUT"
NEWS COMEDY


WEDNESDAY, AUG 23

Lionel Barrymore
Bobs Watson

"On Borrowed

Time"
OUR GANG COMEDY


1 small onion,
chopped
2 tbTsps. fat
Salt and pepper
1 cups tomato
juice


SATURDAY, AUGUST 19


1 tblsp. sugar
2 cups of fresh
cooked or
canned :shrimp
1 green pepper,
shredded


I~s~ssespr~


lk MINIM=~b~rm~:


PAGE TWO


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRiDAY, AUGUST 18, M890








FRIDAY. AU S


IS STILL SEEKING $9000

For the 42nd time Michael
*O'Dea, park employee at San Fran-
cisco, filed suit against the HI-
bernia Bank asking $9000 and for
the 42nd time the suit was dis-
missed.,
With the dismissal came a sug-
gestion from Superior Judge Sy*-
vain Lazarus that O'Dea should
come in to see the judges pri-
vately instead of filing suit when
"this case gets too burdensome
for your mind."
-------P---
Every ads carries a message-
a message that will save money.
r

JEWELRY




PORT ST. JOE, FLA.












OUR SPECIALTY
The surest way to bring
happiness on any occa-
sion is by a Gift of
Jewelry


Kerr Jewelry Co.
PORT ST. JOE, FLA.

WATCH REPAIRING
OUR SPECIALTY




F IS HI N G-

Spend the week-end in
West Florida's best fish-
ing grounds


BOATS -- With' or with-
out'guide-at reasonable
rates. .. Hotel ac-
ccmmodations within the
means of everyone.


SEE-


J. 0 'Jim' SMITH

SUMATRA, FLA.




REAL ICE
IS HEALTHY and

SAFE


Low cost and guaranteed
purity make REAL Ice more
economical and serviceable.
Daily deliveries give you the
best guarantee of satisfaction

PHONE 47

ST. JOE ICE

COMPANY
MAX KILBOURN, Prop.


Will Hitler. Dare



Grab Old Dainziig?


Hitler's much advertised move to seize the Free City of
Danzig from Poland is about due, now that the harvest has
been gathered. If Germany strikes, it will be a general war
which may work undreamed changes on the political map of
the world. But equally important should become the conse-
quences if the summer goes by without the nazis trying to
make good their reiterated boasts.'
What would it mean if the* '
Rome-Berlin axis let the month ever weaker. If this happened, it
Fade out without getting Danzig? is likely that the democracies
It would signify that, in their own themselves would, take the offen-
estimation,.they feel themselves sive and present demands to Hit-
too weak to challenge the ever- ier and to Mussolini. The dicta-
gathering might of the democra- !ors, now loudly declaiming that
cies. theirs are the so-called "have-
Effects of Admission not" nations, may find themselves
Such an admission of relative in the position of beggars in
weakness could have profound in- whose pockets fat bankbooks are
lu'ence on Europe. First, many of discovered.
the smaller neighboring natons-- Turkish newspapers ae area
Yugoslavia. Hungary, Portugal, the campaigning t h a t the peace
Baltic states-which are now va-!front" should not leave the politi-
cillating between the two camps, cal offensive to the dictators, but
would muster enough courage to submit counter-claims. According-
hasten to that side where their lly, the Turks ask that Italy hana


real interests lie.
Secondly, the top-heavy system
of- barter-trade, whict is sup-
ported by fear or desire of what
Germany may or.may not do, wili
receive a jolt.
Tihrdly, a gradual veeringaway
from the adoration of the racial,
economic and political theories or
fascism-if it turns out that these
principles did not make their prac-
ticers strong enough to challenge
the "degenerated" democracies.
Lastly, with the breaking away
of some doubtful nations, the
Rome-Berlin axis would find itself


back to them and to Greece the
12 Mediterranean islands which
she snatched in 1912.
These. islands-the Dodecanes.
-are inhabited by Greeks and
Turks. Mussolini not only con-
verted them into menacing fort-
resses against their mother coun-
tries, but is trying to Italianlz.
the natives.
Similarly, Germany could be
pressed to release the unfortun-
ate Czechs whom Hitler enslaved
despite his solemn agreement
made at Munich when he had got-
ten the Sudeten lands.


Garner Organization Claims


461 Delegates on Ist Ballot


DALLAS, Texas. John Nance
Garner, vice-president of the United
States, will go into the next Demo-
cratic national convention with over
461 votes pledged to him, according
to E. B. Germany, chairman of the
State Democratic Executive commit-
tee and co-chairman of the Texas
Garner-for'President committee.
"We are convinced, from the del-
uge of pledges we .have received at
the Dallas headquarters, that there
is a genuine popular demand for the
nomination of Mr. Garner on the
Democratic ticket. This comes, not
from one section or group of states,
but from the entire nation. From
Oregon and Vermont, and from
Georgia to the Southwest, we are
getting the most enthusiastic protes-
tations of friendship and admiration
for our stalwart Texas statesman.
"Mr. Garner's way of thinking has
captured the public imagination of
the middle ground of America's
straight-thinking citizenry. If the
politicians do not listen to the voice
of the people in 1940, 1 predict that
the Democratic party as an organiza-
tion won't be worth shooting. I have
heard many comments that the poli-
ticians are going to pick the next
candidates for both the Democratic
and Republican parties. My' advice
to them in both parties is to listen
to what the people are thinking. 11
they don't heed the deep longings o0
the mass of America's citizenry, they
will be politically dead after the nexi
election. I repeat: If the Democratic
politicians attempt to thwart the will
of the people in the next convention,
the pajty of Jefferson and Jackson
won't be worth the effort to put it
out of its misery."
In outlining the strength that he
claims for the Texan, Mr. Germari'y
pointed out that out of 1,100 votes in
the Democratic convention, the south


and border states will furnish Mr.
Garner with 286, the chief block of
which is represented by the 46 votes
from Texas. The.southwest and west-
ern states, without counting Califor-
nia, and taking but two of the farm
states, Nebraska and Wisconsin, will
yield Mr. Garner a total of 461 votes.
"Now I am not including in this
forecast of 461 the 210 additional
'votes indicated from the states of
New York, Pennsylvania and Cali-
fornia," declared Mr. Germany. The
Gallup poll in the last three weeks
has printed definite forecasts of pub-
lic opinion from these three states,
which together have 19 percent of
the total convention strength. These
polls show, assuming that the Presi-
dent will not be a candidate which
is the only way that Democrats be-
lieving in the continuance of its tra-
ditional party .policies can think, that
Mr. Garner is the choice of over 50%
of the Democrats in New York and
California and of over 60% of the
Democrats of Pennsylvania.
Oat of these three states, two will
give Mr.iGarner a clear majority of
the convention, the Texas leader
pointed out.
"There is no question in my mind,"
declared Mr. Germany, "that the peo-
ple of the United States have very
definite convictions on the coming
,residential campaign. The principles
Involved we:gh deeply on citizens
everywhere They embrace Mr. Gar-
ner because he stands for a principle
that finds welcome reaction in every
human being who worries and some-
times wonders on the future of his
country.
"Mr. Garner's nomination by the
Democrats of this country is inevita-
ble. It is ordained in the hearts of the
Ameriean people, and 1 view his
nomination and subsequent election
as certain, with the present trend of
events."


Chicago Thief Jailed In Tails Piece of Putty Traps Burglar
When Chicago detectives found Eugene Newberry confessed ron-
11 suits and 24 pairs of shoes bing a store in Davenport, Iowa,
among other clothing in the home when detectives found in the cuff
of Lawrence Webber they told him of his trousers a piece of putty
to put on his own clothes and go that fit into a window that had
to jail for stealing. Web'er donned been smashed by the thief.
a. top hat, an evening coat witn ------
tails, a pair of tan shoes, and a The longest artificial lake in
brown necktie. the world will *be formed when
------~- Grand Coulee dam is finished to'
Save by reading the ads! harness the. Columbia river.


Hat is In the Ring

Gubernatorial Aspirant Has Fop
Principal Platform Plank
A Unified Florida

MIAMI, Aug. 17 (FNS)-Stand-
ing on a platform having for its
principal plank a .plea for unified
Florida, 'Benjamin Axleroad, Mi-,
ami attorney, announced his can-
didacy for governor here.
"I am for a unified Florida," he
stated' in his announcement, "and
will work for all the people in
every section if elected. If North
Florida wants a -ship'-canal, -let
them have it as long -as it does
not hurt anyone else. Personally,
I am for the canal, for I believe
that it would be a national asset.
We want the Everglades conser-
vation and fire control project,
but how are we to expect those In
the northern part of the state to
help us, and this is essential, If
we fight them?"
---,-;-------
Looking ahead, the bureau of
public roads' estimates that 25,000
miles of new four-lane roads will
be needed' by the United States in
the next 25 years.

ERASE the DOUBT
About Your
FRESH WATER FISHING

MIDWAY PARK
Is In the HEART of the
Dead Lakes Fishing Area
Gulf County's north line cuts
the Dead Lakes at the
waistline
Meet Your Friends At
MIDWAY PARK
FURNISHED CAElVNS
On the Waterfront
J. H. SHOEMAKER, Prop.
Postoffice Address
WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA


Read the ads-it pays!


Road Department

Building Sea Wall

Two-Mile Bulkhead On Apalachl-
cola Bridge Fill Will Give
Hurricane Protection

During a recent blow. in which
the wind reached a velocity of 38
miles per hour, traffic over the
Gorrie bridge at Apalachicola was
halted for some time due to waves
breaking over the fill, the sand
bags and wire fence along the fill
being inadequate to cope with the'
seas and hold-them back.
As a consequence, the state road
department has a crew of men at
work on the fills driving creu-
soted piling into the sand to form
a tough sea wall which it is
hoped will save the roadway if a
90-mile wind comes whooping In
over the bay. A jet and pile drives
are being used to place the pillng.
It is anticipated that the" tv,-t
miles of sea wall will be com-
pleted bySeptember, which is the
worst month of the year for high
winds.
Let the hurricanes roar.

Miami Attorney's
r -TTY .1 1


Did You Know

You Can Buy a

1937 V-8 Ford
for as little as


$399.00

We have a large used
car lot full of similar
bargains. Come
see them and try them
out-there's a car to fit
every purse.
See the

NEW FORD V-8
Have our salesmen give
you a demonstration-it
will cost you nothing


ST. JOE MOTOR

COMPANY
W. 0. Anderson, Prop.


LLUCAS PAINTS;

A kind for every

purpose

W. e also carry a complete

line of painting supplies.


ST JOE LUMBER


COMPANY

Phone, 69 Port St. Joe, Fla.
a 1aO- rla-eO f ir.4aC i-aO >tb aa-eaIb 2sC*' t*scb- t e1<"cn k-


Ikaw DO 1W
YOU HAVE
~AYS. when you feel tense,
jumpy, irritable?
NIGHTS when you are wake-
ful and restless?
Over-taxed nerves are likely to
cause loss of friends, loss of sleep,
loss of pleasure, time missed from
work, family quarrels, physical
and mental suffering.
When you are Nervous, try the
soothing effect of one or two
Dr. Miles Effervescent Nervine
Tablets.
Try Dr. Miles Effervescent
Nervine Tablets for Sleeplessness
due to Nervousness, Nervous Ir-
ritability, Nervous Headache,
Nervous Indigestion, "Jumpy
Nerves," and Travel Sickness.
Your money back if they fail to
bring you relief.
At your Drug Store
Small Package 350
Large Package. 750
Remember to ask for
S" ~~ ODR. MILES t4...ev n

N tEVINEINABLETTS


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORMAA


PAGE THREE


FRIDAY, AUGUST 18, 1939








PAGEFOU THESTA, PRT S. JE, ULF OUNY, LORIA FIDA, AUUST18,193


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe,
by The Star Publishing Company


Fla.,


W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year........$2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months..........65c

-4 Telephone 51 .*-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

NO CONCERN OF OURS
A friend of ours dropped into the office the
other day and began telling the" editor how
awful things were in Europe and China and
that the United States ought to do something
about it immediately, if not sooner.
We listened to him patiently, as we al-
ways have been a good listener, and then we'
had our little say.
We pointed out to him that there un-
doubtedly Were more people like him in these
United States, but that the great majo'rity-
of the people do not'want to enter into a war
with anybody about anything. That
the people as a whole consider the ruckuses
among European nations as no concern of
ours and that we shouldn't be pulling their
chestnuts out of the fire. That we,
as a people, resent the invasion of China by
Japan, but still do not consider that we should
go over and slap down the Japs. We prob-
ably would if they grabbed the Philippines,
but that would be an' entirely different prop-
osition-they would be starting a war in our
back yal... .That the people of this
nation are sympathetic with those nations
struggling to maintain the liberties of a de-
mocracy, but that this in no way threatens
our liberties under our democratic form of
government. .. .And that, finally, the
best thing for us to -do would be to build up,
our army, navy and air force to such a point
that other nations would consider a long
time before they took a poke at us.
We don't know whether we changed the
attitude of our 'friend toward the foreign situ-
ation, but at least we believe, we gave him
something to think about.

CONFIDENCE
The reaction the ordinary reader gets
when he or she sees something advertised
attractively is that the product must be what
it is claimed to be or its makers would not
spend their money pushing it.
They do not spend their money pushing it.
They do not say much about the goods that
they are not willing to back up. They may
have to carry some brands of goods that are
a drag on the market because the public has
not been made acquainted with them, but
when a maker or merchant endorses some-
thing heartily and enthusiastically, you can
depend on it that it is something that is ad-
vertised-evidence in itself that all the value
claimed for the product is there.
As a result of that kind of encdprsement,
advertising brings profitable return. If the
product offered is a real bargain-and mer-
chants will not usually advertise it as such
unless it is-then a demand is instantly cre-
ated for it and the public will buy it.
You can depend on advertised goods. They
are better, or they wouldn't .be advertised,

Attorney General Gibls has ruled that bar-
bers of Florida may give finger waves "and
still stay within the 1939 state law setting up
the new barber's sanitary commission." All
right, men, the line forms at the right for
those desiring a finger wave.

Better -wrecks are being made every day
by drunken auto drivers.


IT'S GETTING CLOSER


WHERE DOES THE MONEY GO?
This is not an editorial on high taxes or
grafting politicians, but facts issued by of-
ficials of the United States mint in Washing-
ton showing that an enormous amount of
money issued is lost or otherwise disappears
so that the treasury never has to redeem it,
but is that much to the good.
It is estimated that 5,000,000,000 pennies
have been misplaced since the government
began making them, which doesn't include
the one you are using in your fuse box to
make a blown-out fuse-plug work. Of the
old-time two-cent pieces, of which more than
91,000,000 were coined, more thi-n 57,000,000
are still missing, while less than one-third of
the 94,000,000 three-cent pieces minted more
than a half-century ago were ever returned
for redemption. Of course a large number
of these coins are in the hands of collectors.
But it is not only small coins that do not
return. More than 10,000,000 of the old large-
sized $1 bills, the issue of which was discon-
tinued about 10 years ago, never got back
to the treasury, and the same is true of many
large-sized bills of higher denominations. Of
course, a considerable amount of this old
'money is probably hoarded away and may
come to light some day.
Incidentally, by reducing the size of paper
currency by one-third it is estimated that the
treasury has saved about $18,000,000 in cost
of paper, ink, labor and storage space in the
-last 10 years.
However, with spending going on at the
rate of more than $9,000,000,000 a year, such
a saving is only a drop in the treasury bucket

THE POT SIMMERS
Those who enjoy politics and the thrilling
sport .of voting for or aginn" somebody will
in all likelihood find plenty to entertain them
next year. The woods seem to be full of po-
tential -candidates for this, that and the
other office. Go to it, boys, there's more
money in politics, if you are successful, than S'
in marching across a field behind "Old Beck" t(
for six months in the year. c
The pity of it all is that so many men who l
are not financially able to stand the cost of v
a losing campaign, and who have no more
show of election than a toad has of jumping i,
over the moon, will get into a political race ft
and spend money that might better be spent P
otherwise.
But there isn't a bit of use in advising a
man not to run for office if he asks your i
opinion of his chances. He's probably heard
two or three people make the remark that t
he's just the man for the job and that his cr
country needs him. There may be several an
thousand voters in the county who lhave NOT
asked him to run, but that makes no differ- it
ence with him. Two or three have asked him ut
to run, and he feels that he is the Arnold m
Winkelreid who is destined to lead the co- o
horts to victory. You might just as well tell l
him to get in the game and try out the water,
for if you advise him not to run he will thinI T
you are his enemy and hate you always.- w
DeFuniak Springs Herald. P0

We saw a woman last Saturday who was w
afraid to put a worm on a. fish hook, and yet ti
she was married to one.-Port St. Joe Star.
Sometimes they hook such a worm because t
they have such a good line.-Clermont Press.t
pl
Haven't heard any rumors yet of anybody .
coming out for any of our county offices. "
Looks like everybody is well-satisfied with 0
alI
)ur present setup-'and well they might be.
tr
The reckless driver can be sure of one r i
thing-he probably won't be able to get an,-
gasoline in heaven, and its too hot to keep lp
gasoline in the other place.

Looks like those "good as gold" stamps
are bringing a lot of gold to the merchants "2
who are using them. o
r
You can never convince a woman that men m
think she talks too much. cc


Second Canal Across


Isthmus Being Urged


The Panama Canal-perilously slender life line of the
United States fleet-was 25 years old last Tuesday. When it
vas opened on August 15, 1914, the Big Ditch across the
sthmus of Panama was the engineering marvel of the time.
But after three-tenths of a century it is showing its 'age.
Military strategists, quite*
rank about it, admit tthat ing on President Roosevelt's fleet
something has got to be done expansion program last year.
insure our navy swift and Rights to build' a canal through
o insure our navy swift and Nicaragua and fortify it with
certain passage from the At- naval bases at the Atlantic and
intic to the Pacific, or vice Pacific ends, were acquired under
ersa, in times of emergency. a treaty signed on August 4, 1914,
Debate on procedure is divided eleven days before the Panama
ito two camps. Argument by one Canal began operating, and ratl-
s that a little face-lifting in the fied in 1916.
orm of another set of locks at The United States made a down
anama will suffice. payment of $3,000,000 for rights
Want Second Canal to run 99 years,. The total cost 'of
the canal includes $25,000,000 for
But th.e preponderance of opin- rights, franchises and land. The
on, scorning a compromise on the annu maintenance cost would be
nost vital link in the national de- $10,800,000, according to army es
ense, _demands the security of mates.
timates..
wo cpnals-a second passageway __ _
omi ocean to ocean through Nic-
ragua. THE PROBLEM OF RELIEF
ragua.
The proposed Nicaragua canal
as been banging around .the cap- If you ear one set of political
ol chambers ever since the orators talk, you would believe
united States realized that quick that the distribution of relief ;n
movement of its naval forces from many localities is dominated ry
ne coast to the other would bl politics, and that a great mass of
Indispensable in meeting any people are being pauperized and
ireat to the national safety, encouraged to live permanently'
Administrations frmn Roosevelt, on the government.
., who built the isthmian water- If you listen to the other fel-
ay, to Roosevelt, F. D., have lows, they will tell you that every-
ondered the need of two canals thing possible is being done tu
-one for immediate use in the abolish chiseling, and that if I;
vent that sabotage or attack were not for this relief, millions
wrecked the other in times of hos- of pathetic people would go hun-
lities. gry.
It is no military secret that in Where is the golden mean oL
ie war plans of America-s po- truth? The problem of the uneIv-
ential enemies the wrecking of played millions is too vast to be
ae Panama Canal is elaborately hastily surveyed.
anned as one or the first and Whichever party wins the elec-
ost important blows at our de- tion, the distribution of relie!
use. But with a double life-line must be inquired into with sclen-
two canals, ranking military tific accuracy. The' people want
id' naval leaders believe the pur- aid extended to every needy and
ose of the enemy would be frus- worthy person, but they will not
ated, or even discouraged as a be satisfied if many who get it
tile strategy. are abusing the government's gen-
Opponents of the Nicaragua erosity.
project object to the cost-est- --------
ated by army engineers -n a 1931 HOW ABOUT A DETOUR?
irvey at $722,000,000.
Rights Acquired In 1914 "Your teeth are in bad shape,"
But they are willing to spend said the dentist to a patient. "You
277.000,000 to put in a third set should have a bridge put in at
locks at Panama, leaving "the once."
navy's eggs all in one basket," as "How much will a bridge cost?''
representative Carl Vinson, chair- "About $75."
an of the ,house naval affairs "Say, doc. can't I get along with
immittee, exclaimed at the heai- a small culvert?"'-Toronto Globe.


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORleBA


FRIDAY, AUGUST 18, 1939








RIA.AGS r g~TESAPR T OGL ONY LRD AEFV


TWPA Sets Up

Relief Fund

$200,000 Set Aside for Purpo.e of
f Rendering Quick Relief In
SEvent of Emergency

his week there was set up a
i-state fund of $200,000 for
purposee of rendering quick re-
'n the event of a Florida
,ency.
,PA funds have already been
secured and Governor Cone has
ag-eed to the arrangement for the
state. UndBr the fund the WPA
*s, in position to render Immedl-
ate service in any period .of emer-
gency by transferring men off of
projects and putting them to work
in disaster areas.
It is pointed out that this is a
_tep designed to place a mobile
force at the disposal of official re-
'lief agencies without loss of time
o-should a hurricane, tornado eor
any other type of disaster strike
'Florida and where man-power; is
,needed to handle the resulting
situation.

A farmer can get bigger crops
,-by-'planting and tilling around a
hillside, instead of straight up and
,down the hill.


Mts Time To
DINE!!
Where the food is of the
best .where the service
is prompt and efficient
.... and where you get
HOME COOKED
MEALS
-0-

TRIANGLE
RESTAURANT
--' BEER and WINES -



EYES EXAMINED




Glasses fitted when needed
Made In Our Own Laboratory
All Work Unconditionally
Guaranteed
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 6 p. m.
DR. G. T. NEWBERRY
OPTOMETRIST
PANAMA CITY, FLA.


We have the

EXCLUSIVE

AGENCY
for


Bruce's


Juices

ORANGE
GRAPEFRUIT
TOMATO

We Deliver
On Order



SOLOMON'S

DAIRY

IVEY VANLANDINGHAM:
Local Representative
r ^ ^,, .^ ^ ^ ^


Thanksgiving Is

Advanced Week

President Shatters Tradition By
Setting "Turkey Day" for
November 23

The time-honored custom or
having Thanksgiving fall on the
last Thursday in November was
shattered Tuesday when President
Roosevelt announced that he would
move Thanksgiving Day up a
week in an endeavor to help out
business.
For 75 years Thanksgiving has
been declared by past presidents
to be the last Thursday in No-
ember, but this year it will fall
on the third Thursday-November
23-by proclamation of the presi-
dent.
The reason? Well, it seems
that business men have com-
plained the "last Thursday" date
established by President Lincoln
usually threw the holiday too close
to Christmas and cut down the
Christmas shopping.
"Anything to oblige," says the
president--and so we eat turkey
a week ahead of time and prob-
ably will have turkey hash on the
regular day.
It pays to advertise-try it!


DR. J C. COE
-DENTIST-


Andy Hardy G Spi P Trade at home-your local mer-
y ry Gets Spring JFeverT chants have just what you want.
" .. .-. ".. -. W haet hes



We have the sul
A%7r, F,.


PHONE 70


x., iHelen Gilbert and Mickey Rooney in
Andy Hardy Gets Spring Feverl. -

The lucky seventh of the Hardy dict, before the last reel is over.
Family series, "Andy Hardy Gets The high spot for laughs is the
Spring Fever," playing Sunday ,high school play in which Andy
and Monday at the Port theater plays the leading role. All of us
is proof that audiences like these should be able to see ourselves of
pictures. some years back in these scenes.
Told entertainingly, the story Is Again Lewis Stone is splendli
of how Judge Hardy almost faces as the Judge, Fay Holden as
rain through being mulcted by Mother Hardy, Sara Haden as
crooked -promoters and how young Aunt Milly, and Cecelia Parker ab
Andy falls romantically in love the sister. Mickey Rooney's Andy
with his drama tics class teacher. is but another proof-if one were
The Judge finally manages to re- ever needed-of this young man's
-gain his money and Andy returns rare ability to sway audiences to
to his old sweetheart, Polly Bene- tears or laughter at will.


MILL WORKER LOSES HAND
P. B. Fairley, employed at the
St. Joe Paper company mill, hae
hs hand amputated Friday at a
Panama City hospital as the re-
sult of injuries sustained while
working on the paper machine.
Fairley was tightening a nut on
the machine when the wrench
slipped and his hand was caught
in the machinery, cutting off four
fingers, crushing his thumb ane
cutting a deep gash in his wrist.
---- ---:----
PORT NEWS
S.S. Millinocket of the Bull Line
sailed Saturday with a cargo of
paper and lumber.
S.S. Jean of the Bull Line is
expected to arrive Sunday.


DAUGHTER IN WRECK
J. L. Kerr of this city received
word Wednesday that his daugh-
ter, Miss Mary Elizabeth Kerr of
Chicago, was in a wreck on the
Santa Fe railroad at Denver last
Saturday in which 57 persons
were injured and two killed. Miss
Kerr, who was on a vacation trip
to Los Angeles, San Francisco
and the Canadian Rockies, es-
caped injury.
------T
MERCHANTS WIN
The Merchants defeated Carra-
belle in Wednesday's ball game
by a score of 9 to 8. Batteries
were Hinote and Dendy for the
Merchants and Gander and Pour-
nelle for Carrabelle..


Office Hours:
Sunday By
Costin Bldg.


9 to 12; 1 to 5
Appointment
Port St. Joe


b-agency for the
kJVFY VAN T1NES


and can move your furniture any place in-the
United States, Canada or Mexico.
SFul Insurance Carried At All Times


'Red' orton's Transfer


PORT ST. JOE, FL/


6 % Money



NOW AVAILABLE

NOT FHA


$2500 Maximum Loan


5 Years Maximum Time


New Dwellings, Stores, Filling

Stations, Repairs, Remodeling



We still handle 5% FHA loans; 3-year

miaximumn time


OE LUPANBER
COMPANY


Phone 69


Port St. Joe


------------


T~-ULU^1~ r r r \ r r r r r r r r -~* ~r ~r r C~eLL~L-U-L~
\Y~F~IPILldllS~i-s~L~~llllnun


I


'ftDAY, AUGUST 18, 1939


7


.THE.STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE FlvR


A.'


A& sm

31A






THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


TOO LARGE FOR CELL
William Tilay, seven feet tall,
jailed for a traffic law violation
in Los Angeles, had to sleep la
the corridor, as he was too large
for a cell.
------X------
Mr. and Mrs. Ivey Vanlanding-
ham and small son visited Sun-
day in Graceville. They were ac-
companied home by Mrs. Van-
Iandingham's mother, Mrs. John
Ball, who will visit with them.

SA. D. Lawson, superintendent of
the veteran's CCC camp at Mari-
anna visited over the week-enu
,with his wife and two daughters.
-Mrs. C. E. Boyer and Mrs. E. C.
SPridgeon, Jr.

LEGAL ADVERTISING

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN
CHANCERY.
CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, a mu-
nicipal corporation. plaintiff, vs. C.
G. COSTIN. M. G. LEWIS, et al,
defendants.
NOTICE
TO: H. H. Bullard, Andalusia,
Alabama; H. V. Kell Company, a
corporation, Griffin, Georgia; Na-
omi Lanier, 1411 West 49th Street,
Savannah, Georgia; F. N. Lanier,
1411 West 49th Street, Savannah,.
Georgia; D. Sullivan and wife,
--- Sullivan, if alive, and if
dead their unknown heirs, de-
visees, legatees, or grantees;
Laura Smith and husband,
Smith, if alive, and it dead their
unknown heirs, devisees, legatees,
or grantees; the unknown heirs,
devisees, legatees, or grantees, of
Ernest' H. Williams, deceased; the
unknown heirs, devisees, legatees,
or grantees, of Carrie Spears, de-
ceased; the unknown heirs, do-
visees, legate'es, or grantees, of
-Ilop Patton, deceased;
Any and all parties, persons,
firms, corporations, trustees, ces-
tui que trustent, cestui que trust,
beneficiaries, or others, claiming
by, through or under, each, any and
all the above named known de-
fendants, and any aid all persons,
firms or corporations, having or
claiming any right, title, or inter-
est, under Ernest H. Williams,
'deceased, Carrie Spears, deceased,
or Hop Patton, deceased, in and
to the lands hereinafter described.
You are hereby notified that the
City of Port St. Joe has filed its
Bill of Complaint in the above
named Court to foreclose delin-
quent tax liens, with interest and
penalties, upon the parcels of land
.set .forth in the following sched-
ule, the aggregate amount of such
tax liens against such parcel of
land as set forth in said Bill of
Complaint being set opposite each
parcel in the following schedule,
to-wit:


Our Own Trudie
L 0 *:;


TRIES TO SELL HER
GOLD BRICK TO U. S.
PASADENA, Cal.-Mrs. Clara
MacDonald has a gold brick on
her hands that differs from the
kind that usually get into circu-
lation.
The gold brick in question is
a real one, weighs 52.84 ounces
and, is worth $1,097.20.
Under the federal anti-gold-
boarding ruling of several years
ago, Mrs. MacDonald had it ex-
enmpled as a souvenir. Now she
would like to have Uncle Sain
buy it and has petitioned the
courts to authorize its sale to
the mint. ,.'



Claims Allowed


The following claims a
the city were passed and o
paid at the last regular im
of the city commissioners:
General Fund
M. P. Tomlinson .... :...$


*NEW YORK-(Special)-Ger.
trude Ederle, famed Channel
Swimmer, who has made a gal-
lant comeback from illness, is one
of the stars in Billy Rose's million
dollar Aquacade at the New York
World's Fair. Trudie has been
splashing around in the pool of
the New York State Amphitheatre
with Johnny Weismuller and Ele-
anor Helm for the. entertainment
of more than a million customers
-so far.

TAiN fl ci_ U


against
ordered
meeting


7) ~srr


the neighborhood of Wewahitchka.
Line crows of the St. Joe Tele-
phono & Telegraph company wer-
ber of buildings long tire river-
wor:'king all day Sunday and part
b. Monday repairing damage to
the lines of the company ana re-
storinug communication with the
outside world.
Damage At Apalachicola
The storm done more damage
at .Apalachicola than at any other
point, tearing roofs from a num-
front, pounding boats against the


150.00


Troy Jones .............. 125.00
M. O. Freeman ........... 110.u
A. H. Matthews ........ 22.50
W. B. Dykes ............ 60.00
D. Johnson .............. 37.5o
E. C. Lewis ............. 25.00
B. W Eells, Jr. .......... 110.00
W. D. Dare .............. 83.00
B. W. Eells ............ 10.00
B. A. Pridgeon .......... 10.00
J. L. Sharit ............. 10.00
Estelle Dickens .......... 5.0O
L. J. Drexler, auditor .... 4.9t
n. G. Lewis & Sons ..... 16.79
Eureka Fire Hose Co. ... 100.00
Byrd Parker ............. 64.40
E. C. Lewis .............. 5.00
W. D. Dare, elec. permits 5.00
Black Cat Cafe .......... 19.50
J. L. Sharit ............. 48.00
Pace Company ........... 8.76
H & W B Drew Co. ...... 2.32
R. A. Gray .............. 4.00
J. R. Hunter ........... 21.50
City of Port St. Joe ..... 13.43
St. Joseph Telephone Co. 7.30
Florida Power Corp. .... 64.26
St. Joe City Treasury ... 260.44
The Sentinel ............ 1.38
St. Joe Motor Co. ........ 21.73
Standard Oil Co. ........ 86.99
St. Joe Texaco Station 84.11
St. Joe Hardware Co ... 138.00
Police Department ...... 16.79
Water and Sewer Fund
Florida Power Corp. .....$ 219.48


Try THIS for Malay
When Malaria hits you ot
family this year, get a ibu
Wintersmith's Tonic th: ,t '-,:'
intersmith's has been prvern ay
over 70 years of use. It has helped
thousands upon thousands of psAo
pie. Ask for Wintersmith's by
name. If your dealer doesn't-stocl
it, he can get it for you. Ask himz'

WINTEBSMITH'S

TONIC


We Are Giving


DOUBLE GOLD




STAMPS


on all new or re-

newal subscriptions

paid during the re-

mainder of August







THE STAR

"Your Home Town Newspaper"


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>










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PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


PHONE 51


S Amount iMen neat Snarks City Service Garage .... o.2
-Description Delinquent Tax Gulf Oil Corp. ........... 44.1t
Lots nine and eleven in In a Fi t t oe Lbr. & Export Co. 40.04
Block forty-one ..........$35.75 F Sea Fight isher Stinson Hdw. Co... 16.44
Lot five in Block fifty-eight 2.91
Lotsone and B three 291 LONDON.-Three men had nar- Gulf Hdnv. & Supply Co... 144.30
Block sixty-three ........ 4.32 row escapes when a school of 50 St. Joe Lumber Co. ..... 30.24
Lot twenty-three in Block basking sharks surrounded their St. Joe City Treasury .... 57.72
one thousand and one ... 18.03 boat and one of them hurled 1l W. D. Dare, insp. fees .. 2.00
Ls eleven ad thouen out of the water, off Peninver, six St. Joe Hardware Co. ... 23.58
In Block one thousand
and two ................. 12.38 miles from Campbelltown, Argyll-
Lot twenty-three in Block shire, Scotland.
one thousand and three .. 15.05 Blinded by water, Hugh Cam- SSI A S
Lot twenty-seven in Block the hung
one thousand and three .. 32.91
Lot eighteen in Block one wheel and brought the boat back
thousand and four ....... 2.34 to an even keel. Struggling to REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
-All of the above lots and blocks beat the sharks, the three men
being in accordance with the of- managed to reach land. TWO COTTAGES FOi SALE
ficial map of the City of Port St. "We had not got far out when Waterfront
Joe, Florida, on ile in t office "We had not got far out when t ro
of the Clerk of the Circuit Court the Maggie (tihteir motor-fishing Fie rooms (two bedrooms) and
of Gulf County, Florida. boat) was surrounded by sharks, btcht (complete). Front and back
In addition to the amounts set 40 or 5'0 of them," Cameron sid. annd e eee Electric lightswater
opposite the said parcels of land,and water.
in the foregoing schedule, interest "Suddenly a fin appeared right $1450 EACH
and penalties as provided by law in front of us, and I saw a shark TERMS-$200 down and balance
on such delinquent taxes, to- rising to the surface' underneath at $20 month. Interest at 5%
gether with the cost and expenses the boat. $1350 CASH
of this suit, are sought to be en- "I could have touched it with Lot Size 50 by 90 feet
forced and foreclosed.
You are hereby notified to ap- my hand. I swung the Maggie
pear and make your defenses to around, but the propeller was FOR SALE-First 10 lots in Ben-
said Bill of Complaint on or be- struck by the shark, and we were der Addition at 20% reduction
fore the 4th day of Septembr the whar n we we Investigate this before buying!
A. D. 1939, and if you fail to do lunJ. L. KERR, theater Realtor
so on or belgre said date, the Bill ---- J.. KERR, Realtor
will be taken as confessed by you A LITTLE HIGH Port St. Joe, Florida
and you wil be barred from there- A bill asking $5000 for digging a FOR RENT
after contesting said suit, and said
parcels of land will be sold by de- grave was ruled "a little high" by
cree of said Court for nonpayment a county judge in Sterling, Il., UWFURNISHED 9 by 18-fpet cab-
of said tases, interest and penal- who allowed the estate of the de- ins; cod id o.r heMd Anp des;
ties thereon and the cost of this ceasedgood water; $4 month-. Apply St.
suit; and that this Order be pub- Joe Lu ber Co. 1-2j2tf
listed in "The Star," a newspaper -*
published in Gulf County. Florida, STRAIGHT AND NARROW ROOMS FOR RENT
once a week for four consecutive A negro was being examined for FOR RENT Two-room .apart-
weeks.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, Ia driver's license. He was asked, ment with private entrance.
have hereunto set my hand and "What is the red kne In the Mrs. Ada Jones. 1*
affixed the official seal of said mildle of the road for?"
Court, this 28th day 'of July, A. D. "Fo' bicycles," he replied. IF T"iO ha a rpom for ernt,
1939. ___why not place a classified a* -
4Cireuit Coupt J. R. HUNTER, tipmeant in The Star. The cot is
Seal) Clerk of said Court. Airplane pilots ae teed for loW and returns alp grat-ing...
8-4 9-1 physical fitness every 90 days. Try it today. t(


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PORT S. JOE FLORIDA

-- I


STORM STRIKES CITY docks and flooding lose .ree-:
Sbordering on the river. A a.irt
(Contjnued from Page 1) thle upper section of a s' r.
station on Reid avenue was blown dwelling was blown off and sev-
down, the large Gulf sign in front eral large trees uprooted.
of Little's service station was up-I At Panama City damage was
rooted and a number of other mostly to signs, trees and the
signs' torn from their fastenings, city ball park, where light stan-
but all could b-e repaired at little dards and a section of the ft~nce
cost. were blown down.
In some areas of this section
considerable timber was felled by Save money by read; I- j a
thei :.:'on winds, particularly n --


__~Trl ~ ~_ T-- ------- ---


I~_L_~_________~__________1________~~1_1


~Cat~a~-----b-~aar~


FRIDAY\, AUGUST 18,~f


4,,.


PAGE SIX