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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00144
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: July 21, 1939
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00144

Full Text





The Star-Florida's fastest grow-
ing little newspaper--dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St Joe.


THE


STAR


Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,00'
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fas: ?
- est growing little city. In
the heart.of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY., FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JULY 21, 1939


Major Barnett EveniBeaut Cone Predicts

To Speak Before Prosperity For

Townsend Club Entire State

One of the Most Popular Lec- Says Florida Is On Threshhold of
turers on the American Mighty Bright Future For All
Platform Today Parts of Commonwealth


At the regular meeting of the
Port St. Joe Townsend club hl':'I
last Friday at the Legion hut. it
was decided to have Major A. E.
Barnett of Tallahassee deliver an
address at the meeting of theclubi
this evening.
Major Barnett has been foi
many years one of the most poppu-
lar lecturers on the Americar.
platform. Probably no man spolk-
to more men of the American an-
British forces in the World War
than he. For several years he was
privileged to serve as grand nor
tor-of the Florida Grand Loage-.
F.'& A. M. He has also been an
-Ative leader in civic, educational.
chamber of commerce and re-
ligious work. At the present time
he is field representative in -his
*section for the Florida State
Chamber of Commerce.
At last Friday's meeting of ile-
club several musical numbers
were presented and an amusing
,dialogue was given by F. J. Corbln
and Mrs. Willie Ola Martin.
Buddy McLin gave an intere.t-'
ing. talk on what a wonderifl-
thing ,the Towutn-d plan would
be and urged that all members
:should pull together aand electi
men to public office who wonull
work for the plan and put it over.
J. L. Kerr, president of the lo-
cal club, received a letter this
week from J. H.. Phifer in regard
to the Townsend club .coffee
which is to be sold to help fl-
*nance the plan, in which he
stated: "If all inquiries and or-
ders coming through is any bar-
ometer as to the bigness of the
business, it will be a huge suc-
cess. I have had inquiries and
orders from some 18 states al-
ready, from as far east as New
Hampshire and as far west as
Portland, Oregon." He extended
congratulations to the new Port
St. Joe club.
All members of the club are re-
quested to be present at tonight's
meeting, as well as anyone inter-
ested in the Townsend movement,
to hear Major Barnett. In addition
a minstrel skit will be presented
and W. F. Pohler will take a pic-
ture of the gathering which will
be sent to the Townsend Weekly
for publication.


War On Dog Fly

To Start Soon

U. S. Bureau of Entomology To
Open Laboratory At
Panama City

Avery S. Hoyt, acting chief of
the United States Bureau of En-
tomology and Plant Quarantine at
Washington, D. C., has arranged I
for discontinuance on September
1 of the federal entomological
laboratory at Valdosta, Ga.. t
Hoyt said shortage of funds T
made the rdtrenciment necessary. t
The personnel is to be shifted to
Panama City, whe;-r investigation $
of the dog fly in this section is 5
to be undertaken with a special r
appropriation of $6500. t
The war on the Gulf tick, pre- t
viously carried on at Valdosta, is n
to be continued at Panama City. r


I .


Striking night photograph of
the statue, "The Evening Star,"
silhouetted against the 400-foot
Tower of the Sun at the 1939
Golden Gate International Ex-
position, on Treasure Island in.
San Francisco Bay.


Hunters Kill

Bear At Niles

Three ,Hundred Pound Bruin Is
Exhibited On Streets
Of This City


A new era of prosperity for the


Entire state of Florida was pre-
dicted last Saturday by Governor
Fred P. Cone.in a speech at Lake
City.
The governor also pledged con-
tinued economies in state govern-
Iment and declared the people of
Florida are now "eating high on
Sthe hog," because of better eco-
nomic conditions in the state.
.He denied that the state's fn-
nancial structure is weakening,
but to the contrary. Florida is on
the threshold of a-, "mighty
bright future for all parts of this
great commonwealth," he told his
listeners.
"I want to say that the state Is
cnt five or six million dollars in
the red, as some folks would like
to make you believe," said Cone.
"The state is in pretty good shapu,
I think, and I am proud of it.
"I don't believe in spending
money we haven't got, and 1
wouldn't let acts the legislature
passed, to spend more- money, be-
come laws.. I did a great many
rhinz d ing'irr -.te.-last s.-sMlon of
the legislature I'did not like to do.
I don't like to. veto anything the
legislature does, but I had to in
this session. You know as well as
I do that you can't swim if you
haven't any water, and you just
simply can't spend money when
you haven't got any.
"We have got to live on what
we have, and that's all there is to
it. We are not going to raise
taxes, or put any more tax bur-
dens on the backs of the people.
We have all we can stand now."

Planting Bass

In Dead Lakes


Many Fish to Be Shipped


Supporting the statement that Truck to Other Parts
Gulf county is "Florida's last fron- Of the State
tier." a black honey bear esti-
mated to weigh in the neighbor- Bass from the fish hatchery at
hood of 300 pounds. was brought Wewahitchka are scheduled to go
into town Tuesday by Ben Scott. into the Dead Lakes beginning
George Patton and E. B. Young. Monday, according to T. B. Dowl-
I Mr. Scott sighted the bear near ing, manager of the local state
his home and took a shot at it. hatchery. Dr. I. N. Kennedy, state
He then got Mr. Patton and his executive secretary, nas issued or-
bear dogs and the bruin was ders that the black bass should
trailed into the swamp near Mike ')e ready to be removed fromn the
Smith's chicken ranch at Niles. hatchery and a great man" of the
where it was run down- by the '"'") yurnrgll-t vWi'l I~ dis-
dogs and shot by the three -'-ibhute in the waters of the 30
hunters. v;uare miles of the Dead Lak"s.
The bear was loaded on a truck Specific direc::3ns concerning
and brought into Port St. Joe, distribution of the bass have not
where it was viewed by many. been received, but the fish are old
----- ---- and large enough to be on their
LIQUOR TAX NETS own. now. During their stay at
FLORIDA $4,433,689 Wewa the young bass have been
--fed on chubs. The chubs, 100,000
According to figures just re- in number, were transported from
leased by the United States De- the Kissimmee river in South
apartment of Commerce, Florida's Florida, and have multiplied
ihare of the $317,786,828 taken in rapidly since they have been in
taxes-by state and local govern- the two ponds where the bass
nments last year from alcoholic have been feeding on them.
beverages was. $4,433,689. Mr. Dowling, superintendent of
State license fees brought in. 'he hatchery, has as his expert in
;373,167 and state ABC taxes $3,- the fish kingdom, Hugh Garrett,
564,049, making the state's gross who lives on the 160-acre farm
eceipts $3,937,216. ABC adminis- owned by th-e state of Florida.
native and collections costs came Many of the bass'will be shipped
o $178,527, leaving net ABC reve- by refrigerated trucks to other
tue of $3,758,689. Local ABC reve- parts of the state. Gulf County
:ues amounted to $675,000. Breeze.


Engineers Recommend


Apalachicola System


Road Opening Development of Waterway To
r Provide Low-Cost Transpor-
SDate Changed stationn and Electric Power

From Sunday to Wednesday, July COST IS SET AT $36,524,000
26. to Take Advantage "
Of Half Holiday Port St. Joe Would Benefit
To Large Extent From
Date of holding the celebration Imports and Exports:
marking opening of the newly-
paved Panama City-Wewahitchka The United Stat2s board of en-
highway has been changed from
highSunday, July 23,beento Wednesda from gineers for rivers and- harbors, in
Sunday, July 23, to Wednesday, r
July 26, due to the fact that the reporting on the Apalachicola,
greater part of the business or- Chattahoochee and Flint rivers
organizations in both- Gulf and Bay improvement project this week,
counties observe a half-holiday concurred generally "in the view
each Wednesday during th'e sum- that comprehensive development
mer months.
Site of th-ceebration will be of the Apalachicola and of its ma-
Site of the-celebration wili be
at Sandy Creek, which is approxi- jor tributaries, the Chattahoochee
mately half way between the two and the Flint, is justified in the
county seat cities and motorcades combined interest of low -cost
from the two cities wif meet transportation and of hydro-elec-
there. The 'cade for Gulf county tric power generation," and re-
will leave Wewahitchka at 2:30 p. ferred to the district engineer's,
m., which w;il give a half hour to indication that a "substantial vol-
drive to Sandy Creek, where ctt- ume of bulky commodities is yu-
ting of the ribbon marking open-' tentially, available to enter into
ing of the highway is. scheduled commerce if low.eost trahsporta-
"or 3 o'clock. tion can be. provided.'
Fuller Warren of .llacsonvnlle The hoard recommended that a
,has -Aceepted a iInvitation lo a. pr-hesive plan 't im-prov
as speaker of the day. Scb 6it b ado'pf-d .iud "uierr -?rr
bands from both .ounlies- will par- rloresitIIly to serve the increas-
ticipate in the.::,-ivities. includ- nE needs of commercee and indus-
ing the. Port St. Joe high :school try.
band. Chief of Engineers Approves
E. Clay Lewis of this city will Major General J.' L. Schley,
act as master of ceremonies .for chief, of engineers, gave his ap-
the celebration, and Senator J. L. proval to the recommendation of
Sharit of Port St. Joe has been the board which called for a
named as speaker for Gulf county. ,depth of nine feet to Columbusto


be made possible by the construc-
tion of five dams in the Chatta-
hoochee and one dam just below
the confluence o the Chattahoo-
chee and Flint rivers, .- .-"
Two reservoirs will be required,
one each in the heaewa-ers of the
Chattahoochee and Flint, to regu-
late flows and assure a nine-foot
depth in the Apalachicola and a


At the regular meeting of the somewhat lesser depth in the
board of directors of the Port St. Flint..
Joe Chamber of Commerce held The cost of the proposed de-
Tuesday evening at Port Inn, velopment is estimated at $36,-
the various projects under way by 524,000, but it was determined
the chamber were brought up for that the savings in transportation
considerable discussion, costs, the sale of power, and the
SIt was brought out that the improvement of value to national
body is in better financial condi- defense, to recreational use, and
tion than it has been for some to land worth, would exceed the
time and that the drive to collect annual carrying charges.
back dues from delinquent mem- Immediate Construction
bers is meeting with considerable The chief of engineers recon-
success. mended that the project be de-
The port development commit- veloped by providing first for the
tee met with the directors and. reasonable needs or existing con-
ways and means were discussed (Continued on Page 4)
of improving port facilities and --
of getting the most out of the fa- Gasoline Fund
cilities already available.
One new member, R. F. Outlaw, Goes to Court
was admitted to membership in
the chamber.
---- ---- Florida Supreme Court to Decide
FIREMEN'S BALL TO BE Whether Road Department
NEXT FRIDAY EVENING Will Get Lion's Share
-I
The regular monthly dance of, The Florida supreme court will
the Port St. Joe Volunteer Fire decide whether the state road de-
Department will be held Friday apartment will get the lion's share
night, July 28, at the Centennial of thousands* of dollars of gaso-
auditorium, with music furnished line revenue credited to counties
by Bill Farmer's orchestra. when a new distribution law be-
The Fire Queen for the dance came effective.
will be Miss Kathleen Nedley. Justices directed that the state
---- board of administration show,
Tom Owens has accepted a po- cause by July 27 why it should
sition with the St.'Joe Lumber & not pay to the road department 80
Export company. (Continued on Page 6)


VOLUME II


NUMBER 40


C. of C. Directors

Discuss Projects

Port Development and Finances
Of Chamber Are Taken
Up At Meeting





NUMBER 40


i








, THE STAR,. PORT ST. JGE, GULF CO.i;iTY;' FLORIDA ..JL


YE ED PINCH HITS FOR
SOCIETY EDITOR
Due to the fact that our so-
ciety editor, Mrs. Laneta Da-
vis, found it necessary to take
her son, Carlysle, to a Dothan
hospital for treatment, your
editor this week donned the
society mantle and put forth
his best efforts to drag in all
-social items of importance. If
we have overlooked any items
please blame it to our inex-
perience along this line-we
never did amount to much as
a social butterfly, anyway.

-,MRS. FILLINGIM HOSTESS
TO BAPTIST CIRCLE
The Mary Circle of the Baptist
6hurch iret Monday afternoon at
the: home of Mrs. M. J. Fillingim
`o6n Si::th street,' with Mrs. O. F.
Powell, circle chairman, in charge.
Following .the Bible study, which:
.-gas conducted by the chairman,
4it was voted to present Mrs. .J.
SW. Sisemore with a birthday gift
on her birthday, which was Tues-
,day.
A social hour followed the meet-
,ng,, at which time the hostess
served delicious refreshments to
the members present.

KENNEYS ENTERTAIN,
WITH BUFFET SUPPER
Mr and Mrs. Basil E. Kenney,
Sr., entertained with a buffet sup-
per Sunday evening, having ,a
their guests Wilson Compton. of
'Washington, D. C., Mr. and Mrs.
Teddy Boisfontaine of New Or-
leans, Mr. and .Mrs. Tom Neal of
Brewron,. Ala.I. and Mr. and Mrs.
ierbert Beri::es of New Orleans.'

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS
Born, Friday, July 14, 1939 at
Wakulla, a son to Mr. and Mrs.
Edgar Strange of Port St. Joe.
Born-Monday, July 10, 1939, to
Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Covington
of Niles, a son.

Mrs. S. C. Johnson of Highland
View is spending this week in
Tallahassee.

Mr. and Mrs. Mark Fleischel,
Jr., of Jacksonville and Mr. anA
Mrs. Ellis Crosby of Shamrock
were guests over the week-end of
Mr. and Mrs. Basil E. Kenney, Sr.

J. C. Brown and Mac Ruff of
Shamrock, Fla., are business visi-
tors in the city.

Mr. and Mrs. P. C. Palmer and
daughter, Jane, of Jacksonville
were dinner guests Monday of Mr.
and Mrs. J. O. Baggett.


FLOWERS AND

CORSAGES


WOOD FIBRE FLOWERS
that cannot be told from the
best product of Mother Nature.
. And they keep indefi-
nitely. If they become droopy
you merely place them in the
refrigerator and in a brief time
they are as good as new.
SEE


Mrs. W. S.
STAR OFFICE


Smith
PHONE 51


At the Churches

MULLER TO DELIVER SERMON
Services will be held at 11:00
o'clock Sunday morning at the
Episcopal church at which. time
Howard Muller from Camp Weed
will deliver the sermon.

DR. MOORE TO PREACH'
Dr. E. C. Moore, district super-
intendent of the Mariannla District
of the iM.ethodist Church, will
preach at the Methodist church
next Sunday night.
The sermon subject announced
for that evening will be, post-
poned until Sunday night, August
13-the sermon subject adver-
tised for that night beifg can-
celled.

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Rev. H. F. Beaty Minister
10:00 a. m.-Sunday School.
- 11:00. a. m.-Preaching service..
.,8:00 p. m.,' second and fourth
Sundays-Evening services.t
Rev. Beaty will preach in, We-
,wahitchka the first Sunday night.
at 7:30 o'clock, and in Liberty
county the third Sunday night.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. J. W. Sisemore, Minister
9:45 a. m.-Sunday School.
11i:00 a. m.-Morning Worship.
.7:00 p. m.-B. Y. P. U.
8:00 p. m.-Preaching service.
11 M. U., Monday, 3:00 p. m.
Prayermeeting Wednesday, 7:30 p.
m.-: Teachers meeting, Thursday,
7:,30. p. m.

ASSEMBLY OF GOD
-. Rey. ,E. T. Corbin, Pastor
Full-time services
10:15 a. m.-Sunday Schbool.
11:00 a. m.-Preaching Service.
.7:30 p. m.-Evangelistic service.
Prayermeeting every Wednesday
night.

St. JAMES EPISCOPAL
Rev. Glion Benson, Rector
10:00 a. m.-Church School.
Services first and third Sunday
nights at 7:30.
Communion service fourth Sun-
day mornings at 7:30.

METHODIST CHURCH
D. E. Marietta, Minister
Services Every Sunday
10:00 a. m.-Churcn School.
11:00 a.m.-Morning worship.
7:30 p. m.-Evening worship.

MARTHA CIRCLE MEETS
WITH MRS. D. W. SMITH
The Martha Cihcre of the Bap-
tist church met Monday at the,
home of Mrs. D. W. Smith. The
meeting was opened with prayer
by Mrs. E. C. Cason, followed by
the devotional ana prayer by Mrs.
Hunt. Minutes of the previous
meeting were read and approved,
The roll was called with ten regu-
lar members, one new member,
Mrs. J. E. Pridgeon, and one visi-
tor, Mrs. L. W. Owens, present.
Personal 'service was taken by
Mrs. Daughtry and directed per-
sonal service was discussed for
July. Bible study was conducted
by Mrs. E. D. Deney and the meet-
ing was then dismissed with
prayer by Mrs. J. W. Sisemore.
During the social hour which
followed the business session, the
hostess served chocolate cake,
lemonade and iced tea to all pres-
ent.
The next meeting will be a
Royal Service program Monday at
the church with the Lydia circle
in charge.

William Hurlbut of Albany, Ga.,
visited over the week-end with
Mr. and Mrs. Miles Hurlbut.

Betty Sue McPhaul visited this
week in Tallahassee with her
mother, Mrs. Thomas McPhaul,
who is attending summer session
at F. S. C. W.


KENNINGTON-THOMPSON. *
NUPTIALS SUNDAY
Brooks Kennington, son of Mr.
and Mrs. G. L. Kennington of this
city, and Miss Lillian Thompson
of Attalia, Ala., were united in
wedlock last Sunday morning at 7
o'clock at t he 'First Baptist
church, Rev. J. W. Sisemore per-
forming the ceremony. Only im-
mediate members of the families
and a few friends were present.
Miss Jane Stebel was the only
attendant of the bride, and An-
drew Martin acted asbest man.
The bride, who is well known
here, having taught for some time
in' the local schools, is a graduate
of the Troy, Ala., high school and
the College of Commerce, Bowl-
ing Green, Ky. The groom is a
er.diiaate. of the Pelham, Ga., high
ichiool.
Tile 'yoJbire couple left for Fort
Walton immediately following the
.cer-niony, where they will spend
a .:rie._ honeymoon. They will
make their home in this city upon
their return. where M. Kenning-
ton is. itployed4 by the Quality
grocery.'f.,

METHODIST CIRCLES
IN JOINT MEETING
The Marie Jones and Susannah
Wesley Circles of the Methodist
church. met Monday afternoon at
ihe church in a joint meeting.
Mrs. A. M. Jones, vice-president,:
presided.
Following the regular opening:
de:otional 'and a .brief business
.session, .Mrs. Roy Gibson gave a;
(complete review o~ the recently
completed study book, "The;
Church Takes Root In India."
Ain 'exceptionally good attend-!
ancei was present.

BAPTIST TRAINING
UNION TO MEET HERE
Members of the executive and.
planning committees of the North-
west Coast Baptist Training Union
will meet at the First Baptist
church here Sunday afternoon at
3:30 o'clock.
Plans for study courses to be
presented in the churches of the
district will be worked out at this
meeting, as well as plans for the
annual meeting next October.


Stanley Hidalgo has returned to
his home here from New Orleans
where he was a patient in the
Baptist Ihospital following an ap-
pendectomy.

Mrs. Lee and Mrs. Charles'
Crawford of Highland. View are
visiting with relatives in North
Carolina.

Lawrence Brown of Mobile and
Walter C. Sherman of Panama
City were business visitors Wed-
nesday in Port St. Joe.

Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Fillingim of
Telogia and Mr. and Mrs. J. E.
Fillingim of dampbellton were
guests Sunday of Mr. and Mrs. M.
J. Fillingim.

Joe Hauser was called to Mari-
anna this week due to the illness
of his father. M. Hauser, who
was taken to a Thomasville, Ga.,
hospital for an operation.

L. W.' Owens returned Tuesday
from a three-day business trip to
Americas, Ga.

Mr. and Mrs. J. Lamar Miller
and Mrs. Roy E. Williams and
small son returned Tuesday from
a visit in Fitzgerald and Douglas,
Ga.

Mrs. Horace Soule and son,
Hoppe, returned Wednesday from
.1 two weeks' visit to Savannah,


Society Personals Churches

LANETA DAVIS; Editor
( ;* ..- ,


p~Frr~s~emrae~rrb


THEATRE:

OPENS
DAILY
2:45
Continuously


.*


VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL
HAS GOOD ATTENDANCE
The daily vacation Bible school
at the Presbyteran church -has-
started, off. with a good attend-
ance and new children are' 'enter-
ing every day. All denominatiofis
are cordially invited to come ana
share in the study and play.
The school will be continued
through next week, ending Friday,
July 28, with a special program.
Hours of the school are from 8:30
to 11 a. m. Miss Helen Pember-
ton of Tampa is directing the
school.

ALABAMIANS ENTERTAIN
AT SUMMER HOME
Mr. and Mrs. Tom Neal of
Brewton, Ala., entertained with a
house party last week at their
summer home on Palm Island.
Guests were Mr. and Mrs. Teddy
Boisfontaine of New Orleans, Wil-
son, Compton of Washington, D.i
C., and Mr. and Mrs. Herbert'
Berckes of New Orleans.

Mrs. Norman Brown and chil-
dren returned Tuesday to -their
home in Pensacola arter spending
a' week here as'the guests of Mr.
and Mrs. Basil Kenney, Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. 'Harry Towson of
Gainesville are visiting for two
weeks with their son-in-law and
daughter. Mr. and Mrs. Tommy
Owens.


THEATRE

OPENS

Saturday 1:15

Sunday 1:45


*


SUNDAY-MONDAY-JULY 23-24
THEY LIVED THE STRANGEST STORY IN ALL HISTORY!


BRIAN AHERNE Claude Rains John Garfield
DONALD CRISP JOSEPH CALLEIA GILBERT ROLAND
GALE SONDERGAARD HENRY O'NEILL

Disney Cartoon Latest News Events


TUESDAY, JULY 25


AMATEUR


NITE

Plus-

LEO CARILLO
in

"The Girl and

the Gambler"

Added Joy -
News 'March of Time'


WEDNESDAY, JULY 26
THE BOUNTY HITS
AGAIN!!

Clark Gable

Charles Laughton

Franchot Tone


'Mutiny On


the Bounty'


"NICK'S COFFEE POT"


Thursday-Friday-July 27-28
TASTY BUT TORRID!
DIGNIFIED BUT DYNAMITE!
FIREY BUT FRANTIC!

IT'S AS SPICY AS A SHOWGIRL'S DIARY!


NEWS


Comedy "GUATEMALA"


tAqE,;:T /..


REV. SISEMORE'TO' ATTEND
BAPTIST WORLD ALLIANCE
Rev. J. Wi.' Sisemore, pastor .of
the. First Baptist .church expects
to leave Monday for Atlanta, Ga..
where he will attend the Baptist
World Alliance. This is the sixth
meeting of the Alliance and the
first to be held in the United
States since 1911.
Baptist workers and. preachers
from all over the world will be
present at the convention, and
Rev. Sisemore will meet his
father in Atlanta. The elder Rev.
Sisemore is well known here, hav-
ing conducted a revival at the lo-
cal church last summer.

Mr. and Mrs. Dave Kadish of
Chicago visited yesterday with
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Hauser. Mrs.
Kadish is Mr. Hauser's sister.



EYES EXAMINED





Glasses fitted when needed
Made In Our Own Laboratory
All.Work Unconditionally
Guaranteed
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 6 p. m.

DR. G. T. NEWBERRY
OPTOMETRIST .
PANAMA CITY, ,FLA. \


I


I


-'FrlbAY,, JUL-Y 21" 1939






FRIAY JUY 1,193 TE TAR PRTST.JO, ULFCONT, FORDAPAG TRE


Ice Man Credits Star

And Shopper With Jump

In Ice and Ice Box Sales


Across World's Fair Lagoon


DRUNK TALE
A lady entered an elevator fol-o
lowed by a couple of drunks.
"Floors, please," said the opera-
tor.
"Five," said the lady.
"Shix," said the first drunk, and
"Shix," said the second drunk.
The first drunk nudged his part-
ner. "Your hat," he whispered.
"Shix and a half," said the sec-
ond drunk.


DR. 'J C. COE
DENTIST --
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port-St. Joe

, --,----------.--V '
We have the
EXCLUSIVE
AGENCY
for


Bruce's


Juices
ORANGE
GRAPEFRUIT
TOMATO

We Deliver
O, O Order


SOLOMON'S

DAIRY
IVEY VANLANDINGHAM,
Local Representative



REAL ICE
IS HEALTHY and
SAFE


REAL ICE
IS MORE
Economical


Low cost and guaranteed
purity make REAL Ice more
economical and serviceable.
Daily deliveries give you t.he
best guarantee of satisfaction
PHONE 47
ST. JOE ICE
COMPANY
MAX KILBOURN, Prop.


Complete Coverage Given By Two
Papers Sells Boxes and Ice
For Max Kilbourn
If you don't believe that adver-
tising in The Star and the St. Joe
Shopper brings results, just ask
Max Kilbourn, owner of the St.
Joe Ice Company and distributor
for Bohn ice refrigerators.
"Thanks to the forceful adver-
tisements run for me In The Star
and the St. Joe.Shopper, which
gives complete coverage of the
area we serve with ice, our sales
,of Bohn air-conditioned refrigera-
tors and ice has yumpeds notice-
ably during the past two months
over the same period last year,"
said Mr. Kilbourn, -'and I am more
than gratified -with the 'results
obtained from my advertising ex-
penditure."
Thie St. Joe Ice Company is one
of the most modern in this section
of Florida and is capable of car-
ing for the needs of this city for
many years to come. Their ice is
made from pure water and is de-
livered right to the door by ,a
fleet of delivery trucks.
The Bohn line of air-conditioned
refrigerators handled by the com-
pany are the finest made. All
models are well insulated with an
approved insulation and are guar-
anteed to hold foods at proper
temperatures. These refrigerators
give foods the very essential
health protection by providing re-
frigeration with pure crystal ice
only. The original freshness of
vegetables and fruits is preserve
and the moving chilled fresh air
prevents flavors from Interming-
ling and stagnating. The first pur-
chase cost Is low-and all there
is. There is no upkeep expense.
HOPEFUL
Johnnie was in the habit of
coming to the table with dirty
hands. Though he was always sent
to wash them, he kept repeating
the offense. Finally his mother
lost patience.
"Johnnie," she said, "why do
you persist, week in and week
out, in coming to the table with
dirty hands? You know I always
send you away."
"Once you forgot," was the re-
ply of the boy.
-----------
Every ads carries a message-
a message that will save money.

For MAARIA
For over 70 years, thousands
upon thousands of people have
proven by their purchases that they
consider Wintersmith's the best
Tonic for Malaria. Wintersmith's
must be good-or else it wouldn't
be sold all over the South and in
21 foreign countries! If you have
Malaria, get a bottle today, and
follow the directions on the label.
WINTERSMITH'S

TONIC


It's Time To
DINE!!
Where the food is of the
best where the service
is prompt and efficient
and where you get
HOME COOKED
MEALS
-------------2
TRIANGLE
RESTAURANT
BEER and WINES ---


A "marine" view such as might be obtained at a beautiful lake is this pleasant vista of the Cali-
fornia State Building and colonnades at the 1939 Golden Gate International Exposition. The view is
that seen over the Lake of the Nations, which lies between one of the main exhibit palaces and the
group of state and county structures.




k/nendenf Tests S4how


NHE



NO


TIRE IVYES



SKID STOPS


GOODRICH SILVERTOWN WINS AGAIN

SNON-SKID TESTS BY AMERICA'S LAR
INDEPENDENTT TESTING LABORATORY


QUICKESi





NIN IN)

GEST
Y^ ^-


0.No wonder this new Goodrich
Silvertown will stop you quicker,
safer qn a wet pavement than
You've ever stopped before. The
amazing Life-Saver Tread has a


The famous Pittsburgh Testing Laboratory
checked the regular and premium-priced tires of
America's six largest tire manufacturers to deter-
mine scientifically which tire gave greatest resist-
snce to skids.


windshield-wiper action that '
sweeps wet roads so dry you can
actually light a match on its
trackI Golden Ply blow-out pro-
tection, too-NO EXTRA COST I


HERE'S THE PROOF!
BEST LAST YEAR.Last year when the Life-Saver
Tread Silvertown was first introduced Pittsburgh Testing
Laboratory tested the regular and premium-priced tires of
America's six largest tire manufacturers. Here's their report:
"The new Goodrich Silvertown with the Life-
Saver Tread gave greater skid resistance
than any other tire tested including those tires
listed at from 40% to 70% higher in price."
PITTSBURGH TESTING LABORATORY
BEST THIS YEAR. Since then several of these tire
companies have put new tires on the market. Read how the
Life-Saver Tread stacks up against these new tires in addi.
tional non-skid tests under the same conditions.
"In the tests just completed the Goodrich
Silvertown with the Life-Saver Tread again
gave greater skid resistance than any other
new tire tested."
PITTSBURGH TESTING LABORATORY



i Goodrich&

SAFETY Silvertown
LIFE-SAVER TREAD .... GOLDEN PLY BLOW-OUT PROTECTION


ST. JOE MOTOR CO.


PHONE 37


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


___________ -. -~ ~UIW5~~ffi~MWM5,


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOF, r.ULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE THREE


FRIDAY, JULY 21, 1939








PAGE FOUR THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA FRIDAY, JULY 21, 1939


TRUTH IN STONE

THL E STA R Everyone admits these days the import-
ant part that inventors play in tiheprogress
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla., of this country. Occasionally, however, we
by The Star Publishing Company .
bare inclined to forget that the benefits of
W. S. SMITH, Editor individual inventors would be 'of far less
value and service if it were not for the pro-
SEntered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida, tection proVided by the patent laws and the
under Act of March 3, 1879. United States patent office.
The fact that those laws insure a fair re-
Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance ward for work well done has done.mch to
ward for work well done has done.much to
One Year........$2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months..........65c stimulate research and invention. The result
has been the development of new products,
-4 Telephone 51 -- which in their turn provide new jobs and
payrolls, and offer moie comforts and con-
The spoken word is given scant attention; veniences to all of us.
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed To those :who are inclined to ignore the
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word contribution of the patent system to this
is lost; the printed word remains.
process, a visit to the patent office in Wash-
ington is recommended. Therc, chiseled in
WAR CLOUD HAS SILVER LINING stone, over the door, the doubter will be able
The old saying has it that.every cloud has, to read these immortal words of Abraham
a silver lining, and Japan's "undeclared" war Lincoln:
cloud that has been hanging over China for THE PATENT SYSTEM ADDED THE
some time has a silver lining for the infant FUEL OF INTEREST. TO THE
tung oil industry in the United States which FIRE OF GENIUS
had its beginning in Florida. And that's truth in lasting stone that is
Imports of tung oil to this country, the'well worth pondering!
greater part of which comes from China,
amount to about 140;000,000,pounds annually. We have heard if said that even if a man
The oil is used extensive in paints and var- were dropped down in the middle of a desert
nishes, as top-dressng for linoleun:s and oil island, without food or sustenance, he would
cloths, rain coats and all fabrics, for water- contrive to dig his thumb into the ground,
proofing and insulating wires in electric gen- plant seeds and live. This, in- itself, is the
erators and motors, in printers' inks, and most primitive example of initiative-the will
scores of other purposes, to live. Only the indolent who would rather
Japan is doing her best to curtail export starve than work and live would stand to
of tung oil from China, and as a consequence have their initiative taken from them. But
more attention is being paid to developing from the looks of things, that's what our
the. tung oil industry in\this country, and in government is going to do by developing a
Florida particularly. The. oil produced here system of paternalism through economic
is far superior to that coming from China, planning. Personally, we don't care' for any
and this point will do much to ultimately part of it.
place the American product ahead of the im-
ported oil. We have been reading of convicts going
So the war cloud in the orient is creating on a strike'unless they were.allowed to con-
a wonderful opportunity for the development tinue to buy silk underwear and have a bed-
on a large scale of the tung industry in time snack before retiring. If that's the
Florida and other parts of the South where way our penitentiaries are,.being conducted
the soil is suitable for the raising of tung we're .going to start seriously thinking of
trees. Not knowing a great deal of the na- turning to the crooked path, for the way
ture and habits of the tung tree, we couldn't things stack up now we're lucky to be able
say whether or not Gulf county is suitable to buy cotton underwear, not to mention silk
for growing them, but we have a hunch that ones:
the trees might be grown in the northern
part of the county. Ice cream-the luxury that everyone can
enjoy, old and young, rich and poor. This de-
We have been accused by Rev. D. E. Mari- licious dish is 88 years old this summer, and
etta of making false statements and have even though there are advocates of the home-
been requested to publish a retraction of an grown and the boughtenn" product, we wish
article appearing in these columns several it a happy birthday and trust that it will con-
weeks ago. It seems that we made the re- tinue in existence until the end of time.
mark that we were going to hear him de-
liver a sermon on something or other, even Florida interests are said to be trying to
if we had to go to church in our shirt sleeves popularize bread made largely ;of grapefruit.
during this hot weather-and then we failed First, we imagine, they'll have to convince
to put in an appearance. We tried to on- people it won't shirt when itten-Cincin-
vince thd minister that our intentions were nati Enquirer.
good, but he. came right back at us with the
fact that the road to hell is paved with good
intentions. We couldn't come right'out and A newspaper, to persons in communities
Other than its own, carries in its advertising
tell him that the reason we didn't show up
l him tha. the rso we didn't sow up columns, more so than in its news columns,
had something to do with fish, and so we
just had to i and take it on the chin an impression of what its -town really is.
just had to sit and take- it on the chin.

We were talking with a woman the other
A monthly expenditure for newspaper ad-
A m e f n clay whose husband is in prison, and she was
vertising should be regarded as just as essen-. i. r;
t or xllio ao11 u.1 lt him. ..11 She a. n fraid the


tial to a business as the renting of a place
in which to carry on that business.


President Roosevelt ordered 'Argentine
corned beef for the United States navy-and
discovered there's plenty of beef in congress.
--Boston Transcript.


Some folks expect a newspaper to be per-
fect and never make mistakes. Everybody
else makes mistakes, so we're entitled to that
privilege occasionally, too.


A bank clerk has written a comedy around
the sort of people he meets every day. It is
feared, however, that most of the characters
will be overdawfti.-Montreal Star.


vely canxlVLJ LtI L 111111. Ln WasYL CLell rla llk
pardon board would turn him loose.

One of our readers writes in to ask if a
lizard has two "z's." To which we reply:
We looked at one very carefully and still
don't know.

A friend of ours says he found out Sunday
what rural electrification is-kissing a coun-
try girl.

Christmas is just 'around the corner. We
received a box of sample Yuletide cards yes-
terday to show to our customers.

When asked the feminine of monk, Dumb
Dora replied that it must be monkey.


NeWS Item: American industry spends $750,000 each
working day for research to find new and better products.


DOG DAYS

It's time to muzzle the"'dog.
To prepare for another long
spell of rain.
To drink lemon sour each morn-
ing.
To put bonnets on the mules
and cows. to protect them from
the sun.
And time to quit work, get lazy
and go fishing.
The reason? "Dog Days" are'
at hand.
Now, actually, "Dog Days" have
nothing to do with dogs, and there
is no reason to climb a tree every
time a panting pooch comes your
way. Chances are he's only hot,
like yourself, and would appreci-
ate a cooling gulp of water.
"Dog Days" do come -n the hot-
test part of the year, however,
hence the showers, .the cooling
lemonade and the bonnets for
Maude and Boss). Also. why this
period is excellent for quitting
work and going nshing.
'The designation of this hot sea-
son as "Dog Days" is not a new
one, and the name comes from an
object said to be 50,000,000,000,000
miles away-the dog s:ar Sirius.
Sirius, or Canicuma (for those
who wish to get tec-nimcal about
this thing) is a star or tnle first
magnitude in the consteliaUon Ca-
nis Major. the heliacal rising of
which occurs in tneirnoLtest parts
of .the year, and which is respon-
sible for the name. "Dog Days"
Heliacal signifies 'to, or near,
the sun, and is* applied to those
risings and settings of a star
which are as nearly coincident
with those of thbe. en as can be
observed. The stars rise and set a
little earlier each successive day.
The first rising of a star each
year in time to be seen before
sunrise is described a- the "nelia-
ca? rising," and the last setting of
such a star which may be observed
after sunset is described as the
"holiacal setting."
From the time of a star's helia-
cal setting to the time of its helia-
cal rising and the last setting to
be seen, is a .period of 30 to 40
days. according to computations
of the ancients.
Various dates from July 3 to Au-
gust 15 have been assigned for
IThe first "Dog Day," and there
are, likewise, various durations
ranging from 30 tu 5-. ,ays.
Much has been written on the
subjectt. Even as far back as 400
n. C., Hippicrates had written
that "Dog Days" were in the hot-
test and most unhealthy part of
the summer.
Perhaps the m s t common


reckoning of "Dog Days-' now is
from July 3 to August 11, inclu-
sive.-Andalusia Star.
----
ENGINEERS RECOMMEND
APALACHICOLA SYSTEM

(Continued, from Page 1)
merce, undertaking now only such
work as may be.necessary to ex-
tend to Columbus and to Bain-
bridge the six-foot depth now au-
thorized for the Apalachicola, all
to be accomplished by the con-
struction of one Cam in the Ap-
alachicola, just below the junction,
and one at Fort Benning on the
Chattahoochee, at an estimated
cost of. $6,500,000. and an annual
maintenance charge of $200,000 in
addition to that now required.
Advantages to r'ort St. Joe
Development of the Apalachicola
system will mean much to Port St.
Joe and all of West Florida; An
effort is now being made to ex-
tend the services ane operations
of the Inland Waterways corpora-
tion barge service from Mobile to
Carrabelle, with service to Port
St. Joe through the recently com-
pleted canal connecting with the
inland waterway, and, upon com-
pletion of the Apalachicola and
tributaries improvement, that ser-
vice can be extended to Columbus
and Bainbridge.
Then, upon completion of con-
struction of the Carrabelle-Saint
Marks canal, all, oj -,Vest Florida
will be given the advantages of
cheap water transportation to and
from the .entire Gulf coast, the
Mississippi, Warrior and Chatta-
hoochee river system.
Port St. Joe, Apalachicola and
other Gulf ports will materially
benefit from the imports and ex-
ports to the Georgia-Alabama ter-
ritory.
-----k-------
DELICIOUS POTATO SALAD

Our grandmother used to sea-
son her potato salad with celery
seeds, which, in our opinion made
it most delectable.
Which reminds ps of one of our
boyhood chums who ate some of
this. salad. Upon returnmg home
he told his mother what he had
for lunch and saia:
"Why don't you ever make po-
tato salad with fleas in it, Ilie
Bill Smith's grandmother does?"
.- --- ----
SHOCK TO FATHER

Mrs. Jones: "I'm going to give
Jim a new lawn mower for his
birthday."
Mrs. Smith: "I imagine it will
be quite a surprise."
.Mrs. Jones: "It will be a de-
cided shock-he, thinks I'm going
to give him an easy chair."


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, JULY 21, 1939











"Juarez" Is Picture of "'"

Sweeping Proportions
~bgS~`I~IF~~~i~l~~jc~d:


'i l\-


50

Genuine Engraved

WEDDING

INVITATIONS
(Plate Included)

$8.95
With Envelopes

100 Engraved

'Visiting Cards

$2.00
(Plate Included)
66 Styles To Choose From

We Can Also Supply
Engraved
Business

Stationery
`CARDS
LETTERHEADS
ENVELOPES
ASK TO SEE SAMPLES


SMITH PRINTING
COMPANY
Phone 51 Port St. Joe
.*4-0 aa** ** .A


Miss Carolyn Stoutamire of Tal-
lahassee is visiting with Miss
Margie Smith.
Mrs. T. F. Mincey returned
Sunday from Sylvester, Ga., where
she visited for t}yo weeks with
Mr. and Mrs. G. S. Walker.
Steve McPhaul, who has been
spending some months in Tampa,
is in the city for a brief visit be-
fore returning to South Florida.
Read the 'ads-it pays!


F you never have it, just
be thankful. Headaches
take a lot of the joy out of
life for most of us.
If you suffer, as most of
us do, from an occasional
headache, take DR. MILES
ANTI-PAIN PILLS. You
will find them pleasant to
take and unusually prompt
and effective in action. Dr.
Miles Anti-Pain Pills are
also recommended for Neu-
ralgia, and for. Muscular
Pains.
Dr. Miles Anti-Pain Pills
'do not upset the stomach
nor leave you with a dopey,
drugged feeling.
At Your Drug Store:
125 Tablets 1.00
25 Tablets 25


"Juarez," playing next Sunday The story of "Juarez" begins at
Sand Monday at the Port theater, that period (1863) wnen French
is a picture, of sweeping propor- troops had occupied Mexico for
tions, about an idea. It dramatic- nearly two years in a vain effort
ally relates a triangular issue be- to collect loans made to the dic-
tween corrupt autocracy, Na- tator, Santa Anna, now deposed,
poleon III; kindly 'nut inept royal- for concessions and lands. Benito
ismi, Maximilian, and a theory of Juarez, who had established a
democracy, Juarez. constitutional democracy and was
There are stirring conflicts, now president, had declared a
movement of personages great moratorium on these debts; and
and small, glamours and shudders, now the wily Napoleon III was
pageanttry and politics, loves and weaving a web of international de-
hates-but the story is about de- sign, which resultcc :n .Maximilian
mocracy expounded ly Paul Muni von Hapsburg accepting the "nom-
as "Juarez" against a background nation" in response to a "plebis-
of historical coloraton pertaining cite" in Mhexico demanding an
to the Europe, but mostly the emperor.
Mexico, of three-quarters of a cen- From. these beginnings the ac-
tury ago. tion moves swiftly through blood-
The basic materials are history, drenched Mexico to tne inevitable
,but history dealt with in all the finale.
freedom accorded to the creative An entirely original musical
artist concerned with his special score accompanies the picture, in
purposes. Most apparent among; descriptive and interpretative to-
these elements of treatment is the nal background. When Carlota
stylized mantling of "Juarez" in prays at the wayside shrine of
Muni's role in the garb and mien the Virgin that she may bear a
of Abraham Lincoln. Critics will child to give as heir to the throne
call Muni's Lincolnesque "Juarez" of Mexico, her rervent petition
one of his most notable roles, soars on wings of lovely melody.
But in the opinion or many an When the grim, 'ragged troops of
obseryvr, Maximilian is the fat Juarez, on the march and singing
o'le, most abundantly laden with a rousing chanson, abruptly e-
human appeal, no part of which come mute when t'ney see the
Brian Aherne, who plays the part, corpses of their compatriots-vic-
fails to realize upon. tims of the Black. Decree-the
Bette Davis brings to the role ominous silence s eloquent In its
of Carlota, the empress, a sensi- poignant pathos.
tive, mobile perception of one of ---- ---
the most pathetic characters in Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Lister
history. The scene in which she and Miss Katherine Lister of Pen-
confronts Louis Napoleon and up- sacola were guests Sunday of Dr.
braids him in a fury of passion, and Mrs. A. L. Ward. Mr. Lister is
and finally goes Insane, is over- Mrs. Ward's brother.
whelming in its stark tragedy. fr 3*
** @e *e* *** W. T. Eidwards .oof Jacksonville
was in the city this week on
business.
.7-., *


The SAPOTE is a very i$,eresting trop-
ical fruit that grows well in the protected
areas of Southern Florida. The tree attains
huge size and its large leaves are a distinc-
tive feature often reaching a length of 12
inches, light green above and light brown
beneath. The brown fruits greatly, re-
semble a russet apple in.shape and have a
very firm reddish pulp with a somewhat
spicy but delicious taste. The fruit is
eaten fresh, and also used in making fine
sherbets and marmalades. .
By his capture of Pensacola in 1781, the


distinguished GALVEZ, who was governor
of Louisiana, under Spain,, forever ended
English dominion in West Florida. Galvez's
brilliant military successes during this
period were rewarded by his being made
a count and receiving the appointment of
captain-general of Louisiana, Cuba and
West Florida.- Later he was made Vicerov
of Mexico. Hisoperations in West Florida
against the English were regarded as be-
ing very helpful to the young colonies bit-
terly struggling with Britain for their fre -
dom at the time.


PALM BEACH SUITS


DON'T LET THIS WARM WEATHER
GET YOU DOWN. Come to Apa-
lachicola and let us show you how to be well-
dressed and yet be cool rith a new


Palm Beach Suit



$15.50

They're cool shape-retaining .
and much smarter than you thought a wash-
able suit could ever be. They add a
lot to the joy of living, and very little to
your expense account.



Austin's is but 40 minutes' drive from
Port St. Joe

Make our store your headquarters while
in Apalachicola


A


U


ST N'S


APALACHICOLA


FLORIDA


OfU
MOU KKT
llla OITI1 "R(


7Z'E ACc4A' j%'kJ. 42IZ/l~


~





T.HE STAR; -PORT ST, JOE, GULF COUNTV:i-FLORIDA


PAG .,Fjv!


PRIDAY, *JLLY 21, ~1939 7L .=~'







PAESI HESA, OT T JE UL OUTFLRDAFIDY UL 1,13


Ooooh! What A Light!

.



-~~ p

z=~r'"~ ., ,


r") '


The largest lamp ever manufactured has amazed many a- Asitor
to the General Electric Co. display at the California World's iair
as well as little Miss Beverly Ann Rheder of Oakland, Calif., a
3-year-old who looked over the Exposition with her mother. The
huge lamp of 50,000 watts is two and a half feet high and Beverly
lust can't eee-MAG-ine who'd use such a whonoer.


YOU CAN BUY A BOHN ON EASY TERMS AT




ST. JOE ICE COMPANY


PORT ST. JOE


FLORIDA


IV Dan Farmer, director of the St.
'Naughty But Nice' Joe high school band. and his four

Is Full of Chuckles drumi miajoesses Barbara Ed-
wards, Ann Treadwell, Mary Ann
-- Lewis and Frances Stagg, will
Comedy, Romance and Music Fea- go to Crestview today to observe
.... D ^ i.... i i. A n. the drum majors in the band at


ure c rictui r ajig.y n/t rvor
Theater July 27 and 28

"Naughty But Nice', which will
be seen at the Port theater on
Thursday and Friday, July 27 and
28, is concerned with the adven-
tures of a small-town professor of
music in New York's Tin Pan Al-
ley. The professor is the retiring
sort, grown to manhood under the
watchful eyes of tree spinster
aunts. His visit to New York is
for the purpose of getting his mu-
sical masterpiece punished. The
piece emerges as a swing concoc-
tion, "Hooray for ;plnach." much
to the professor's discomfiture.
Dick Powell plays tne profes-
sor. and Ann Sheridan, the cur-
rent Warner Bros. "oomph" girl,
plays the part of the gfrl respon-
sible for the predicaments to
which the professor finds himself
heir.
Others in the cast are Zasu
Pitts as one of th. spinster aunts;
Helen Broderick as the fourth
aunt who ran away to marry a
musician; Alien Jenkins, a song
writer, and Slapsie Maxie Rosen-
bloom as the completely daffy
cook, housekeeper tand general all
around handy man ror the profes-
sor's "Aunt Martha.'"
For a good time and lots of
laughs, this picture should be put
on the "must see" list.
---------*

Crashes Kill

32,400 In 1938

At the end of 1938 there were
29,1t5;680 motor vehicles regis-
tered in the United States. Col-
lectively, they traveled approxi-
mately 250,000,000.000 miles aur-
ing the year.
In the wake of their purring ex-
haust pipes were 32,400 men,
women and children-all killed in
motor vehicle accidents.
These are grim statistical totals
that appear in "Accident Facts,"
the National Safety Council's
yearbook, just published.
Traffic accident deaths were
clicked off at the rate of one
every 16 minutes, 89 per day, or
32.400 deaths for the year.
Non-fatal injuries suffered in
motor vehicle accidents during
1938 occurred at a rate of one
every 27 seconds, 130 every hour,
S,200 every day, or 1,150,000 dur-
ing the year.
The council estimated .that mo-
tor vehicle traffic accidents dur-
ing 1938 cost $750,000,000 in wage
loss. medical expense and the
overhead cost of insurance, plus
another $750,000,000 for property
damage.
*-- I
GASOLINE FUND TO COURT

(Continued from Page 1)
per cent of the surplus accrued to
all counties June 9, when the 1939
act became law.
At issue is an opinion of Attok-
ney General George Couper Gibbs,
who ruled the law is not retroac-
tive and counties are entitled to
the entire surplus accruing prior
to the effective date.

PORT NEWS
S.S. 'Hilton of the Bull Line ar-
rived Friday and sailed the same
day with a cargo of paper.
S.S. Henry S. Grove, Fillette-
Green & Co.. agents, arrived Mon-
day and sailed same day with
cargo of paper for the west coast.
-- -----
Miss Betty Brenner of Chicago
arrived in this city Tuesday to
spend the summer with her
brother-in-law and sister. Mr. and
Mrs. Joe Hauser.

Eugene Knodle of Mobile, Ala..
is the guest of his father, Karl
Knodel. i


CLASSIFIED ADS

FOR RENT


that city. UNFURNISHED 9 by 18-foot cab-
o o a ins; ceiled overhead and sides;
Good water $6 month. Apply St.,
Mr. and Mrs. C. Lumpkin oft Joe Lumber Co. 1212|tf
nT'tvi'll, Va., and Mr. and Mrs. D.
R. McEachern and daughter, Lois, ROOMS FOR RENT
of Concord, N. C., visited last FOR RENT Two-room apart-
week "rom Thursday to Sunday ment. S'ee A. W. Jones.
with Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Barrier. -
Mrs. McE:chern and Mrs. Lump- IF YOU have a room for rent,
S why not place a classified adver-
kin are sisters of Mr. Barrier. tisement in The Star. The cost is
S-i allow and returns are gratifying...
Mr. and Mrs. Victor Sirman of Try it toay. tt
Miar-i were guests from Saturday REAL HISTORY OF ST. JOSEPH


until Tuesday of Mr. and Mrs. W.
S. Smith. While here they enjoyed
a fishing trip to the Dead Lakes.

Capt. and Mrs. M. J. Beck of,
Panama City were guests Sunday
afternoon of Mr. and Mrs. T. E.
Fisher and daughter, Jane.

G. B. Sheffield returned to this
(tiy Tuesday after visiting for
,"o weeks in Gainesville with rel-
atives.

J. G. Blount, manager of the lo-
cal Danley Furniture company
store, attended a quarterly meet-
ing of Danley store managers ac
Opp, Ala., Wednesday.

Rev. and Mrs. H. F. Beaty re-
turned to this city last Friday
and both report a very pleasant
vacation and trip. Mr. Beaty spent
a week at Mortreat, N. C.

It pays to advertise-try it! 1


-We have a few copies left of
the authentic history of the an-
cient city of St. Joseph, which
may be secured at 15c per copy.
The Star. Phone 51.

ERASE the DOUBT
About Your
FRESH WATER FISHING

MIDWAY PARK
Is In the HEART of the
Dead Lakes Fishing Area
Gulf County's north line cuts?'
the Dead Lakes at the
waistline
Meet Your Friends At
MIDWAY P A K
FURNISHED CABINS"-
On the Waterfront
J. H. SHOEMAKER, Prop.
Postoffice Address
WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA


I

.MOVING?

We have the sub-agency for the

MAYFLOWER VAN LINES
and can move your furniture any place in the
United States, Canada or Mexico.
Full Insurance Carried At All Times


'Red' Horton's Transfer
PHONE 70 PORT ST. JOE, FLA.



SPECIALS'

For Friday, Saturday and Sunday
WE CLOSE SU NDAY AT NOON
Where Business Is Brisk You Will Always Find Fresh Goods

MILK-6 Small or O23 Ice Cream Powder- 25C
3 Tall ....................... 3 Boxes for ............ 2
2 lbs. Sweet Sixteen 2c Huskies, Whole Wheat
OLEOMARGARINE Flakes-2 boxes ........15c
Bartlett PEARS-can ....5c Pink SALMON-2 cans 25c
PICNIC NAPKINS-. 25 SUPER SUDS-One 2c
10c 3 pkgs. for-... : 10c size & 1 25c size VI
TEA FLAKES CRACKERS-lOc Box; 2 boxes ........15c


No. 1Irish 1 w 25C

Potatoes 1 lbs. 2


TOSmA TO .E.S 25c SUGAR s 26c
6 Small for ..........-... U- Ibs.
MAXWELL HOUSE 29 FLOUR-Good grade 451
COFFEE Lb .... 12 lbs.
Fresh Yard EGGS, doz. 28c MATCHES, 3 boxes ....10c
COOKING OIL, gal. ...85c 5c Macaroni, 3 boxes....l0c


VEAL CHOPS and ROUND
STEAK-Swift's 930
Per pound .............. 0 C


COCA COLA-6 Bottle Carton .............25c
FANCY SLICED BACON-Per pound 25c
SALT MEAT-- ,.5 Pure OIL SAUSAGE 55C
2 Pounds ................. 3-po nd can ..........
WE SELL ONLY GOVERNMENT INSPECTED MEAT

BAY SHORE GROCERY
Location: First Store on Right on Patama City Road After
Crossing Canal West of Port St. Joe
Highland View We Appre.,iate Your Patronage
ISO IN mm M -mvax, I


Western Steaks, Round or
T-Bone-lb. ................30c
Miles' SALT-3 boxes 10c


- -1-pospo-mo-oll -0--momm


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORMAA


FRIDAY, JULY, 21, 1939


PAGE SIX