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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00139
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: June 16, 1939
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00139

Full Text






The Star-Florida's fastest grow. I
ing little newspaper--dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St Joe.


E


S,,TAR


Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill--Florlda's fast-
est growing little city. .. In
the heart of the pine belt.


The Home. Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JUNE 16, 1939


,STAR OFFERS

SPECIAL TRIP

TO WORLD FAIR

Eight-Day Excursion With
Hotel Accommodations
At Low Rate

When we first 'heard rumblings
from the "World of Tomorrow,"
we felt rather like grandfather
did, when he laughed at Joe Au-
tomobile. Such things couldn't be
-except on a fair ground. The
streamlined architecture, the new
use of special colors, materials
unheard of before taking the tra-
ditional place of brick and steel!
The wonders of the scientific dds-
plays, the aspiration of the artis-
tic, the farsightedness and scope
of the industrial! To us it was a
drean of civilization wonderful
but impractical a "one shot"
thing-impossible to adhere to as.
a working pattern for designing a
beautiful '"orld of Tomorrow."
That was when we were read-
ing and looking at pictures. The
fair itself has changed all that.
The most impressive character-
istic of the New York World's
Fair i; revealed when you have
realized its immediate practical-
ity; mat ri.is woril rd of wonders is
the ".',:rifie nex~ generationn will
be I.'orn -' nd take iore or less
-for i acs we do oar cars and
Sra-di-,s.. 'Ith.Ce I.st Way not to
be left behind the times. is to get
au..-,aj ,it. n ".he fair give? Vyoi
t!0e on..'.gol,.i n op,:,iport inty to
"':..ict at h",'h" the -omi n- ?cn.
Sti., rl jd he S r, "Your
1-ime wsp:-." i: _iping
3y 1i L bis i -'g den :ppo titanity.
i'Li $f i onjl O nct; on v. ith
T .I vel c.1 ti. t.:-z otf N\;v. Yorl:.
:,tiel' a. t.ir-diht ay trip to th,"
.. incb ir ",ltil a>,comnmolJ-
11..o- an;-i -jeN w .i.'rk and

,u of round trii:. in
L I ,din "i ro y's In_ New'. Y,! I:
Cai I. lo Page S)


iNani

C.:

Followli
G. 1


ree New

Directors


amed As
large
'p1 .


Fo'IIov~i l & of th
<,:,nu.rtt a.-f. thie. Poz I Joe
C'hjimbe.r 'l .Comrmerce. j'&* dayo
riclrt to (p-aoe hib. bo& of di-
re-toni fri eightt t,) el ven mem-
bei.. ihe',dir,:tors met Tuesday
e\,nriing a tel office of" J L Kerr
and Damed H A. Kidd. A. R. Yar
bbrouThL arod T E. Fisher as the
new me-mber- 3o.f the board.
G. P. Wood'"w.s named as direc-
tor at large.

WRUF IS TO BE LEASED
,OR SILENCED BY STATE
State-owned radio station WRUF
at the University of Florida in
Gainesville will go off the air the
night of June 30 unless the state
board of control is able to lease
the station.
This is due to the fact that the
governor vetoed all appropriations
for the station and requested that
it be leased&.

GETS CERTIFICATE
Russell J. Behiens of Port St.
Joe Wednesday was granted a cer-
tificate by the state board' of phar-
macy to practice pharmacy in the
'state of Florida.


Acts Become Laws

Without Signature

Of Governor Cone

Criminal Code, Highway Patrol
Tax Law and Other Measures
Go to Secretary of State

Approximately 500 legislative
measures passed by the house
and- senate were sent to Secretary
of State R. A. Gray Tuesday by
Governor Fred Cone which he
had not signed nor vetoed. Tues-
day was the deadline for the chief
executive to act upon them or, to
allow them to. become law with-
out his signature. Cone vetoed
154 acts.
Included in the measures was
one for creation of a state high-
way patrol, to be financed' by li-
cense fees .of 50 cents against
each automobile driver.
Amendments to the state -crimi-
nal code to speed up trial proce-
dure and appeals in criminal
cases.
A maximum levy of 47/s mills
is authorized by the ad valorem
(Continued on Page 4)
-4-------'

Churches Seek

Oldest Father

Gifts to Be Given, Oldest, Young-
est and Most Prolific Fathers
At Sunday Night Services

Who is the oldest father, the
youngest father and the father of
the most children in Port St. Joe?
To each of these three suitable
recognition and a gift will be
given at the First Methodist and
First Baptist churches next Sun-
day night. The Reverends D. E.
Marietta and J..W. Sisemore will
make this a special Father's 'Day
service.
This is the second Sunday night
in the present loyalty campaign
being, conducted by these two
churches, which is scheduled to
continue through ten weeks'. Con-
siderable interest is being mani-


fested in this series of special
services, according to the two min-
isters, and church attendance is
reaching an all-time high for Port
St. Joe.
The public is warned that they
ipust come early to get a back
0e1 r for these services.

COMPTROLLER LEE WARNS
EMPLOYES TO EXPECT CUT
Following the action of Gover-
nor Cone in calling the members
of the state cabinet into session
to discuss ways and means of cut-
ting state expenses to meet re-
stricted finances, Comptroller Jim
Lee warned the employes of his
office to prepare themselves for
salary cuts.
"There's no use to fool our-
selves," he said. "You might just
as well begin to make your ar-
rangements to accept a cut in sal-
ary." Such cuts, he indicated, will
be made on a percentage basis.
"There's got to be retrenchment
in public expenditures. That, is in-
evitable. We can't go on spending
money that we haven't got, and
we aren't going to have as much
money in the next two years as
we've had in the past," he said.
Announcements from the other
members of the cabinet of similar
action are expected as soon as
they have been able to carefully
check their budgets and have
been able to determine where and
in what amounts cuts in their ex-
penditures can best be made.


OLDRESIDENTIS

TAKENBYDEATH

MONDAY NIGHT


R. A.
73


Costin Dies At: Age of
Following Illndes of
Long Duratioii


R. 'A. Costin, 73, a resident o
SPort St. Joe since 1909, passed
away Monday night at his home
on Monument avenue fdilowing ai
illness of long duratioA.
'Mr. Costin was drni hear Wil
mington, N. C., in 1865, first corn
ing to this city in 190 and re
turning in 1909 to establish .-
mercantile business, whibh he op
erated up until a few tears ago
When he retired and the business
twas taken over by his son, C. G
Costin. He was a charter mem
her of the First Baptist church.
Funeral services, were held
Wednesday afternoon at the home
with Rev. J. W. Sisemore of the
First Baptist church in charge,
assisted by Rev. D. E. Marietta
of the Methodist church and Rev.
H. F. Beaty of the Presbyterian
church. Interment was in Jehu
cemetery, near V'ewahitchka.
Mr. Costin is survived by his
widow; three daughters, Mrs. T.
S. Gibson of Atlanta. Mrs. F. N.
Lanier of Savannah, Ga., and Mrs.
H. yT. oule of this city, and two
sons, Cecil G. of this city and
Chauncey L. Costin of -Wewa-
hitchka, and, a number of grand-
children.
The Star joins with the resi-
dents of this section in offering
condolences to the bereaved fam-
ily in their loss.
-----------
SPEND WEEK-END ON LAKES
Editor and. Mrs. W. S. Smith
spent a most enjoyable week-end
at Midway Park on the Dead
SLakes, and in spite of the jinx
that usually haunts Ye Ed while
fishing, he managed to out-catch
his frau and returned with a
fairly decent string, including a
two-pound bass caught with the
aid of an agile angleworm. Mr.
and Mrs. J. H. Shoemaker, opera-
tors of the camp, extended won-
derful hospitality and made the
excursion very enjoyable.
-. -- ---- -
PORT NEWS
The S.S. Dorothy of the Bull
Line arrived Sunday and sailed
Monday with a cargo of paper and
lumber.
.-~-------
Edgar Giddens of Inverness has
been employed by the Kerr
Jewelry company as watch repair-
man.

Mrs. Charles Brown and chil-
dren of Apalachicola moved to
this city last week.


FATHER OF LOCAL
MAN HONORED
-- -
H. W. Cameron," who this
week accepted a position with
the St. Joe Menhaden corpora-
tion as chief engineer at their
plant west of the city, has re-
ceived a letter stating that his
father, who is 103 years of age
and the oldest voter in Ontario,
was presented to the king and
queen of England as the honored
guest of Sudenberg, Ontario,
Canada, an honor that never
had been given to any citizen of
Canada, no matter 0ow high in
rank. 4i 1. f .


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Le


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e


Cleary Brothers

Low Bidders On-

Paving Project

Expected That Work Will Begin
On Fifth Street In Very
Near Future

Among a number of bids sub-
mitted' to the state .road depart-
ment this week for paving proj-
ects in various sections of the
state was that of the Cleary
Brothers Construction company of
West Palm Beach for constructing
a double-lane concrete boulevard
in Port St. Joe.
The project is on, Fifth street
and will extend from the intersec-
tion of Fifth street and Monument
avenue one-half mile eastward.
The bid of Cleary Brothers on
the job was $129,476.13, being the
lowest of several bids.
It is expected that work will be-
gin in the very near future, as the
construction company. already has
a large part of their equipment in
this city, having just completed
work of building the bridge across'
the canal west of the city.
------~- --

Legislative Bills

Of Local Interest


Pertaining to the City of Port
Joe and Gulf Cour As
A Whol"tz I


The following bills applying to
Port St. Joe and Gulf county were
passed at the recent session of
the legislature, according to E.
Clay Lewis, Gulf county represen-
tative:
Amendments to the city charter
changing the terms of city com-
missioners from six to three years
with an election to be held each
year, and to limit the bonded in-
debtedness of the city of Port St.
Joe to 15 per cent of the assessed'
.valuation.
A measure requiring that all
voters of Gulf county be re-regis-
tered.
A bill providing that Gulf county
commissioners and members Of
the school board shall run at
large for nomination, but shall be
from their separate districts.
Another bill provides that coun-
ty commissioners shall be placed
on a straight salary of $50 per
month in lieu of per diem and
mileage allowance as at present.
The county board of bond trus-
tess will be abolished and their
work carried on by the county
commissioners.
The road from Wewahitchka
via Overtstreet to Beacon Hill is
designated as a state road under
another ill.
Another bill, which became law
without Governor Cone's signa-
ture, provides that no franchise
can be granted by the board of
city commissioners of Port St. Joe
without a vote of the people.

GOV. CONE ISSUES SAFETY
CAMPAIGN PROCLAMATION

Governor Cone last Tuesday is-
sued a procamation urging "every
man, woman and child" to join the
National Safety Council campaign
for "greater July and summer
safety."
"Let each of us use increased
care in walking and driving, exer-
cise greater caution in swimming
and boating, refuse to use explo-
sives and fireworks, and refrain
from driving after drinking," the
proclamation concluded.


GOVERNOR'S PEN

C U T S MILLIONS

FROM STATE COST


States Legislature Appropri-
ated More Than Provided
For In Revenue Bills

Governor Fred 0p. Cone's pen
the past week has slashed mil-
lions of dollars off the 1939 legis-
lature's record-breaking appropria-
tions for which no sources of rev-
enue were provided.
The list included:
An emergency- appropriation of
$1,400,000 annually f or school
teachers' salaries during the next
two years.
$100,000 for additional farmers'
markets.
$50,000 for a state livestock
market and, abattoir.
$110,000 for new buildings at
the St. Augustine school for the
deaf and blind.
$50,000 for a state probation
and parole commiss-on.
$50,000 for dogfly eradication in
Northwest Florida coastal coun-
ties.
$55,000, for WRUF, state-owned
radio station at Gainesville.
$250,000 annually from general
revenue to make up any de-
ficiency in property taxes allo-
cated, to purchase free textbooks.
$80,000-for rehabilitating the. ex-
periment station at the, insiersity
of Florida.
$40,000 to furnish the student-
alumnae building at the Florida
Sttate College for Women.
$10,000 for road repair and con-
struction at the state school for
the deaf and blind.
$12,500 to the p'ate board of
forestry for special work in state
parks.
$15,600 for special expenses of
the national guard.
$9,000 for additional railroad
commission inspectors.
$15,895 for special expenses of
the state geological survey.

Port Theater Will

Observe Birthday

One of Most Modern Playhouses
In Northwest Florida Has
Been Open One Year

The Port theater, which opened
June 20, 1938, beginning Sunday
will observe its first birthday with
a week of exceptionally fine pic-
tures.
The theater. one of the Martin
& Martin chain and classed as
one of the most modern and up-
to-date in Northwest Florida, is
n charge of Roy Williams, local
manager.
----
FURNITURE BURNS

.Carlos Boyles left Saturday eve.
ning for Gainesville, to return
Sunday, bringing his wife and
furniture with him. On the return
rip the truck caught fire and all
heir furniture was lost. Mr. Boyles
had one hand badly burned, but
he truck was not seriously dam-
aged.
..-4-----
BUYS PAPERS

L. Evans of Fairhope, Ala., has
purchased the Gulf County Breeze
nd the Port St. Joe Sentinel from
C. F. Hanlon and has many ideas
or improvement of the two pub,
ications.


VOLUME II


NUMBER 35


-


;I







PAETOTESAPR T OGL ONY LRD RDY UE1,j(


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at. Port St. Joe, Fla.,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December' 10,
1937, at the Posto'fice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year........$2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months..........65c

-. Telephone 51 ) -

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts;,, the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

REMEMBER POOR OLD DAD /f
Next Sunday is Father's Day-if he can
get it. Anyhow, that's what the calendar
says, and theoretically father is entitled to
occupy the place of.honor in the family circle
on that day.
However, whether he does or not, he
should.,at. least.be remembered by other meim-
bers of the family .with small (or large).
gifts-things that will be his'n and his'n
alone...Many a dadhas shares in lamps for
the living room, furniture for the dining
room, perhaps a half interest in a pair of
andirons for the living room and maybe a
bit of stock in a washing machine, but has he
anything that he can truthfully say his all
his? Son wears his socks and ties, and daugh-
ter and mother take his shirts and pants to
wear fishing, but poor old dad can't borrow
a thing from the rest of the family.
So let's do all we can for dad Sunday. He
will feel happy if he is remembered, for
fathers are really not the hard-boiled, crusty
critters they are usually made out to be in
most families. They have big hearts that are
(easily melted and the outward show,,ogruff-
,ness -i usually a pose adopted to get'the at-
tention of the family.
SDad really isn't a bad fellow if his family
-would only get to know him-but to a great
,extent he's to blame because they don't.
-* -- '
S DON'T BE DISCOURAGED
'" When a man gets fired from his first job
ihe should not be discouraged. The record is
full of such instances in which other men
Aho have flopped at one occupation have
gone on to make outstanding successes in
some other line of work. The important thing
is to keep trying.
SA list of present-day celebrities who failed
in previous occupations appears in the cur-
rent issue of Your Life magazine as follows:
George S. Kaufman, before hfe became
Broadway's leading playwright, was a leather
goods drummer, surveyor's helper, and pri-
vate secretary.
Zane Grey was a dentist and he disliked
the work so intensely that he gave it up to
spend five years trying to write something
that would sell.
Irving Berlin worked in a Bowery restau-
rant before he became America's most fa-
mous song writer.
Vincent Bendix was trained to be a lawyer
but he abandoned his profession to take up
engineering, and became one of the most
successful in his field.
Sinclair Lewis, Nobel prize winner in lit-
erature, was fired from his first four news-
paper jobs.
Edward Arlington Robinson, outstanding
poet of his generation, worked- as a 'i-ght
watchman on a construction job.
Carveth Wells, the famous lecturer, was a
construction engineer for over ten years be-
fore he stepped on a rostrum. --ganlTord
Herald.

If all of us bought everything we use, that
can be bought, in Port St. Joe, every busi-
ness that is justified in continuing in business
would not only live but would -be prosperous,
and the city would grow in proportion.


CONE SWINGS A WICKED VETO:
(o;qer'nr Fred Cone is swinging a wicked
veto 'and knocking out. numerous appropria-
ion bills passed by the legislature. ..
All of this vetoing by his excellency means
there will be no extra session of the legis-
lature this year, that the road department
vill haive $2,000,000 more to spend on gen-
eral highway construction than heretofore,
that the Northwest Florida Gulf section will
hia-'e to go right on swatting the dogfly,
that counties will be required to raise taxes
for schools and for road and bridge bonds in
cases where they have been relying to a
large extent on the state for school aid and
lebt payment, that any property owner who
failed to redeem old tax certificates under
the Murphy act has lost his property, that
;ome of the schools may not be open for full
terms next year, and' numerous other mat-
ters that affect counties and municipalities
11il over the state.
However, perhaps the governor is right in
vetoing these measures for, as he points out,
the legislature provided no means of raising
money for the carrying out of the various
projects. t.
From the looks of things the recent legis-
lative session was a mere waste of time and
the state is in just the same position it was
before the sixty-day session.
Anyway, if Fred keeps on vetoing meas-
ures, we can rest assured that the state will
not go bankrupt nor face a serious deficit.

TIME FOR VACATIONS
This comment on the results of the rapid
pace which humanity is leading these days
nay touch your funny-bone,, but it has too
much of the element of truth in it to be truly
hilarious.
The boss was off for an afternoon of golf
to quiet his nerves, when his stenog went
,erserk and penned the following note of
farewell:
"Dear Boss-I'm tired. I'm quitting this
game. My head hasT'gone dizzy. My back
.ias gone lame. My seat is all calloused, my
hands paralyzed from taking dictation; God
help my poor eyes! I've finished the brief in
ihe Westchester case-sloppy memento of
this awful pace. The writ of attachment was
served on the bank. (Defendant was- called'
and he thinks it's a prank.) Miss Prewter
was in and she asked you to phone. Your
wife's raising hell-says she's too much alone
I'he stamps are all gone. You need a new
chair. Your nails could stand trimming, and
remember your hair. I cleaned out the bottles
and cigaret butts. You'll need a new steno,
ior this ones gone'nuts."-Arcadia Arcadian.

NOTHING IN THE PAPER
"There's never anything in the paper,"
complained Mrs. Grumbie. But she forgot
that it was only last week she asked to have
her bridge party kept out of the paper be-
:ause there were two or three people whom
.he neglected to invite; and that the family
didn't want it mentioned when they bought a
iew car because they still owed the doctor
for Junior, and two or three merchants were
wanting a settlement. The editor left the ac-
ount of the daughter's careless driving spree
mut of the paper because he felt sorry for.the
ild man, and he also neglected to mention
:he fact that Mrs. Griimbie's brother had
>een jugged for imibibing too freely. But
still Mrs. Grumbie thinks the editor could
print more news. He probably could-but
what if he should?-Winter Haven Herald.

Looks like trouble won't be long in start-
ing in Europe now. Britain and France have
agreed to conditions demanded by Russia in
a triple alliance against Nazi-Fascist aggres-
sion and will furnish immediate full-armed
support in the event Russia goes to war to
halt further "expansion" in Europe. The way
we have been seeing things, Russia has been
itching to take a whack at Germany, and now
with France and England backing her it won't
he long.

Remember father nexf Sunday.


WHO GAVE HIM. THE SAW?


Too Late to Classify
By RUSSELL KAY


Out in Nebraska a few years
ago, a small group of taxpayers
got to worryin' about mounting
taxes and. the waste of public
funds. Of course, it was "none of
their business" from the view-
point of the politicians who
seemed to hold the impression
that it was their God-given priv-
illege to get all the money they
could and spend it where and
when they pleased.
These taxpayers w e r e hard-
working, sound-thinking farmers
and' small town business men.
Through the years they had
learned that success came from
hard work and. careful manage-
ment. They had little sympathy
with waste and extravagance.
They paid their obligations and
were careful not to incur any
they couldn't pay.
Starting in a small way in one
county, these taxpayers began to
poke their noses into local gov-
.ernmental operations.. Some start-
ling things were revealed. It was,
found that the county was paying
$12.50 each for creosoted' posts
that another county was buying
for $1.25 each. There were many
other similar instances where
city and county officials were
purchasing supplies and equip-
ment and paying many times the
price quoted on the open market.
Instead of going to the county
commissioners or city officials and
howling about it, these wise tax-
payers' went to their local newspa-
per man. They laid the facts be-
fore him, gave him the' compara-
tives figures, easily verified, and
urged his help in presenting this
information to the people.
The newspaper man, like most
of his clan, was glad to "play
ball." Without bringing in any
personalities or starting a quarrel
with any politician, he simply told
the facts. He asked If this was
good business and wanted to know
if taxpayers were content to have
their money squandered in this
manner.
Most of them weren't. So they
got together, hired an independent
auditor and kept track of all
county expenditures. They com-
pared prices paid in their county
with those paid in other counties
and against the open market.
Whenever they found expendi-
tures were out of line they pub-
licized it through the press, over
the radio and' talked about it in
open meetings. People who never
before had paid any attention to


the government began to get in-
terested. Extravagant minded of-
fice holders began to get worried,
and with good reason, for when
election time rolled around they
lost their jobs.
The taxpayers' group kept out
of politics. They endorsed no can-
didates, told no one whom to vote
for. They simply gave people the
facts and let them use their own
judgment.
So successfully did the plan
work that county after county fell
in line. Folks who had aways felt
that nothing could be done about
it saw other taxpayers actually
putting a stop to waste and' bring-
ing about lower taxes and sound
business in government.
Groups began to think as indi-
viduals. If Clay county found that
Polk county was buying tractors
for less money, tney became in-
dignant and found out why, just
as Bill Jones would do if he paid
his hardware merchant $5 for an
axe and then learned that John
Smith got the same kind of axe
the same day at me same store
for $1.25.
Local taxpayers' groups got to-
gether to form a state organia-
tion. They hired auditors to ch'ck
governmental operations. They
published the facts. Every pubic
,servant from office boy to govrr-
nor came under the watchful ere
of "his boss," the taxpayer. pf
money was wasted, the employ e
was fired, with no "ifs, ands 4r
buts."
Today there is an unwritten law
in Nebraska that every public of-
ficial knows by heart, and that all
observe with diligence: "You shall
not put your people in debt; you
.shall not waste your people's
money."
As. a result, Nebraska's budget
is always in balance. The state
pays cash and demands value re-
ceived for every penny. There is
no bonded indebtedness; no sales
tax; no service tax; no use tax;
no luxury tax; no cigaret tax; no
income tax. Taxes, state, county
and city, have been reduced over
33 per cent in 10 years. During
the same period the state has paid
off $38,000,000 of old debts and
today is the one bright spot on
the national map.
SIT CAN BE DONE, but YOU,
Mr. Taxpayer, will have to DO IT.
---- -----
TAKE YOUR CHOICE
He: "You know, things aren't
as they were in earlier times."
She: "How's that?"
He: "Well, it used to be 'Gire
me liberty or give me death.' But
now when you go to the news
stand if they don't have Liberty
you can get Life."
Save by reading the ads!


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY FLORIDA


PAGE TWO


FRIDAY, JUNE 16, 1989










f CO N Y F D P THR


Best Leaf Crops for


Fine Bowl Salads









LEAF LETTUCE COS LETTUCE BROAD LEAVED CURL\' LEAVED
OR ROMAINE ENDIVE. ENDIVE


always include as an indispsable frost. A late sowing should always




part of a perfect menu, is enjoying be made to mature.in the fall, when
.a revival and playing a new role. fost improves. the flavor.-
freshness and flavr, it is no pre- flavor..which makes i..t a welcome in-















scribed by physicians as the most gredient of the bowl salad, and is
Vitamins. And new discoveries have Curled garden cress thrives with / -. .. ,
indicates richness in the sishine salad. Watercress is highly p.- rized
Green Leaves R i Vitamins Easily Grown at m.he
Bowl salad, which gourmets of leaved. Both have a distinctive
the gay nineties insisted on mix- flavor. They mature in 70 days,
ing at the table, and greae, it chefs and stand bothly hot weather and
always include as an ind our big cspensabe fros. A late sowing should antlways
part of a perfect menu, is enjoying be made to mature in the fall, when
a revival and playing a new role. frost improves the flavor.
Always esteemed for its piquant Corn salad hs a fi-e:!i and spicy
freshness and flavcrd lettuce, wheit is no pre- flavor which makes it a welcome in-
scribed by physicians as the most gradient of the bowl salad, and is
important salads.ource of health giving grown easily in spring aLiked fall.
vitamins. And new discoveries have Curled garden cress thrives with
placed a premium on green leaves ordinary garden culture and im-
in the salad, since green coloring parts a pgent flavor o thbow
indicates richness in the sunofChivesshine salad. Watercress is highly prized
vitamin C. gardeners, ssurand easily grown where there is a
Here is another point on which good supply of fresh water to keep
the gourmets and doctors agree, it coughstantly moist.
since leading chefs in our big cities Chervil is an arom atic plant some-
have been romaine. Both are ng upon leaf and what resembling parsley but su-
cos rather than head lettuce, where period in flavor; and can be used
thummey could get it, for mixing their both in the bowl salad and as a











large enough to use in thirty days den path.
finest salads. TighthRomading sorts garnishment for meats. Like pars
they say, lack flavor and do not do ley, the wayseed is slow to germinate.
justice to carefully blended dress- Sow it with a few radish seeds to
ngs. mark o the row.
A most interesting variety of Chives is a most useful salad vege-
gre leaves or bowl salad can be table. It is a cou sin of the onion
grown by home gardeners, a ur- which the leaves are used. They
ing a varied selection throughout have a delicate onion flavor, just
the summer and fall. To begin with enough to season the salad. Chives
are leaf and cos lettuce, chefs call grow from seed easily, and a plant
the latter romainec. Both are easily lives many years. It bears a*_ at-
grown, 'leaf lettuce in rthe early tractive lavender flower aid is oft-
summer and fall, giving leaves en used as a border along the gar-
large enough to use in thirty days den path.
from sowing. Romaine is fully ma- At least two sowings should al-
ture in sixty days, and stands the ways be made of these leaf vegeta-
hot weather somewhat better than bles, one in. the spring and one in
the leaf type. midsummer for the fall crop; and
.,Endive is next in importance. It as many as'four sowings may be
comes int two types, broad and curly made with good results.


New Film Depicts

Lincoln As Youth


Not as the great American, but
rather as the gawky young lawyer
that his home town knew, is Abe
Lincoln characterized by Henry
Fonda ini the title role of "Young
Mr. Lincoln," which comes to the
Port theater next Thursday and
Friday.
With Marjorie Weaver, Alice
Brady and Arleen Whelan co-fea-
tured, the production brings back
the flesh and blood of a Lincoln
never shown before. The story of
Abraham Lincoln that has never
been told depicts his thrilling, ex-
citing, romantic youth and makes
a stirring picture.
-- --_____ --
Undertaker: "How's business?"
Electrician: "Shocking. How's
yours?"
SUndertaker: "Dead."
----------------


FISHING-

Spend the week-end in
West Florida's best fish-
ing grounds


BOATS With or with-
out guide-at reasonable
rates.. Hotel ac-
commodations within the
means of everyone.


SEE-


J. O. 'Jim' SMITH

SUMATRA, FLA.


Coming to Port


WILBUR SHAW,
the 1939 winner
On Ma.y OrOh, Wilbur Shaw
dro(-, to bis second Mictor' in
hic 500-milc Indianapolis Race
on Firestone Champion Tires
at an average speed of 115.03 miles an hour. Champion
race drivers, whose very lives and chances of victory depend
on tire safety, know tire construction. That is why they
select and buy Firestone Tires for their racing cars.








151
.. :bUO; ~t;f


Tyrone Power and Alice Faye
ac they appear, In "Rose of
Washington Square," playing at
the Port theater Sunday and
Monday.

SENTIMENTAL GESTURE
Johnnie Davis' gift last Christ-
mas from his pal, Marie Wilson,
who was working with Johnnie in
Warner Bros.' "Sweepstakes Win-
ner,' which plays Tuesday at the
Port theater, was a handsome col-
lection of seven sweepstakes
ticketss which Marie didn't win any
noney bn last summer.

It pays to advertise-try it!


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF, COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, JUNE 16, 1939


PAGE THREE


l
t
1
]
1







A E- C


IST


PORT THEATRE


--o Sunday, June 18, Throu


,;,.,,,,,,..,,,..,,.. ....,...,..................... ..., ...................,..,...,.1;;....,.._A


PERSONALS

The Misses Kathleen Saunder
and Betty Saunders returned Sm
day from Spring City, Tenn
where they visited relatives.
Kelly Freeman of Fernandin
was the week-end guest of Mis
Margie Stepp.


rs
n-


a
is


Mrs. Jim Perritt and Mrs. Le-
roy Gainous left Sunday for Tal-
lahassee to enroll for the summer
session at F. S. C. W.
Mr. and Mrss. B. B. Conklin and
Mr. and Mrs. Huel Crockett spent
the week-end at the Dead Lakes.
Mr. and Mrs. Hoke Larkin spent
Sunday in Bristol, guests of Mrs.
Larkin's mother.
Miss Dolly Jordon of Bastrop,
La., is the guest this week of Mr.
and Mrs. Doyle Smith.
Mrs. J. W. Cooper returned
Monday to her home in Ochloch-
nee, Ga., after spending two weeks
here as the guest of her son and
aaughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs.
George Cooper.
Mr. and Mrs. H. V. Forehand of
Kokomo, Ind., are the guests of
W. C. Forehand at Highland View.
J. G. Knighton and daughter,
Bonnie,- of Shreveport, La., are
the guests of Mr. and Mrs. R. H.
Hart.
A. D. Core was a business visi-
tor in Mobile over the week-end.
Mrs. Joel Carr of Bogalusa, La.,
joined her husband here last
week where he has been employed
for some time.
Miss Selma Outlaw returned to
her home in Panama City last
Thursday after spending a week
here as the guest of Mr. and Mrs.
R. H. Outlaw.

ACTS BECOME LAWS
(Continued from Page 1)
tax law, an increase of 11/ mills
over the present rate. The gover-
nor may levy less than the maxi-
mum.
A new school code, prepared
by the state department of edu-
cation in co-operation with county
and public school officials and
civic organizations.
S Other less important measures
allowed to become law include:
Free distribution of insulin, uni-
form seeds law, the pure food and
drug act, prescribing a 10-year
limitation for delinquent tax cer-
tificates held by individuals, put-
ting a tax of seven cents a gal-
lon on gasoline substitutes used
in operating motor vehicles on
highways, regulating the basic
science practices, re-levying the
seventh cent of gasoline taxes,
regulating the photographic pro-
fession, appropriating $10,000 for
the state library, increasing sal-
aries of the state market commis-
sioner, the state auditor and the
state motor vehicle commissioner,
and establishing a college of for-
estry at the University of Florida.
------------
Over 1,000,000 persons in South
America have been vaccinated
against yellow fever.


C


C


C

C
C







I


I



I


I; -L lillllll illll ll illulllllf l larnIfI @ @IIIIII L- _

SUNDAY and MONDAY, JUNE 18-19
ANOTHER GRAND PICTURE AND THE STAR
OPENS THE GATES OF O"- S Op BACK THE PAST
MEMORY .. TO REMEMBER

The Sta's of SlTTA Gordon and Revel's
"Alexander's Ragtime Band" Hits.

"DONALD'S COUSIN GUS" LATEST CURRENT NEWS



TUESDAY, JUNE 20 WEDNESDAY, JUNE









'Everyn
hou. '.sa r02--



ha ...re




Bob's an altar- L
dodger! But leave
Sit to this cutie to
MAR W LSON Alln n make him ad Walter CONNOLLY Rgina
MARIE WILSON Allen Jenkin a Lt. ,h As
M C harle r~u .Alier Llonina I about nratri. Gene LOCKHART*-Arthur TREACHER-.Bill
JohnnieDa ChareFy You cnt creenPlayobySamuelHloffenstelnoDirectIed byW
JohnnieS Da*vis. Ch'varles Foy-Jerry '*a'w ^ beat it for howl- # Produceild by Edgar Sehwyn A Metro-6omwlln-,
Directed by William McGonn-Screen Play by John Krofft and Albert DeMondFrom on Original Sto ing heart-throbl s! -
by Albert DeMond and Hugh Cumnings A First Notionol Picture Presented by WARNER BRO
SWINGSATIONAL MUSICAL COMEDY DIXIE'S OWN "MARCH OF TIM
LATEST NEWS EVENTS ALL ABOUT DIXIE


THURSDAY AND


Murder By Moonlight and a Mob in a Mood


HENRY
FONDA


MARJORIE
WEAVER


ARLEEN
WHELAN


FRIDAY, JUNE 22-23


for LYNCHING! But There Stood Young Lincoln
ALICE DONALD RICH,
BRADY MEEK CROI


Iw


MORE JOY


Riotous Cartoon


Saturday, June 24 Theatre Opens 1:15


GiENE
AUTRY 11 / : I[ Mae]
e ll5


Plus "LONE RANGER" RIOTOUS CARTOON


SLatest News -


SATURDAY OWL SHOW?


JESSE CRAWFORD AT TH


I


%'_ =-~ I~


VX^ "


- li i


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF C COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE FOUR -


FRIDAY, JUNE 16, 1939


MTIM



N N I








TAEC r f6 -


PAGr. r17 =-


, saturday, June 24


Compliments to the


PORT THEATRE

The Martins and Manager Roy Williams

on the First Anniversary of this modern

and up-to-date playhouse






Bayshore Grocery & Mkt.






OUR COMPLIMENTS

TO THE PORT THEATRE

on its First Anniversary. We are proud

to think that the Martins had the faith
in Port St. Joe to erect this playhouse


QUALITY GROCERY

Clerks Polite -- Prices Right




We Extend


CONGRATULATIONS

to Manager Roy Williams and Hugh Martin
on the FIRST ANNIVERSARY of the

PORT THEATRE

ST. JOE BAR



We Congratulate the

PORT THEATRE
on its

First Anniversary
All Success In the Future

Mi-Lady's Dress Shoppe




CONGRATULATIONS-

To the Martins and Manager Roy Wil-

liams on the First Anniversary of the

new and modern Port Theatre.
,

Cooper's Barber Shop




CONGRATULATIONS

PORT THEATRE

Here's Wishing You Many
Years of Continued
Success!

Triangle Restaurant

HOME-COOKED MEALS


MISSIONARY SOCIETY
MEETS AT CHURCH
Both circles of the Methodist
Women's Missionary society met
Monday afternoon at the church
for Bible study and a business
meeting. Mrs. A. M. Jones, Sr.
vice-president, served in the ab-
sence of the president, Mrs. Boyd.
Mrs. J. L. Sharit, Mrs. J. L. Mil-
ler and Mrs. Jones presented the
third and fourth chapters of the
study book, "The Church Takes
Root In India." A snort business
session was held, minutes, were
read by Mrs. Jesse Bradbury, and
the treasurer's report was given
by Mrs. B. H. Smith. Other busi-
ness was discussed and the meet-
ing dismissed.

MRS. G. H. BELL HOSTESS
TO MARY CIRCLE
The members of the Mary circle
of the Baptist Missionary society
were entertained Monday after-
.noon by Mrs. G. H. Bell at the
home of Mrs. W. J. Fillingim on
Woodward, avenue. The meeting
was in charge of Mrs. 0. F.
Powell and was opened with the
devotional taken from I Corinthi-
ans, 13th chapter. Following the
Bible study, a short business ses-
sion was held, after which the
meeting was dismissed by repeat-
ing the Mispah. After the business
meeting the seven members pres-
ent enjoyed a delightful social
hour.
S*r
MRS. J. M. SMITH
ENTERTAINS CLUB
Mrs. J. M. Smith entertained
the Thursday Bridge club at her
home- this week. Vases of beauti-
ful roses were placed about the
room where two tables were
placed for play. After several pro-
gressions, prizes w-ere awarded.
Refreshments of frozen salad,
saltines, cookies and ice tea were
served to Mesdames Edwin Ram-
sey, M. P. Tomlinson, J. B. Gloek-
ler, C. Edwards, R. Coburn, E. C.
Lewis and' T. Owens.
t
Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Dowell and
family of Birmingham, Ala., ar-
rived last week-end to spend the
summer months at their cottage
on the beach.

D. G. McPherson, B. B. Conklin
and Wilbur Wells attended a dis-
trict meeting of Lions clubs held,
last evening in Panama City.

Friends of Robert Logan regret
to learn of his illness and wish
for him a speedy recovery.

Miss Frances Palmer, student at
F. S. C. W., Tallahassee, arrived
last Saturday to spend the sum-
mer months with her parents, Mr.
and Mrs. Curtis Palmer.

The Misses Marigene Smith and
Muirnice Taunton returned Satur-
day from Tallahass.e, where they
attended the 4H short course,

Charming Guest House
Large Cool Rooms, Excellent
Meals, Reasonable Rates
MRS. W A. SCOTT
268 Chestnut Street
ASHEVILLE, N. C.
I


PHONE 41


MISS HAMMOCK HOSTESS
TO G. Y. B. CLUB
Miss Lunnette Hammock enter-
; trained the members of the G. Y.
SB. club this week at the home of
her parents on Third street.
,Games were enjoyed, after which
Three new members, the Misses
SAllah Mae and Betty Darcey and
Kathleen Saunders, were wel-
comed following their initiation at
Beacon Hill Monday afternoon.
Refreshments of iced lemonade
and' cookies were served to the
Misses Murnice Taunton, Melba
Nedley, Marigene Smith, Elaine
Gore, Allah Mae Darcey, Kathleen
Saunders and Betty Darcey, all
members of the club, and visitors,
Miss Elizabeth and Carol Carroll
of Jacksonville and Miss Dolly
Jordon of Bastrop, La.
The next meeting of the club
will be held Tuesday at the home
of Miss Kathleen Saunders.
t-fr
MRS. BLOUNT ENTERTAINS
THURSDAY BRIDGE CLUB
Mrs. John Blount was hostess
to the, Thursday Afternoon Bridge
club this week. A color scheme of
pink and' white was-carried out in
decorations for the living room
where players enjoyed an hour of
bridge. Following tne tallying of
scores, prizes were presented.
Aiding in the color scheme, de-
licious brick ice cream and cake
was served to Mgsdiames W. Dan-
ley, Jesse Bradbury, Jim Bounds,
Joe Morrow, M. Wardl, G. Has-
tings and George Hudson.
The next meeting of the club
will be held at the home of Mrs.
George Hudsdn.

EPISCOPAL AUXILIARY -
IN MEETING TUESDAY
Tie regular meeting of the Aux-
iliary of the Saint James Episco-
pal church was held Tuesday af-
ternoon at the church 'with the
president, Mrs. W, E. Smith, pre-
siding. Following the business
session, at which time the mem-
bers made their pledges, the Bible
study was held and the meeting
dismissed.

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Thorne and
daughter, Miss Mary Devine, of
Everglades City were the guests
Sunday of Mr. and Mrs. B. B.
Conklin.

Mr. and Mrs. Aubrey Tomlinson
left yesterday for Douglas, Ga.,
called to that city by the illness
of Mrs. Tomlinson's mother.

Mrs. W. T. Allen and three chil-
dren of Tallahassee spent Thurs-
day of last week in the city, the
guests of Mr. and Mrs. M. K. Hurl-
but. ;-

Mr. and Mrs. T. M. Schneider
and family spent Sunday in Pan-
ama City visiting relatives.
a pa
Lewis Perritt visited Sunday in
Panama City with his mother,
Mrs. J. J. Perritt, and sister, Mrs.
Coy Redd.

Miss Tommy oIu King returned
to her home in Vilas Saturday.
Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Larkin. accom-
panied her, spending the week-
end in Vilas and Bristol.


SOFT WATER USED
Evening Appointments


ADAMS BEAUTY SHOP
PERCY ADAMS, Proprietor
N L With This
S P E C I AL Advertisement
SHAMPOO, FINGER WAVE, MANICURE
and ARCH. All for ................... $ 1 0 0
$3.50 OI.L WAVES-2 FOR $.00


WORK GUARANTEED


MONUMENT AVENUE


PRESBYTERIAN AUXILIARY
MEETS WITH MRS. HORTON
The Presbyterian Auxiliary met
Monday afternoon at the home of
Mrs. E H. Horton. Following the
regular business routine, Howard
McKinnon gave an interesting
talk on "Christian Education." and
from his talk three Sunday school
teachers were obtained, Mrs. J_
F. Taylor, Beginner's teacher;
Mrs. E. H. Horton, Juniors' teach-
er, and Mrs. Adams, Intermediate
teacher. Mrs. Basil Kenney, Sr.,.
gave a summary or the accom-
plishments of the Auxiliary for
the first quarter.
A social hour was enjoyed,, at
which time the hostess served de-
liciomis refreshments to. Mesdames
J. F. Taylor, T. R. L. Carter, Hf.
F. Beaty, H. McKinnon, O. W-
Jervis, Adams and Basil Kenney,

LYDIA CIRCLE MEETS
WITH MRS. BARRIER
The Lydia circle of the Baptist
Missionary society met Monday
afternoon at the home of Mrs. W.
W. Barrier with Mrs. Daisy Sta-
ten as hostess. Mrs. Curtis Palmer
presided. During the business
meeting a committee was named
to place flowers in the church
for the next service. An open dis-
cussion was held on charity cases,
Bible chapter report andi personal
service reports were read. Mrs.
Palmer led the Bible study, after
which the meeting was dismissed
by repeating the Mispah. During
the social hour the hostess served
cake and iced drinks to members
present.

MONDAY BRIDGE CLUB
MEETS WITH MRS. FARMER
Mrs. P. D. Farmer entertained
the Tuesday Bridge club on the
beach at Money Bayou this week..
Following several progressions,
prizes were presented to Mrs. B.
H. Graves, high, Mrs. W. C. Cogs-
dill, cut, Mrs. Tom Mitchell, honor
and Mrs. J. S. Grimsley, traveling.
The hostess served- refreshments
to Mesdames W. M. Howell, W. S-
Smith, B. H. Graves, W. C. Cogs-
dill, Tom Mitchell, J. S. GrimsIey
and William Bragg.
t *
Mrs. DeWitt Marks. and daugh-
ter, Miss Cronin Marks, .of Apa-
lachicola were guests last Friday
of Mrs. J. B. Gloekler and DeWitt.
Marks.

Mrs. Lovell Yerkes of Birming-
ham is expected to arrive today
to be the guest of Mr. and Mrs.
Basil E. Kenney, Sr., for several'
days.

Mrs. C. J. Hurlbut of Bartow


spent the week-end in-
Joe, the guest of her
daughter-in-law, Mr. and
K. Hurlbut.


Port St
son arnd
Mrs. M.


The Misses Eineline and, Martha
Belin, spent Sunday in Panama
City with their parents, Mr. and
Mrs. W. J. Belin

Mr. and Mrs. R. O. Roberts and'
son, Charles, spent Sunday in At-
more, Ala., guests of Mr. and'
Mrs. C. L. Steele.

The Misses Elizabeth and Caror
Carroll of Jacksonville are visit-
ing their brother-in-law and sis-
ter, Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Spence-

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Gibson arnd
son, Tommy. of Atlanta, and, Mr-
and Mrs. Frank Lanier of Savan-
nah, Ga., were called here Mon-
day night by the death of R. A.
Costing, father of Mrs. Gibson and!
Mrs. Lanier.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Creech
and baby of Dothan, Ala., were
guests last week of Kenneth andc
Gus Creech.


Society Personals Churches

LANETA DAVIS, Editor


-~ ~-~~-~~~~-r~~l' -~~-~~--~`~-~~~~--~--~~~~-


------------r--- ---


FRIDAY, JUNE 16, -1939 --!"M1~


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


1

r


(







GTPO-TR, &IIIM Ilb 1|00
m


The pompadour fish gets its Forestry to Play
name from its dorsal fin which J
suggests hair brushed back from Important Role In
a forehead. I o a
South's Progress

DR. IJ C. COE Establishment of Paper Mills Has
D E NT I S T Enhanced Interest In Forests
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5 And Forest Lands
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe
Forestry is destined to play an
Important role in the development
Sof Florida and the South. Recent
It s T m e To establishment of numerous paper
SI N E and pulp mills in this and other
SDIN Esouthern states has tremendously
enhanced interest in forests and
Where the food is of the forest lands. So the recent report
best ..where the service of the southern forest experiment
is prompt and efficient station of the United States For-
est Service, with headquarters in
and where you get New Orleans and' a branch in
HOME COOKED Lake City, Fla., is of unusual in-
terest at this time.
MEALS The report says that forest sur-
._ vey figures on the South's forest
------0-----
resources indicate that virgin old-
T R I A N G L E growth timber stands are being
rapidly depleted, but that second-
RESTAURANT growth stands have followed on
BEER and WINES most of the cut-ovr lands. Today
these form an important growing
stock of timber which, if properly
S-- .,,, ... ..'.. cared for and conservatively util-
iRzed w ill appreciate in both vol-
SI ume and value. These stands,
However, are now producing only
ASSLURED! one-third the timber of which they
are capable.
"Now, for the first time," the
report says, "we can see the part
that forests must play in the fu-
--' ture of the South, but we also see
/, that in every forest type and in
every phase of forest industry
'^, there is immed-iate need for more
S specificd knowledge of what to do
and how to do it. The territory is
-- f a huge one, afid within it the for-
/ estry problems to be solved are
For Each and Every Bottle many, ivarfyed o and complex."
S An inventory of forest lands
o. of Milk or Cream We Deliver 4
of Is Protetedam We Deiverth a and resources recently completed
for the entire deep South showed
SANITARY PARCHMENT that of the total or nearly 210,000,-:
COVER 000 acres surveyed, almost 60 per
cent was productive forest land.
Use Only Old-growth forest stands were
O T I ILK'a n found on nearly 16 per cent of the
J V A productive area; some stage' of
pasteurized second-growth and,.- reproduction
te on about 77",per cent, and clear-
cut forest land on only 8 percent.
VM IILK The report indicates the neces-
sity of applying forestry principles
Pasteurized for Your to the care and use of growing
Protection timber and timber lands if they
....... ......... t are to serve as a sound basis for
the greatly increased forest indus-
tries essential to the future pros-'
perity of the South.

'Why Kiss Babies,

They Don't Vote

That's What Glenda Farrell Said
When She Ran ror Mayor of
'North Hollywood and Won

"Why kiss babies? They don't
vote," replied Glenda Farrell to a
For Your question about her rather unortho-
P ROdox campaign methods when she
N was running last fall for the of-
fice of mayor of North Hollywood,
This Summer a sizeable community near the
Our special filtering process Warner Bros. studio where she
and quick-freeze method as- works.
sures you ice that REALLY "Political osculation," she ex-
is pure! It protects your food plained, "has been wasted on non-
therefore it protects, you. voters. Anybody I kiss will be
There is.no substitute for the over voting age."
value of REAL Ice. That Glenda had the right
idea about the way to campaign
THE WELL-INFORMED seems to have been proven by the
USE ICE fact that she was an easy victor
in the election and is today the
Deliveries by Phone only woman chief executive of a
or Regular Route community as large as North
PHONE 47 Hollywood.
It was her election to this post
---which gave Warner. Bros. the idea
for the latest of, her series bf
S T J O E I CE Torchy Blane pictures, "Torchy
o A N Y Runs for Mayor," which istlihe fea-
C M i N Y ture at the Port theater Owl
Show Satirday night, June 24. As
MAX KILBOURN, Prop. has been the case from the begin-
ning of the series, Barton McLanie


able limit to the weight of trucks
as well as limitations upon their
speed."
------le---
The Star is $2 per year-sub-
! scribe now!
.........


and Tom Kennedy share top act- not able to withstand the in-
ing honors with Glenda in the new creased, truck weights allowed un-
picture. der this bill.
"The roads are now being de-
TRUCK WEIGHT INCREASE stroyed rapidly by heavy trucks
IS KILLED BY GOVERNOR and if we are to maintain our
roads for all vehicular travel, the
A bill providing for the raising most of which is passenger ve-
of the weight limit on trucks in hicles, there must be some reason-
Florida to 24,000 pounds for single
vehicles and 40,000 pounds for Don't L f ih la
combinations, was killed Saturday 't PLAY W Maria!
by Governor Cone's veto. A 10 per -Malaria is one of the world's
cent overweight allowance would really bad scourges. It is nothing
to play with. If you have Malaria,
have been made for a vehicle hav- do something about it. For over
ing six pneumatic tires in contact 70 years, Wintersmith's Tonic has
with the road. been preferred by millions of
"The state has more than $200,- people. Millions of people can't be
wrong. Get a bottle today, and
000,000 invested in its highways," see for yourself. For your own
Cone said in vetoing the act. "A sake-try Wintersmith's!
high gasoline tax is being paid, to BEISlTlH'B SM
build and maintain the roads and II'S I
bridges. The'engineers of the road
department advise that many of TONI
the bridges on main highways are


BI[EEVE IN U(c 9-
t- -LBSLB L fl..U ^ S
*'* A fl ^


It Can Be YOUR Good Fortune to See


"THE WOMLD OF TOMORROW"

AS PRESENTED AT

THE NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR
the great nations of the world, our own Federal Government, States
and Territories, the City of New York-Industry, Labor, Civic Groups-
Art, Science, Capital-all are combined in presenting this great educational
and entertaining spectacle .
STAY LUCKY Make Your Reservation Now!


Special Tours

Leaving from
RIVER JUNCTION

June 20

July 25

August 29

October 5

8 DAYS

$74.40
Children Under 12 Years
of Age $45.00


WRITE, PHONE or CALL
IN PERSON for further
i..-formation and de-
scriptive leaflet


Proposed Itinerasy from Port St. Joe
FIRST DAY-Leave River Junction 12:15 p. m. (Luncheon pro-
vided on train.) Arrive Jacksonville 6 p. m. Leave Jackson-
ville 7:30 p. m. (Dinner provided on train.)
SECOND DAY-Arrive New York 4:15 p. m. (Byeakfast and
luncheon provided on train.)
THIRD TO SIXTH DAYS-In New York. Hotel accommodations
for five nights provided. (Meals not included.) Sightseeing pro-
gram includes a GRAND ESCORTED TOUR OF NEW YORK,
UPPER AND LOWER MANHATTAN, and PRINCIPAL POINTS
OF INTEREST, and ONE GENERAL ADMISSION to the
WORLD'S FAIR (which includes all but seven of the main ex-
hibits). Escorts will accompany members to the entrance gates
on the first visit (individual carfare 10 cents each way). Sub-
sequent visits may be made independently, for which directions
wi!l be provided, together with information about other activi-
ties in New York to suit every taste.
SEVENTH DAY-Leave New York 8:15 a. m. (Luncheon pro-
vided on train.) Arrive Washington, D. C., 12:35 p. m. GRAND
SIGHTSEEING TOUR OF WASHINGTON provided, including
Hains Point and Lincoln Memorial. Leave Washington 3 p. m.
(Dinner provided on train.)
EIGHTH DAY-Arrive Jacksonville 7 a. m. (Breakfast provided
at Jacksonville.) Leave Jacksonville 11:35 a. m. (Luncheon pro-
vided on train.) Arrive River Junction 5:35 p. m. ........
UNDER AUSPICES OF


THE


S"Your Home-Town Newspaper"
In Co-operation With
TRAVEL ASSOCIATES, Inc.
521 Fifth Ave. New York, N. Y.


STAR


I


EYES EXAMINED




Glasses fitted when needed
Made In Our Own Laboratory
All Work Unconditionally
Guaranteed
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 6 p. m.

DR.. G. NEWBERRY
OPTOMETRIST
PANAMA CITY, FLA.


PAGE SIX


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY JUNE 16 1989







o r -.


Tax Delinquent

Property Now

Goes to State

Veto of Measure By Cone Allows
Tax Certificate Lands Older
; Than '35 to Revert to State

SVeto of a bill Saturday by Gov-
ernor Cone which the 1939 legs.
lature passed to postpone for two
years the title reversion provision
\of the 1937 Murphy act, allows the
'state to take over any tax delin-
quent property against which it
holds certificates that were more
than two years old on June 9,
1937.
The internal improvement fund,
of which the governor and cabinet
officers are trustees, will be
vested with the titles, and may
sell the property to the highest
bidder in the same manner that
other state-owned lands are sold.
The Murphy law of 1937 pro-
vided that it word expire auto-
matically on June 9 of this year,
and that any tax certificates held
by the state would give the state
title to the property covered.
The Murphy law authorized re-
demption, at the highest public
auction bid, of delinquent tax cer-
tificates held by the state. In
many instances, certificates were
redeemed for a few cents above
the cost of preparing and adver.


tising them, so that governmental
units did not obtain any appreci-
able revenues.
The 1939 law proposed to post.
pone the Murphy law's title rever-
sion for two years and allow prop-
erty owners until June 9, 1941, to
redeem their certificates under
other laws.
"The state of Florida has lost
millions of dollars by reason of
the Murphy act, and there is no
valid reason why this act-should
be extended," said Governor Cone
in vetoing the bill. "The new bill
seeks to extend the Murphy act
for two more years, which is un-
fair to those of our people who
have regularly paIt, their taxes.
Individuals, firms and corpora-
tions who desired to take advant-
age of this act nave had ample
time in the past two years to do
so.
"Tax delinquencies, and especi
aly,of big land owners, must end
somewhere, some time, and there
is no better time than the present
when it is vital that the taxes
owing to the state and its subdi-
visions be paid, or the penalties
of the present law applied," con-
cluded Cone.
----- -----
SUMMER SPORT
Lady: "Hello, sonny. Fishing?"
Boy: "Naw; drowning worms."

A Whale can be "weighed" by
a mathematical formula,' i its
length Is known.,


Two Crops

for Every

Garden Row
Getting the most produce from a
small plot of ground is a problem
for most urban and suburban gar-
deners. Where unlimited space is
available for a garden, every vege-
table may be grown in its own par-
ticular section, but with limited
space, early and late crops must
be doubled up.
Succession planting is the answer,
and with a little investigation and
planning on paper almost the entire
gamut of garden edibles may be
grown on a 20-foot square in one sea-
son.
In general, do not follow root
crops with root crops or plants of
one family with members of the
same family. Here are a few com-
binations that work out excellently:
Late peas followed by celery;
early peas followed by late cab-
bage; early lettuce by summer
squash; spinach, lettuce, and rad-
ishes by bush lima beans; early
beets by string beans; early string
Beans by fal bets; early earrot
by endive or Chinese cabbage, earth,
onions fro sets by kale; peas by
tunip, or carrots.
Tomatoes may be st between the
row aot peas to get started hi t
peas are reaching maturity, and
then the vims ae removed, leaU
the entirspae to tM tomatoes.
Cuumbers may be plante too
pickles afer the eariy letter, red-
cshes, spii~aan"d oieaw ftMa ato
ae out it the way.



t~p is pn atie d, addtk alt aod
Is needed. nha te seOmeBd
*c is ewo a balaowed pant tod
bKould be applied at ibe a te at M
east two pMmads tfar eMa I square
These dOal arangemeats are the
ost important faetoe in drawing
te plan far the vegetable garden.
ie small garden plan should be
workedd out carefully before
seed orders st t. J

Gov.Cone Endorses


Young Democrats'

Membership Drive

Proclamation Calls Upon Demo.
crats of State to Observe
'Young Democrat Week'

TALLAHASSEE, June 15 (FNS)
-The state-wide membership cam-
paign begun this week by Young
Democratic clubs throughout the
state was opened by the proclama-
tion issued by Governor Cone call-
ing upon all Democrats in the
state to observe the week of June
12-17 as "Young Democrat Week."
"Every Democrat in this state,"
the governor said, "should be in
line with Young Democrat Week
and should assist the Young Dem-
ocratic club members in every
county of the state to reach their
quota and lend their voice to im-
press upon the young men and
young women the great opportun-
ity offered them for constructive
service to the Democratic party.
"I consider it a special privilege
as governor of Florida to have the
power to recognize Young Demo-
crat Week by proclamation, and
to direct the attention of every
good Democrat, as well as the
citizens as a whole, to this im-
portant event."
The governor's proclamation
calls attention to the Invitation is-
sued by the 1939 legislature to the,
Young Democratic Clubs of Amer.
ica to hold their biennial conven-
tion of 1941 in Florida, and states
that the Young Democratic clubs
have In recent years and do now
stand on the battle front to pre-
serve the great Democratic tradi-
tions of the state of Florida and
have been Intensively active in
building within the state a co-
hesive party unit sufficiently flex-
ible and speedy to act at all times
as guardians and fighters for the
party.
-------Kc------.
Among plants that thrive in
shady gardens are pansies, for-
get-me-nots, azaleas and rhodo-
dendrons.


Graduates Seeking

Jobs Can Registes

Representative of Employment
Service At City Hall Each
Wednesday

Graduates of Florida colleges
and universities in the class of
1939, many of whom are now seek-
ing employment, are invited to
register at their local state em-
ployment service office, said M. G.
Sperry, manager of the Panama
City office.
Mr. Sperry explained that the
state employment service oper-
ates 25 offices and that graduates
should register where most con-
venient to them. A representative
of the Panama City district office
is at the Port St. Joe city hall
every Wednesday from 9 a. m. to'
4 p. m.
"While the Florida State Em-
ployment .Service does not guar-
antee any applicant a job, we are
confident that our state-wide con-
tact with employers greatly in-
creases the job applicant's chance
of employment," Mr. Sperry said.
"Our business is to find the va-
cant job first and then match it


with a person well qualified to
.fill it; and in oraer ,for us to give
the employer quick referral serv-
ice, applicants should keep us in-
formed at all times of changes ia
their address so that they may be
easily located if and. when suit-
able work is found for them. Ap-
plications also become inactive
after 60 days unless renewed," he
concluded.

Read the ads-it pays!


ERASE the DOUBT
About Your
FRESH WATER FISHING

MIDWAY PARK
Is In the HEART of the
Dead Lakes Fishing Area
Gulf County's north line cuts
the Dead Lakes at the
waistline
Meet Your Friend* At
MIDWAY PARK
FURNISHED CABINS
On the Waterfront
J. H. SHOEMAKER, Prop.
Poatefffice Address
WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA


4'- n ~ 5' c % '. 4 ,v

WE HAUL ANYTHING-

CALIh US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING
WE HAVE GOOD CLEAN BUILDING SAND FOR SALE

Prompt and Efficient Service Always


C. W. HORT0N


PHONE 70


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


---- --- ---- ----------- ---------,,

MADAM GORDON
PALMIST. CRYSTAL AND PSYCHIC READER
She Tells Everything You Wish To Know ,
Without having seen or heard of you before, will
tell you of your private affairs, giving you dates,
facts and figures that will amaze and benefit you.
Strange, true and fascinating are the words that
flow from the lips of this gifted and unrivaled
Palmist. Not only will she read your life like an
open book, but also help you out of your troubles.
reunite the separated. settle lovers' quarrels, en-
able you to wrin he esteem. love and affection
of any certain one, restore lost affection, bring
sunshine and happiness to discordant families .
S give reliable Information and advice on all prob.
lems of life such as love. courtship, marriage.
changes, travel. business. stock and investments.
WAITING ROOM FOR COLORED
Permanently Located at
PANAMA CITY, ON ROUTE 98, AT RESTFUL INN
V4 Mile South of Hugh Sills Variety Store


Says REDDY KILOWATT
Your Electrical ServaNt



Especially on a new,


modern, fast-cooking



ELECTRIC RANGE

IT'S really surprising how little it actually costs
to cook Electrically. The new, faster-cooking Elec-
' trick Ranges embody many improvements that add
to the pleasure of cooking this ideal way. Begin
now to improve your kitchen by modernizing your
cooking method. You can buy a new Electric Range
for a small down payment with terms arranged
conveniently. Investigate the low cost of Electric
Cooking today. See the new, attractive Electric
Ranges. And, remember, your kitchen will be
COOL if you cook Electrically


GUESS AGAIN Ask Your
Electric Cooking Costs ELECTRIC RANGE
Leus Than You Thin! DEALER or



FLORIDA POWER


Corporation


I k\ Vee' ro-- eJ.O" t"
ONS eoy eater freedom fr everyday ae and pains
because they have heard-and belleved--Alka-Seltzer an-
nouncements over the air or have read-nd beleved-printed
statements about Alka-Seltzer.
To these millions th relief obtained fromthusee of Alka-Seltaer
is worth much more than the genuine y nt they get from
All-Seltzer broadcasts.
hy don't you try the Alka-Seltzer wa w relief from gas on
Stomach, Heartburn, Headache, Acid Indigestion and Distres of
Colds, "Morning After" Mu and cua Pai?
YOU GET TWO FOLD REUEF
First-reief from pain, because Alka-Seltzer contains an anal-
gesic, (sodium salt of aspirin).
Seond--relief from the over-acid condition that is often asodl-
ated with these everyday ailments, because Alka-Seltzer contains
allaliting agents.
.. Get Alka- the ext time you paS
t a drug store


u---------------------------------------


.FRID.AY,. JUNE 16,- 1939


THE-STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE SEVEN







PAGE~~~~~~ EIH H TR OTS.JE UFCONY LRD RDY UE1,13


CONE VETOES BILL GIVING
:COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
UNWARRANTED POWER
House Bill 902, which would
have authorized county commis-
sioners to budget and earmark
money for paying refunding bonds,
which was sponsored by Represen-
tative Crary of Martin, county on
the ground that county funds are
subjects to "sharpshooting bond-
holders" who have original bonds,
was vetoed Saturday by Governor
Cone.
"The effect of this bill," Cone
said, "is to clothe the respective
board's of county. commissioners
with supreme authority to ear-
mark gasoline tax funds and other
revenues for the payment of such
county's bonds as they may in
their sole discretion elect.
"In my opinion this gives un-
warranted power to boards of
county commissioners. It would
enable them to decline to use such
funds to pay interest or principal
on original county bonds where
the holders have preferred not to
exchange the same for refunding
bonds. Such original bonds are
just as sacred county obligations
as bonds issued to refund the
same, but this bill would give the
county commissioners authority to
discriminate against the holders
of such original county obliga-
tions."
C-K
SPENDING OTHER
PEOPLE'S MONEY
An example of how free-hearted
state legislators can be with the
taxpayers' money is found in the
following section taKen from an
Associated Press adspatch from
Tallahassee with regard to vetoes
by Governor Cone:
Senate Bill 681: For relief of
T. Bernard Bishop and J. M.
Mashburn as surety bondesmen
for Joe James, charged in Jackson
county with unlawful operation of
motor vehicle while under the in-
fluence of whiskey. James' failed
to appear for trial. "There are no
reasons given why the bondsmen
,should not pay this bond as the
law .requires,' the governor said.
House Bill 876: For paying hos-
pital and doctor bills of J. E.
Madigan, traveling auditor for
'state comptroller's office who was
injured in automobile accident.
Governor Cone said the state was
not responsible for the accident,
:and In addition, Madigan was paid
'ls regular salary of $178 monthly
for eight weeks when he was not
able to work.
House Bill 1088: For paying
$100 to Rep. J. Min Ayres of Gil-
christ county for loss of clothing
and personal effects when he and
Rep. Halley B. Lewis of Levy
county were held up and, robbed
by two escaped convicts, near In-
verness last winter. "The state is
not liable for acts of escaped con-
victs," Governor Cone said.
SSenate Bill 690: For paying C.
D. Ivey of St. Johns county for


CLASSIFIED ADS
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Small farms close in.
Prices reasonable. Liberal terms
and small down payment. If pur-
chased this month, no interest
will be. charged on deferred
payments. Call The Star, phone
51. 6-2 3t
WANTED TO RENT
WANTED TO RENT-All or part
of building suitable for storage
purposes. St. Joe Furniture Co.
Phone 59. It
POR RENT
UNFURNISHED 9 by 18-foot cab-
ins; ceiled overhead and sides;
good water; $6 month. Apply St.
Joe Lumber Co. 12121tf
ROOMS FOR RENT
IF YOU have a room for rent,
why not place a classified adver-
tisement in The Star. The cost is
low and returns are gratifying. .
' Try it today. tt


injuries in automobile accident Miss Virginia ATiller of Talla-
which he charged resulted because hassee is the guaet of the Misses
of unsafe condition of State Road Jewel and Marianne Lewis at
No. 4. Liability, the governor their beach home.
said, would rest upon the state -
road department, if any liability,STAR OFFERS SPECIAL


existed, and he said the road de-
partment has not received any
notice of claim for the accident,
which occurred on January 1,
1936.-Panama City News-Herald.

Mrs. Elgin Bayless was the
week-end guest or her mother,
Mrs Nora Howard. Mrs. Bayless'
sons, Elgin, Jr., and Tommy, who
had been visiting their grand-
-0_-1-T- d- -Pl rpirmrl


TRIP TO WORLD FAIR

(Continued from Page 1)
Excursions will leave River Junc-
tion on June 20, July 25, August
29 and October 5. Complete infor-
mation may be obtained by turn-
ing to page six of this issue, and
further details may be secured at
The Star office
One hardly realizes the magni-


lothner flor Lwo weelU retu tude of the fair unless it can be
home with her. seen. The exhibits are all on a
scale that has never before been
The Misses Melba Nedley and attempted. The foremost design-
Lunnette Hammock spent last ers in the country. nave been en-
week with Mr. and Mrs. D. C. gaged to contrive superlatively
Smith-at their home in, Niles. dramatic and compelling presen-
: stations' in all branches of science
Charles Parker was a weeKt-end and industry.
visitor in Tuscaloosa, Ala. The greatest of these and most

PHONE Monument
P54H MOTOR PARTS "AMnume

NATIONALLY KNOWN PARTS for Trucks and Automobiles


High Quality


Low Cost


publicized is, of course, the fair's
theme exhibit, displayed, within
the 200-foot Perisphere, the in-
terior contents of which is twice
that of the great Radio City mu-


sic hall.
The Star invites everyone in
Port St. Joe to view the "World
of Tomorrow" by taking advant-
a'e of this special trip offer.


No* *04 0*;:0, s e *o c e



* DANCE.


at


WILLIAMS'

DANCE HALL


DANCING EACH DAY AND NIGHT By Victrola Music

SPECIAL DANCES wednesday and Saturday
W ANights
Music By Midnight Sheiks
All Dances Conducted In An Orderly Manner


Delic
Home.
BEER


ioui
Mad


l. BARBECUE SANDWICHES
WINE SOFT DRINKS SANDWICHES


1S**** WW** UU40#00000 UUU UUU ,


Action speaks louder than
words! Here are the results
of the 3 leading cornetitive
automobile road tests held'
so far in 1939...


lUhi 541


Last January, in the famous 315-mile Gilmore- i:
Yosemite Road Run, an 85 h.p. Ford V-8 gave ..
best gas mileage of all leading low-priced cars, ,
with 24.57 miles per gallon! (Ford-built Mercury 8
also surpassed the low-priced sixes in gas mileage
in this run!) .
." .... . .i. .
I


No wonder it wins ... look what it's got!

ONLY V-8 ENGINE in any low-priced car!

BIGGEST HYDRAULIC BRAKES in any low-priced car!

STEADIEST-RIDING CHASSIS in any low-priced carl

LONGEST RIDEBASE of any low-priced car! j' i

TOP OVER-ALL ENGINEERING in the low-price field!


THIS IS THE YEAR TO GO






FORD V 8
AN "8" IS BETTER THAN A "6"


ST. JOE MOTOR COMPANY


SALES
qr^SiwaP


SERVICE


SEE YOUR FORD DEALER FIRST FOR LOW-COST FINANCING


HO'S 141 COT IT


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE EIGHT


FRIDAY, SUNE 16, 1939