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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00136
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: May 26, 1939
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00136

Full Text







The Star-Florida's fastest grow.
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St Joe.


S Prt St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast.
eat growing little city. In
AR- the heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


VOLUME II PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY., FLORIDA, FRIDAY, MAY 26, 1939 NUMBER 32


TOLLS MAY BRIN

MONEY FOR GUL

COUNTY CANA

MEASURE BY SHARIT, PASS!
BY SENATE, MAY CHANGE
FEDERAL RULING

United States army enginee
recently refused to recommend
imbursement of $200,000 to Gi
county for construction of tI
connecting canal between
Joseph's Bay and the intracoast
canal, although, they have ma
the recommendation that the fe
eral government take over tl
waterway, widen it and deepen
to conform to width and depth
existing canals.
Contention of the engineers
that the canal was constructed
priinarily for use or the St. J(
Paper company in order that pu
logs could be brought by water
the huge kraft mill located her
Provides Tolls
A measure .introducace~l day i
the 'state senate by Senator'J. 1
Sharit of this city providing can
tolls to be levied in counties ha
ing a population of not less tha
2,750 nor more 'than 3,150, an
which was passed by the senate
may cause, a reversal of opinion
by the army engineers, as under
provisions of the bill Gulf count
would be. able to collect toll
from all'boats and bdrges usin
the connecting, canal in order t
raese funds to fntuet paymenIts c
interest and principal on th
$200,000 worth of bonds voted b
this. county for digging of th
canal.
In an effort to nave the govern
ment reimburse Gulf county fo
this money, which it was believe
would be the case at the time th,
bonds were voted, trips have beer
made to Washington, Atlanta and
Mobile by interested parties, ean
in this connection the following
telegram was sent this week tt
the. chairman of the federal river;
and harbors committee:
Congressman Mansfield, Chm.
Rivers, and Harbors Committee,
Washington, D. C.
Gulf county, Florida, could nol
conceivably have undertaken the
financial obligation to provide
$200,000 towards construction of
the Gulf county canal unless the
people of the county had been
reasonably certain that reimburse.
ment could and would be secured
from the federal government. At
(Continued on Page 6)

Would Take Mule

Instead of Books


Lawmaker Requests Two Cows If
Choice Red Mule Is Not
Available

Senator Ernest R. Graham of
Pensuco, one of Dade county's
leading dairyrmen, wants a re.
mule instead of the set of law
books voted him by senate ac-
tion last Friday at Tallahassee.
"I have no use. for the set of.
law books,' he said, "but 1
would like to get 'a mule if we
are going to give things away,
and if it is all the same, I'd like
a red mule. If -t can't get the
mule, then I want two cows." .
In continuing hts plea before
the senate, Graham said he was
not a lawyer and was able "to
get away with' things now on ig-
norance of the law pleas," and
he was afraid if he got the books
some judge might hold him ac-
countable. _
I


roln


IN FLANDERSFIELDS LEGISLATORS Amendment for Abolishing

J ANES FIELS LOOK OVER CITY Ad Valorem Tax System In

In Flandorswfs te po AND PAPER MILL Florida Is Killed By Hoiu
Between the cosses. row o H ouse ----- -


Between the crosses, row or
D row,
That mark our place, and in tht
sky
The larks, still bravely singing
rs fly
re- Scarce heard amid the guns be
ulf low.
he
St. We are the Dead. Short days
:al ago
de We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset
.d- glow,
he Loved and were roved, and norw
it we lie
of In Flanders fields.

S Take up our quarrel with the
ed foe;
To you from failing hands we
o throw
The Torch; be yours to hold it
to high.
e. If ye break faith--with us who
;n We die
We shall not sleep, though pop-
pies grow
In Flanders fields.
v-
n
d Poppy Money
e,
'i .Aids Disabled
ar
y
.s Every Penny Contributed Tomor
g row Will Go To Disabled Vet-
o erans and Their Families
If .___
e Every penny of the money con
y tribute for memorial poppies to
e morrow, Poppy Day, will go to aid
disabled veterans and there families
l- left in need by the death or dis-
r ability of a veteran, according to
d Mrs. T. M. Schneider, poppy chair-
e man of Gulf County Unit No. 116,
I American Legion Auxiliary. Dis-
d tribution of flowers will be con-
d ducted by volunteer workers and
g all contributions will go in their
6 entirety into the rehabilitation
s and welfare. funds of the Legion
(Continued on Page 6)
------k--------

Memorial Day

e Services to Be

Held Tuesday

.At Port Inn Park Under Auspices
Of Gulf County Post 116,
American Legion

Memorial Day will be. observed
next Tuesday In Port St. Joe with
services, to be conducted at Port
Inn park by Gulf.County Post 116,
American Legion.
A number of district Legion dig-
nitaries have been contacted to
take part in the program and fa-
vorable replies have been received
from Clyde Mayhall of Marianna,
who is slated to make the main
address, and Col. P. C. Coombs of
Apalachicola. The local band will
furnish appropriate music for the
services, which will begin prompt-
ly at 12:15 p. m. Joe Lilienfeld,
named state bugler for the Veter-
ans. of Foreign Wars, will sound
taps and Colonel .Coombs, -com-
mander of the National Guard in
.this area, will endeavor to have
a firing squad on hand.
In case of rain, arrangements
have been made to hold the serv-
ices at the Centennaal building.
Immediately following the cere-
monies, a dinner will be served
for members of the Legion post,
the ladies of the Auxiliary and
invited guests.


1 -


%A


If passed, a bill introduced .in
the house Wednesday by. Repre-
sentative E. Clay Lewis would al-
low the. city of Port St. Joe to
grant franchises for the establish-
ment or maintenance of any pub-
lic utilities, and provide for sub-
mission of the franchise ordin-
ance to a referendum vote of the
people.
'Another bill, subniitted Tuesday
by Lewis, provides for the regis-
tration andt re-registration of all
qualified .electors in Gulf county
as a pre-requisite for voting, and
also provides for the making of a
new set of registration books fgr
this county. ,


'S


Believed Attemps To Gain Adop-
tion -of Sales Tax Definitely
At End For Session

A proposed legislative amend-
ment to abolish the ad valorem
system of taxation in Florida was
killed in the house of representa-
tives late last Friday.
Ratification of the proposal by
the people of the state, had it
nslached them, would have resulted.
in the need. of a sa-es tax, accord-
ing to opponents of the measure,
to .substitute for the $43,000,000
now collected annually by the
state and its. governmental units
4rom land owners.
The amendment met its defeat
when the house voted. 43 to 40 for
income and inheritance taxes to
take the ,place of the ad valorem
method of taxation. The whole-
plan was later killed 79 to 3.
Lewis One of Floor Leaders
Debate on the measure waged
hot and furious, and after hours
of bitter debate, Representative E.


will be spent to lull us. into a
sense of security."
He said a sales tax would re-
sult as a replacement for real es-
tate taxes, unless the state made
provision for acbme and inherit,
ance taxes.
Representative' Surrency of Sar
asota offered an amendment that
would leave future -legislatures.
free to impose any kind of tax-
income, intangibles, inheritance,
ad valorem, sales, transaction or
excises-if the people- approved
the amendment te abolish ad va.
loremn taxes.
"If we are. going to let down
the bars for taxes against the poor
man, then let's do the same and
open up the way to tax the rich
man," said Rep. Holt in support
of Surrency's -idea. The Surrency
substitute was. defeated 52 to 34.
-idprE d_.. Lindsey of Dade
said Florida should not "levy a
tax upon the poor man and allow
idle lands-from which toq for-
tunes have been removed in naval
stores and lumhber-tno row un


PARTY OF 150 VIEW FLORIDA
e FUTURE INDUSTRIAL
CENTER

Members of the Florida legisl
tyre, the Capitol Press club ar
their guests, to the number of a
s proximately 150, invaded Port S
Joe last Sunday to inspect at firl
t hand what we or this city aI
pleased to term "Florida's futui
r industrial center."
The party eame nere at the ii
vitatioi of Senator Joe Sharit an
Representative Clay Lewis of th:
city and made the trip in a flee
of air-cpnditioned buses provide
by Harold Colee of the Florid
Motor Lines.
Inspect Monument
Updn arrival here, after viewing
historical 'points between this cit
and Tallahassee, the visitors Wer
taken to Constitution .Park where
the y inspected the 'monumen
marking the site of Florida's firs
constitutional convention held i:
1838, the new $73.00Q CGentennia
auditorium and the replica of th
First locomotive used in this state
which was operated over the Laki
Wimico railroad 100 years ago.
A buffet lunch wa.s served a
the Port Inn. where the guest
were entertained by.a quartet fron
the Flocida.. A.. &' I. College ii
STallahasse. They "were thenn takeI
for a tour about the, city, ant
I many' were the expressions o:
Amazement at the phenomena
Growth voiced by those who had
visited the city previous' to con
Sstruction of the paper mill.
Almost two hours was spent by
Sthe party'in inspecting the houge
S$7,500;000 kraft paper mill, one of
the largest in the South.
In writing of the visit, Herbert
Bayer staff correspondent for the
Jacksonville Times-Union, had this
to say of Port St. Joe:
City Going Forward
'Although new with industrial
attire, the town Is going forward
in strides, unparalleled perhaps by
any community in the state. This
forward movement, this industrial
development and this progressive-
nhess is due to the unusual ca-
pacity of one man-it represents
his dream-for it is the result of
the dream and planning of the
late Mr. DuPont, to whom the city
and Gulf county shall ever be
grateful."


Lewis Introduces

Local Utility Bill


City Would 1e Allowed to Grant
Utility Franchises and Have
Election Held on Same


would, vote against it because they
are opposed to abolition of ad va-
t lorem.
"I would like to see these sub-
mitted in separate propositions,
but now it would be a useless ex-
pense, andi I hope the amendment
will be 'defeated."
SThe house killed earlier in the
day a proposal to insert inherit-
ance. and income taxes into a
broader proposal which also would
have allowed future legislatures
to levy a sales tax or other reve-
nues in place of real estate
revenue.
It is believed that this action by
the house. -last Friday definitely
ends any passage of a general
sales, tax during this session of
the legislature.
Abolition Would Result in Tax
Opponents of complete abolition
of the ad valorem system said a
sales tax would be the result un-
less the voters themselves could
authorize income or inheritance
taxes, at the same time they voted
on abolition. They charged that
abolition would( put the tax bur-
de;ns from wealthy land owners
on the working class of people.
"Impoverished, underprivileged
millionaires are aklng the people
to take the burden off them," de-
clared Representative Warren of
Duval. "If they were fair and want
the same rules to operate in every
direction, they'll be willing to sub-
mit this whole question to the
people, including the income and
inheritance taxes."


Money Would Be Spent
Representative Holt said: "The
greatest propaganda machine this
state ever saw will start opera-
tions if the abolition amendment
is submitted to the people. We
have listened to this propaganda-
for the past few years, and there
is no telling how much money


from St. Petersburg.)


Would Raise Bond Payment Funds
Representative Martin of Polk,
who recommended the exemption
of property from ad valorem tax
for state government purposes,
said that elimination of the ad va-
lorem system would result in in-
creased valuations mn the counties.
"If you remove ad valorem," he
stated, "it will make ,property
subject only to payment of bond
taxes, and mind you, these people
who own bonds bought them at
depressed prices, and the bond
holders could, by court action, en-
force increased levies against
property to raise bond payment
funds.
"The laboring class of people
are not going to let us take taxes
off the rich people and shift it to
them," he said. "The poor man is
not going to pay a four or five
per cent sales tax in order to have
a half million acres of land owned
by somebody else exempt from
taxes."
Vicious Proposal
"This is the most vicious and
far-reaching proposal offered to
the legislature in 20 years," Rep-
resentative Collins of Leon said in
discussing outright repeal of ad
valorem taxes. "The most import-
ant problem facing this state is a
revision of the ad valorem tax
structure," he stated. He outlined
that at present some property
may be confiscated for non-pay-
ment and other property may ad-
just for a few cents hundreds of
dollars of taxes legally assessed.
He said exemption will give every
bond holder a first mortgage on
every piece of property in Florida.
Wood Steps Down
Speaker Pierce Wood, general
manager for the DuPont interests
(Continued on Page 2)


Clay Lewis of Port St. Joe. one another fortune in ,pulp, wood and
of the floor leaders for the pro- timber without taxes." '
posal, asked for the plan as Representative' Outman of Pin-
amen'ded to be defeated. ellas stated elimination of the ad-
Before roll call he said: "The valorem system .of 'taxation is
purpose'of the opponents has been p eposterius. "You're -voting for
.a,:,lv,. I think we all realize hie cIaop-l k.boct a0 vote o
fallacy -'f 'submitting the amend- t plan to abolish all adva.
Y'" 'his "orm. T "th~e plan to abolish all ad va-
ment in this form. There' are lorem,'. he said' "-or God's sake.
those who would vote against the proet yor h. "om e governme
O protect your home government
amendment because they are op- and my home government. I'm op-
posed to an income or inherit- posed, to St. Petersurg becoming
ance .tax. There are those who a vassal of Tallahassee." (He is


I









PAGE TWO THE STAR, PORT ST. J~3E. GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA FRIDAY, MAY 26, 1939


ROYAL SERVICE PROGRAM
FOR MISSIONARY SOCIETY
The three circles of the Baptist
Missionary society met Monday
afternoon at the church for the
missionary program for May, with
the Martha Circle: in charge.
Topic for the afternoon was "The
Great Commission and the Min-
istry of the Healing." The Bible
study was by Mrs. C. McClellan.
The various phases of the pro-
gram were developed by Mes-
dames McClellan, Holliday, White
and Cason, which dealt with the
healing agencies, the hospitals of
the Baptist denomination, the for-
eign and home fields. Following
.announcement of the next meet-
ing, which is a stewardship pro-
gram to be at the church, the
meeting adjourned.

MISS LeHARDY ENTERTAINS
MONDAY BRIDGE CLUB
Miss Margaret LeHardy enter-
tained the Monday Night Bridge
club this week at her home on
Long avenue. After several pro-
gressions -prizes were awarded to
Mrs. W. M. Howell, high, and
Mrs. F. A. LeHardy, cut.
Delicious refreshments w e r e
served to Mesdames R. E. Wil-
liams, F. A. LeBaray, P. D. Far-
ther, G. W. Cooper, B. H. Graves,
W. M. Howell and Miss. Louise
LeHardy. .

SUNDAY SCHOOL CLASS
ENJOYS FISHING TRIP
The members of the. Sunday
school class of B. B. Conklin were
treated to 'a fishing trip on, the
bay Sunday afternoon. The guests
left from the canal bridge at 1
o'clock and; enjoyed the afternoon
trolling. Before turningg home a
delicious .lunch was ejoy-d by
Tommy O:w ,'e Jr., Huel' Crockett,
Jr., Billy Roberts and guests, E.
A, Conklin and Carlyle Matthews.

CONGRATULATIONS
The Siar joins with the many
friends of Mr. and Mrs. J. Lilien-
feld in extending congratulations
on their eighteenth wedding anni-
versary, which they observed last
Tuesday.
We also extend felicitations to
Mr. and, Mrs. C. P. VanHorn, who
will observe their twentieth wed-
ding anniversary May 31.

Mrs. O. O. Miller returned to
her home in Blountstown Satur-
day after spending a week here
as the guest of Mr. and Mrs. E.
B. Dendy and Mr. and Mrs. J. F.
Miller.

Mr. and Mrs. Otto Anderson of
Apalachicola moved Monday to
their summer home on the Gulf
near Beacon Hill.

Mrs. W. C. Roche and little son
were dismissed from a Panama
City hospital and arrived home
Sunday.

Miss Marigene Smith left Wed-
nesday for Cottoncale to visit
Miss. Marigene Williams.

Friends of Mrs. M. J. Fillingim
regret to learn of her illness and
wish for her a speedy recovery.

Mrs. M. Stuckey of Pensacola is
the guest for the. summer of Mr.
and Mrs. C. P. VanHorn at Beacon
Hill.

The Misses Margaret and Mary
Catherine Blount have returned to
their home in Geneva, Ala., after
visiting with their brother and
sister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. John
B!ount.

Rev. and Mrs. Charles Watten-
barger of Bonifay were .the guests
Sunday oftMr. and Mrs. J. O. Bag-
gett and' family.


At the Churches

METHODIST CHURCH
D. E. Marietta, Minister
Services Every Sunday
10:00 a. m.-Churcn School.
11:00 a. m.-Morning worship.
7:30 p. m.-Evening worship.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. J. W. Sisemore, Minister,
10:00 a. m.--Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.-Morning Worship.
7:00 p. m.-B. Y. P. U.
8:00 p. nm.-Preaching service.
WV. M. U., Monday, 3:00 p. m.
Prayermeeting Wednesday, 7:30 p.
m. Teachers meeting, Thursday,
7:30 p. m.

ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Rev. E. T. Corbin, Pastor
Full-time services
10:-15 a.,m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.-Preaching Service.
7:30 p. mn.-Evangelistic service.
Prayermeeting every Wednesday
night.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
Rev. H. F. Beaty, Minister
10,:00 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.-Preaching s.ervice.
7:30 p. m.-Preaching service.

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL,
Rev. Glion Benson, Rector
10:00 a. m.-Church School.
Services first and third. Sunday
nights at 7:30.
Communion service fourth Sun-
day mornings at 7:30.
---------
J. A. M. CLUB MEETS
WITH MRS. J. M. SMITH
Mrs. J. M. Smith was hostess to
the J. A. M, club Monday night
at her home on Monument ave-
nue. Cut flowers were used to
.decorate the living room where
thq guests were' ente.rtaiued. Sew-
ing was enjoyed, after which gifts
were exchanged and names drawn
for the following meeting.
Delicious ice cream, cake and
soft drinks were served to Mes-
dames W. C. Pridgeon, A. D. Law-
son, B. A. Pridgeon, C. E. Boyer,
E. C. Pridgeon, Lewis Perritt, J.
A. Connell and Miss Myrtice
Coody.

SUSANNAH WESLEY CIRCLE
IN MEETING MONDAY
The Susannah Wesley Circle of
the Methodist Missionary society
met Monday at the church with
Mrs. George Patton presiding. The
study for the afternoon, taken
from the Mission Book on India,
was led' by Mrs. Patton and Mrs.
Roy Gibson. Following the study
the .meeting was dismissed by the
Rev. D'. E. Marietta.

Mrs. Pete Strange and daugh-
ter, Evelyn, left Saturday to visit
relatives in St. Petersburg.

E. A. Conklin left Tuesday to
spend the summer months visiting
relatives in Charlotteville, Va.,
and Bronxville, N. Y.

Miss Malzie McCoy of Blounts-
town is the guest of her brother-
in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs.
Frank LeHardy, Jr.
*& *
Mrs. W. H. Howell and children
left Tuesday to visit with her sis-
ter, Mrs. W. B. Shores, in Cot-
tondale.

Miss Kathleen Saunders left
last week to spend the summer
months with relatives in Spring
City, Tenn.

Mr. and Mrs. W. Sawyer of
Apalachicola visited Sunday in
this city.


B. R. Gibson, Jr., a
Barnesville, Ga., will
day to spend the sumi
with his parents, Mr.
R. Gibson.


a student in


G. P. B. GIRLS' CLUB IN
MEETING TUESDAY
Miss Marigene Smith enter-
tained members of the G. P. B.
club Tuesday afternoon at the
home of her parents on Monument
avenue. Seasonal flowers decor-
ated the living room where the
guests were entertained. A regu-
lar meeting was held, at which
time plans were made for a buf-
fet supper to be held soon at the
home of Miss Dorothy Crockett.
Refreshments of punch, sand-
wiches and! crackers were served
to the Misses Murnice Taunton,
Lunette Hammock, Elaine Gore,
Dorothy Crockett, Melba Nedley
and g uest, Malzie McCoy of
Blountstown.
.ft i"r
MRS. GLOEKLER HOSTESS
TO THURSDAY CLUB
The members of the Thursday
Bridge club met this week at the
home. of Mrs. J. B. Gloekler. The
living room, where two tables
were placed for play, was attrac-
tively decorated with cut flowers,
roses predominating. At the con-
clusion of several progressions,
scores were tallied' and high and
low prizes presented.
The hostess served a sweet
course to Mesdames B. A. Prid-
geon, J. M. Smith, Tom Owens,
Edwin Ramsey, M. P. Tomlinson
and invited guests, Mrs. Joe Mira
and Mrs. Dell Mahon.

POT-LUCK LUNCHEON
AND BRIDGE PARTY
A pot-luck luncheon and bridge
was held' Tnesday afternoon at
the home of-'Mrs. Robert Bellows
on Monument avenue. Beautiful
ciiit lower' decorated the living
and dining rooms. Following a de-
licioris luncheon of chicken salad,
potato chips, deviled eggs, sliced
tomatoes,' hot rolls, iced tea and
pie, bridge was enjoyed by twenty-
five ladies present.

MARIE JONES CIRCLE MEETS
WITH MRS. EDWIN RAMSEY
The Marie Jones Circle, of the
Methodist Missionary society met
Monday at the home of Mrs. Ed-
win Ramsey, with Mrs. R. A.
Swatts in charge of the program.
Mrs. J. L. Temple, chairman of
the circle, held a short business
session. Following the benediction
by Rev. D. E. Marietta, 'games and
refreshments were enjoyed,.

Mrs. J. C. Logan returned last
Friday to her home in Pensacola
after spending two weeks here as
the guest of her daughter, Mrs.
Basil E. Kenney, Jr.

Charles Conter of Apalachicola
is the guest this week of Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Tapper.

C. B. Forsyth left Saturday to
accept a position in Washington.

Mr. and .Mrs. Roy Williams
were visiting Sunday in Panama
City.

Mrs. J. W. Smith of Sumatra is
visiting with Mr. and Mrs. W. S.
Smith, having arrived Saturday.

Miss Alama Burcher expects to
leave this week-end to accept a
position in Wilmington, Del.

Opal Ogburn returned Saturday
from a business trip to points in
the southern part of the state.

Miss Minnie Ola Pridgeon re-
turned Saturday to her home in
Wewahitchka after spending te.n
days here as the guest of her
brother and sister-in-law, Mr. and
Mrs. E. C. Pridgeon.


arrive Tues- f f
mer vacation Mrs. Mattie Gauldifig returned
and Mrs. B. to the city this week after visit-
.., ing in LaBelle and Immokalee.


GIRLS' AUXILIARY. MEETS C. G. Costin, Jr., who lias been
j.,J:ki- Fillingim was hostess to .a student a't-the Gulf Coast Mili-
the .ijrj.ir Girl-' Auxiliary this 'tary AcadeIfy for' the past term,
. 0ek Fpllaw ing the. regular. busi- returned home''Monday.
ness meeting, plans were made for
a stewardship program at the Mrs. S. A. Martin and daughter
a stewardship program at the
church next Tuesday. The hostess of Charleston, S. C., are guests of
served refreshments to members Mr. and Mrs. R. W. Smith.
present.
r Miss Ozelle Matthews of Tusca-
loosa, Ala., is visiting Miss Ednia
Buy a Poppy Tomorrow. McCoud at Beacon Hill.


Phone 41


Soft Water Used


Evening Appointments

ADAMS BEAUTY SHOP
PERCY ADAMS, Proprietor
--o< Specialist In All Branches of Beauty Work }---
ALL WORK GUARANTEED

Shampoo and Finger Wave 50c

Permanent Waves $3.50 up
Monument Avenue Port St. Joe, Fla.


"MAGIC OF
"Charlie Mc-


y


NOTICE Carthy's Onl:
Due to length Rival"
of this show and the
we will be un- "COLLEGE
able to show CUTIES"
Owl Show
first
n" hb C,,


NOTICE
Due to this ex-
tra attraction,
we will ad-
vance prices to
10-15-25 Matinee
10-25-35 Evening


n tlS ) creenL
Gene Autrey and Smiley Burnette

"WESTERN JAMBOREE"
LONE RANGER CARTOON
;s~~EwraemP,~---41-----l-d--
ADMISSION
ORCHESTRA 'Til Six 25c
BALCONY, All Time 15c
ORCHESTRA, After Six ..............35c
CHILDREN (Under 12) ................10c


OWL SHOW-10:30 P. M.
REGULAR PRICES
ACTION GALORE!

JACK HOLT in

"WHISPERING ENEMIES"


SUNDAY MONDAY MAY 28 AND 29


R R i5Confessions
CORNERED.... of a



iCA"^ Im ISPY

EDWARD G. ROBINSON
FRANCIS LEDERER Co. Sanders paul' uku
Honyr 'Neill*Directed by ANATOLE LITVAK
-' Predented by WARNER BROS.
"en Ploy by M .ion Ki -$ ond John Wcxlly T.chn, mo
nrB ml M L Me ad vh. Od*or LonG.Tvrrou,&formerGM on *A Rrd F Nlonal Pic- v


.


1 P0 .


THEATRE
OPENS
SATURDAY
1:15 P. M.
SUNDAY
1:45 P. M.
DAILY 2:45 P. M.


~racsa -


Society Personals churches

LANETA DAVIS, Editor


- -- - -- - - - -- -


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE. GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, MAY 26, 1939


PAGE TWO


A-"






FRIDAY MAY. 26 1939I --h~----~WI Y_ \1-- ~ THE. STR PORT ST. JOE, GUL COUTY FLOID PAGE THREE--~--;Z,~"'"~~- 'C"--- -


JACK HOLT IN

SATURDAY OWL

SHOW ATPORT

4'Whispering Enemies" is Chock
Full of Action and Drama
With Strong Cast

A noval plot idea makes "Whis-
pering Enemies," playing at the
Port theater owl show Saturday
night, a sure winner in its field.
Jack Holt, who turns in his
usual convincing, rugged perform-
ance, takes the part of a success-
ful cosmetic manufacturer who is
helpless when a rival concern


Jack Holt and Dolores Costello
launches a whispering campaign
against his product. Finally driv-
en to bankruptcy, le organizes an
advertising agency and launches a
similar campaign against those
who wrecked his business.
The rival firm Is hbaded by Do-
lores Costello, attractive and im-
pressive in the chief supporting
role, who joins his staff to secure
evidence against him. Finally the
law catches up with. Holt, but
when he talels his rap he finds
Miss Costello waiting for him.
Others making up the strong
cast are Addison Richards, Don-
ald Briggs, Joseph Crehan, Pert
Kelton and Paul Everton.

Naval Marksmen

Again Take St. Joe

Down Local Skeet Shooters 498
To 376 In Return; Match
At Pensacola

The skeet-shooting squad of the
St. Joe Gun club journeyed to
Pensacola last Sunday for a re-
turn match with the Naval Air
Station sharpshooters and the out-
come' of the matcl was even more
disastrous than that held here the
previous Spnday.
The shoot was held on the new
skeet field at the air station, and
apparently the navy had) been
doing a bit of practicing, for two
men placed in the 90 class. Lieu-
tenant Allison with a 90, and
Cadet George with a 92 were the
high men for the day, Pete Ber-
nal, with 84, and Frank Rowan,
with 76,-were tops for St. Joe.
Final outcome was Naval Station
498, St. Joe 376.
The Port St. Joe shooters left
this city at 8:30 a. vn. and arrived
at the air station at. 11, where
they were met by Lieut. Kersch-
ner and shown around the station
until noon, when the local marks-
men and, their wives were guests
at the Officers Club for lunch.
All making the trip were well
satisfied, even though they did
come out on the small end of the
score; and expressed to the na-
val station m'en their thanks for
a most enjoyable day.
Arrangements are now under
way for the next intra-club shoot
to be held June 4. This time the
local aggregation is picking a club
that doesn't boast so many ex-
pert marksmen. Definite details
will be released next week.

The average normal person has
from 15 to 20 different sleeping
positions about 35 times a night
to allow various muscles of the
body to relax ana rest.


--- I or Your


Week-end


Trip


u. A


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SG m-Dipping a new ad other makes of tires combined.
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Another exclusive Firestone safety feature.
STwo Extra Layers of Safety-Lock Cords Under the Tread provide PLU c
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Another exclusive Firestone safety feature. c:e
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Secured On a Few Hours' Notice


St. Joe Texaco Service Station

PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA




'-9 III'E R E 8 I


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE THREE


FRIDAY, MAY 26, 1939







PG FOU TH STR OTS.JE UFCUTFOIAFIAMY2,13


OUT OF THE HICK TOWN CLASS
TH E STA R ?Where do they get that word "Hick" any-

Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla, Last week organizers working to persuade
by The Star Publishing Company the people of a neighboring community to
W. S. SMITH, Editor vote for daylight saving startled their pub-
lic with the slogan: "Vote 'for Daylight Say-
Entered :as Second-class matter, December 10, ing and Keep Our Town Out of the Hick
1937, .at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879. Town Class.
Obviously it was the intention of the slogan
Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance makers to convey the impression that a "hick
One Year........$2.00 Six Months......$1.00 town" is something to be looked down upon,
Three Months..........65c
the kind of a town we would not want to
-4( Telephone 51- live iln.
From long usage the term "hick town,"
The spoken word is given scant attention; when used by city dwellers, has come to
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. mean a rural, farming community Now just
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word what is there so out of order, so uncouth,
is lost; the printed word remains. so undersirable about a rural, farming com-
munity?
MEMORIES ON MEMORIAL DAY Well, let us see. In the first place the "hick
Next Tuesday is Memorial Day, recalling town", is a community where the air is fresh
the. ghosts of yesteryear, reliving the days and pure, free from the smoke and gas and
of splendor and glory, thrusting aside the filth of city streets; in the "hick town" you
-present in reverence for the past-this is know your neighbors and neighbor with them
Memorial Day's purpose. -usually you don't have to lock your doors
We consciously pay tribute to men and at night; the churches and schools are still
women mnst nf thePm nn lnn-pr wi;th 1s for the outstanding institutions of these com-


THE BARRIER


,N g UI, 1 U11 % I b
their service to our native land. We bow our
heads in prayer not only for those who have
gone, but for those who now protect and
who in the future will protect our homes and
hearths.
Muffled drums beat on Memorial Day-
muffled that the sleeping heroes may not be
awakened from their rest so long deserved.
Muffled drums echo and re-echo the thoughts
of American men and women for those who
sacrificed their lives.
And the thought comes naturally of those
still living, yet disabled. Veterans in hos-
pitals who no longer can march behind a
military band; veterans who must sit day in
and night out working only with their hands,
their eyes, and often the crippled remnants
of once strong bodies. .- .,,,;.
Is not Memorial Day for these men still
living though housed in broken bodies? Do
we not owe them a debt of gratitude perhaps
even greater than those who have passed on ?
SNext Tuesday let us consider in our Me-
*morial Day plans these men; let us soften
what bitterness they feel toward life. Let us
raise them on a pedestal of glory as high, if
;not higher, than any others.

ADVERTISE ADVERTISED BRANDS
Advertising sold the American housewife
"Uneeda Biscuit," instead of crackers out of
a barrel.
In the same way, advertising has sold a
thousand and more names of merchandise
which American people buy. Most individuals
have a preference for some brand of soups,
canned fruits and vegetables, macaroni,
tooth paste and tooth brushes, shaving cream
and face lotions, clothes, cars and radios. Ad-
vertising created these preferences.
The retail merchant who sells branded
merchandise-and they all do-has a ready-
made market if he will but tell the people,
in a definite way, what he is offering and at
what prices.
The public will buy what it wants. At
home, if it can, br away from home, if it
must. Carrying and advertising advertised
brands is good merchandising on the part of
any local merchant.-Publisher's Auxiliary.

-It is commonly believed that lightning
doesn't strike twice in the same place. Per-
haps so, but water is no respecter of tradi-
tions. Ye Ed, for the second time in three
months, fell overboard while fishing Satur-
day at Sumatra. But the day was warm and
we got a beautiful string of fish, so we have
no complaint to make.

Just now the world is interested in Just
how far Musslini and Hitler can bluff Eng-
land and France.

Bass season opens next Thursday. Have
you overhauled your fishing paraphernalia?.


munities; there is grass anywhere for the
children to play on, they don't have to travel
to a park or play on the pavement; there are
birds and flowers, the natural ones, not the
park variety, to be seen and enjoyed; there
is peace and quiet and confidence. More and
more those city dwellers who can afford it
are moving out to "hick towns" to live and
raise their families. .. '" -,,;. ij
Politics in the "hick town" are not com-
plicated by the partnership of this or that
political group with the underworld of vice,
gambling, booze. The "hick town" doesn't
have to go through the periodical wave of
moral reform when a "clean-up" is made just
before election in order to catch the church
vote-and then allowed to die a natural death
as soon as the shouting is over and the
elected city administration again needs per-
sonal spending money and a place "to meet
privately" and plot and plan and indulge in
the very pastimes they so roundly denounced
a short time before.
Business leaders wtll tell you that their
smartest and most reliable men and women
workers were boys and girls from the "hick
towns." You don't hear the "hick towns"
wailing about their impending bankruptcy
unless the state or national government helps
solve their financial problems. There is-but
what's the use. We could go on and on,
If by a "hick town" those campaign or-
ganizers mean what "hick" town usually
does, if they mean a community which takes
its time and minds its own business and is
not always bellering for something or about
something, and that's a good place to live
and do business, where the people don't get
all "het up" day in and day out about new
frills in style and the stock markets, then
thank God, we live and will live in a "hick
town." Let 'er Hick!-Oneida (N. Y.) Dem-
ocratic Union.

Nature is a wonderful thing. We saw a
,man the other day whose head was com-
pletely bald, yet he had whiskers down to the
second button of his vest.

War is what results when one country
takes steps to defend itself from another
country that is taking steps to defend it-
self.-Wall Street Journal.

Mussolini says he and Hitler will bring
peace to Europe if they have to go to war
to do it.

Prosperity used to be "just around the cor-
ner." Now it seems to be up a blind alley.-
Washington Star.

Life would be drab indeed right now in
Florida if the legislature wasn't in session.

Port St. Joe, "where the state of Florida
was born."'


Sitting In With the

Lawmakers
By GILBERT D. LEACH
Florida News Service


"What to do!" What to do!"
Ever been in that fix?
Well, that's just .where we are
now up here in Tallahassee. We
have spent millions and millions.
Nary a nickel but somebody
wanted a dime! But we've spent
the millions just the same.
Now we have to dig. You
folks got to PUT! How'll you
have it?
Want to play the slots'and have
the state grab off the jackpot?
Want to buy liquor until you're
staggering so there will be suffi-
cient to pay off? Want the bookies
to set up shop in your little town
andr take bets on the horses or
dogs.? Want the state to run "bo-
lita"? Want an extra penny or
two on each packet of fags? Want
your insurance penalized? Want
more gas tax? Want more taxes
on your little plot of ground?
Make up your mind. Something
has to yield revenue!
Time is getting short. Appro-
priations have flourished although
we do say there has been a ten-
dency to keep everything under
control. But where the money is
coming from is the acute .prob-
lem of today and every other to-
day from here on ort.
Here's my guess transaction
tax!
Hope I'm wrong. Hope I'm ig-
norant. Hope I'm misinformed.
Hope against hope nothing like
that will be visited upon Florida
this year. But that's my guess.
Stkcking my neck out, maybe.
Not nerve enough yet to put it
over, maybe. Leave a lot of ap-
propriations floating in thin air,
maybe. But all I can see in the
frantic moments, when the clock
stops and everybody tears his
hair is that transaction tax.

Weeks ago I said that out of
this turmoil would arise some
outstanding candidate for gover-
nor of Florida. I am beginning to
be discouraged. Nobody has come
forward with any unusual or out-
standing solution of our big prob-
lems. And time is short. If there
be such a man and such a solu-
tion, and should that man stand
forth next week and proclaim his
panacea to the legislature, he can
have Florida's governorship on a
silver platter. But I have looked
along Monroe street here in Tal-
lahassee and in the corridors of
the capitol and I have not seen


him nor have I neard his silver
voice. I am afraid he is not here.

Wish I could paint a picture of
the personalities of the bunch of
men who make up the senate and
the house. They're just the same
kind of folks you meet down town
on Main street Saturday night.
They're not high-hat up here.
They're just as scared as you are
when you come up and wonder
how you can get even a seat in
the gallery.
Of course, after they've been
here a term. or two it gets com-
mon to them and they act just
like they were at home-with the
wife gone-for they wouldn't dare
put their feet on the coffee table
if she were home. But they have
not changed a little bit. If you
knew them well bac- home, you'll
know them well.up here, and they
will be a heap gladder to see you
than you are to see them. Be-
lieve it or not!
-------4<-_

'Eye-Dears of 1939'

On Stage At Port

Theater Saturday

Girls, Girls, Girls and More Girls
Features Premiere Stage
Attraction

What holds promise of being
one of the best vauGeville shows
to .play at the Port theater in a
long time will be seen Saturday
when Ross Russell presents to
Port St. Joe his "Eye-Delars. of
1939," consisting of 18 people-
'mostly gorgeous, glamorous girls.
In addition to the bevy of femi-
nine pulchritude will be seen El-
len, Dixon, the "Sweet Swingstress
of Song"; thle Bohn Duo in "Ac-
robatic Novelties"; Renee and
Evans, "The Whirling Senations";
Tontay presenting "Magic of To-
morrow"; Roy Howard and Ed-
die Allen In "Charlie McCarthy's
Only Rival'; the College Cuties
and Bob Deitrich and His Col-
legians-all this in addition to
thei regular picture program.

AMENDMENT TO ABOLISH
AD VALOREM SYSTEM IN
STATE KILLED BY HOUSE

(Continued from Page 1)
in Port St. Joe and representative
from Liberty county, stepped down
from the rostrum during debate
on the measure and turned the
gavel over to former Speaker W.
McL. Christie. Wood did not take
part in the debate, but merely
viewed the show from the side-
lines.


PAGE FOUR11


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, MAY 26, 1939








F.RA. M 2 1 T S P S JOE, GU L C L


WOULD TAX BOOKMAKER'S
A race bookmakers' license bill
to raise money for counties and
state old age pensions was 'intro-
duced in the house Monday by.
Representative Clay Lewis, chair-
man of the appropriations com-
mittee. He estimated it would
produce about $5,000,000 a year.


SDR. JC. COE
- DENTIST -
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe



EYES EXAMINED




Glasses fitted when needed
Made In Our Own Laboratory
All Work Unconditionally
Guaranteed
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 6 p. m.

DR. G. T. NEWBERRY
OPTOMETRIST
PANAMA CITY, FLA.



PURITY IS

ASSURED!









:...


For Each and Every Bottle
of Milk or Cream We Deliver
Is Protected With a
SANITARY PARCHMENT
COVER

Use Only

SOLOMON' S

Pasteurized


Amos Lewis Tells

Tall Tale In Talk

Marianna Senator Tells Story In
Course of Debate on Chain
Store Tax Increase Bill

Senator Amos Lewis of'Mari-
anna told a tall tale during the
course of his debate In favor of
the chain store tax increase bill,
the substance or :ie story be-
ing as follows:
Jim and John were talking of
their fishing exploits. The first
at bat, Jim, announced he had
caught a 57-pound black bass on
his last fishing expedition. Not
to be outdone, John said on his
last trip he had hauled from the
bottom of a river a railroad lan-
tern, found it to be still burn-
ing, and up-on investigation had
discovered it had been in the
river for 57 years. He then
turned to Jim and ,aid: "Let's
arbitrate this matter, Jim. If
you'll cut 50 pounds off your
fish, I'll blow out my lantern."
---------
TILE FLOOR BEING LAID
IN NEW BANK BUILDING
A crew of workmen this week
began laying a beautiful tile floor
in the new bank building at the
corner of Long avenue and Fifth
street.
Since removal of supporting
timbers used in pouring the con-
crete for the second floor and roof
work is expected to be speeded
up considerably on the structure.

Mrs. T. S. Singletary and little
daughter returned Saturday after
a week's visit with relatives in
Panama City.


It's Time To

DINE!!

Where thefood is of the
best where the service
is prompt and efficient
S. and where you get
HOME COOKED
MEALS
-o--


MILK TRIANGLE
RESTAURANT
Pasteurized for Your
Protection BEER ahd WINES -
- ----~"""---


Why Suffer Longer Than Necessary?
Dr. Miles Anti-Pain Pills Relieve Quickly
DR. MILES ANTI PAIN put you back on your feet
PILLS were made for just one again "rarin' to go".
purpose--to relieve pain. Users DR. MILES ANTI PAIN
write that they "work like PILLS act quickly. You don't
magic". They contain an ef- have to wait. forty minutes to
magic. q cota an gef- an hour.for them to take effect
fective, quick-acting, analgesic as is the case with many anal-
-pain reliever, gesics. You'll get action in from
Try Dr. Miles Anti-Pain Pills ten to twenty minutes.
before you lose a day's work- DR. MILES ANTI PAIN
and pay--or break a social en- PILLS are pleasant to take,
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IC, OR NEURALGIC PAINS. upset the stomach. Their cost
They may be just what you is small One, or at most, two,
need to relieve your pain and is usually sufficient to relieve.
At your Drug Store. 25 for 25c. 125 for $1.00.


U -


Lodge Notices

Order of Eastern Star
Meets on second and fourth
Tuesday of each month in the
Masonic hall, over postoffice. Visi-
tors who are members are cor-
dially invited to be present.
American Legion Meets first
Monday in month at club house.


Rep. Lewis States

Members Oppose

: -Pesion Measure

Makes Charge That Men Who
Signed' Measure Hope It
Will Never Pass

Chairman E. Clay Lewis of ths
house appropriations committee,
Guli county representative, made
the charge Saturday that many
house members who joined in in-
troducing a $7,200,000 old age pen-
sion bill "hope -L -w:; never
pass.'
"Many of them have told me,"
said Lewis, apcordiing to an Asso-
ciated Press dispatch, "that they
signed the bill, but they hope it
will never pass."
The senate already has passed
a similar measure.
Lewis opposed an effort to put
the big appropriation on the house
calendar without sending it to a
committee. It was introduced by
57 members-nine more than the
majority required to pass it.
Representative Sudduth of Bay
county said, "We've taken care of
everybody else, but we've not
made one gesture toward the old
people."
"It .will be a useless gesture to-
ward all these people," Lewis re-
plied, "We're appropriating mil-
lions and millions of dollars with
no funds to pay them, and it's
just a useless gesture and a
fraud." Lewis. won efforts to send
the bill to the appropriations com-
mittee on a voice vote.
The present appropriation for
old age pensions and aid to the
blind is $3,SOO,000 annually. Pen-
sion payments average; $13 per
month, including federal funds.
Sponsors of the double appro-
priation for the next two years
stated they hoped that pensions
could be raised to an average of
$30 a month, including the federal
snatching funds.
----- ------
SHARIT AND LEWIS ENTER
MEASURES INVITING .KING
AND QUEEN TO VISIT FAIR

A concurrent resolution inviting
the king and queen of England to
visit the Florida exhibit at the
New York World's Fair, was
adopted by the Florida legislature
Tuesday.
The measure was proposed in
the house by E. Clay Lewis and in
the senate by Joe Sharit.

VOICE APPRECIATION

The house of representatives, in
a resolution Tuesday, officially
extended a vote of thanks to Sen-
ator Joe Sharit and Representa-
tive Clay Lewis for making pos-
sible their visit Sunday to this
city.

MISS CONNELL NAMED QUEEN

At the firemen's ball held last
Friday evening at the Centennial
.building, Miss Ne:l Connell was
elected as Fire Queen for the ball
to be held June, 16.
-i----
Vacuums so high that they can-
not be measured with existing
gauges have been produced by a
new technique and equipment re-
cently perfected,. The machine has
no moving parts, consisting only
of electric wiring and glassware.

Jaws of big ants were once
used in Brazil to cramp ed.Zes of
wounds.


PORT ST. JOE


FLORIDA


1 Mon


1-lOWDY


F' DRIENDSJ









,












"I am REDDY KILOWATT-your Electrical
Servant. You've probably not seen me before
but I am an old friend of yours. I've been in your
home right along, doing everything you'll let me
do to help you.

Some people call me a champion servant because
I never eat or sleep; I'm always on the job; and I
work for a few cents a day. My job is to light
your home, cook your meals, heat the water, re-
frigerate the food and dozens of other jobs. It's
fun for me to make life easier for you.

Call on me for any task-you'll find me on tip-toe
in the wall just behind the electric switch. Snap
the switch or plug in a wire and I'm on the job.

Let me do more work for you, because. Im your
cheapest, most constant servant and I can do more
for you than any other servant. I'm standing by
-and hope I'll be seeing you.


Your Willing Electrical Servant



Reddy Kilowatt


" Stonsored by
FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION


''


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Roche's Appliance Store


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE FIVE


FRIDAY, MiAY 26, 1939








'PG SXTE TR PR T.JE GL OUTFLRD FIA, A 6,13


Speed Stars Make Final Tune-up for Indianapolis

IME M lca '\ mpy 8,, f/A


MRS. ANNIE BARTEE
DIES IN PANAMA CITY
Mrs. Annie Bartee, 62, who was
well known in Port St. Joe, died
suddenly Saturday night from a
heart attack. She was an active
member of the Order of Eastern
Star and visited ine tocal chapter
on many occasions.
'Fundral services were conducted
Sunday at the Panama City Wirst
Baptist church, with Rev. E. D.
McDaniel officiating. The body
was sent to Manchester for burial.


ITEM
Interior appearance of the city
hall has been greatly Improved, by
a thorough job of floor scrubbing
done by two husky colored boys
under personal supervision of City
Clerk M. P. Tomlinson.
S----^---^---
Mr. and Mrs. M. Ross Watson
are, leaving this week for Wil-
mington, Del.


Mrs. Leroy Gainous and son re-
turned Sunday after spending a
week in Panama City as guests of
Mrs. J. J. Perritt.



CLASSIFIED ADS

FOR RENT
FOR RENT-New houses at Be-
con Hill. Front lot facing G1lf.
Furnished, running water, sani-
tary conveniences, electricity.
Apply T. W. Wilson, or ,Box
495, Port St. Joe. --3tf
UNFURNISHED 9 by 18-foot cab-
ins; ceiled overhead and sides;
good water; $6 month. Apply St.
Joe Lumber Co. 12[21tf
ROOMS FOR RENT
.IF YOU have a room for rent,
why'not place a classified adver-
tisement in The Star. The cost is
low and returns are gratifying. .
Try it tocay. tt


When 33 of the world's finest
drivers line up for the start of the
Indianapolis race the morning of
May 30,.this quintet of speed aces
will be rated among the most for-
rnidable contenders for the big
cas.h purses. A year of engineer-
ing refinement and sizeable cash
fortunes have been spent on their
cars. Like every Indianapolis win-
ner for the last 19 years, they will
ride on Firestone Gum-Dipped
tires.


TOLLS MAY BRING
MONEY FOR CANAL

(Continued 'from Page 1)
,every stage of the proceedings and
'at every step of the engineering
.andi-construction -of the canal, the
county officials sought and se-
%cured the co-operation and advice
of the United States Army Engi-
neers, with the constantly im-
plied and expressed belief that
all steps taken were to safeguard
the. county's rights to expect re-
inibursement.
The United States Army Engi-
neers were thoroughly cognizant
of this expectation, and at no
time during the preliminaries and
construction was. the county ever
warned that reimbursement -might
not be in order or might not be
.ob.ta'i'ed.
In Public Interest
All of the public hearings on
-this project and all reports, of the
army engineers with which we
are familiar have fully and com-
- pletely justified the project in the
.general public interest. In our
, opinion .these hearings and re-
:ports completely nullify an intima-
Ition that the project was built in
'the particular interest of the St.
Joe Paper company. The latter
company was conceived and car-
ried to fruition at a cost of $8,-
00,000 'by our great and good
friend. the late Alfred I. duPont,
to give employment to thousands
of people in a territory which had
practically been devastated. We
believe this conception of the late
Mr. DuPent.. coincides exactly
with the policies of the federal
government upon whicn millions
of dollars of public money have
been spent.
Other than a small amount of
money appropriated by the fed-
eral government for the harbor
project in St. Joseph's Bay, the
federal government has not been
asked or expected to contribute
anything toward the establishment
of this. great industry except the
reimbursement of Gulf county for
$200,000 which it advanced for
construction .of the Gulf county
canal.
We believe you can fully ap-
preclate the economic and social
justification for our urgent re-
quest for reimbursement to Gulf
county, and we earnestly .solicit
the good offices of you and your
committee to that end.
G. P. WOOD, Speaker House
of Representatives.
J. L. SIHARIT, State Senator,
25th District.
E. CLAY LEWIS, JR., Gulf
County Representative..
JESSE GASKIN, ChairiYan
County Commissioners
W: T. EBDWARDS.
The people of Gulf county feel
that the government should reim-
burse the county for these bonds,
as they were voted with the im-
.plied belief that such would be
the case. If not, the only way out,


artist from Glendale, Calif., puts
the finishing touches on his mo-
tor. Lou Meyer (right), the only
:three- time Indianapolis winner,
makes adjustments on the motor.
that he, himself, has built withI
watch-like precision.
BELOW Babe Stapp (left)
makes a few last-minute changes
in his Italian Alfa-Romeo car,
Stapp has led the race nine of


apparently, is the collection of
tolls from all who make use of
the waterway.

POPPY MONEY AIDS DISABLED

(Continued from Page 1)
and Auxiliary.
"The dimes, quarters and, dol-
lars which are dropped into the
boxes of the poppy workers on
Poppy Day form .the principal
source of support for the relief
and welfare work carried out by
the Auxiliary throughout the year
1930-1940," said Mrs. Schneider.
"There is a vast amount to be
done for tlre. disabled veterans,
for their families and; for the fam-
ilies of those who have died, and
we believe that those in distress
because of patriotic sacrifices are
'entitled to everything which can
be' done for them.
"While the government has
made provision for care and com-
pensation of the war disabled, jus-
tice is never automatic. andi the
aid of the Legion and Auxiliary is
often needed to bring the veter-
an's case properly derore the gov-
ernment. A great number of the
disabled do not come within the
provisions of the law and receive
no compensation eal hardship
faces their families when they be-
come unable to work or require
hospitalization. Naturally, their
comrades in the Legion and the
American Legion Auxiliary are
their first source of aid.
"Through wearing a poppy on
Poppy Day, everyone can help us
be ready to respond to the calls
for help which will .come to us
during the year ahead," concluded
Mrs. Schneider. "The poppy, which
honors the' war dead', also aids
those who did not die but who
lost health and strength in the na-
tion's service."

Buy a Poppy Tomorrow.

ARE YOU RUN DOWN?
.We wish you could SEE some of
the letters that come to us, telling
what Wintersmith's has done for
people with Malaria-people who
Share run-down, sick, "no good" due
to Malaria. For over 70 years, these
letters have come in by hundreds.
-All these people can't be wrong.
Why don't YOU get a bottle of
Wintersmith's, and TRY it?

WINTERSMITH'S

TONIC:


the last 11 years until mechanical
trouble' forced him to the pit.
Floyd Roberts (center) last year's
winner, established a new record,
averaging 117.2 miles per hour for
the 500 miles. Jimmy Snyder
(right), the Flying Chicago Milk-
man, will drive a car almost iden-
tical in design to the one being
used by Rex Mays. In 1937 Snyder
established a lap record of 130.4
miles per hour for the 2V2-mile
distance.

PORT NEWS


Arrived Tuesday, S.S. Aachen
from Bremen, Germany, with car-
go of salt cake for St. Joe Paper
company. Sailed WeaTresday. Fil-,
lette, Green & Co., agents. I
Arrived Monday, S.S. Steel-
worker. Sailed Monday with cargo
of kraft paper for west coast.


DANCE


at


S o WIL.LIAMS'

DANCE HALL

HIGHLAND VIEW

DANCING EACH DAY AND NIGHT By Victrola Music

SPECIAL DANCES Wednesday and Saturday
Music By Midnight Sheiks
All Dances Conducted In An Orderly Manner


SHcme BARBECUE SANDWICHES
BEER WINE SOFT DRINKS SANDWICHES


I've found the PERFECT WAY to



".- MEAT.
^^ S" .
--- -MONO


S. GIVES od EXTRA '
S COLD TMPErAull "s
VVIIH JUST IHE RICH
-J-








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Prevents needless drying out and loss of flavor. Located right
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permits air circulation on ALL sides of. the meat. Be sure to
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Oiry, Westiaghouse has the MEAT-KEEPER!



DANLEY FURNITURE CO.

PORT ST. JOE FLORIDA


I


~~n~~ra~a, m Ir n ~ n .~ s~ A~PJ~n~AB


------------ I-..-- ------------


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


'PAGE SIX


FRIDAY, MAY 26, 1939