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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00135
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: May 19, 1939
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00135

Full Text







The Star-Florida's fastest grow-
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
thd City of Port St Joe.


THE


Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
e. t growing little city. In
S T A R the heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


VOLUME II PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, MAY 19, 1939 NUMBER 31
)


C. OF C. HAS MANY MEMORIAL SERVICES
TO BE HELD IN PARK


MATTERS IN HAND

AT PRESENT TIME

PUSH WATERWAY AND DOG-
FLY ERADICATION; WILL
SPONSOR ARBOR DAY

The Port St. Joe Chamber of
Commerce directors met Tuesday
evening at the Port Inn in regu-
lar monthly Session. Many mat-
ters of importance to the progress
of the city came ,p for discus-
sion, among, them being legisla-
tioh in the state legislature and
national congress concerning erad-
ication of the dogfly. An inten-
sive campaign toward this end. is
being cafrded on by :the local or-
ganization and results seem to be
assured.
Simple ages were shown of
the pamphlet to be distributed by
the state department of agricul-
ture at the New York World's
Fair, in which the local chamber
was fortunate enough to get a pic-
ture of the constitutional monu-
ment here and one of the Dead
Lakes near Wewahtchka.' This is
an elaborate publication and 100,-
000 of them are being printed'for
free distribution at the- fair.
Working for Waterway
The chamber of commerce is
working With chambers, in various
cities in''Georgia a ad Alabama for
canalization of the Chattahoochee
and Apalachicola river' systems,
and the latest developments, along
these lines were rorught outt. This
is one of the most important mat-
ters in which the local body is en-
gaged, because or our, being con-
nected by canal with these water-
ways and of our deep water har-
bor here.
J. J. Darcey of the St. Joe Pa-
per company, who was present as
a guest, made some very helpful
suggestions 'whe* asked for his
opinion as to what could be done
to help. the city. He said he be-
lieved that to clean up and keep
clean all commercial and private
premises in the city would give
an eye-appeal to visitors that
would go far toward inducing
them to locate here. The fact that
the rear of a portion of the busi-
ness section is in plain view from
the highway should cause all
merchants to keep the alley back
of their places of business free
(Continued on Page 5)
--

Firemen's Ball

To Be Tonight

Miss Dorothy. Crockett Will Lead
Grand March As Fire Queen
SFor the' Evening

Another in the series of balls
being given by the volunteer fire
department will be held tonight at
the Centennial building with mu-
sic being furnished by the well
known Glenn Wright orchestra.
Miss Dorothy Crockett will lead
the grand march, having been se-
lected as Fire Queen at the pre-
vious dance. Queen for the next
affair will be chosen tonight by
popular vote.
Everyone is urged to attend the
dance, as funds raised are to be
"used for the purchase of new
equipment.
-------K--~----
PORT NEWS
S.S. Dorothy of the Bull Line
arrived Sunday. Sailed Monday
with cargo of paper, paval stores
and lumber.
V


Memorial Day services, to be
held in Port St. Joe under the
auspices of Gulf County Post
116, American Legion, will be
held at 12:15 p. m. Tuesday,
May 30, at theTand stand in
Port Inn Park.
In case of rain, services will
be held in the Centennial build-
ing.

Fire Destroys

Ratliff. House

Mr. and Mri. Roy Gibson Lose
Furnishings In Blaze of Un-
determined Origin

A fire of undetermined origin,
discovered early Sunday morning,
completely destroyed the house at
the corner of Long avenue and
Fourth street belonging to Miss
Daisy Ratliff of Stockton, *a., and
occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Roy
Gibson.
The house was unoccupied at
the time, Mrs. Gibson and Miss
Malzie Waters, a roomer, being in
Panama City on a visit, and Mr.
Gibson being at work in the pa-
per 'mill. All household furnishings
and clothing of the occupants
were burned and the .house was
a complete loss. The Gibsons car-
ried, a small amount of insurancee
on their -personal'-'prodierty, '"ut' It
is not know whether Miss Ratliff,
a former teacher in the Port St.
Joe school, had the building in-
sured against loss.

BLAZE AT RAILROAD SHOP
The fire department was called
out Wefdnesday evening to ex-
tinguish a blaze In the locker room
of the Apalachicola -Northern rail-
road shops. The fire was brought
under control before arrival of the
truck and little 'damage resulted..
-----K

Kibosh Put On

State-Operated

Slot Machines

Measure To Legalize "One-Armed
Bandits"' Defeated By In-
definite Postponement

The kibosh was put on legaliza-
tion of state-owned slot machines
Monday when Florida's senate,
by a vote of 34 to 2, used the in-
definite postponement of consider-
ation method of killing Senate
Bill 180, which would have set up
a state-owned slot machine sys-
tem. The bill was proposed by
Senator William H. Mapoles of
Crestview for the purpose of fi-
nancing old' age pensions.
The motion to so quickly end
the life of the measure was by
Senator Spessard L. Holland of
Bartow, chairman of the finance
and taxation committee, which
frowned unanimously on the pro-
posal.

MISSION IS TO BE HELD NEXT
WEEK AT CATHOLIC CHURCH

Beginning Sunday morning at
10:15 a mission will be held for a
wfek at the St. Joseph's Catholic
church on Eighth street. Mass at
7 a. m. Evening(service at 8.

TO STUDY TUNG OIL
Two new government labora-
tories for research on tung oil are
to be opened in Louisiana and
Florida. .


LEGISLATORSAND

NEWSMEN ARE TO

VISITPORTST JOE

AT INVITATION OF LEWIS AND
SHARIT TO VIEW MILL OF
ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY

Port St. Joe, for a 'day at least,
will become the legislative center
of the st td when members of the
Florida legislature, the Capitol
Press club and their guests visit
here Sunday as the guests of Sen-
ator Joe Sharit and RepneBenta-
tive Clay Lewis to view the huge
mill ot the St Joe Paper company
in operation'.
.Transportation for the visitors
will be furnished' by Harold Colee,
an official of the Fl6fida Motor
Lines, who is placing a number of
big buses at the disposal of the
hundred-odd guests.' 'Dinner will
be served at the Port "Inn by the
city.
"I believe that this visit should'
prove both educational and enjoy-
able to the memlierEhip of the
legislature, the newspaper cor-
respondents and their guests, said
Representative Lewis in extend-
ing the invitation Tuesday.
This motorcade will leave Talla-
hassee about 10 a. m. and will re-
turn to the capital in the after-
noon.

Claims Gaibling

Bill Would Allow

Return of Slots

Jacksonville Minister Says Legal
Gambling Measure Would Al-I
low Return of Machines

A proposed legalized gambling
bill introduced by Representative
Douglas of Putnam county has
aroused, the ire of the Florida
Anti-Slot Machine association, of
which Rev. James E. Barbee of
Jacksonville is president, and the
association is opposing passage of
the measure on the grounds that
it will allow return of slot ma-
chines to the state.
"Slot machines could not, be
kept out of the state under this
act," said Rev. Barmee. ."It lets
down all the bars. The bill is writ-
ten for the return of the slot ma-
chines. Section 24 of the bill re-
peals the present slot machine
law. Then Section' 32 has a joker
statement about slot -machines
which would not stand up in court
for five minutes. .. This bill
is a trial- balloon which the
gamblers want sent up ,in the
house of representatives. Their
gambling Iqgislation in the senate
is falling flat.
"The Douglas bill would be a
body blow to legitimate business
in Florida. The tourist
trade would be hurt by, this act.
Real estate would suffer
a loss through legalized gambling.
All FloriJa would get of
legalized gambling will be a lot of
gamblers, racketeers and bums.
"The bill makes no provision
for a referendum. Citizens are not
given the right to vote it in or
out. Sponsors of this bill know it
would be voted, down as slot ma-
chines were overwhelming de-
feated. What the voters are
against should not be shoved over
on them."

The many friends of R. A. Cos-
tin regret to learn of his serious
Illness and wish for him a speedy.
recovery.


BILL TO 'PLOW UNDER'
LAWYERS OF FLORIDA

A bill was introduced in the
Florida house Tuesday to "plow
under" every third lawyer in
Florida twice a, year It was all
in fun, but the bill received a
formal number, 1399, and Speak-
er Pierce Wood referred it to
,the committee on livestock.
The bill provided for two
plowing, yearly-spring and fall.


Race Revenue

Is Increasing

Revenue from Legalized Racing
Exceeded Two Million Dollars
For Season Just Closed

TALLAHASSEE, May 19 (FNS)
-For the, first time since racing
was legalized in Florida, revenue
from this source exceeded two
million dollars during the season
just closed, according to figures
just released by the state auditor.
The table in the audit showing
revenue for the emgft seasons of
legal racing supports Governor
Cone's assertion that the natural
increase in revenue should be
ample to take care of increased
costs of operation. The first sea-
son, that of 131-3z, returned
$737,300 in revenue. Each season
since then has shown a substan-
tial increase to an all-time :high
;this year-'6f revenue amountieg N
$2,000,736.' Total revenue for the
eight years of operation amounts
to $,1,222,538.
'The amount distributed to the
counties also shows a steady in-
crease for each year since crea-
,ton of the racing commission,
with the exception of 1935-36,
when the' high cost of operation
materially cut the amount dis-
tributed. For the season of 1931-32
each county received $9,226. This
season each county has received
$24,863 and will receive $2000 ad-
ditional when final payment is
made.
-------y----~------*

Old-Time Fiddler

Convention to Be

Held Here June 9


Sponsored By American
Post; Prizes Offered
Best Players


Legion
For


The Centennial building will be
the scene of an old-time fiddler's
convention 'Friday night, June 9,
which is' being sponsored by Gulf
County Post 116, American Legion.
An invitation is being extended
to all fiddlers (and we mdan
"fiddlers," not violinists) in this
section of Florida to participate in
the affair. First prize will be $10
in cash', second. prize $7.50, and
third prize $5. All fiddlers desir-
ing to take part are asked to con-
tact Commander T. M. Schneider
or Mr. Lane. There will be no
entry fee.
Following selection of the best
fiddlers by the judges, a square
and. round dance will be held with
a small admission charge. A small
fee will also be charged for the
fiddler's convention.

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT
Born, May 12, at 2 a. m. in the
Lisenby hospital at Panama City,
to Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Roche, a
7-pound boy, who has been named
Michael Pinehton Roche. Mother
and baby are reported to.be doing
fine.


SOLONS FACED

WITH MATTER OF

RAISING CASH

FINANCE PROBLEM THUS FAR
HAS BAFFLED BEST MINDS
OF BOTH HOUSES

TALLIHASSEE, May 19 (FNS)
-Facing the alternatives of legal-
izing gambling in all forms, taxing
amusements ,or putting a sales tax
on all commodities, Florida's 1939
legislature has reached its. most
crucial period' in which it tackles
problems of finance that thus far
have baffled the best minds of
both the house and senate.
Proposed Bills
Bills covering all three types of
taxation are before standing com-
rdittees. One would levy a 10 per
cent tax on all amusements, in-
eluding theaters, night clubs,
skating rinks-everything, in' fact,
except hotels or restaurants where
meals are served with music but
without floor shows or special en-
tertainment This measure would;
produce, according-to Representa-
tive Clay Lewis of Gulf county, ail
estimated, $20,000,00 that would '
be spilt 50-50, half to the sttf& old'
age welfare" fund and the other
half to the counties' school fund
to be used exclusively for teacher:
salaries.
Another bill. to create a tate
a ausements c6~Pomrisj ,~' hi bih
would supervise the legalized o-
eration of gambling' 'sinos of all
descriptions as well as collect
taxes from bookie wire services,
is before the house public amuse-
ments committee. It would raise,
sponsors .say, approximately $12,-
000,000 a year out of which $9,-
000,000 would go to old age pen-
sions and, the remaining $3,000,000
would be returned to the counties
on the basis of about $45,000 a
year per county.
Two Transaction Tax Plans
SIntroduced by Representative J.
Ed Stokes and others, a bill is on
the 'house finance and taxation
docket that would levy a 3 per
cent tax on all transactions, with
enforcement conditional upon the
ratification of a proposed consti-
(Continued on Page 5)


Mother of T. Jones


Is Called By Death


In Quincy Hospital Following An
Illness of Three Months;
Services Today

Mrs. H. C. Jones, 60, mother of
Chief of Police Troy Jones of this
city, passed away Wednesday eve-
ning in a Quincy hospital follow-
ing an operation. She had been in
ill health for three months.
Besides Chief Jones she is sur-
vived by the following children:
Mrs. R. C. Morris of Atlanta, Ga.,
Harvey Jones of Havana, Fla.,
Mrs. Charles Dickey, H. C. Jons,
Bessie Jones and Kathleen Jones,
all of Concord, Fla.
Funeral services for Mrs. Jones
will be held this afternoon at 2
o'clock at Hinson, Fla., near Ha*
vana.

CALL MEETING OF LEGION
POST NEXT MONDAY NIGHT

There will be a special called
meeting of Gulf County Post 116,
American Legion, at-the Hut next
Monday night for th.purpose of
completing arrangemfent& for the
Memorial Day seriyle ..


I








AF


MRS. LeHARDY HOSTESS Mr. and Mrs. Jim Perritt and
TO MONDAY BRIDGE CLUB little daughter, Gladys Jean, spent
Mrs. Frank LeHardy entertained : Society Personals C churches Tuesday in Panama City.
the members of the Monday c
Bridge club at her home this LANETA DAVIS, Editor Mrs. Charles Morgan of Wewa-
week. Following several progres- hitchka attended the benefit
sions, prizes, were presented to bridge Wrzd.nesday at Port Inn.
Mrs. B. A. Pridgeon, high, and BENEFIT BRIDGE AND EPISCOPAL CHILDREN'S
Mrs. Paul Farmer, cut. Delicious CHECKER PARTY r MISSION SCHOOL
refreshments were served by the A benefit bridge and checker t te h The mission school being held
hostess to- Mesdames Roy Wil- party was held Wednesday after- at the St. James Episcopal church
liams, Ben Graves, W. M. Howell, noon in the parlors of thlel Port METHODIST CHURCH for children of the community un-
Paul Farmer, B. A. Pridgeon, E. Inn by the Port St. Joe Woman's D. E. Marietta, Minister der the direction of Rev. Glion
Ramsey and George Hudson. club. The parlors were beautiful Services Every Sunday Benson of Apalachicola-Tas proven
m 10:00 a. m.-Churcn School. both interesting and educational
decorated for the occasion with 11:00 a.m.-Morning worship.atio
Doris and Howard McEachin, spring flowers. 7:30 p. m.--Evening worship. for children taking part in it.
children of Rex McEachin, expect Sixteen tables were placed for -Following the short service of
to leave Sunday for Bonifay to play, and following the scoring of FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH songs, Bible stones and prayer,
spend thie summer with their talliels appropriate prizes were Rev. J. W. Sisemore, .Minister the children have been engaged in
10:00 a. m.--.Sunday School- making frames .r religious pic-
grandparents. presented to Mrs. C Spence, 11:00 a. m.-Morning Worship.makin frames religious pi
r high; Mrs.'R. F. Miller, second 7:00 p. m.-B. Y. P. U. tule.s, and for those old enough to
Rev. and Mrs. Glion Benson and high; Mrs. C. P. VanIHorn, low; 8:00 p. m.-Preaching service. do the work, the construction of
daughters, .Elsbeth and Janet, of Miss Florence Morris of Apalachi- W. M. U., Monday, 3:00 p. m. prayer desks. About ten children
Apalachicola, spent Sunday in the cola, door and traveling prizes; Prayermeeting Wednesday, 7:30 p. have been happily engaged for
city. .'."g Mrs. H. D. Marks, Apalachicola, mi. Teachers meeting, Thursday, two hours each morning this week Genuine Engraved
a checker prize. 7 p.m at this work.
Rev. D. E. Marietta, Lrs. J. L. The punch table was covered ASSEMBLY OF GOD Following is, the program, fdr WEDDING
Temple and Mrs. J. C. Bradbury with a Vietnetian lace cloth and Rev. E. T. Corbin, Pastor the week:' Monday, short service
attended the zone meeting of the was presided over by Mrs. Robert Full-time services and -story, "'The Greatest Knight INVITATIONS
Methodist Missionary society last Bellows and Mrs. Nick Comforter. 10:-15 a. m.-Sunday School. In the World." Tuesday, a short
Wednesday in Panama City. 11:00 a. m.-Preaching Service. service with story, ."A Daring (Plate Included)
MARY AND MARTHA 7:30 p. nI.-Evangelistic service. Knight" (St. Paul). Wednesday, a
AAA09^ -A CIRCLES MErET Prayermeeting every Wednesday short service .With story, "A 8 .9
CIRCLES ME night. 11 .0 -.
The Mary circle of the Baptist Knight Who C0p'tured His Bro-
Missionary society met Monday FIRST PRESBYTERIAN their" (St. Andrew). Thursday, a With Envelopes .
afternoon-at the home of Mrs. Rev. H. F. Beaty, Minister short service with story, "The
Wilbur Wells. Mrs. O. F. Powell 10,:00 a. m.-Sunday 'School. Knight of the Holy Grail" (Sir
led the devotional. Two new mem- 11:00 a. m.-Preaching service. Galahad). Friday, short service 100 Engraved
bears were welcomed after which 7:30 p. m.-Preaching service. and story, "A Knight of Today."
the regular business routine was ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL The final service .will be held in Visiting Cards
carried out. The meeting was dis- Rev. Glion Benson, Rector the evening at 7:30. All are in-
carr ed out. Thew Glion Benson, Rector a .
missed with prayer by Mrs. A. 10:00 a. m.-Church School. vited to attend. 0
Ezell. Following the business the Services first and third. Sunday GIRLS' AUXILIARY IN .(Plate Icluded)
hostess served sandwiches, iced nights at 7:30. MEETING TUESDAY
drinks and crackers. Communion service fourth un- Gir Auxili 66 Styles To Choose From
Special Owl Show The Martha circle was enter- day mornings at :30.Lotte on GcAu
tainted Monday afternoon at the _. ary of the Baptist church met -^
FRIDAY NITE-10:30 P. M. church by Mrs. L.. E. Voss and METHODIST MISSIONARY Tuesday afternoon at the homeof WeCan Also Supply
Mrs. John White, with Mrs. Chas. CIRCLES IN JOINT MEETING opening song, Betty J lin led Engraved
MoClellan presiding. The devo- The circles of the Methodist openingg song, Betty Jo Lane led Engraved
McClellan presiding. The devo- The circles of the Methodist in prayer and Hazel Cason- gave
THE FIRST ALL-COLORED tional was followed with prayer Missionary society held a joint in prayer and Hazel ctakng ar e
MUSICAL COMEDY by Mrs. L. R. Holliday. Minutes meeting at the church Monday af- t intheters taking art Sg
To, Be Shownin Port St. Joe were read and .the roll called af- ternon witthMrs V.. Bo pre- rgrae Stationery
-ter which regular business was siding. ThMe meeting opened with Stati
SWINGSATIONAL ransacted. Each member brought song, "How Firm a Foundation, Jo and Jerry w that CARDS
a towel and wash cloth for the and was followed bv a short busi- Annoncement ws made that
Jamboree of Tuneful Baptist orphanage at Arcadia. The ns session; after which Mrs. G. the gis would have a rtain LETTERHEADS
R H Y T H M Bible study was led by Mrs. E. B. A. Patton took charge and, pre- show.' for the girls' iormiory a aENVELOPES
RALPH COOPER in Dendy, after which th meeting seated the following program: the baptist orphaa isie.
was dismissed by Mrs. E. A. M- g Hizons The meeting was dismissed to ASK TO SEE SAMPLES
Subject, "Broadening Horizons meet next Tuesday at the home
Th Duke Is Taskey. The hostesses served of Rural Work." The call to wor- meet net Tuesday at the home
cake, sandwiches and iced drinks ship was by Mrs. Patton followed of Jackie Fillingi~m
SATURDAY-MAY 20 to the members present. with song, "O Worship the King." Mr. andMr. Hub SMITH PRINTING
The scripture' reading was by
LIFT 'EM UP HIGH MISTER- YOUNG LADIES ORGANIZE Mrs. EdwinRamsey. Praerhymn,their two sons, Joe and Dickie, of COMPANY
Or I'll Start Pumping Lead!! THE G. Y. B. CLUB Break Thou the Bread of Life"; Florala, Ala., were visiting here
HOPALONG CASSIDY Several members of the younger "The Meditation," by Mrs. Boyd; Sundaywith Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Phone 51 Port St. Joe
Cawthon. :e0 00* *.
and WINDY in set met Wednesday afternoon at prayer by Mrs. Patton; poem, "We
"SUINT TS T 'TRAIL" the home of Miss Murnice Taun- Plow the Fields and Scatter," by .-.. .. .......-.-- ---
1 1ton and organized the G. Y. B. Mrs. Roy Gibson; "Pioneers In Phone 41 Soft Water Used
club. Officers were chosen As fol- Rural Work,"' by Mrs. J. L. Evening Appointments
lows: Miss Murnice Taunton, Temple; "Work of Miracles," by ADAM S BEAUT SHOP
LONE .RANGER CARTOON president; Miss Doiothy Crockett, Mrs. P. Howell. ADAM S BEAUTY SHOP
vice-president; Miss Lunnette An interesting talk on "Ewha PERCY ADAMS, Proprietor
OWL SHOW-10:30 P. M. Hammock, secretary; Miss' Marl- College in Korea" was given by In A B o
I Specialist In All Branches of Beauty Work 1-
S P E C I A L gene Smith, treasurer. Plans were Mrs. Tom Gibson. Prayer and a Al B o B
SL made for the future, after which report on the zone meeting was ALL WORK GUARANTEED
ON THE STAGE the members were served with de- given by Mrs. Temple, after which ham and 'nWav
FISTIC FUN! licious refreshments by their most the benediction was given by i po Finger 5
^ Bat charming hostess. The next meet- Rev. D. E. Marietta.Permanen0
Colored Battle ing will be held at the home of The Susannah Wesley circle erl e tWa es $3.50 up
oy lMiss' MMarigene Smith on Monu- will meet Monday with Mrs. John Monument Avenue Port' St. Joe, Fla.
ROyai ment avenue. Maddox and the Marie Jones circle
Those enjoying the afternoon with Mrs. E. Ramsey.
FUN GALORE! with Miss Taunton were Misses ** ++ + <**O ** 0***
The Battle of the Century! Melba Nedley, Elaine Gore, Mari- LYDIA CIRCLE MEETS

and Lunnette Hammock. The Lydia circle of the Baptist / 0 AN E
FAY BAINTER and Missionary society met at the L
IDA LUPINO in Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bellows church Monday afternoon with 4
spent Tuesday in Tallahassee. Mrs. Curtis Palmer'presiding. The "
"THE LADY AND Mrs. Bellows attended the lunch- meeting opened with a song,
'THE MOBS3 eon given by Mrs. J. L. Sharit at "Highear Groundi,'" followed with at
Wakulla Springs while there. the devotional by Mrs. Palmer.
Prayer was by Mrs. J. T. Smith, *
SUN., MON.-MAY 21-22 Mrs. N. L. Gibson has returned after which each member present o W I L L I A M S '
to Marianna after visiting here presented a towel for the Baptist
with her sister, Mrs. Lucille orphanage. A short, business ses- D A N C E H A LL
Hutto, who has been ill. sion followed and report of Bible A C
r a chapters read by members. Mrs. HIGHLAND VIEW .
Mrs. Roy Talley of Sun, La., ar- Hammock led the Bible study from *
rived last week for an extended the 1Book of Samuel. DANCING EACH DAY AND NIGHT By Victrola Music
visit with her son, Woodrow Tal- Next circle meeting, June 13, a d


for Chattahoochee where he will AUl Dances Conducted In An Orderly Manner *
Al Ow.a'i 0 Avisit with. his .aunt, Mrs. V. J. Opal Ogburn spent the week- 1 -
Joiner. end in the:southern part of the Delicious BARBECUE SANDWIC ES
"I'M JUST",A JITTERBUG" a state on business. g Homne Made A
LATEST NEWS EVENTS The Misses Sara VanHorn and f Hm
Myrtle Whitakiir left Sat'rday to Miss Rochelle McDaniel visited BEER WINE SOFT DRINKS SANDWICHES 6
: spend several days in Pensacola. in Blountstown over the week-end. g ees,
1 0$ O @ ~~~~6~ 0@1 @@ 1@ $ @ O19 @*@


PAGE TWO


THE STARZ, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


,FRIDAY M.AY 19, 1939


r








IDAY, MAY 9,_ _9 I E STAR, PR- ST. E, LFCOUNTY, LORIDAPAGTR


PLANNING FOR TRAFFIC


As H. S. Fairbank, Chief of the
U. S. Bureau of Public Roads' Di-
vision of Information has said:
"The end of all surveys is expect-
ed to be a report. It generally is
the end. The report goes on the
shelf when the survey is finished;
forgotten and no one is the better
or worse for it."
In order that such a fate may
not overtake the three years of
research that have gone into Flor-
ida's state-wide Highway Planning
Survey, the 1937 session of the

r* -- A


way simultaneously on all classes
of roads.
3. Referring again to traffic
survey maps, the Committee will
indicate within' each class, the
roads to be improved, and the or-
der of their improvement. Thus
the highways most important to all
the people will receive first atten-
tion.
4., Road life studies and finan-
cial studies showing how nfich
money each road earns in gas tax
revenue, will be used to determine



. .. .. .


I


No. 1-U. S. 1, between Miami and West Palm Beach; No. 2-Fla. 17,
west of Tampa; No. 3-Fla. 5, north of Brooksville. To adequately
serve traffic, the Highway Planning Survey finds that Florida needs
a planned 15-year construction program of roads like these.


Legislature, in Senate Concurrent
Resolution Number 10, provided for
a legislative committee charged
with the task of preparing a long-
range rationally planned highway
program plus the necessary legis-
lation to put such a plan into effect.
Legislative Committee
A. B. Hale, chairman of the Road
Board, is, chairman of the commit-
tee. Members include Senators J.
Locke Kelly, Clearwater; George
F. Westbrook, Clermont; Joe
Sharit, Port St. Joe; John R.
Beacham, West Palm Beach; A. G.
McArthur, Callahan; and Repre-
sentatives G. Pierce Wood, Bristol;
Norman P. Ives, Lake City; John
S. Burks, Dade City: L. C. Leedy,
Orlando; Dwight W. Rogers, Ft.
Lauderdale.
The legislative committee has
been studying the results of the
planning survey for a year now,
and following a meeting in Fort
Lauderdale, February 15th, made
their first public announcement by
stating that to adequately serve
traffic, that part of the State High-
way System under the care of the
Road Department should be revised
upward from about 6,400 miles to
8,500 miles. The revised system
will include 800 miles of streets
that act as connecting links
through cities, and will serve 82
percent of all traffic outside of
urban areas.
Preparing a Road Program
Ia the final preparation of a
long-range highway plan from
Survey data, the legislative com-
mittee will follow the method of
procedure recommended by the U.
S. Bureau of Public Roads
1. All roads in the state will be
divided into the varying levels of
traffic volume and placed in pri-
mary, secondary or tertiary classes,
as determined by the traffic
studies.
2. Then, with data gathered in
road use studies, available funds
will be divided among the various
classes of roads on the basis of
revenues earned by each class.
This means that new construction
and reconstruction will be under


the most economical type of con-
struction for each class of road.
Account will be taken of the prob-
able increase in traffic that in most
cases follows improvement.
5. Each road will be designed to
fit the character of the traffic it
must carry-the design arrived at
by an analysis of motor vehicle
behavior studies, accident studies,
highway capacity studies. Thus,
where traffic is very heavy, these
scientific studies may indicate that
to make the road safe for motor
vehicles, divided lane construction
is necessary.
$15,000,000 Program
The Legislative Committee has
pointed out that by following the
procedure outline above, a highway
system fitted to Florida's needs
and designed to take care of fu-
ture increases in traffic can be
completed in 15 years at a cost of
some 15 million dollars per year.
This sum is $3,000,000 more than
the Road Department is now
spending, but is only about half
of the amount Florida collects each
year from motorists.
Public Support Essential
In commenting on the signifi-
cance of the material now avail-
able for the future development
of Florida, Thomas H. McDonald,
Chief of the U. S. Bureau of Public
Roads, said in a recent letter to
Karl Lehmann, secretary-treasurer
of the Florida Highway Council:
S. Through a long public
service I have developed faith in
the support for sound public poli-
cies that arises from an informed
public opinion. The same is true
of the legislative action when
needed. For the first time the peo-
ple of Florida have available com-
prehensive data on which to base
sound future programs for the im-
provement of the highways of all
classes. I know of no state in
which a long-time program is.more
important. This is true within the
state itself but it is also of great
importance that Florida through
example shall help to bring about
coordinated long-time programs in
other states, since Florida becomes
one of the most important bene-
ficiaries.


' Tax Collection


Ban Is Vetoed

Cone Refuses To Sign .Measure
Prohibiting Collection of Chain
Store Taxes In Arrears

A legislative act (Senate Bill
338) which would have prohibited
collection of chain store taxes two
years in arrears if the comptroller
issued licenses on payments of
lesser sums, was vetoed Monday
by Governor Fred Cone. Oppon-
ents of the bill in the legislature
said it would cancel about $400,000
in delinquent taxes.
Senator Beall or Pensacola, in-
troducer of the bill, said "If a man
owns three or four places of liusi-
ness and the tax collector accepts
separate license fees, he is pre-
vented by this bill from going
back, lumping the places together
and suing."
In vetoing the measure, Gover-
nor Cone said: "This bill creates
a statute of limitations against
the collection of license taxes for
the state of Florida. There
are now pending many suits for
collection of license taxes due
the state, and the bill would bar
the state from recovery and de-
prive the school fund of large
,sums of money.
"A law of this nature encour-
ages taxpayers to become delin-
quent in paying their taxes in the
hope the y will be forgiven,
thereby penalizing the man that
does pay."
----K------
The city of Bombay, India, is
completely dry us the result of
the extension of the Ahmedabad
experimental dry area to include
the entire cfty.. Liquor permits
may be obtained by Europeans.


EYES EXAMINED




Glasses fitted when needed
Made In Our Own Laboratory
All Work Unconditionally
Guaranteed
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 6 p. m.

DR. G. T. NEWBERRY
OPTOMETRIST
PANAMA CITY, FLA.


County's Welfare

Payroll Growing

Payments for Old Age Assistance,
Aid to Blind and Dependent
Children Shows Increase

According to figures made pub.
lic yesterday by the Jacksonville
office of the state welfare board,
Gulf county's public assistance
payroll climbed to $1,898 in April.
The number of Uult county re-
cipients in the three categories-
old age assistance, aid to the blind
and aid to dependent children-
and the aggregate amount received
in each was announced as fol-
lows: Old age assistance, 177 re-
cipients, $1,630; aid to the blind,
six recipients, $102; aid to depen-
dent children, six cases, $166.
----4-----~------
COLORED BALL TEAMS TO
PLAY SATURDAY-SUNDAY
The Port .St. Joe Sluggers and
the Shamrock Giants, two colored
baseball teams, will tangle here
Saturday and Sunday in the first
game of the season.
The Port St. Joe boys are re-


MADAM GORDON
PALMIST. CRYSTAL AND PSYCHIC READER
,. She Tells Everything You Wish To Know &w
Without having seen or heard of you before, will
tell you of your private affairs, giving you dates,
facts and figures that will amaze and benefit you.
Strange, true and fascinating are the words that
flow from the lips of this gifted and unrivaled
Palmist. Not only will she read your life like an
open book, but also help you out of your troubles.
reunite the separated. settle lovers' quarrels, en-
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of any certain one, restore lost affection, bring
sunshine and happiness to discordant families.
S give reliable information and advice on all prob-
lems of life such as love. courtship, marriage.
changes, travel, business. stock and investments.
WAITING ROOM FOR COLORED
Permanently Located& at
PANAMA CITY, ON ROUTE 98, AT RESTFUL INN
4 Mile South. of Hugh. Sills Variety Store -



WE HAUL ANYTHING-

CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING
WE HAVE GOOD CLEAN BUILDING SAND FOR SALE

Prompt and Efficient Service Always


C. W. HORTON


PHONE 70


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


See how much you get this year


BIGGEST HYDRAULIC BRAKES-
12" drums, 162 sq. inches of braking surface;
biggest ever used on a low-priced car.

MOST ADVANCED STYLING-Ford
V-8 and De Luxe Ford V-8 are recognized style
leaders of 1939 low-price field.

ONLY V'8 ENGINESin anv low-priced car.


ONLY IN A


Smoother, more responsive, more fun to drive!

HIGH GAS MILEAGE-85 h.p. Ford V-8
in this year's Gilmore-Yosemite Economy Run
showed best gasoline mileage among all lead-
ing low-priced cars.

STABILIZED RIDE-only low-priced car
with Torque-tube drive and radius rods front
and rear. AU nM AI II niu.


LONGER RIDEBASE than any other low.
priced car; 123 inches between front and rear
springs.

EXTRA EQUIPMENT atno extra cost, i
clouded in all Ford V-8 delivered prices.


KWIUnU /LL LLBUINU


LOW-PRICED CARS

EXCELS IN THE THINGS THAT COUNTY

olJ


THIS YEAR Of AL YEARS... Sr
AND DRIVE A FORD V.8 BEFORE
YOU CHOOSE rYOUR NEW CAR#


American farmers receive more "crops" produced from beneath
than $200,000,000 annually for oil their farms.
.. -. .: ..... .i .


ow


lying on their ace twirler, "Steel
Arm" Rabbit, to defeat the strong
invading team.


DR. J. C. COE
DENTIST--
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe



It's Time To

DINE!!

Where the food is of the
best ...where,the service
Is prompt and efficient
.and where you get
HOME COOKED
MEALS


TRIANGLE
RESTAURANT
BEER and WINES -


,T,HE STAR, PORT S8T. JOE, &ULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, MAY 19, J939


PAGE THREE


~""""~~~ .: _;~.~pp~i~g~~








PAE FS R


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla.,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year........$2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months..........65c

-*<{ Telephone 51 j'-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken .word
is lost; the printed word remains.

ADVERTISING
Many of today's business failures, if inves-
tigated, would be found to be due to lack of
foresight and planning and, most of all, to
improper advertising methods.


WHO WILL BE THE SUFFERERS?
In discussing the effect of a sales tax in
Florida on the small business man and the
citrus growers, the Orange County Chief has
this to say, in part:
"The sales tax reduces buying power
wherever it is applied, and the first to suf-
fer from a reduction of buying power are
producers like citrus growers, or merchants
or professional people who depend upon all
these for their living.
"The citrus grower and small business man
will also not be told that when tney escape
the ad valorem tax, at the same time.the
railroads, power companies, the phosphate
mines, the downtown real estate holders in
our big cities and other such properties, will
be escaping the ad valorem tax: That is, the
tax bills of these people, most able to pay
taxes, will be saddled on the grower and the
small merchants and their employes and cus-
tomers. Those concerns which now exact
their pound of flesh from business and work-
ing people alike in good times and bad times,
will escape all responsibility to contribute to


It is common to hear a business man, who the governments which protect them and
was a heavy advertiser in The Star a year give them services tlhat they cannot do with-
ago, say: "I can't advertise much now-I'veout.


THE. WORLD OF TOMORROW (?)


got to cut my overhead."
It is erroneous to consider advertising
costs as a part of current overhead. Rents,
salaries, insurance and repairs and replace-
ments are items properly chargeable against
articles being sold today, but advertising
should not be classed as current overhead. It
is future overhead and should be planned to
come out of future profits.
The sales the business man makes today
and the general increased prestige of his
store are largely the result of his advertising
program of months or even years before.
SAnd turning the telescope the other way,
the type of advertising program he follows
this week, next week and the following week,
will largely determine his sales and his pres-
tige in the distant future.
A properly managed business will take into
consideration the cumulative effect of adver-
tising'and the future importance of advertis-
ing money expended today.
'Advertising is a cost of operation that can-
not be avoided, a burden which is light in
good times and somewhat difficult in days of
depression. Why not plan advertising expen-
ditures with possible depressions clearly in
mind? -
William Wrigley's method of advertising
most when sales were least is too well known
to need elaboration. But it paid him and will
pay any business man in Port St. Joe.
These are the days in which heavy adver-:
tising pays the heaviest dividends.

Sunday night's fire demonstrated the ne-
cessity of having a night man on hand at the
city hall to get the fire truck underway as
soon as the siren sounds. Perhaps arrange-
rhents could be made to have someone sleep
in one of the rear rooms of, the city hall to
be no hand for such emergencies. We under-
stand that with a night man and slightly bet-
ter fire-fighting equipment Port St. Joe can
get a further reduction in fire insurance
rates. -

We notice a lot of maps of Florida on
which are pointed out the spots of interest
to be seen by the tourist, yet none of them
indicate Port St. Joe, where stands the monu-
ment marking the site of Florida's first con-
stitutional convention-"the birthplace of the
state."

Florida has 435 kinds of birds, of which
174 may be classed as "permanent residents."
-Titusville Star-Advocate. Wonder if that
includes the "snow birds"?

If you think conditions are tough here, just
be thankful you aren't living in Europe or
China.

Apparently the hardest thing to find in this
strange new world is government at popular
pricks.--Atlanta Constitution. .


"It is necessary for the welfare of Florida
that the sales tax under any name should be
kept out of this state and out of all other
states where Florida goods are sold."

A SENATOR'S EDITORIAL
Senator Pat Harrison, chairman of the
senate finance committee, should be an au-
thority on the question of governmental fis-
cal affairs, and what he had to say on this
subject recently is well worthwhile reading.
Here 'tis:
"The government's fiscal picture must be
carefully.scanned, and that -doesn't mean next
year, but now-and it should be done thru
clear vision and not through colored lens.
"We are confronted with a budget which
calls for over ten billion dollars in appropria-
tions for the next fiscal year we
have a national debt of forty billion dollars
taxes are now so heavy that to in-
crease them would add additional burdens
upon American industry and the American
people. Additional taxes would act as a de-
terrent to the revival of business.
"I appreciate the difficulty of the task, but
if everyone connected with the operation of
government, whether in the executive or
legislative departments, will realize the seri-
ous fiscal situation confronting us, and coun-
sel together and co-operate in mapping out
a plan, and unflinchingly and without politi-
cal consideration work toward that end, we
can accomplish results that will bring hope
and encouragement to our people and finan-
cial stability to our government.
"If immediate and. unified plans are not
laid, and enormous and unprecedented ex-
penditures are continued, with the national
debt mounting, economic confusion and
chaos are inevitable.
"I have no confidence in the economic
philosophy that we must spend ourselves out
of this economic disorder."

The legislative act setting up a teachers'
retirement system, which was allowed to be-
come a law without Governoi Cone's signa-
ture, is a good one. Our teachers are entitled
to something like this. When we come right
down to it, our teachers hold one of the most
responsible positions in the community-that
of moulding the youth of the land to the right
standards.

Russia, it seems, is of a mind to help pre-
vent II Duce carve himself a slice of Turkey.
-Florida Times-Union. The old boy would
like some Greece to go with his Turkey, from
the looks of things.

Missouri claims the laziest man yet. He
turned his entire income for 1938 over to
the government with the request that it fig-
ure out what part, if any, belonged to him.
-Macon Telegraph. I


Sitting In With the

Lawmakers
By GILBERT D. LEACH
Florida News Service


Folks are tunny.- Couple of
dozen people at a senate commit-
tee hearing where a bill under
consideration would, put a transac-
tion tax on everything in Florida
and pay old folks higher wages
for doing nothing than most of
'em ever earned when they were
working the hardest millions
upon millions of dollars involved-
and only a couple of dozen people.
Then standing room only in the
-house, all there -to listen to and
see a dogfight over a grudge Dill
that affects nobody outside the
city of Tampa. Almost any morn-
ing they could have seen the same
kind, of a dogfight over in the sen-
ate chamber where Senator Gra-
ham is trying to take racing apart
to find its ticks, but that doesn't'
seem to catch the popular flair.
Within ten feet of the committee
table where the hottest kind of
arguments stir the air, business
goes on as usual.
Battles and, skirmishes multi-
ply. Senator Mapoles had a bill on
third reading to put the poll tax
back on, and was there a battle!
That dashing bachelor, Amos Lew-
is, made two and a half speeches
that caused fluttering in the
breasts of a goodly feminine gal-
lery, but it was all shattered
when Bill Hodges tolled, a doleful
dirge, smiling all the while. Dead
bill! Still no poll tax!

No sooner do we get the poll
tax situation back in hand than
the perilous plight of Florida's
barbers-or their board-comes to
light in a bill sponsored by Sena-
tor Savage of Ooana. He tells of
their grave difficulties and how
the barber board couldn't collect
enough fees to pay itself, so
wouldn't the legislature please cut
their salaries so they could col-
lect? Reminded me of tne old ne-
gro who didn't want $2 a day-
rather have $1 a day so if he hap-
pened not to be paid, he wouldn't
lose so much.

I've heard a lot of folks won-
dering out loud why the legisla-
ture goes on appropriating money
to this and that before finding
out how much money will be
available and whire It is coming
from.
That's an easy one. The mem-
bers are just like you and me.
When we want something we go
out and buy it on the easy pay-


ment plan. After we get it we be-
gin to wonder just how we're go-
ing to pay for it, and we begin to
scratch around on the old budget
sheet and manipulate things so we
can meet the monthly payments.
That's when the worry sets in.
Well, worry is about to set in
'for the members of Florida's legis-
lature. They have been staving it
off as well as they could, but it's
staring them right in the face
row. There's a lot of money to
be raised somewhere, and nobody
wants to pay. Everybody has a
scheme for making the other fel-
low foot the bill.

Your guess is as good as mine
-maybe :better-but it looks from
irere like some kind of a sales tax
will be the only 'out" when the
eleventh hour scramble comes. Of
course, it will be put on merely
for the "time being,' but you've
seen those things before. Every
one of the emergency gasoline
taxes has become a permanent
fixture, and if we didn't have the
highest in the United States al-
ready, it would be upped again.

But listen to this: If the "Flor-
ida Townsend Plan" transaction
tax should happen to slip under
the wire first, woe unto the gen-
eral revenue fund!
-------X-~----
FINE POTATOES
The editor was presented with
a sack of Red Bliss potatoes this
week by Messrs. J. H. Shoemaker
and Dillon Linton, operators of
the Midway Fish Camp on Dead
Lakes. These spues were of large
size and as pretty as we have
seen in many a moon, and as for
flavor-they can't be beat.
---~----~--
Mr. and Mrs. B. B. Conklin and
Mr. and Mrs. Huel Crockett spent
last Saturday in Tallahassee. Miss
Dorothy Crockett returned to Port
St. Joe with them, having spent
a week in the capital city with
her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs.
L. vonWeller.
**
Miss Amelia Schneider, student
at Florida State College for Wo-
men, Tallahassee, was the week-
end guest of her parents, Mr. and
Mrs. T. M. Schneider.

Mrs. Leroy Galnous and little
son, Leroy, Jr., are spending this.
week with Mrs. Gainous' mother,
Mrs. J. J. Perritt, in Panama City.

Bishop Juhan of Jacksonville
was in this city Sunday for con-
firmation services at the'Episco-
pal church.

T. E. Austin of Apalachicola
was a business visitor in the city
last Thursday.


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIlDA


FRIDAY MAY 19, 1939








FRIDAY, MAY 19, 1939


I


Patty Lovett returned last Sat-
urday from Atlanta, where he has
been for treatment for the past
two months.

Mr. and Mrs. Philip Lovett and
Mrs. Emma Farr spent Sunday in
Wewahitchka, guests o! Mr. and
Mrs. W. Rowell.

Mrs. Dawson Hewitt has re-
turned from Tuscaloosa, Ala.,
where she visited relatives.



CLASSIFIED ADS

FOR RENT
FOR RENT-New houses at Bea-
con Hill. Front lot facing Gulf.
Furnished, running water. sani-
tary conveniences, electricity.
Apply T. W. Wilson, or Box
495, Port -St. Joe. 3-3tf
UNFURNISHED 9 by 18-foot cab-
ins; ceiled overhead and sides;
'good water; $6 month. Apply St.
Joe Lumber Co. 12121tf
ROOMS FOR RENT
IF YOU have a room for rent,
why not place a classified adver-
tisement in The Star. The cost is
low and returns are gratifying. .
\Try it today. ti
MISCELLANEOUS
A TRUE EPIC OF FLORIDA
"The Rise and Decline of the Old
City of St. Joseph," the only au-
thentic history of the long-dead
birthplace of Florida's first con-
stitution. Bound in kraft paper
from one of the first test runs
made by the St. Joe Paper Co.
mill. This interesting booklet
may be secure at The Star of-
fice or LeHardy's Pharmacy for
15 cents per copy. Send them to
your relatives and friends out-
side the state. tf



FISHING--

Spend the week-end in
West Florida's best fish-
ing grounds.
4- 4-



BOATS With or with-
out guide-at reasonable
rates. Hotel ac-
commodations within the
means of everyone.
4
SEE-


J. 0. 'Jim' SMITH

SUMATRA, FLA.



i FLOWERS AND

CORSAGES


WOOD FIBRE FLOWERS
that cannot be told from the
best product of Mother Nature.
S. .. And they keep indefi-
nitely. If they become droopy
you merely place them in the
refrigerator and in a brief time
they are as good .as neyw.

SEE

Mrs.. S. Smith
STAR OFFICE PHONE 51


PERSONALS


Mr. and Mrs. Erskine Johnson
of Panama City were the guests
Sunday of Mr. and Mrs. George
Johnson.

Miss Lila Carter, who is in Tal-
lahass'ee during legislature, spent
Sunday here with her parents.

B. A. Cogsdill was a week-end
visitor in Gainesville.

Mr. and .Mrs. R. o. Roberts and
little son, Charles, spent Sunday
in Atmore, Ala., guests of Mr. and
Mrs. C. L. Steele.

Miss Jewell Presnell of De-
Funiak. Springs,- field supervisor of
music, Federal Music Project, was
a visitor here Tuesday.

E. Clay Lewis spent Sunday in
this city with his family.

Gwendolyn Hdwell left' yester-
day morning to visit her aunt,
Mrs. W. B. Shores, in Cottondale
for several weeks.

Mr. and Mrs. Jim Bounds and
children are spending this week
in Panama City.

Mrs. Woodrow Talley left Mon-
day to spend the. week in Panama
City with her parents.

Mrs. Bill Brooks is spending
this w'ek in Savannah, Ga.

Mr. and Mrs. C. P. VanHorn
spent last Sunday in Panama City
as the guests of Mr. and Mrs. J.
K. Brock.

Mrs. 0. F. Powell and son, Dud-
ley returned Sunday from Mobile
where they visited for two weeks.

Mrs. H. A. Drare left Saturday
for a vacation in Atlanta and
other points in Georgia.

Mrs. Charlie Cogsdill arrived
Sunday from Gainesville to visit
relatives here.
---------
C. OF C. HAS MANY
MATTERS IN HAND

(Continued from Page 1)
from accumulations of debris and
litter.
Plant Trees and Flowers
Planting of trees and flowers
would assist greatly in improving
the city, said Mr. Darcey, and
along this line he endorsed the
movement of the cnamoer of com-
merce to have cattle fences built
north and south of the city from
the bay to the c~eai to keep out
stock. He told- of now flowers in
his own yard had been destroyed
by cattle coming in at night.
Mr. Darcey .stated that always,
when moving to another city, he
had felt that the new place of res-
idence did not need him so much
as, he needed, it, and that the same
thing applied to Port St. Joe. He
has lived here almost two years
and in that time has come to love
this city and believe whole-heart-
'edly in its future, and that he de-
sires to do all in his power to-
ward the public good. He says one
of his policies in hiring help at
the mill is- to wait for them to
ask about schools and, churches in
the city, and that if these ques-
tions are not forthcoming he would
feel that the applicant did not in-
tend to become a very good citi-
zen for, after all, those are very
vital forces in any city. Mr. Dar-
cey made a very lne impression
and was given the unanimous
thanks of the directors.
Propose Arbor Day
Director Horace Soule proposed
that the chamber sponsor an Ar-
bor Day program arite end'evor to
have every citizen':plant at least
one tree for beautification. If done
now, in a few years the city will
have abundant shade and; a great-


Checking Florida's Traffic


Electric eyes like this automatically measure the flow of traffic over
Florida's roads.
By weighing trucks, the Planning Survey finds out how strong roads
must be built to support traffic.



THE P OCKETBOOK'

1 KNOWLEDEITOPPS


ly improved appearance. Arbor
Day is a day set aside in many
states for the planting of trees,
and usually falls in April or May.
Here in Florida, where one can
plant at any time during the year
and expect results, almost any
day would be suitable. The direc-
tors will name a day at the next
meeting and everyone will be re-
quested to plant a tree on that
day. This is a very worthy move-
ment and should have the full co-
operation of everyone.
Four New Members
The following men were, con-
sidered for membership ande ac-
cepted: Kenneth A. Creech, C. J.
Sullivan, Percy H. Adams and J.
J. Darcey.
Director T. M. Schneider ex-
tended an invitation to all to be
present at the Memorial Day serv-
ices to be held May 30 under di-
rection of the American Legion
post.

About 71,000 dentists are licens-
ed to practice in the 1. S.


SOLONS FACE MATTER
OF RAISING CASH

(Continued from Page 1)
tutional amendment to abolish all
forms of ad valorem property
levies.
Still another transaction tax,
also a 3 per cent plan, is on the
senate's special order calendar.
But this bill would benefit old age
pensions exclusively, since the bill
further provides for a pension of
$200 a .month for all persons above
the age of 65 years. It is spon-
sored by Senator Johns of Starke.
Both the Johns and Stokes bill
would produce an estimated $48,-
000,000 a year each. The Stokes
measure, however, would not be
used for pensions. All of the reve-
nue would be applied to replace
money now raised by state, coun-
ty and municipal ad valorem prop-
erty taxes.

The world's greatest source of
tin is in the Malay States, in
Southern Asia,


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


For Each and Every Bottle
Sof Milk or Cream We Deliver
:; Is Protected With, a
SANITARY PARCHMENT
COVER

Use Only

SOLOMON' S

Pasteurized

MILK

Pasteurized for Your
Protection


CALM IHOSE BY USING
NERVES, DOCTOR
BE SWEET- MILES'
SERENEs! NERVINE


Can you afford to be
NERVOUS?
Perhaps you could afford
those attacks of Nerves if you
were the only one affected.
Tense nerves make you a nui-
sance to everyone with whom
you come in contact. No one
lies you when you are jumpy,
irritable and nervous.
DR.MILES'E
ERVIN
DR. MILES NERVINE has
been recognized as effective for
more than 60 years by sufferers
from Sleeplessness, Nervous Ir-
ritabilty, Nervous Headache.
Nervous Indigestion, Travel
Sickness.
LIQUID NERVINE
Large btl. $1.00, Small btL 251
EFFERVESCENT TABLETS
Large pkg. 750, Small pkg. 350
At your drug store


PAGE FIVE


IT MM T BE a
Any medicine that has been used
for generation after generaticni
MUST be good. That's the record
behind Wintersmith's over 70
years of continuous demand. Mil-
lions of people have preferred it-
millions both in America and in
21 foreign countries. TRY Winter-
smith's as a General Tonic, and for
Malaria. Then judge for yourself.

WINTERSMITI'S

TONIC

ERASE the DOUBT
About Your
FRESH WATER FISHING

MIDWAY PARK
Is In the HEART of the
Dead Lakes Fishing Area
Gulf County's north' line cuts
the Dead Lakes at the
waistline
Meet Your Friends At
MIDWAY PARK
when the season opens June 1.
.. Meantime
FURNISHED CABINS
On the Waterfront
J. H. SHOEMAKER, Prop.
Postoffice Address
WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA



PURITY IS

ASSURED!


b~tB~







AGE T


METHODIST LAYMEN TO
MEET SUNDAY, MAY 21

The first annual district-wide
Laymen's Conference of the Mari-
anna district will be held by the
Methodist church next Sunday,
May 21, at the old Galilee church
between Chipley ano Graceville.
The conference will begin at 10
o'clock and will be featured by
splendid ,addresses, good singing
and dinner on the grounds, Meth-
odist families from all parts of
the district are cordially Invited
to come and bring their lunches.
It is expected to be a great day.
Taking part on the program will
be Dr. E. C. Moore, presiding el-
der; O. L. Tompkins, Dr. C. A.
Cornell, Rev. F. G. Hastings, God-
frey King and others.
I-------) --
Ben Grace of Florala, Ala., has
accepted a position with the St.
Joe Furniture company.


St.N

goo why In




PORT THEATRE
MAY 28 and 29
-&uab ~ .L-


Gulf Coast League

Opens Here Sunday

Baseball Games To Be Played
On Local Field Every Sun-
day and Wednesday

The first game in the newly-
formed Gulf Coast Baseball league
will be played here Sunday when
the Port St. Joe town team meets
Apalachicola. At tne same time
the St. Joe Paper company team
will travel to Carrabelle to meet
thie team from that city.
Schedule of games inas not yet
been drawn up, but games will,be
played here every Wednesday and
Sunday, starting at 3:30 p. m. An
admission charge of 10 and 25
cents will be made.
In the double-header played at
the local park last Sunday Carra-
belle won from the Papermakers
8 to 2, while Apalachicola downed
the Port St. Joe team 7 to 5.
------~------
DANLEY EMPLOYES
ATTEND BANQUET

H. D. Danley, owner of the
Danley furniture stores, enter-
tained his employes at a banquet
at' Opp, Ala., on thel evening of
May 10. The banquet hall was
elaborately decorated, a large
screen bore the word "Danley"
and attractive place cards of min-
iature furniture marked the places
for 43 guests at the table. A de-
licious dinner was served, an in-
teresting program presented and
favors distributed.
Attending from the Port St. Joe
store were John Blount, Miss El-
nita Hall, W. L. Dannelly, Max


ST. JOE LOSES TO NAVY
IN SKEET SHOOT HERE

A team from the St. Joe Gun
club went down to defeat, 489 to
379, before the unerring eyes of
a team from the naval air station
at Pensacola in the skeet shoot
held here Sunday.
The navy men participating in
the shoot, who flew here in a
'bombing plane, were Lieut.-Com-
'mander Meadows and Lieutenants
Kirschner, George, Odaffer, Alli-
son and Badger.
'Making up the team for Port St.
Joe were F. M. Rowan, P. Bernal,
George TapplerL, E. M. Watts, H.
Soule and Basil Kenney, Jr.
.Lieut. Kerschner was high man
for the visitors with 93 out of 100
pigeons, and Bernal was high for
the locals with'85.
The St. Joe club will meet the
air station team at Pensacola
Sunday and they hope the results
will be different.
Lieut. Kerschner wrote a letter
of appreciation to the local club,
stating: "We wish to thank you
for the wonderful hospitality
shown us while in your city. All
members of our team had a de-
lightful time, and are looking for-
ward to the 21st in order that we
may have the opportunity to re-
pay you all."
*-~'"-----
Mrs. Tom Gibson, Jr., of At-
lanta, Ga., was called to this city
Wednesday by the serious illness
of heir father, R. A. Costin.

Flemming, Joe Morrow and Rich-
ard Moore. Mr. Blount took part
in the program, delivering an in-
teresting talk on "Care and Ap-
pearance of the Furniture Store."


F:


Mrs. H. D. Marks and Miss attended the benefit bridge at the
lorence Morris of Apalachicola Port Inn Wednesday.



THRIFT SPECIALS
FRIDAY & SATURDAY-May 19-20

POTATOES 10 Pounds 19c
LETTUCE-3 for ..........25c COOKING OIL gal can 80c.
White Ring Flour COOK. OIL, ga ......4
RICE, 3 lb. Bag ...........19c
24 Pounds ............ 904 CATSUP, 14 oz., 2 for 25c
12 Pounds ............ 484 Pork & Beans, 11 oz. 3....25c
PORK AND BEANS-No. 2V/ Can 10c
BABY FOOD IN GLASS JARS-3 for 25c

BANANAS 5 Pounds 19c
Tomato Juice, 50 oz. ....25c TEA, /V lb. 25c
Grapefruit Juice, 50 oz. 20c TOILET PAPER, 6 rls. 25c
HOMINY, No. 2V2 can 10c Paper Towels, 2 rolls ....25c
PINEAPPLE, No. 2......15c SALAD DRESSING, qt 25c

LEMONS Dozen 15c
TRIPE, 1/ lb. can ......23c ENGLISH PEAS ..
CREAM, 3 Large Cans 20c STRING BEANS ....
FLOOR MOP ............20Corn, wh.o ye.....
GOO------- BROOM RED BEANS .:............
GOOD, BROOM .........20c TOMATOES .............
CORN FLAKES, 3 for 25c Crowder PEAS ....
Aunt Jemima GRITS, 3 25c Can. SPAGHETTI ... -

THESE ARE CASH PRICES
CASH MARKET SPECIALS CASH
ONLY ONLY
Best Native Steak, lb. 25c No. 1 White Meat, lb. 13c
No. 7 STEAK ................20c Bulk Cooking Oil, gal. 70c
RIB STEW, 2 lbs. .-...25c Best Sliced BACON, Ib. 26c
Rolled Boneless Ham lb. 45c MIXED EGGS, 2 doz. 35c
Native Pork Chops, lb. 20c 2 Pounds Tasty
Weiners, 2 lbs. ............35c OLEOMARGARINE ...25c


GRIFFIN GROCERY


Port St. Joe


AND MARKET


PHONE 63


THESE ARE CASH PRICES

for FRIDAY and SATURDAY

MAY 19 AND 20


FLOUR
JU NE BR I DE
Self-Rising

24 b 65 12b 35*



IRISH.


POTATOES

10 lbs. 25c





SUGAR
0 BULK

10 lbs. 48c


Cooking Oil GAL 75C Gs. 45 c


Water Ground Meal


12 25
LBS. 25c


MILK 3.Tall Cans 20c
SLMN ALASKA PINK 25
SALMON 2 CANS,25


Phillips Pork and Beans-
No. 2V2 Can
DESSERT PEACHES-
Rosedale-3 No. 1 Cans.........


9c

25c


MATCHES 2 Cartons..........15c
CORN BEEF-12 oz. can......17c
3 Large Octagon Powders......13c

Hershey's COCOA-1 lb. can 14c

Indiana CORN-3 No. 2 cans 24c
DRY SALT MEAT-Per lb...15c
GRITS 5 pounds ...............15c
SPINACH-3 No. 2 Cans 25V
DILL PICKLES-Quart Jar I15


Owens & Murdock


fTed


~


5



5
c

d
i


PAGE SIX


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY MAY 19, 1939


FLORIDA


PORT ST. JOE