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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00132
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: April 28, 1939
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00132

Full Text






The Star-Plorida's fastest grow-
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St Joe. H


STAR


Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
est growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center

VOLUME 1I PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, APRIL 28, 1939 NUMBER 28


HEART ATTACK

IS FATAL FOR

E. W. SELLARS

ROAD SUPERINTENDENT OF A.
N. RAILROAD STRICKEN
AT GREENSBORO

Elisha W. Sellars, 57, of this
city, died in .Greensboro about
midnight last Friday as the re-
sult .of a heart attack. Funeral
services were conducted Saturday
in DeFuniak Springs, with a large
number, of friends from this city
in attendance.
Mr. Sellars was stricken earlier
in' the. evening while on a busi-
ness trip to Greensooro, but had
stated that it wouldd soon wear off
and that there was no necessity
"oor, taking him to a hospital; as.
-he had too much work to.do; A
short time later he died.
Mr. Sellars was born in. Ala-
bama. a I 1882 and had followed
railroad work in Alabama, Florida
and Mlssssisppi, being employed
as roadmastdr for the Florida
East Coast, Great Southern, Ili-
nois 0Cetral and Louisville &
Nashville railroads. For almost
two years past he had been em-
ployed as roadmaster by the Apa-
lachicola Northern Railroad com-
pany and, had made his home in
Port St. Joe.
Besides his widow, Mrs. Minnie
C. Sellars of this cty, ne'isatsur
vivqd by-four daaghtssa,. Mip,-..G
bert C. Hastings of.,Port St.. Je,
Mrs. Victor Rahner .o St. Augus-
tine, Mrs. O. H. Fannin of South
Jacksonville, and Miss Juanita
Sellars of Jacksonville.

Pine Ridge Follies

At Port On May 6

Full Cast of Seasoned Actors to
Appear On Stage of
Local Playhouse

The "Pine Ridge Follies" plays
the Port Theater Saturday, May
6, and everyone who has seen
them recommend them highly.
The cast is made up of 15,people,
including the original Pine Ridge
cast of Weyman and Mack, May
and Kiluduff, Star and Lee, Kay
and Joyce, Jeanie Lee, Eldwynn
Schubert and the Pine Ridge Col-
lege band.
Reports from all theaters where
they have appeared in recent
months are very commendatory,
according to Manager Roy Wil-
liams, which means that theater-
goers who plan to visit the Port
theater on May 6 will receive a
welcome treat.
On the screen with this show
will be the Three Mesquiteers In
"Overland Stage Raiders," and
the owl show will be "King Kong"
with Fay Wray and Bruce Cabot.
**--------
MOTHER. OF LOCAL
MEN DIES SUNDAY

Mrs. Antoinette Owens Creech,
15, widow of the late Kenneth
Douglas Creech, died about 9:30
'Sunday morning in Dothan, Ala.,
following an apoplectic 'stroke.
Mrs. Creech Is survived by
seven children, Kenneth and Gus
oCre6ch of Port St. Joe, Mrs. W.
L. Horn of Dothan, Ala., Mrs. W.
L. Benton of Birmingham, Ala.,
Mrs. J. R. Dillon of Jacksonville,
Mrs, M. E. Hicks of Atlanta, Ga.,
Mrs. J. W. Horne of Thomasville,
Ga.,'and Charles Creech ofl Do-
than. Ala. :


Teachers of Gulf county schools
,met last week at Van's recreation
hall at -.eacon' Hill to' :ofrm' a
teachers' organization for Gull
county. Wilbur Wells acted as
host and greeted the guests upon
their arrival after which a de-
licious chicken supper was served.
During the course of the meal,
discussion was held as to the pur-
pose and aims of the organization,
and at this time Miss Erline Mc-
Clellan was elected as president
and Miss Sarah Witherspoon of
Wewahitchka elected as secretary
and treasurer. About 40 teachers
were present at the meeting, and
following the supper, dancing was
enjoyed.
The new organization will meet
four times yearly in combined
business and social sessions.
------- ----
IMPORTANT MEETING
OF CHAMBER MONDAY

The regular meeting of the
Port St. Joe Chamber of Com-
merce will be held Monday eve-
ning at 8 o'clock in the old Ma-
sonic hall. This session will be in
charge of the merchants' co-opera-
tive committee, and as a number
of important amendments to the
constitution and by-laws are to be
acted upon, all members ,f the
body are urged to be. present.
-------4------
MISS DOROTHY CROCKETT
TO BE QUEEN OF THE BALL

At the fireman's ball held in the
Centennial building last. Friday
night, Miss Dorothy Crockett was
elected by popular vote as queen
of the next ball.
Miss Brownie Carter was named
as queen for Friday's ball and led
the grand march on the arm of
B. W. Eells, Sr.
---
$5 CAR TAG BILL KILLED

The house motor vehicle com-
mittee Tuesday killed a bill that
would have reduced; the annual li-
cense fee from $10 to $5 on cars
weighing less than 3000 pounds.
It was said that reduction of the
fee would cut public school reve-
.-..-, - ,F ino nl,0 ." -e'r.


SIXTEEN WILL

GET DIPLOMAS

THIS EVENING

CLOSING EXERCISES OF HIGH
SCHOOL TO BE H0LD IN
AUDITORIUM


Gun Club Members

Are Practicing For

Shoot with Airmen

Naval Air Station Squad To Be
Here May 14 for Shoot With
St. Joe Gun Club Experts


Looking forward with anticipa-
Port St. Joe high school tonight tion to the match shoot to be held


Paving Project

Here Approved

By City Board

Provides For Paving on Four City
Streets and Paving of
Public Dock

The board of city commission-
ers at their meeting Tuesday eve-
ning approved a WPA application
requesting $47,627 for the paving
of 36,000 square yards on First,
Sixth, Tenth a nd Thirteenth
streets and for laying of pave-
ment on First street from Monu-
ment avenue to the new ware-
house on the public dock.
Sponsors share of the project
will be $22,392, and the govern-
ment's share, $25,235. It is 'under-
stood that local interests will take
care of the city! portion of the
proposed project.
The paving will be of clay base
with tar priming and an asphalt
and slag surface.
-k
Teachers Meet To

Form Association

Gulf County Educators nForm As-
sociation In Session at
Peacon Hill


here May 14 with a squad from
the naval air station at Pensacola,
marksmen of the St. Joe Rod and
Gun club have 'Dben doing some
earnest practicing at the range
n,. the Centennial grounds.
A second practice. round was
held Sunday afternoon with the
following scores being made:


Skeet Shoot-
Bernal ...................
W ard ....................
Ezell ....................
Tapper ..................
Rowan ...................
Soule ....................
Eells, Jr. ...... ........
Brooks ...................


76x100
63x125
21X 5t
41x 75
42x 75
35x 75-
31x 75
lx 25


is graduating a class 'of sixteen
young men and women. As usual,
a series of events and occasions
have distinguished their egress
from high school Into 'the future.
It is a fitting climax td the years
,)f work in the lower grades and
the high school tnat ie students
are permitted to redlke that this
ist a time for cel tjiation and
gaiety, and also a ti e for dig-
nity and, solemnity :;
To some of .those o lduating to-
nltt, the curtain hi7 rung down
on directed, education They will
have to make a placed the world
without further schobling in the
temples of education' They will
find, however, that education is
never completed, 64en though
they have not the bdndfit of teach-
ers of higher learning. From their
everyday experiences1 they will
continue to learn, and perhaps
among the members of this class
of '39 there will be some who will
reach greater heights than others
who are privileged to pursue the
paths of higher learning.
Colleges and anlyeralfes wilL
claim some members of this class.
They will gain a broader outlook
in the worlds of science, art, the
professions and politics, which
may or may not place them in the
(Continued on Page 5)



Ball League

Four Games Per Week Will Be
Played, On Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday

.At a meeting held last Friday
night at the Black Cat cafe, the
Port St. Joe Diamond Ball League
was organized with four teams
represented, the Power House, the
Pulp Mill and the Chemists of the
St. Joe Paper company and a team
from the local Lion's club.
The four managers of the re-
spective teams, Carl Bounds, Sam-
mie McCall, Wilbur Wells and Mr.
Smith, drew up a schedule for the
first half and D. G. McPherson
was elected as secretary-treasurer
of the league.
Games will be played beginning
at 4 o'clock every Monday, Tues-
day, Wednesday and Thursday.
The first scheduled games for
Monday and Tuesday were rained
out and will be played off at a
later date.
In the first game Wednesday
afternoon,, which was a wild and
woolly, free-hitting affair, the
Power House team outscored the
Pulp Mill gang by a score of 16
to 12. Carl Bounds was on the
mound for the Pulpers and Smitty
tossed them over for the Power
House boys.
Yesterday the Lions club met
the Chemists and trimmed them
by a close score of 6 to 5. The
game was fast from start to finish
and the outcome was in doubt un-
til the first of the, seventh, when
the Lions held the Chemists down
to retain their one-run lead. The
hits were evenly divided at six
for each club. Player of the Lions
led in hitting, getting one hit in
-.- r *, ,1.." ,"0.


I


(Continued on Page 5)
--------.-

City Is Now Making

Sewer Connections

Will Lay Sewer Lines from Main
Sewer to Property, Line
Without Cost

Under. a WPA project now in el-
fect, theki'ity of Port St. Joe will
lay 'sewer lines from. the main
sewer to the property line with-
out cost to property owners, thus
effecting a considerable saving to
those who have been contemplat-
ing connecting with the city's
sewage disposal system but have
not done so due to the prohibitive
cost of laying lines from their,
property to the main sewers.
All that Is necessary to have
a line laid to the property line in
order to connect is to go to the
city clerk's office and ask for the
issuing of a permit to connect.
1 -K
SENATE VOTES REPEAL
OF GROSS RECEIPTS TAX

Repeal of the gross receipts tax,
a levy on Florida business men
ordered by the 1935 legislature
and each year netting about $2,-
000,000 for the public school fund,
Wednesday was voted by the sen-
ate.
Repeal of the tax was by a 36
to 1 vote, President J. Turner But-
ler casting the lone dissenting
vote.
-- ------
SLOT MACHINE BILL IS
PLACED ON CALENDAR

Legalization of slot machines
under a state ownership plan ad-
vanced by Senator W. H. Mapoles
of Crestview will be argued on
the floor of the senate Monday af-
ternoon at Tallahassee.
Senator Spessard L. Holland of
the finance and taxation commit-
tee announced he would move for
an indefinite: postponement of
consideration of. the measure, the
procedure followed wFen bills that
are frowned upon by committees
come before the senate. Adoption
of a motion to that effect would
kill the measure.
S--- -- -
BARRIER GOES IN THE RED
W. W. Barrier this week had
the front of his 5 and 10 cent
store repainted in bright red,
which adds much to the appear-
ance of this up-to-date business


WPA LOAN FOR

HOSPITAL HERE

IS APPROVED

CALDWELL WIRES PROJECT
IS NOW AWAITING PRESI-
DENTIAL APPROVAL

A telegram received yesterday
by the editor of The Star from
Congressman Millard Caldwell at
Washington states that the long-
sought loan for constructionn of a
modern hospital here has, been
approved and is now awaiting
'presidential action.
Caldwell's telegram is as fol-
lows:
W. S. Smith,
Port St. Joe, Fla.
Port St. Joe hospital project
31028 approved, by, all di-
visions WPA. Now awaiting
presidential action. Am urging
prompt final approval.
Mtllard Catdwell, M. 0.
Application for a .W9,000 loan
for construction of a 30room ~1
pital here was made by the clty.
commissioners December 27, 1938.
The sponsor's share or! 26,423 has
been assured by local interests,
as well as $15,000 required for
necessary equipment.
The hospital, whicn will be lo-
oated in the Bay Ridge section
west of the Centennial building,
wlil: -ffr'a long-ftrt need beare, si.
the nearest h'ospltal accommoda-
tions at the 'present time are at
Panama City, .36 miles distant.

Hearing Held On

Ad Valorem Tax

Local Delegation Appears Before
Senate Committee Hearing
Arguments On Matter

A proposed constitutional amend-
ment to abolish all ad valorem
taxes was attacked and defended
Tuesday night in Tallahassee be-
fore a senate committee.
Those in favor of doing away
with the tax averred that the ad
valorem tax system has broken
down and that it is unfair, con-
fisctory and is not based on abil-
ity to pay. They pointed out that
if the state is to go ahead, it must
have a solid tax foundation.
Strong opposition to the amend-
ment was registered by opponents
to the plan, it being stated that
abolition of the real estate levy
would put many local governments
in Florida in a precarious posi-
tion and probably would result in
the imposition of a sales tax.
A delegation from Port St. Joe
consisting of J. L. Kerr, Rev. D.
E. Marietta, C. A. Tovey and Mr.
and Mrs. George Bennett attended
the hearing, Rev. Marietta acting
as spokesman for the group, and
requested that the matter of re-
pealing the ad valorem tax be
submitted to a vote of the people.

PORT NEWS

The S.S. Steelmaker, Isthamial
Steamship company, owners, ar-
rived Sunday and sailed Sunday
with a cargo of 50.0 tons of paper
from the St. Joe Paper company.
S.S. Quebec City, flying the
British flag, arrived Wednesilay
and sailed yesterday with a cargo
of lumber from the St. Joe Lum-
ber and Export company.
The S.S. Jean of the Bull Line
: dcue to arrive Sunday.









A T


EASTERN STAR HOLDS
SCHOOL OF INSTRUCTION
Following the regular meeting
of the Order of Eastern Star Tues-
day night, Mrs. Effie Jones of
Panama City, instructress for the
-third district, held a school of in-
struction for members of the lo-
cal chapter.


Following the session, Mrs.
Jones was re-elected as district
instructress for the coming year.

HEWITToWOOTEN
Miss Stella Wooten of Ponce
DeLeon and John Hewitt were
married in Bonifay, Sunday, April
23, They arrived ihi this city Wed-
nesday to make tneir home. Mr.
Hewitt is connected with the St.
Joe Lumber and Export company.

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT
Mr. and Mrs: A. C. Hensley of
Port St. Joe announce the birth
of a 7-pound boy,. born April 18
at Mobile, Ala. The young man
has been named James Albert.

Mis. 'G. T: Boswell returned to'
her home here this' week after
visiting for' two -months in 'Mobile
with her sons, C. T. and Burrell
Boswell.








-oi


FRIDAY NITE 10:30
GALA MIDNITE SHOW!
ALL COLORED CAST
WESTERN THRILLER

"TWO' GUN MAN

FROM HARLEM"I
*ftA f ^<^ft>-(E<3^>"*


SATURDAY ONLY
APRIL 29

"GENE AUTREY
and SMILEY BURNETT'E

"HOME ON THE

PRAIRIE"


LONE RANGER


CARTOON


OWL SHOW 10:30 P. M.
'Thf story the reporter dared not write!


ROGERS CHC ALEN

' 4 40 4 0 -0e 4
SUN.-MON.-April 30, May 1

IoRETmA YOUNG WARNER BAXTER




'A 20iCeituvy-Fox Piture

WALT DISNEY'S SILLY SYMPHOINTY






THURS.-FRI--MAY 4 and 5
.iull hriv the time of "!aut UFE at IDNIGHT!


GALA STAGE SHOW !
SATURDAY, MAY 6


'Pine Ridge Follies'

GIRLS-MUSIC-DANCING


Th;s Is NOT a Hill Billy Show

^---------A, I&


Personals


S Churches


LANETA DAVIS, Editor


The program for the.. year 1939-


40 was read and approved, and
promises interesting programs for
the coming year. The new pro-
gram stresses the importance of
literature, feeling that it has been
neglected in the past programs.
It was voted to have a social
hour at all meetings, with the hos-
tess for the day paying the ex-
penses. The meeting place for the
club will be decided upon by the
executive committee 'and announc-
ed at a later date.
It was decided to hold a bene-
fit bridge at the Port Inn on May
17. Mrs. J. L. Miller was appointed
chairman bf the committee, with
Mrs. Richard' Porter, Mrs. Charles
Parker, Mrs. Basil Kenney, Sr.,
and Mrs. Fred Curtis as co-work-
ers for the occasion.
The club voted to give a schol-
arship to the short course at Tal-
lahassee to the 4H club girl with
the most outstanding work, for
the year. This is the third year
that the club has given such a
scholarship.

LOCAL AUXILIARY WELL
REPRESENTED AT MEET
The Presbyterian Auxiliary was
well represented at the Presby-
terial meeting held mn Tallahassee
last week, and a very good im-
pression was made by those rep-
resenting Port St. Joe.
Attending Thursday were Mrs.
Basil E. Kenney, Sr., Mrs. E. H.
Horton and Mrs. R. Logan. On
Friday, Rev. H. F. Beaty took
Mrs. H. L. McKinnon, Mrs. P. D.
Prows and Mrs. Sara Johnson to
the meeting.

Mr. and Mrs. D. G. Farmer will
leave today for a two weeks' visit
in Elba and Headland, Ala.
Mrs. J. W. Smith returned to
Sumatra last Friday after spend-
ing a week here as the guest of
Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Smith.
Mr. and Mrs. T. M. Schneider
and Mr. and Mrs. Joe Hauser were
visiting Wednesday in Panama
City.
Mrs. Cecil O. Hewitt of Pelham,
Ga., was the week end guest of
her husband, C. O. Hewitt.
tt


WOMAN'S CLUB IN LAST
MEETING OF THE YEAR
The Port St. Joe Woman's club
held its last meeting of the year
Wednesday afternoon at the Meth-
odist church witi a gooa attend-
ance. Old business was disposed
of,- with Mrs. George Patton, the
retiring president, in the chair.
Prior to presenting the gavel to
Mrs. W. A. Smith, the newly-
elected president, tIe club pre-
sented Mrs. Patton with a Federa-
tion pin for her untiring service
during the year.
Upon receiving tae gavel, Mrs.
Smith appointed her committees
for the coming year as follows:
American Citizenship--Mrs. Roy
Gibson, chairman, Mrs. L. H. Bar-
tee, Mrs. Patty Lovett. Education
-Mrs. Charles Brown, chairman;
Mrs. Brooks Harrell, Mrs. Richard
Porter.- American Home-Mrs. J.
L. Miller, chairman; Mrs. B. W.
Eells, Mrs. Joe Whitfield." Conser-
vation- and .Natural Resources-
MrS. H. W. Soule, chairman; Mrs.
G:.L.' Snowden; Mrs. Basil E. Ken-
tiey, Jr. .Fine Arts-Mrs. H; S:.
Lilius, chairman; Mrs. D. L.
Owens, Mrs, W.. A.. Smith. Public
Welfare-Mrs, Basil. Kenney, Sr.,
chairman; Mrs. Robert Bellows,
Mrs. Ross-: Coburn. 'Legislation-
Mrs. E. C. Lewis. international
Relations-Mrs. M. L. Fuller. Mu-'
si--Mrs. Charles Parker, chair-
man; Mrs. E. Ramsey, Mrs. W:
A. Smith, Mrs: J. L. Temple: Fi-
nancial Committee Mrs. D. L.
Owens,' chairman; Mrs. H. L.
Crockett: Press anC Publicity-
Mrs. R. R. Minus, chairman; Miss
Lillian Ferrell. Foundation Fund-
Mrs. George A. Patton.


The meeting was called to or-
der and then turned over to
County Superintendent C. L. Cos-
tin, who installed the following
officers: Mrs.'.E. A. Horton, presi-
dent; Mrs. John Lane, first vice-
president; Mrs. J. T. McNeill,
second vice-president; Mrs. Robt.
Tapperj historian; Mrs. Leroy
Gainous, secretary; Collis Land,
treasurer.
A short talk was given by Mr.
Costin pledging his support to the
P.-T. A., after which the meeting
was turned over to the new presi-
dent. Mrs. Gainous read a letter
regarding the P.-T. A. institute to
be held in Gainesville June 6. Re-
port of the treasurer was heard
and. a motion made and approved
to send the president and pro-
gram chairman as delegates to
the institute. Committees were ap-
pointed, after whicn the meeting
adjourned.

THURSDAY BRIDGE CLUB
MEETS WITH MRS. OWENS
The Thursday Bridge club was
entertained this week at the home
of' Mrs. T. Owens. Two tables were
in. progression and following the
tallying of! scores, prizes were
presented. Ice cream and cake
was served 'to Mesdames E. Ram-
sey, B. A. Pridgeon, .s. M. Smith,
H. Soule, M. P. Tomlinson, J. B.
Gloekler, 0. Edwards and guest,
Mrs. Fred Curtis.

MRS. B. C. GAILLARD
ENTERTAINS' AT BRIDGE
Mrs. B. C. Gaillard entertained
with two tables of bridge Monday
afternoon at her home on Long
avenue. Following several pro-
gressions, scores were tallied and
Mrs. Gaillard awarded high and
Mrs. George Wimberly second
high. Sandwiches, cookies and
coffee were served to Mesdames
B. J. Hull, George Wimberly, R.
Watson, F. Curtis, J. Mira, H.
Lilius and J. B. Gloekler.

Miss Enid .Mathison .left Monday
for New York to enter special
nurses' training. She won an eight
weeks' scholarship.


At the Churches

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
Rev. H.. F. Beaty, Minister
10,:00 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. m--Preaching service.
Rev. George H. Hurst of Brazil
will preach Sunday morning. Be
sure to hear him.
There will be no night service.

METHODIST CHURCH
D. E. Marietta, Minister
Services Every Sunday
10:00 a. m.-Churcn School.
11:00 a. m.--Morning worship.
7:30 p. m.--Evening worship.

FIRST. BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. J. W.~Sisemore, Minister
10:00 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00'a. m.-Morning Worship.
7:00 p. m.-B. Y. P. U.
8:00 p. mt-Preaching 'service.
W. M. U.,"Monday, 3:00 p. m.
Prayermeeting Wednesday, 7:30 p.
m. Teaohers meeting, Thursday,
7:30 p. m...

ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Rev. T. 'Corbin, Pastor
Full-fime services
10:-15 a. m.'-Sunday- School.
11:00 a. r:---Preaching, Service..
7:30 p. p.-r-Evangelistic service.
Prayermeeting every Wednesday
night.
-----+~-------
INSTALLATION SERVICE
HELD YESTERDAY BY P.-T.A.
The last meeting of the year
and installation services for the
Port St. Joe Parent Teacher asso-
ciation was held in the high
school auditorium yesterday after-
noon with Collis Land. presiding
in the absence of the president.
Miss 'Lillian Thompson act d as
.0 o~nrrf


a business vis-
in Panama.


without worry. Without w
little to operate that you'll


ork. AND, I cost so
be surprised!" '.
"p,


ON WHAT:AMILLION USERS SAY ABOUT



ELECTRIC WATER HEATERS


R4sk Your ELECTRICAL DEALER Or



FLORIDA POWER


CORPORRAT1 ON


"They sure do- and more besides. An electric.
water heater is automatic,and carefree re-I
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ens stay cool because an electric water heater is
tops inefficiency, keeps all its heat inside! I give
a million users the convenience of instant hot
water always at the turn of a faucet .


MRS. D. C. SMITH HOSTESS
TO WEDNESDAY BRIDGE CLUB
Mrs. D. C. Smith was hostess
to the Wednesday Bridge club
this week at hei some at Niles.
Two tables were placed for play
and following several progres-
sions, prizes were presented to
Mrs. W. M. Howell, high, Mrs. J.
A. Christmas, low, and Mrs. P. D.
Farmer, cut.
A delicious dinner of f;ied
chicken hot biscuits, salad, olives,
cookies and coffee was served to
Mesdames W. H. Howell, P. D.
Farmer, W. S. Smith, Grimsley,
M..Larkin, C. Trammell and' J. A.
Christmas.

MR. AND MRS. LEHARDY
CELEBRATE ANNIVERSARY,
Mr. aid; Mrs. F. A. LeHardy
Jr., celebrated their third' wedding
anniversary Monday night with a
weiner roast at Beacon Hill. Swim-
ming was enjoyed ny; the party,
after- which all roasted weiners.
Enjoying this affair were Mr.
and. Mrs. W. C. Roche, Mr: and
Jrs. Roy Williams, Mr.. and Mrs.
Henry Lilius and Mr.- and, Mrs.
Miles Hurlbut.


~ ,P-~Ea~lY-~s~a---~pb~- -


PAGE TWO


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA'


FRIDAY, APRIL 28, 1939


BAPTIST MISSIONARY
SOCIETY MEETS AT CHURCH
The Royal Service program was
rendered by the Lyd'ia circle of
the Baptist Missionary society
Monday afternoon at the church,
with all circles attending.
Topic 'for the month was "South-
ern Baptist Respons'e to the Great
Commission In Latin America."
The W. M. U. year song was sung
as the opening number, followed
with prayer by Mrs. Curtis Pal-
mer, who gave tne Bible study,
"The Way of Salvat.on. "The;
Great Commission in Latin Amer-
ica" was given by Mrs. Charles
McClellan. Prayer that all nations
may know the one way was given
by Mrs. Fred Maddox.
Mrs. J. F. Miller spoke on "The
Need of the Gospel In Latin
America"; "Responding to the
Great Commission," Mrs. Daisy
Staten; "Unreached Millions," by
Mrs. J. W..Sisemore.. The closing
prayer was by Mrs. J. O. Baggett.
After a few matters of business
were transacted ,and plans for, the
second quarterly W. M. U. associ-
ation meeting at Emanuel church,
Panama City, were discussed,. the
Mispah. was repeated.
The'next meeting will be a joint.
business meeting .at the church
May 1L .
t f ..T
Mrs. Pete* Bernal and Miss
Brownie Carter spent Thursday
and Friday in Tallahassee, guests
of Miss Lila Carter, who is in the
capital city during legislature.


C. A. Tovey was
itor last Thursday


secre/al y.


i


I








FIDAY ST OR iOE-RrlA iR i I. LTMTilY.PR L.


Oil engineers are now trying to
locate oil pools by analyzing the
surface soil for traces of gas and
other clues.



1111. ;J C. COE
DENTIST-
-D E N T I S T--
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bidg. Port St. Joe



EYES EXAMINED


-ESEARCH TO THE RESCUE


In the.early 1930s the highway
picture was pretty dismal.. The
National. Safety Council's "three
E"' formula-Education, Enforce-
ment, Engineering-hfad just been
evolved, and the .attack on the
steadily counting traffic toll was
beginning to get under way along
Education and Enforcement lines.
Th6n up at the Harvard school for
Traffic Research, a red-headed, 42-
year-old traffic engineer named


At about the 'same time Dr. Mc-
.Clintock was evolving his friction
theory, highway engineers all over
the country were beginning to see
that from now on traffic engineer-
ing must play an important part
in highway design. Paved surfaces,
they agreed, were not alone
enough-they must be safe sur-
faces. But they also realized that
to bring even the 10 per cent of the
nation's highway mileage that car-


Glasses fitted when needed
Made In Our Own Laboratoty
All Work Unconditionally
Guaranteed
Office Hours: 9a. m. to 6 p. m.

DR. G. T. NEWBERRY
OPTOMETRIST
PANAMA CITY, FLA.

_-~-_,,.- -.- ^. ., ,-.I


F ISHIN G:- -


4I -


.


"d6 oTS -r"With or wil
"oU^ guide-at reasonat
**'""i~ps.. GI
cm :c modations' within"
means of' everyone.


: 'SEE--


J..Ji n' SMIT
41 $"


In'
ih.f


1e.
hle







HTT


SUMATRA, FLA.


ERASE the DOUBT
About Your
FRESH 'WATER FISHING


1s In the''4ART of 'the
Dead Lakes Fishing' Area
Gulf ~qunty's porth line cuts
ti e D ad Lakes gi" the
4alitlirie
Meet Your' #iehds At
MIDWAY Y P ARK
when the season opens June 1.
S'Meanrtime
FURNISHED CABINS
On the Waterfront
J. H. SHOEMAKER and
J. P. BRANTON, Proprietors
Postoffice Address
WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA



PURITY IS

ASSURED!


Amendment

Would Stop Tax

Compromises


Measure Sponsored By Lewis Hits
At Laws Like the Futch, Go-
mez and Murphy Acts

The Florida house of represen-
tatives Tuesday approved a con-
stitutional amendment sponsored
by Representative E. Clay Lewis
of Port St. Joe, that would limit
to narrow lines the cancellation
or compromise of taxes legally
assessed and levied. A two-thirds
vote of the legislature's member-


ship of 133 would ,e required to in the place of imported peat
reduce or cancel any taxes under moss in rooting cuttings of orna.


Lewis' law. The proposed amend-
ment, which passed the house 57
to 33, is now in the senate.
Representative' Lewis said he
was "hitting at laws llke the
Futch, Gomez and Murphy acts"
by which past legislatures legal-
ized adjustments. He said State
Comptroller J. M. Lee reported
$51),0i)0,1i0 of assesssed' and 'lvied
'taxes had been settled 'ih'"'0 years


~+It.' url~tal't 'Int' ~ip'lc'-~5ngflnerlflg. this' ination of Cfcugo'. dU'ter
Driv hls carried 5ppr ,,m s qf o qr.' a day for
aimwemwYk nv wllt .ie


six yrl,,witno. ni
SDRj. iai MacCl ntqe worked" ut
,'Jfsf h JaUde'.1he :felpen 'ie-
ory"' showing Why tbl highway.
was ta .failtin,:r y acldents and
awht 'blllfe donbt-f'buld alI ity
anto. highways. Aonlyzing accidents
not In'lai terms of car and driver
failure, but with'an 'Ye to rto d
failure. Dr. McCllntock came.to t
conclusion 'that 'traffic Is' I tsli a'
fluid composed of streaqts of cars
.going In he same electionn a4pd
hb opposite directions. When'tLeise
streams'rub against each orher, or
against obstructions 'n 'the road,
they' create friction," which In turn-
creates congestion or accidents.
The "Lilited 'Wiay"
SDr:'.McClintock found one answer
to his friction problems In the so-
called limiteded way." On this high-
Way 'opp6silng streams of traffic
are separated by a parkway to'pre-
vent head-on collisions. .At ill
SIntersections, .traffic. Is separtaed
byI over or under-passes. Rigjt-
ofi-ways are.. clear of all pedes-
trians, telepline" 'poles and slmi-
lar obstructlbons Where side roads
Senter, an "extra lane Is pro-
'vided,, to..keep ,cars .out of .te
main traffic stream 'while en-
.'.tr-lg' or leaving the highway. The
'present Miamil-WesL 'Palm'bneach
hkhi~hay Is a n:odified "limited
way," approaching' the ideal In road
approaching the ideal in road fa-
facilities. However, traffic surveys
shoiw that in Floi',da, only a very
limited mileage of heavy traffic
highways' will 'require this type 'of
construction.


jlps 5b.per ceut 9f sll traffic and on
'whcht'80' er" cent '6 alli~cl'dcnta
"Eur, 'tb'l sch 'hh'i ai"daiards' i
the limitedd way" requires, will be
an expenslve proposition.
Planning NIjcssarr
It became apparent to everyone
In the"hlgliay transport field 'that
,f Itthe: nation's oads are to 'be fit-'
ted to traffic, haphazard oad
building must. pestopped nd road
departments must 'ey' all their ef-
forts Into a master plan. designed
.o serve each state efficiently 'and.
''ut6^beldr'a 'i~ lmster pjlan coild
be evolved, highway engineers had
to know how much traffic flows
over all the roads;W ho ~fses the
roads, and what our highways cost
to.buildd nd maintain.
r'With this information at' hind,
road 'departments could 'design
.rpads that would carry safely .the
traffic of today, and that antl6cpat-
ed for "the future; roads 'could be
built wh9re they would serve the
'greatest number of people and not
:where political' expifdlency or un-
sound engineering dictated.. Fin-
ally, it could be. determined how
the 'cost of ian 'adequate 'lflgway
system' could be' distributed.
STo provide this information, the
United. States Bdurau of Public:
Rdads 'worked out a gigaRnti re-
search program and labelled it a
State-wide Highwlay Painning Sur-
vey. Today,' 46 states are making'
the surveys, largely with Federal
funds.


mental plants.
--------- -
Nearly 1,000,000 railway cars
are required each year to trans-
port 'anthracite coal, producing
'railway' revenue .of about $100,.
000,000.
_---------~-----,-
The Ohio river flood of 1937
w'as the highest on record for the
United States.


PALMIST. CRYSTAL 'ArfD PSYCHIC READERR
Setbe all Ev1erytBhin l'ou Vlsh' To itw
S,Withut .havilug,'&eri pr;'ht rd of yi lifore.' will
r tell you of your Piats lffair. giving you dates,
t l aigactC ~ a nd f b nefit you.
l .$trlingo, true an4h facipilrng are the words that
flow from the lips of thin lifted and unrivaled
S'Palmi'(t.N'ot only wilfl"he read. your life' like an
open book, but'also help ybu' out 'of your'trbbfes.
reunite the separated. settle lovers' quarrels, en.
'able you to wfn ti'e'esfeem. .rove and affection
df' any certain one, restore lost "affection, bring*
sunshine and hapiness to sdlcordaitt. fiamllie.
"ive rilible n'fihfin' tio'and advice o all' i'rob
lems.:of life such as love. coutrtship, marriage.
changes, travel, buainxa, 'stock and investments
WAINl'id" RObM FOR COLORED
SPeriiiainetly 'L'oateT' at, .
PANAMA CITY, ON ROUTE 98, AT RESTFUL INN
1, ~4 ile South of Hugh Sills Variety fStore- :
41* 2 Ct'. -..


WE BAAUL N IN-

CALL US' FbR LIGIT 'AND TkEAVY Hi
WE HAVE GOOD CLEAN BUILDING SAND FO


Pro&pt' iand Efficient 'Servic Always


SC.W. H'ORTON
' PHONE 70 ''=r'"s PORT ST. JOE,


. -. .

JLING
SALE





FLA.
4


- .-.-.-.----- .... ... ..... ...


'Inside Story' Feature At Owl Show


For Each and Every Bottle
of Milk or Cream We Deliver
Is Protected With a
SANITARY PARCHMENT
COVER

Use Only

SOLOMON' S

Pasteurized

MILK
Pasteurized for Your
Protection


Michael 'Whalen and Douglas. Fowley in "Inside Story"

"Inside Story," playing at the disclosure of a murder to which
10:30 Owl Show Saturday night at she had been an eye-witness. Fea-
the Port Theater, is the tale of a tured are Michael Whalen, Jean
Rogers and Douglas Fowley. It's
newspaper man who meets a night
newsprmanwho meetsua nigh good, says Manager Roy Williams.
club hostess through a "stunt" ad,
saves her from being killed b' the
- -r 0" t'..h clu'j who feared her. It ;a-s ,to a2',ri;sc-- ory It'
/


Millions of users feel that they get quicker, more pleas-'
ant, more effective relief from ALKA-SELTZER than from
old-fashioned unpalatable preparations. That's why
ALKA-SELTZER is more in demand than almost any
other single item in the average drug store.
We recommend ALKA-SELTZER for the relief of
Gas on Stomach, Sour Stomach, Headache, Colds,
"Morning After," Muscular Pairis, and as a Gargle
in Minor Throat Irritations.
We really mean it.
Use ALKA-SELTZER for any or all of these discom-
forts. Your money back if it fails to relieve."
In addition to an analgesic (Acetyl-Salicylate
of Soda), each glass of ALKA-SELTZER
contains alkalizers which help to
correct those everyday ailments
due to Hyper-Acidity.
SIn 30 :and 60 packages at your
S drug store.


Alk -ete


for $300,000.
The landowners, Lewis stated,
"have had several years to clean
up delinquent taxes, and it's time
we started demanding payment of
taxes."
While the measure was under
discussion, Representative Hodges
of Orlando asked: "Who would be
benefited most by this-the bond-
holders or the taxpayers?" To
which Lewis replied: "The tax.
payers."
Representative Outman of Pi-
nellas said compromises of taxes
were necessary after the Florida
boom because of excessive valua-
tions and assessments.

A bran made of peanut hulls
may be mixed with sand and used


--r---- +------- +-- --- --------- -
v~,,,;--;,.,,, r,,, r ,- - - --- ~(


THE`S-eXR,'',P-ORTST. JOI:* BU CqqN .TY. EO q PA,


PAGE THREE


ctilmAV APRILN. 193


AU
)R







THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


THEY MADE US LOOK CHEAP

TH E STA R Shall we have slot machines back again?
A bill introduced at this session of the legis-
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla., lature proposes to legalize them for second
by The Star Publishing Company trial. Senator Mapoles of Crestview, who in-
W. S. SMITH, Editor produced the bill, argues that by having the
state own and operate them, the state treas-
Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida, ury would benefit to the tune of $25,000,000
under Act of March 3, 1879. a year, and we can well believe that. Never-
theless, we don't much like the idea.
Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance In 1935 slot machines were legalized. The
One Year........$2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months..........65c difference from the present bill was that the
profits went to private owners and operators,
-..{ Telephone 51 j.- not to the state. By the time the 1937 legis-
lature met, experience with the machines had
The spoken word is given scant attention; turned most of us against them. The legisla-
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed ture yielded to popular demand, and in the
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word final referendum vote the machines were
is lost; the printed word remains. overy
overwhelmingly defeated.
Just what'caused the tide or public opin-
AUTOMOBILES AND ACCIDENTS ion to turn against them? The public was
The Florida Safety Council has compiled apathetic at first, certainly, so moral objec-
some figures that should be scanned by all tions were probably not predominant. There
motorists and a lesson learned therefrom, was no organized campaign, of any import-
For 325,726,184 gallons of gas sold in 1938 afice, to run them out of business. To some
there was one accident for every 2016 gal-' small merchants they seemed a godsend. But
lons, and for the 448,306 motor vehicles in less than a year the average person had
registered in 1938 there was one accident for'decided that they were a pesky nuisance.


THE ROAD HOG


every three vehicles.
There was a total of 108,000 accidents in
1938, or one accident every five minutes, in
which 720 people were killed and 2",200 per-
sons injured, which averaged one .person
killed every. 12 hours and one injured every
20 minutes..Cost of hospitalization for those
injured was $831,600, or $33 for each indi-
vidual.. Property damage resulting ..from
these accidents amounted- to $4,416,900.
In a breakdown of the cause of these 108,-
S000 accidents the following figures resulted:
Driving too fast 28%
Improper passing 4%
Didn't have the right-of-way 14%
SReckless driving 9%
Failing to signal 7%
D runk drivers .......:..........................:.....19%
Jnanken pedestrians involved 13%
Mis.eallaneous causes 6%'
S Traffic deaths in Florida for the period
from 1929 to 1938, inclusive, came -to 5,536.
If these, victims were placed in pine boxes
and piled on top of each other they would
.reach three miles into the air. If the boxes
-were placed end to end they would. reach a
distance of seven miles.
Gruesome statistics? Perhaps. But things
like this must be brought to the attention of
motorists in order to teach them to drive
more carefully and cut down this huge loss
of life due to fast and careless driving.
If you drive a car, you may figure in the
1939 tabulation. Remember, one out of every
three automobiles registered in Florida will
figure in an accident during 1939.

According to information brought out by
the senate committee investigating Florida's
racing situation, Governor Cone was offered
$50,000 by Miami race track interests as a
contribution toward the governor's campaign
deficit, and those offering this pot of small
change "didn't want anything for it." Per-
haps not, but if the governor had accepted
the contribution there would have been a lot
pf hinting and suggestions as to what would
be good for the racing interests.

The American frontier has definitely been
reached. Contract bridge has superseded draw
poker as the nation's favorite card game.-
Hartford Courant.

The free American need join no bund. To
get that sense of power, he buys a grand-
stand seat arid bawls "kill the umpire!"-At-
lanta Constitution.

A writer says he can't think of a word to
describe a man who constantly deceives his
wife. We can. We think he's a marvel.-
Montreal Star.

4 A senator says a state sales tax would be
"beneficial." Beneficial to whojn?


They stood outside on the sidewalks. Lines.
of people stood in line ;to play them. They
were everywhere one went. -They were being
played by the people who'could least afford
to lose; Chances of winning were outrageous-
ly small; probably no more unfair form of
gambling had ever been legalized. They gave
whole communities the air of being adjuncts
to a cheap, money-grabbing side show. De-
cent people who: had no profound moral ob-
jections to gambling, were di-gusted.
Maybe we're wrong,- but it seems to us
that that is why the people of Florida ran
the slot machines out-and why they don't
want them back.-St. Petersburg 'Indepen-
dent.

Senator Mapoles claims, that state-owned
slot machines. would bring iM $25,000,000 a
year to the treasury. Perhaps. But why bring
back the one-armed bandits for the school
children to put their lunch money In? If the
state treasury must have revenue from legal-
ized gambling outside the pari mutuel ma-
chines, why not organize a state lottery?
Hundreds of thousands .of Irish Sweepstakes
tickets are sold in Florida every year, and
the money goes out of the country. If we
had a state lottery, we could repeal the ad-
valorem tax, the chain tax, the sales tax,
the syntax, the carpet tax and every other
kind of tax, and have plenty of money to op-
erate the state government, run the schools,
build roads and pile up a huge reserve fund.
We, for one, would be willing to kick in ten
or twenty dollars a year for tickets for the
purpose of operating the state and the off
chance that we might win anywhere from a
thousand to a hundred thousand simoleons.

We didn't know until, the other day that
oogies (menhaden to you) spawned in fresh
water, but while fishing in Owl creek at Su-
matra the waters were churned to a froth
'y thousands of pogies seeking a spawning
ground and being harassed by hungry bass,
Some of the bass jumping clear of the water
would easily have gone fifteen pounds-and
there we were in the midst of them with the
ieasof closed. What a feeling for a fisher-
man !

Asia for the Asiatics seems to mean Japan
for the Japanese, Manchoukuo for the Jap-
anese, and China for the Japanese.-Syracuse
Herald. And now it begins to look like Eur-
ope for Hitler and Mussolini.

The totalitarian states have millions of
men and millions of guns, but when it comes
to the billions of dollars that are required to
finance a major war-well, that Is another
nut for dictators to crack.-Albany Herald.

Send The Star to a friend-only $2 a year

Read the ads and reap.


Sitting In With the

Lawmakers
By GILBERT D. LEACH
Florida News Service

Well, folks, we're kind o' clear-
ing up the situation and maybe
we can get down to solving some


pants."

Looks like we're goiig to have
some kind of, a. drivers' license,
but whether you'll be examined by
the policeman on the corner or by
a fifth cousin of tae sheriff hasn't
been determined. There are three
bills. If they decide to bunch 'em
and push 'em through, we'll have
another untimely answer to a
timely demand.


of the major problems in another G
week or so Getting a bill through the legisa-
week or so.
The cow problem is out o te lature ought to be a simple pro-
The cow problem is out of the
way. Fuller "Bull" Warren pawed cess. That's what you think! All
and bellowed for .an hour-or more you have ito-do is pass it in on
but it was all racket. The com- house, take it over and pass it in
mittee (livestock) said as how the theotherhouseBut there areall
bulls and cows ana their nonde- kinds of unpredictable interrup-
script children could bed down on tons that get in the way of mak-
the highways for another two ing a law.
A bill is prepared. Weeks of
years or so. Motvorsts could just
keep on bearing. thought and work went into it and
the author thinks it is perfect.
e o t c f a But the first man who looks it
Some of the citrus folks are
over asks where is the provision
momentarily satisfied. What they
momentary satisfied. Wat they for an appropriation to carry out
asked for was so easy to get they the ntent. That's fed. Then
the intent. That's fiwxd. Then
were "disencouraged." The whole Ie T.
wleg isature was keyed u to g- somebody finds it conflicts with a
legislature was keyed up to giv- l p b n 1 F
ing them. everything they wanted e c i na
and it was so surprising they It gets Into committee and after
t v e t w several changes goes on the floor.
didn't even have time to work up
di even hae tme to wok up There it is the target for amend-
a disagreement among themselves.
Having got what tney asked for, m'ents until it has to go back to
they will discoverit wasn't what committee, and en it finally
they wanted, but they got it and comes out it bears only slight re-
if they think of anything else they mbe alto paes th o s
want they can come up and, it will nd
be made a special order of busi.and e the er to be man
handled in the same manner. By


aess.

Union labor lobylists are faring
pretty well, thank you! Every bill
.hey offered was in the nature of
"shooting the moon," and that's a
splendid idea. Even now they've
got more than they had any right
to expect, and they got it by put-
ting forth demands that in some
instances approached the ridicu-
tOUS.

Oh, yes. Almost forgot the chain
stores. Maybe what we did -up
here wasn't quite right by any-
body's standards and demands, but
everything is a compromise and
that's the best we had in the shop
at the moment. The prize for the
best parade goes to Cotton Ma-
Lher, even if he didn't have a
sound wagon.

Talk about perfecting your tech-
nique! Man alive, this "small
county bloc" approaches perfec-
tion. The famous "LaFollette fili-
buster" in the United States con-
gress wasn't a patching on this
operation. If this "bloc" ever
wakes up to its possibilities and
puts over a county unit voting
law for Florida, the senator from
Dade will be using no mere figure
of speech when he orates about
his' county getting a "kick in the
,\


that time, maybe, the session is
over, even if they do set the clock
back a few hours.
I know this is tedious reading,
but it is a tedious process and you
ought to get a true pictU of the
legislature. These me: are not up
here on a playboy vacation. You
hear tall tales of their nights of
frivolity, but those nights average
about one out of every three or
four weeks for most of them, and
if that is too often for a fling on
the part of one or your six-dollar-
a-day employes, quit having those
Thursday half holidays nearly half
the year.

Children who get a good deal
of sunshine have less dental de-
cay than children who live where
there is meager sunlight, judging
by a study of 94,000 boys.

A new continuous strip mill can
turn out a strip of steel a mile
long and a yard wide in about 2
minutes.
------------
The lima bean gets its name
from Lima. Peru, where a naval
officer got some seed and brought
them to the States in 1824.
--------~-4-----
Approximately 250,000 chicks
are hatched in Wyoming yearly.


PAGE FOUR


FRIDAY, APRIL 28, 1939








RI DAYA.ivF


The Tattler
ST. JOE HIGH SCHOOL NEWS


'Little Women'

Played Before.

Packed House

Junior-Senior State Presentatiol
Considered One of Best
In Years

The junior-senior play, "Little
Women," presented Tuesday nigh
in the high school auditorium
drew a packed house and the
"Standing Room Only" sign was
hung up long before the curtail
was scheduled to rise. The play
directed by Miss Erline McClel
lan, displayed much talent, a,
each one taking part did excel
lent work. It was rated. by those
)who were present as one of the
best plays presented in Port St
Joe for many years:
Cast of the play follows.:
Jo ....... .. Virginia' Stoutamifre
Beth .............. Alice Gibson
Meg .......... Allah Mae Darcey
Amy ........... Adelaide 'Hardy
Mrs. March ......... Lelia Smith
Mr., March ........ Paul Johnson
Laurie Lawrence.... Al Schneider
,Prof. Bhaer ...... Winston Jdnes
John Brooks .......Ed Hufft
Aunt March ...... Opal Greene
Hannah.the-maid..iFlorence Facion
Proceeds from the play will go
for props and settings for the
stage of the new auditorium.,

That's All, Folks

Today is the last day of school
and graduation exercises are to
be hel, tonight in the high school
auditorium. As scib6of is 'tut, The
Tattler will suspend publication
until next fall.
I would like to show, if I could,
in any way, my appreciation to
my assistant editor-in-hief and the
staff of The Tattler. I would also
like to say that I have enjoyed
the position which I held and also
enjoyed the co-operation of Editor
Bill of'The Star. I also desire to
|thank the merchants of Port St.
Joe for their splendid co-opera-
tion, and I hope to hold the same
position on The Tattier staff next
year.
DICK STEPP,
Editor-in-Chief.

SENIORS HOSTS TO JUNIORS
AT 'HONOR POINT' PICNIC
An agreement maae between the
junior and senior classes some
time back in regard to honor
point standings was that the class
having the lowest average was to
.give a picnic for the winner in the
contest.
,The average of the junior class
was 35.8, and that of the seniors
35.07, so the seniors acted as hosts
at a picnic last Monday at Beacon
Hill. A good time was enjoyed by
everyone, and the junior class
wishes to take this opportunity to
thank the graduates for a wonder-
,ful time. We will miss you next
year.

ADDRESS COLORED MEET
Rev. D. E. Marietta gave the
address of welcome from the
churches of Port St Joe at the
district conference of the African
Methodist church held here last
week, and T.W. Wilson welcomed
the gathering on behalf of the
city and the cham'oer of com-
merce.


LEWIS LASHES

SCHOOL LOBBY

BEFORE HOUSE

DECLARES IT MOST VICIOUS
AND MOST POWERFUL.
IN FLORIDA

While speaking on the $200,000
teachers' retirement bill before
the house Wednesday, Represen-
tative E. Clay Lewis of Port St.
Joe lashed at the public school
lobby with a declaration that "it
is the most powerful and most
vicious in Florida," according to
a Times-Union staff writer. The
retirement bill had passed the
senate and been sent to the house,
for consideration.
Representative Warren asked'
Lewis, "How do you think it is.
vicious?"
"I presume," replied Lewis,
?'the lobby, has already served no-
tice on you, and I say that it.,is so
-vicious' that- many people are
afraidd to oppose it." .
..Lewis wantss to' .ave the an-
nual appropriating 1 limited to
$200,000 a'.year:'"The bill would set
up $200,000 a year for the first
two years, and after that what-
ever amount would be necessary
to give compensation to eligible
teachers Who desire to retire. He
offered such an amendment.
: The bill, it is said, is almost
identical with the one Governor
Cone vetoed after the 1937 session
adjourned. In vetoing the bill, the
governor said the law would give
public school teachers a benefit
not available to other classes of
public employes.

Gun Club


(Continued from Page 1)


Trap Shoot-
Bernal ..................
W ard ...................
Ezell ...................
;Dells, Jr. ....................
Soule ....................
Lapper ......... .........
Rowan .................
Brooks ....................
Boyer ...................
Smith ...............


18x25
42x75
14x25
24x50
9x25
41x50
32x50
17x25
17x25
13x25


The, third round wilI be held at
2:30 Sunday afternoon at the club
grounds. Many interested specta-
tors were. present 'last Sunday and
it is hoped more will be present
at the next round. To all that en-
joy this type of sport an invita-
tion is extended.
The air 'station men believe
they can show the St. Joe sharp-
shooters just how this skeet busi-
ness should be done. Whether
they can or not remains to be
seen. They are to arrive here in
one of the big navy seaplanes
about '11:30 a. m. on May 14, and
Capt. John Maddox has agreed to
meet them in the channel with
his pilot boat and escort them to
the hotel pier, where they will tie
up the plane.
Those wishing to see what these
big seaplanes look like will have
an opportunity at that time.
__-__ _-_-_ *
Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Sharit and
son, Joe, Jr., ahd Bobby Bellows
returned Saturday from Tallahas-
see to spend the week-end here.


CLASSIFIED ADS

FOR RENT
FOR RENT Four-room cottage
with bath, in "Oak Grove." See
Karl Knodel, Oak Grove. 1*


,Mr. Wilson also delivered tne
e FOR RENT-New houses at Bea-
addre-.-, of welcome to the meet-
con Hill. Front lot facing Gulf.
ing of the Church of the .First Furnished, running water, sani-
Born, colored, last evening. tary conveniences, electricity.
Apply T. W. Wilson, or Box
Steve McPhaul, who has been 495, Port St. Joe. 3-3tf
in Tampa since before Christmas,
returned to Port St. Joe last Fri- UNFURNISHED 9 by 18-foot cab-
day on'a. brief visit: H""tleft Wed-. ins; ceiled overhead and sides;
nesday' night to return to Tampa. good water $6 month. AplySt
Joe Lumber Co. 12121tt


MRS. MILLER HOSTESS TO SON ILL [ercises at the1 high school audi-
MARIE JONES CIRCLE torium, beginning at 8:15, is as
The Marie Jones circle of the Freddie Owens, young son of follows:
Methodist Missionary society met Mr. and Mrs. Buster Owens, was IP
Monday afternoon at the home.of taken to a Panama dity hospital nrocessonal ...... .Seor Class
Mrs. J. L. Miller on Seventh Wednesday with what was be-Invoction Rev H F Baty
street. Ten members were pres- lived to be a mastoid of the left Salutatory .... Allah Mae Darcey
ent and the following program ear.. I Selection, "Berceuse" ........
was rendered: Topic, "The Foun- --- ............ High School Band
nations for the City." Scripture Paul Marschall, Joe Langford, Introduction of Speaker
was read by Mrs. J. C. Bradbury, "Shorty" Langford, Newton Creek- Address ..... Rev. D. E. Marietta
followed by the introduction to more, Slater Cox and Richard Valedictory .... Howard Taunton
"The Social Teachings of Jesus" Porter spent Saturday and Sunday Presentation of Medals, etc. ..
by Mrs. W. B. Stagg, "The Church in Carrabellt on a fishing trip. ... Principal D. G. McPherson
and the State" by Mrs. J. L. They reported such a large catch Awarding of Diplomas ........
Temple. A short business session that they were awarded free mem- ............. Supt. C. L. Costing
was held, after which a social berships in the "Liar's Club." Benediction...Rev. J. 'W. Sisemore
hour was enjoyed. Sheriff B. E. Parker and family Seniors receiving their diplomas
Q Q of Wewahitchka spent last Friday tonight are Annie Mae Boyette,
Mrs. L. vonWeller of Tallahas- in this city. Allah Mae Darcey, Alice Ruth
see was the guest Saturday of Mr. Joe Hanser was transacting bus- Gibson, Winifred Harris, Winston
and Mrs. Huel Crockett. Miss Dor- iness Tuesday in Marianna. .nnes ottv- T. .wis a. ? T.1 n


othy Crockett accompanied Mrs.
VonWeller to Tallanassee, return-
ing Monday.
'Mrs. T. V. Westbrook and chil-
dren, Phonzo and Norma Jean,
were called, to Chipley Saturday
due to the serious illness of Mrs.
Westbrook's mother-in-law, Mrs.
Mary Gilbert.
Mrs. Ted Frary, M.rs. W. A.
Smith, Mrs. Mary Lovett, Mrs. C.
Fuller, Mrs: Fred "Ctirti' and' Mr:
and Mrs. Robert Bellows at-
tended th'e' Episcbpal Auxiifiar'y
luncheon .T Tuesday in :.palah.i-
cola.
Mrs. Ecie Hi.keay. Was in..Wewa-
hitchka Saturday on business.
Kenneth and Gus Creech were
called to Dothan, Ala., Saturday
due to -the serious illness of their
mother, who passed away Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Steele of At-
more, Ala., were guests Sundaypf
Mr. and.Mrs. R. O. Roberts.
Harvey Egg of Mobile was in
this city Wednesday. on business.


Kathleen Saunders, Ausley Stout-
Get Diplomas amire, Leila Smith, Virginia Stout-
amire, Howard Taunton, William,
Trawick, Sara VanHorn, Preston.
(Continued from Page 1):.. White and Myrtle .Whittaker.
high places of lire, since such ;
places are attained by the com-
parative few, but they will be It Time To
given the opportunity to serve I s T e
their fellow -men- with- understand- -"I I N E !
ing and sympathy. These should
apprgidiatW- anw kiasp thh W6 firil- h
apprdiat6 and' 'grasp- the 'p -"l- "Where the 'food. is of the '
eges of higher education. and the
opportunities :so fered.' .' b st-':;'.; where:the service
.The, Star inswth. the people is prqmpt, .and efficient
of Port St. Joe in saluting these .
... and where you get
young imen. and .wnmen .who .will-. ,a..wh you get
carry on in our stead. They may HOME COOKED
be' coxfrt~oted'\itli the formidable
task of bringing order out of ex-
isting economic chaos, but they a
will also be privileged to sit in
and be actors in the thrilling T.R I A N G L E
events of the future that few'f RESTAURANT
the present generation will live
to see. -- BEER and WINES -
.Program for this evening's ..ex-


T#14'z ows


THiEE A CASH PRICES

for FRIDAY and SATURDAY

APRIL 28 AND 29


FLOUR" "
JUNE BRIDE
Self-Rising

24 lb 651 12lb 35*




IRISH


POT TOES

10 POUNDS c
107 29c,


MATCHES-2 Cartons


-- 15c


!CORN BEEF-2 cans..............35c

3 Large Octagon Powders......13c


Water Ground Meal 25c

STRING BEANS 3 No. 2 cans 25c

Cooking Oil GAL 80c 45c
SPINACH-3 No. 2 Cans 25
DILL PICKLES-Quart Jar 150
FRESH BUTTER BEANS-2 No. 2 Cans ......250

DRY SALT MEAT-Per lb...15c

M.I LK 3 Tall:Cans 20c


DESSERT PEACHES-
Rosedkle-3 No. 1 Cans..-.....


SU GAR,

BUL K


10 Ibs. 48c
ffIriii *" -


PORT ST. JOE


25c


GRITS 5 pounds ................15c


SALMON


ALASKA PINK"
2 CANS


25c


Phillips Pork and Beans- 10c
No. 2/2 Can


.a


FLORIDA


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY FLORIDA


FRIDAY, APRIL 28, 1939,


PAGE FIVF


r-


0-wens'&.: Murdock







hP-gE 8lX THllllSTARI T S. 1, GF C, FOIDA R9i


Congratulations A T j Q of Port St. Joe

to the U A1 j High School





T ONIGHT sixteen high school students will be graduated from the
Port St. Joe High School, some to take up their life's work in the
channels for which they have been training through the last twelve
years, and others to continue their studies toward fitting themselves for
the maximum usefulness and service to mankind.


These young people represent Port St. Joe's finest and most
priceless product. This city is coming, to the fore as a commercial and
manufacturing center, but these things fade into the background in com-
parison with the asset of these fine, robust young men, and the beautiful,
charming and cultured young women who are receiving their diplomas to-
night in the auditorium of our fine new school building. The Graduating Class
of 1939
ANNIE MAE BOYETTE
Those who comprise the older. element in the citizenship of ALLAH MAE DARCEY
ALICE RUTH GIBSON
Port St. Joe, who have borne the burden of taxation for school purposes, WINIFRED HARRIS
have but to look at these young people to forget what they may have termed WINSTON JONES
BETTY LEWIS
excessive levies for educational purposes. Instead they will feel a justified BRADY NELL
.pride in the fact that they have been able to contribute their share toward KATHLEEN SAUNDERS
'- L E I L A S M I T H -
making it possible to add this noteworthy contribution toward assuring the A LEY STOTAMIR
future security and progress of Port St. Joe and Gulf county. VIRGINIA STOUTAMIRE
HOWARD TAUNTON
WILLIAM TRAWICK
SARA VAN HORN
We welcome these young people now going forth into the PRESTON WHITE
MYRTLE WHITTAKER
world on their own to the business and social life of our city in their new
capacity as men and women. Port St. Joe High School


OUR INTEREST IN THE WELFARE OF PORT ST. JOE PROMPTS US TO SPONSOR


Solomon's Dairy
Ivey Vanlandingham, Local Distributor


Bayshore Grocery and Market

J. Lamar Miller's
Standard Oil Service

Hauser's Department Store

Suwannee Grocery and Market

Club Cafe

Costin's Department Store

Quality Grocery and Market

Motor Parts
Louis Emrich, Proprietor

Homer Coe


THIS MESSAGE TO THE GRADUATES


St. Joe Hardware Company

SCHNEIDER'S Department Store

George H. Wimberly

Carver Drug Company

Ed George

Griffin's Grocery and Market

C. L. Fain

Adams Beauty Shoppe

Mr. and Mrs. Austin Huggins

Barrier's 5c and 10c Store

The Star -
"Your Home Town Newspaper"





PAGE IfX


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF: COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, APRIL 28, 1939