<%BANNER%>

UFPKY NEH LSTA



The star
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00131
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: April 21, 1939
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00131

Full Text






The Star-Florida's fastest grow.
Ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuillding of
the City of Port St Joe.


THE


Port St. Joe-S
DuPont Paper
Sest growing liti
A R the heart o


ite of the $7,500,000Q
Mill-Florida's fast-
tie city. In
f the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center

VOLUME II PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, APRIL 21, 1939 NUMBER 27


ST. JOE SCHOOL

BAND RANKS

FIRST IN CLASS


,Organization Eligible for Compe
tition In National Contest
In Charlotte, N. C.

The West Florida Music Festi-
.val held at DeFuniak Springs last
'Thursday, Friday and- Saturday
was said by those attending from
this city to be the most brilliant
affair of its kind ever held in this
part of the state.
The Port St. Joe high school
'band. under the direction of Dan
Farmer, and wearing their natty
new uniforms, again came home
with honors of which any city
should be proud. The band ranked
first in the "C" division, which
places them in class "B" for next
year and made them eligible for
competition at the national con-
vention to be held next month in
Charlotte, N. C.
It is certain that with more ex-
perience and with more and bet-
ter instruments. that our band
will take its place among the
truly good bands of the state.
A fine addition to the appear-
ance of the band was the banner
donated by the Band Boosters
club, which was made by the lo-
cal WPA- sewing. room. The ban-
nier was a surprise to ithe band.
and, no plylsion had been made
for a color 'bearer. -But Ed Hufft
volunteered to carry it, and the
harness was fitted to him. a uni-
form provided, and he got Into
step and carried the banner with
great dignity.
The girls' trio of the Glee club,
under the direction of Mrs. Erie
Hickey, also came home with hon-
ors. winning second place in their
division.
The Pensacola band came out
with highest honors, winning a
grade of "A" on every point ex-
cept instrumentation. Ranked in
the first division of the bands
were Pensacola. Walton, Panama
City, Port St. Joe, Chipley and
(Continued on Page 6).
.--

Well-Baby Clinic

To Be Held Here


Physical. Examinations.
munizations To Be
Next Thursday


and. Im.
Given


A. "Well-Baby Clinic" will be
'held in the Port St. Joe health of-
fice next Thursday, April 27, be-
ginning at 1:30 p. m., according to
announcement by the Gulf county
health department.
Physical examinations will be
given any child from six weeks
of age through five years. Diph-
theria and smallpox immunizations
will be offered to any child who
has not been protected against
these diseases.
It is especially urged that all
children who expect to enter
school next fall be brought in for
this examination.
--*----------'
LIONS TO SPONSOR
SOFTBALL LEAGUE
At the regular meer!ng of the
Port St. Joe Lions club held Wed-
nesday at the Port Inn, members
decided to sponsor a city softball
league during the summer season.
The club also extends an invi-
tation to all visiting Lions to at-
tend meetings at the inn on the
first and third Wednesdays of
each month.


House For Repealing
State Laundry Laws

By an 11 to 6" vote Monday eve-


ning a
mended
cleaning
permits


house committee recom-
repeal of the state dry
and laundry law which
price-fixing.


The vote came after a public
hearing at which nte public health
group heard the law described al-
ternately as the salvation of the
cleaning industry and as an
instrument which fosters bu-
reaucracy.


BroWnie Carter Is

Named Fire Queen

For Firemen's Ball To Be Held
This Evening At Cen-
tennial Building


S At a. meeting of members of the
volunteer fire department Tues-
day evening at the Blaci Cat cafe,
SMiss Brownie Carter was named
as "Fire Queen" for the grand
ball scheduled for tonight at the
Centennial building. The Misses
Nell Connell and Julia O'Quinn
were selected as ladies-in-waiting.
Miss Carter,. escorted by City
Commissioner B. W. Eells and
followed by Miss O'Quinn and
Miss Connell and their escorts,
will head the grand march.
A queen for the next dance to
be given by the firemen will be
chosen by popular vote at to-
night's dance, the votes 'to be sold
at a penny eabh.'
Music for the afrair will be fur-
nished by a colored orchestra;
Little Joe and his rhythm makers,
from Alexandria, La., featuring
an accordion player, blues singer
and tap dancers.
These dances being given by
the fire department not only fur-
nish excellent entertainment, but
are being given for a most com-
mendable purpose, that of raising
funds for additional equipment to
bring the fire department up-to-
date. Citizens of the city are urged
to attend these dances and help
the firemen, as they work without
pay for the protection and bene-
fit of the entire city.
->c------
PlIn to Protect Frogs,
Rabbits and Palmettos

Frogs and rabbits would get a
break under terms of a bill intro-
duced Monday in the house by
Representative Dishong of DeSoto
county. His bill would make it
unlawful to hunt and kill frogs
and rabbits at night during the
regular hunting season.
A bill sponsored by Representa-
tive Sheldon of Hillsborough coun-
ty would prohibit the sale or ex-
change of terminal leaf buds of
the cabbage palmetto, the heart
of which is known as palm cab-
bage. The bill provides for a fine
of not more than $100 and Im-
prisonment of not more than six
months for violation.
4-K
TOMLINSON FAVORS FENCING

City Clerk M. P. Tomlinson has
long been against 'fencing of our
highways to keep cattle from
roaming at large, but now he has
changed his mind and is highly
in favor of fencing them in.
The reason? Well, Tommy has
been nursing along some beauti-
ful rose bushes in the front yard
of his new home, slaving over
them like a woman with her first-
born babe. Tuesday night some


MEASURE WOULD Double License Plates
MWSought In Legislature

KEEP RACE CASH If a bill introduced in the legis-
lature Tuesday by Representative
F C 0 UNT ES Sheldon of Hillsborough county is
passed, IFlorida ',automobiles will
S-display front and rear orange and
Bill Pushed By Lewis Intended to green license plates.


t
r
I




I


Sheldon's bill would make or-
ange and green the official color
for license tags and would have
the color combination alternated
annually. Most states issue two
tags, but Florida requires but one.
---~------

Gun Club Team to

Meet Navy Lads

Pensacola Air Station Shooters to
Fly Here In Large
Seaplane

Members of the St. Joe Rod and
Gun club and their friends are
getting their guns well oiled and
their eyes trained for the coming
shoot scheduled with a team from
the U. S. Naval Air Station at
Pensacola,, which is to be held in
May at the cub grounds back of
the Centennial building. The exact
date of the affair will be an-
nounced later. A return match is
to be held at the air station In
Pensacola.
Lieutenant Kerschner of the
naval squad, who believes his
men will make it hot for the lo-
cal marksmen, states that h -.will
bring lhis team 'to Port St. Joe in
one of the large navy seaplanes.
which will be anchored in the bay
off the pier of the Port Inn.
Practice rounds are being held
each Sunday afternoon, starting
at 2:30, and any and all are in-
vited to witness the shooting and
are welcome to enter if they care
to. Scores are kept, and from
these tabulations. ten men will be
selected to represent the St. Joe
Rod and Gun club.
Results of last Sunday's prac-
tice rounds are as follows:


Safeguard Funds If Present
Distribution Is Ruled Out

A bill introduced and pushed by
Representative E. Clay Lewis of
Gulf county in the house of rep-
resentatives providing that special
acts relating to the use of monies
from racing taxes after it is re-
ceived by the counties from the
state will remain in full force and
effect was passed Wednesday by
the house under. waiver of the
rules. It designates county com-
missioners as ex-officlo state
agencies with authority to-spend
the money for public roads or
schools should the'"present distri-
bution be held unconstitutional by
the courts.
A second bill set out that the
county commission may transfer
the race track money to other pur-
poses than schools or roads after
receiving it, while a third meas-
ure provides that if the proposed
alternative distribution also is
held unconstitutional, the race
track revenue will be impounded
in the state treasury until the
legislature directs its distribution.
It was stated that the three
measures were Intended to estab-
lish an alternative method for dis-
tributing the money if the pres-
ent distribution, equally among
the counties without restriction.
is declared unconstitutional.
----------

Baccalaureate

Service Sunday

In High School Auditorium For
Graduating Class of Port
St. Joe High School

Sixteen students comprising the
graduating class of '39 for the
Port St. Joe high school will file
on to the stage in the high school
auditorium Sunday night at 8:15
o'clock for the first of the exer-
cises marking the close of their
high school days.
Program for the baccalaureate
services is as follows:
Processional ........Senior Class
Invocation ... Rev. D. E. Marietta
Chorus......."Unfold Ye Portals"
Glee Club
Scripture ...... Rev. H. F. Beaty
Hymn...... All Hail the Power"
Congregation
Solo ............ Adelaide Hardy
Announcements
Benediction... .Rev. Glion Benson
Recessional ........ Senior Class
A cordial invitation is extended
the public to be present at this
service by Principal D. G. Mc:
Pherson.
Graduatibn exercises will be
leld in the high school auditorium
next Friday evening, with-Rev. D.
E. Marietta delivering the ad-
dress to the graduates.

RETURN FROM VACATION

Mr. and Mrs. H. L. McKinnon
returned late last week from an
extended visit in Chattahoochee
with relatives. While there Mr.
McKinnon represented the Pres-
byterian church of Port St. Joe in


Tapper ...........
Kenney ...........


13- 8
8-12


39x50
14x25
27x50
23x50
21x50
2lx5O
20x50


The second round will be held
Sunday, and those wanting to try
their luck are welcome. Bring a
gun, but if you do not have one,
come just the same as there are
plenty of guns to shoot with. Com-
fortable benches are provided for
those desiring to watch, and the
club extends an Invitation to all
to be present.

Bill To Assure Sober
Wedding Principals

Representative Inman of Brad-
ford county introduced a bill in
the house Monday designed to
keep intoxicated persons from ob-
taining marriage licenses.
The bill requires five days' no-
tice of intention to marry. "All
you have to do today." he said, "is
to make an affidavit to get a li-
cense, and reports have come to
me that many licenses have been
issued in this state to intoxicated
would-be brides and grooms."
---
PORT NEWS

The S.S. Wacosta, from Mo'ile,
Waterman Steamship Line, own-
ers, arrived Monday with a cargo


the meeting of the I'resbytery at of salt cake for the St. Joe Paper


bovine marauder came along and Havana. ,The PreBbytery meets company. Sailed Wednesday with
ate the bushes practically down next November in he Red Bay. carg -,of kraft paper for eastern
to the. 7r o

Change From Thursday Due To
Fact That Panama Stores
To Close Wednesday

A tentative agreement drawn up
two weeks ago by Port St. Joe
business houses set Thursdaj af-
ternoons for closing during the
summer, but due to the fact that
Panama City business houses de-
cided to close Wednesday after-
noons, the local concerns changed
their day of closing to conform.
Consequently, starting on Wed-
nesday of next week, practically
every business house in Port St.
Joe .will close its doors at noon,
allowing the proprietors and the
hired help to go fishing or take
in the baseball games which soon
will be underway in the inter-city
league.
-------
EASTERN STAR BENEFIT
SUPPER TOMORROW NIGHT
Ladies of the Order of Eastern
Star are giving a benefit chicken
supper tomorrow evening in the
new Masonic hall, starting at 5
o'clock and continuing until the
chicken gives out, for the purpose
of raising funds to furnish the
new lodge hall.
This is a worthy purpose, and
everyone is urged to attend and
partake of a dinner prepared by
the best cooks of Port St. Joe--
and when we say "best' there can
r' non' basterr."


Bernal ........... 17-22
Hammock ........ 14
Soule ............. 16-11
Alsip ............. 10-13
Cox .............. 9-12


LOCAL CHAMBER

IS WORKING FOR

TERMINAL HERE

Would Bring River Steamers Here
Now Plying Apalachicola and
Chattahoochee Rivers

One of the most important mat-
ters discussed by the directors of
the Port St. Joe Chamber of Com-
merce at their meeting Tuesday
evening at ,the Port Inn, was in
connection with establishing here
of a terminal for river steamers.
now plying t he Apalachicola,
Chattahoochee and Flint rivers.
The chamber has been working
on this matter for some. time and
has been informed that two lines
will make Port St. Joe their ter-
minus if suitable facilities can be
provided. If this can be worked
out it will mean that these river
steamers will bring freight here
from far in the interior and take
on upbound freight to cities on
? cent to these three rivers.
T-m ary T. W. Wilson states
that it is practically certain these
facilities will be provided In the
very near future and soon the
great basins of these rivers will
be providing commerce that right-
ly belongs to Port St. Joe's deep
sea harbor. This will add much to
the industrial life of the city.
The chamber is soon to launch,
a drive or new fiembers, "and in'
this connection, through the cour-
tesy of the Port theater and the
Alexander Film company, a short
advertising film Is being shown
on the screen at the theater. It
is pointed out that there are any
number of citizens who could be
members of the chamber of com-
merce and who would be if the
matter was properly brought to
their attention. A ladies' auxiliary
to the chamber is also being or-
ganized, and this will aid greatly
(Continued on Page 6)


Stores Will Close

Here Wednesdays









PAGE TWO ~rHE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA FRIDAY, APRIL 21, 1939


'Mid-Summer's

Day' Draws Praise
The operetta, "On Mid-Summers
Day," presented last Friday eve-
ning by students of the grammar
school. has been acclaimed by all
who saw it as the Test performed
and the most beautiful of any en-
tertainment ever presented by
the schools of the city.
The stage, a veritable fairyland,
was a perfect setting for the col-
orful costumes of the little peo-
ple that represented fairies, sun-
beams, brownies, flowers, sunbon-
net babes and overall boys. The
two leading characters, the Child,
played by Geraldine Parker, and
the Fairy Queen, played by Ger-
aldine Sowers, both of the fourth
grade, are especially to be com-
mended on their excellent per-
formances.
The operetta was played to a
packed auditorium and many that
saw it have stated that it should
be presented in every school in
nearby cities, and have compared
it, for its beauty of costuming,
catchy, little songs and excellent
performance, with the beautiful
picture of Snow White and the
Seven Dwarfs.
The teachers of the grammar
school wish to tank every'6he
who aided in any way in making
the operetta the perfect perform-'
ance that it was. The many com-
pliments 'received has many times
repaid the time and effort spent
In training the children. They also
wish to thank the children for
their splendid co-operation.

MARTHA CIRCLE MEETS
WITH MRS. PATTERSON
Mrs. J. E. Patterson was hos-
tess to the Martha Circle of the
Baptist Missionary society this
week at her home on Fourth
street. Mrs. Charles McClellan
presided and read for the devo-
tional the 23rd Psalm, which was
followed by prayer. A short busi-


At the Churches

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL
Rev. Glion Benson, Rector
10:00 a. m.-Church School.
Communion services will be
held at 7:30 Sunday morning in-
stead of regular evening services.

METHODIST CHURCH
D. E. Marietta, Minister
Services Every Sunday
10:00 a. m.-Churcn School.
11:00 a. m.-Morning worship.
7:30 p. m.-Evening worship.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. J. W. Sisemore, Minister
10:00 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.-Morning Worship.
7:00 p. m.-B. Y. P. U,
8:00 p. m.-Preaching service.
W. M. U., Monday, 3:00 p. m.
Prayermeeting Wednesday, 7:30 p.
m. Teachers meeting, Thursday,
7:30 p. m.

ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Rev. E. T. Corbin, Pastor
Full-time services
10:15 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. rn.-Preaching Service.
7:30 p. m.-Evangelistic service.
Prayermeeting every Wednesday
night.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
Rev. H. F. Beaty, Minister
10100 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.-Preaching service.
7:30 p. m.-Preaching service.
---->----
GENE WELLINGTON
CELEBRATES BIRTHDAY
Gene Wellington celebrated his
tenth birthday last Friday after-
noon at the h'oie of his parents
on Garrison avenue. The color
scheme for the occasion was pink,
green and white, with roses be-
ing used as flowers for decora-
tion. The centerpiece for the
table was a beautifully decorated
birthday cake. Games were played
and the guests were served ice
cream and cake.
Invited were Huel Crockett. H.
L. Hatton, Haywood Walker, Bar-
bara Crockett, Noan Sarvis, Betty


ness session was held. The Bible June Wright and Peggy Miller.
study was led by Mrs. E. B. Dendy Mrs. Huel Crockett assisted Mrs.


after which the meeting was dis-
missed with prayer by Mrs. W. C.
Pridgeon.
During the social hour-the hos-
tess served lemonade, ice cream
and cookies to the seven members
present.

WOMAN'S CLUB TO
MEET NEXT WEDNESDAY
The Port St. Joe Woman's club
will hold its last meeting of the
year next Wednesday, April 26. at
3 p. m., at the Methodist church.
The new officers will preside at
this session.
The flower show, which was to
have been held April 26, has been
cancelled and instead a May fes-
tival has 'been planned for the
early patt of May at the home of
Mrs. George Patton at "Oak
Grove." This will be in the form
of a lawn party ana silver tea.

MARY CIRCLE MEETS WITH
MRS. GEORGE COOPER
The Mary Circle of the Bapist
Missionary society met this week
at the home of Mrs. George Coo-
per, with Mrs. O. F. Powell in
charge. The regular routine of
business was carried out, after
which Mrs. Powell led the Bible
study. Delicious refreshments were
served by the hostess to mem-
bers present.

Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Smith. Mrs.
J. T. McNeill and' Collis Land at-
tended the music festival in De-
Funiak Springs Friday and Satur-
day.

Rev. Glion Benson of Apalachi-
cola visited friends in this city
last Friday.


Wellington in entertaining the
young guests.

MRS. J. M. SMITH ENTERTAINS
THURSDAY BRIDGE CLUB
The members of the Thursday
Bridge club were entertained yes-
terday by Mrs. J. M. Smitlh t her
home on Reid revenue. Vases of
roses placed about the room and
bowls of pansies on the two tables
placed for play aided in the dec-
'orations. After several progres-
sions scores were tallied and
prizes presented.
A salad course and iced tea was
served to Mesdames B. A. Prid-
geon, J. B. Gloekler, T. Owens, C.
Edwards. H. Soule, E. Ramsey
and M. P. Tomlinson.
*
ROY WILLIAMS HONORED
WITH BIRTHDAY PARTY
Mrs. Roy Williams entertained
Tuesday night for her husband at
their apartment In the theater
building, the occasion being the
birthday of Mr. Williams.
d Mrs. Williams served a delicious
dinner to Mr. and Mrs. Frank Le-
Hardy, Mr. and Mrs. B. H. Graves,
William Fletcher and Ralph Man-
tereffel.
The honoree was the recipient
of many handsome and useful
gifts, as well as the usual happy
returns .of the day.

The Misses Louise Solomon and
Erline McClellan were the week-
end guests of the Misses Emeline
and Martha Belin at the home of
their parents in Panama City.
*r *
Mrs. Charles Doyle and daugh-
ter, Eva. spent last Friday in the
city, guests of Mr. and Mrs. Ches-
ter" Edwards.


Electric Cooking

Demonstration
The Florida Power corporation
is extending an invitation to the
housewives of Port St. Joe to at-
tend a demonstration of electric
cookery to be held at their office
on Reid avenue this afternoon, be-
ginning promptly at 3:30 o'clock.
This demonstration, which is
for the purpose of giving all the
opportunity to see a modern elec-
tric range in operation, will be in
charge of Mrs. Genevieve McCrary
of St. Petersburg, well-known au-
thority on cooking. Prizes will be
awarded as part of the demonstra-
tion and everyone interested is
urged to be present this after-
noon.

LOTTIE MOON GIRLS
HONOR MRS. OWENS
The Lottie Moon Junior Girls'
Auxiliary of the Baptist church
met this week at the home of Sara
Jo Costin. All were asked to bring
fruit and flowers, and upon their
arrival they all went to the home
of Mrs. L. W. Owens and: pre-
sented her with the gift and ,pre-
senting the following program:
Song, "We've a Song to Tell the
Nation"; the 23rd Psalm. repeated.
in unison; their alligeance, G. A.
song and manual review. The
meeting was dismissed with sen-
tence prayers with all 14 present
participating.
Following their call on Mrs.
Owens, the girls returned to the
home of their hostess where ice
cream and cake was served.

LYDIA CIRCLE MEETS
WITH MRS. BAGGETT
Mrs. J. 0. Baggett was hostess
'o the Lydia Circle of the Baptist
Missionary society Monday after-
noon. Mrs. Curtis Palmer pre-
sided. The devotional, 1st Samuel
8th chapter, was read by Mrs. J.
F. Miller and followed with pray-
er by Mrs. Baggett. Roll was
called, minutes read and reports
received from committees. The
personal service report was taken
after which the circle had Bible
study. led by Mrs. Palmer.
Following the business meeting
i social-hour was enjoyed, during
which the hostess served fruit
salad and iced tea.

MISSIONARY CIRCLES
IN JOINT MEETING
The circles of the Methodist
Missionary society held .a joint
meeting at the church Monday af-
ternoon with Mrs. W. E. Boyd pre-
siding. Regular routine of busi-
ness was carried out after which
interesting talks were given by
Mrs. J. C. Temple and Mrs. J. C.
Bradbury. Following a short busi-
noss discussion the meeting was
dismissed.

SUNDAY SCHOOL COURSE IS
HELD AT BAPTIST CHURCH
Mrs. Vatts and Mrs. Gross of
Gainesville ;are holding a study
course in Sunday school work at
the Baptist church this week. Mrs.
Vatts is in, charge of the Inter-
mediate department and Mrs.
Gross is in charge of the Junior
department. Both are giving' splen-
dil lectures, and everyone interest-
ed in the work is cordially invited
to attend.

Mrs. B. A. Cogsdill and family
of Gainesville were the weekend
guests of B. A. Cogsdill.

Mrs. B. B. Conklin spent Satur-
day in St. Andrews, the guest of
her mother, Mrs. M. J. Thompson.

Mrs. Harry Sawyer of Apalachi-
cola was visiting in this city Wed-
nesday afternoon.


Society Personals Churches

LANETA DAVIS, Editor


FOR RENT

FOR RENT-New houses at Bea-
,con Hill Front lot facing Gulf.
Furnished, running water, sani-
tary conveniences, electricity.
Apply T. W. Wilson, or Box
495, Port St. Joe. 3-3tf
UNFURNISHED 9 by 18-foot cab-
ins; ceioed overhead and sides;
good water; $6 month. Apply St.
Joe Lumber Co. 12121tf
ROOMS FOR RENT

IF YOU have a room for rent,
why not place a classified adver-
tisement in The Star. The cost is
low and returns are gratifying. .
Fry it today. tf
MISCELLANEOUS

$25.00 REWARD
For information leading to the
arrest and conviction of one or
more persons violating any of
the Game Laws.
J. K. PRIDGEON
Conservation Officer


WEDNESDAY BRIDGE CLUB
MEETS AT BEACON HILL
The Tuesday Bridge club was
changed this week to meet on
Wednesday and was entertained
at the Beacon Hill home of Mrs.
Carl Trammell. Two tables were
in progress, after which prizes
were presented to Mrs. J. A.
Christmas. high. and Mrs. W. S.
Smith, low.
The hostess served refreshments
of fruit salad, saltines, lemonade
and butter pie topped with whip-
ped cream and pecans to Mes-
dames W. M. Howell, T. V. West-
brook. D. C. Smith. W. S. Smith,
G. Grcmsley, J. A. Christmas and
P. D. Farmer.

Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Smith vis-
ited 'over the wee--end in Su-
matra with Mr. and Mrs. Jim
Smith. Mrs. J. W. Smith, mother
of Mrs. W. 9. Smith, returned to
Port St. Joe with them for a
visit.

Hoke Tomlinson and Miss Viv-
ian Wilsoa of Valdosta, Ga., and
J. E. Rollins of Gorlon, Ala..
were guests Sunday,.of Mrs. J. E.
Rollins.

Mrs. F. N. Lanier and little
daughter, Sally, of Savannah, Ga.,
arrived Sunday and are guests of
Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Costin.

Mrs. George Patton and Mrs.
Fred Maddox attended the music
festival in DeFunlak Springs last
week.




CLASSIFIED ADS


SATURDAY-APRIL 22
Hopalong Cassidy and Windy
Ride the Range!
WILLIAM BOYD in

'Renegade Trai'


"Lone Ranger" No 5 Cartoon


OWL SHOW 10:30

THREE YEARS IN PRISON
He'll pay for every moment of ft!

PAUL KELLY
RUTH HUSSY

'WITHIN THE

LAW'


COMMUNITY SING

SUN,, MON.-APRIL 23-24

a'i7

p"eyer^a '

jPs~i^^^M^^~~ \


W 7,113
., .


A New UNIVERSAL Picture

MUSICAL LATEST NEWS


STHE FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION

* CORDIALLY INVITES YOU TO ATTEND A
O DEMONSTRATION OF




kery
* *Electric








TO BE HELD IN THE
F D POWE OfFICE
*
* #










FRIDAY, APRIL 21

BEGINNING PROMPTLY AT 3:30 P. M.
PRIZES WILL BE AWARDED






* DON'T MISS THIS CHANCE TO SEE A MODERN
* ELECTRIC RANGE PERFORM
S* 0<


Mr. and Mrs. Jim Perritt and
little daughter. Gladys Jean, and
Mrs. Leroy Gainous and son, Le-
roy, Jr., visited Sunday with Mrs.
J. J. Perritt in Panama City.











FRIDAY-APRIL 21
THRILLS! CHILLS!
10:30 P. M.

'"WHITE


~~ ~daas


+>anff...'lra*auhW'>.afH-pbmM1* I.MM


T.HE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, APRIL 21, 1939


PAGE TWO


[]



sS~cwcraYua"**^'









L


A new treatment for black eyes
consists of applying a chemical
called histamine by aid of elec-
tric current.



DR. J. C. COE
DENTIST
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe



EYES EXAMINED


BACKGROUND FOR PLANNING


Early in the 1920's the American
people suddenly awoke to discover a
green and sunny land, slicing down
Into the Caribbean from the south-
eastern tip of the continent. And
finding this land with a way of life
to their liking, they flocked south
to Florida by the hundred thou-
sand. So fast did they come that
for a time freight-glutted terminals
forced the railroads to embargo all
but necessities.


road building program faltered.
Pressed by low returns from gen-
eral tax sources, government be-
gan dipping into the revenues de-
rived from motorists in gas tax and
license fees, for these were the
only revenues that retained a nor-
mal appearance. And so the thou-
sand and one things done by the
state began to be financed by road
users-and the habit grew until
today only about one-third of the


Glasses fitted when needed
Made In Our Own Laboratory
All Work Unconditionally
Guaranteed
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 6 p. m.

DR. G. T. NEWBERRY
OPTOMETRIST
PANAMA CITY, FLA.




FISHING--
Spend the week-end in
West Florida's. best fish--
ing grounds.


BOATS With or with-
out guide-at reasonable
rates. Hotel ac-
commodations within the
means of everyone.


SEE-


SJ 0. 'Jim' SMITH

SUMATRA, IFLA.


ERASE the DOUBT
About Your
FRESH WATER FISHING

MIDWAY PARK
Is In tfle iHEART of the
Dead Lakes Fishing Area
Gulf County'q north line cuts
the Dead Lakes at the
Waistline
Meet Your Frilends At
M I D W AY A R K
when the season oliens Junie A
Meantime,
FURN S'HED CABINS
On 'the Waterfront
J. H. SHOE'MAKER and
J. P. BRANTON, Proprietors
Postoffice Address
WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA

-T -t ^-rft ,-. -

POfLarY IS

AS URtED!


For Each and EvGry Bottle
of Milk or Ci-am We Deliver
Is Protected'Wit'h a
SANITARY PARCHMENT
COVER

Use Only
SO 4IONON' S.

Pasteurized



PaiteUitzd for TYour
Protection ,


Highways grow up with the country (1) Day before yesterday (2) Yes-
terday, (3) Today, (4) Tomorrow,
As wave after wave of population total motor revenues collected in
rolled over the land and Florida Florida are available to the Road
became more and more settled, Department.
some way had to be provided for As a result, while traffic grew
t people to get from one part of the -ea'vler and heavier, less and less
state to 'another, to move produce money was available to provide ad-
to market, to handle the rapidly in- equate highway facilities. The de-
creasing flow of tourists. And sb cline in highway money, measured
Florida began piecing together a in dollars per mile, has been so
statewide highway system. great that only 19 per cent as
iodad System Begun 'much was available in 1936 as in
i1926.
In 19'3 the Legislature enacted
the "Miller Bill," providing for a Florida Highways Inadequate
system of state roads. Since the That Florida's highway facilities
passage of the act, the designated are inadequate to serve traffic is
state road system has been in- 'evide'c6d by a recent'survey spon-
creased from time to time by sub- scored by the American Association
sequent legislation-until it now ap- of State Highway Officials. The
proximates more than 12,000 miles, Association's report shows that be-
of which a corislderable proportion cause of traffic and safety condi-
is represented only by proposed 1o-
cations. To 'finance a road build- i This :chart, based on
ing program, the 1923 Legislature planning sutVey stud.
raised the gas-tax from one cent ies, pictures the decline
to two cents, a precedent followed In dollars available to
by subsequent Legislatures until the !oad Oepartm'nt
today Florida niotorists pay an per mile of road. Only
eight cent tax on each gallon of about one-sixth as
gas. much money was avail.
Engineers had little precedence abl -in 1936 as in 126.
on which to work in designing
roads for automobiles. The great
trade 'routes 'that had 'grown 'up.
with the country had been largely
supplanted by rail and water
traftsp6rtation. In. Florida, the
press of traffic demanded the sur-
facing of a large mileage as rap- '
idly as possible. As a -result, en-
gilneHn g wias'sacrfficed for qilan- We o
tity. Mniy roads followed existing tns, d c o
wagon tracks.' They werd narrow, minimum rFl a should carry ut a
high-crowned and of the fence cor- ,58 miles, elocatng 200 miles,
nor variety when It came to align;- 1,586 n les, relocating 200 miles,
ment. reconstructing 2,097 miles, and re-
Yet those early roads served their placing 75 :bridges.
prirpoBe-thy nlmded that Vart 'of Florida's motor accident'death rate
Florida ae-gy from thle radirtads is sixth highest in the nation on a
habitable. mileage-travelled basis. Engineers
bt Ou tw, feel that little progress can be
Traffic', utgrows Roads made in lowering the accident rate
However, by the beginning of th(s until safety is built into highways.
decade traffic had increased tre- But If the depression threw .a
mendously. Cars were fast and bril- monkey wrench into the road build-
Ilant. 'raffic deaths were iicreas- ing machinery, it also made high-
ing at an appalling rate. Plain' fact way engineers 'stop, look and lis-
of the idatter was-a great niajor- ten. It rapidly became evident
ity of the rbads 'built five years that if roads, are to be fitted to
previously were out of date, both traffic with minimum waste and
from the standpoint of safety ansd maximum efficiency, a definite,
front ability to take the pounding long-range highway plan is nec-
'griid 'of ti'affic. Once again'Flor- essary. But first, facts had to be
i1a faced a difficultt road problem obtained to provide the basic data
'Then the depression struck, on which a highway-plan could be
emptying state purses, and the based.

'Approximately one out of every Iron ore deposits in upper Egypt
seven persons 'bitten by. a poison- are to be exploited and are be-
o'"3 '.l *; d'62 of: fe Po:on. :':-. :- *;o L. v2::. :.!-:-'.


Powerful Drama Playing

At Port Saturday Night

"Within the Law," Starring Ruth JOCKEY'S SUPERSTITION
Hussey and 'Tom Neal, Sched- Because of the superstition
uled for 10:30 Owl Show among jockeys against wearing
death colors, the Victoria Racing
A modernized version of Bayard club of Adelaide, Australia, has
Veiller's magnificent stage drama, refused to register a white skull
"Within the Law," will play at and crossbones against a black
the Port theater's owl show Sat- jacket as the colors of a local
urday night at 10:30. The picture owner. He wanted them for the
retains all the powerful drama of jockey who would ride his steeple
the play, but is strictly up to the chaser named Pall Bearer.


minute.
Ruth Hussey is superb in the
role of Mary Turner, while Tom
Neal has the male lead. A strong
cast includes Paul Kelly, William
Gargan, Rita Johnson. Paul Cav-
anagh, Sidney Blackmer. Jo Ann
Sayers and Ann Morriss.
The story unravels in the at-
mosphere of modern Manhattan.
Mary Turner, a department store
salesgirl, is jailed for a theft she
did not commit. She swears ven-
gance and studies law in prison.
On gaining her freedom she joins
a band of racketeers who prey on
the store owner.
She meets his son and he falls
in love with her. She even mar-
ries him, then discovers that she
loves him. They are involved in a
crime and the police are closing
in. At the psychological moment
the racketeer leader steps in and
assumes the blame to save the
boy. The moral now, as it was in
1912 when the play was produced
on Broadway, is simply that crime
doesn't pay.
Without exception the cast han-
dles this gripping situation with
excellent understanding. The sets
are modern, as are the costumes
and dialogue. "Within the Law" is
a first rate picture, improved over
the play by its striking note of
contemporary daring,
-'i ------ "-- i
Cancer of the stomach is found
twice as frequently in men as in
women, states Dr. Sara M. Jordan
in the American Medical Journal.


STOP IT WITH
Alka-Seltzer
Does Headache "slow you
down?" You are a rare ex-
ception if it does not.
One or two tablets ofALKA-
SELTZER in a glass of water
makes a pleasant alkalizing
solution that usually brings
relief in just a few minutes.
ALKA-SELTZER is also recom-.
mended for
Gas on Stomach, "Morning
After Add Indigestion,
Colds, and Muscular Pains.
You will like the tangy flavor
and the results when you take
Alka-Seltzer. Alka-Seltzer, when
dissolved in water, contains an
analgesic, (Sodium Acetyl-Saliyl-
,ate). In addition, the alkaliz
agents in Alka-Seltzer help to re-
lieve those everyday disor-
ders associated with hyper-
aeidity,
Sminall package 30c
Large package


-- -- -- -- -- -

MADAM GORDON
PALMIST. CRYSTAL AND PSYCHIC READER
te She Tells Everything You Wish To Know
SWithout having seen or heard of you before. will
tell you of your private affairs, giving you dates,
facts and figures thatwill amaze and benefit you.
Strange, tirueand fasclnatihg are the words that
'flow from the lips of this gifted and unrivaled
Palmist. Not only will she read your life like an
open book, but also'help you out of your troubles.
reunite the separated. settle lovers' quarrels, en.
able you to win the esteem. love and affection
of any certain one, restore'lost affection, bring
sunshine and happinesss to discordant :families.
give reliable information and advice on all prob-
lems of life such -as love. courtship, marriage.
hangse, travel. business. stock and investments.
WAITING ROOM FOR COLORED
Permanently Located at
PANAMA CITY, ON ROUTE 98, AT RESTFUL INN
/4'Mile South of-Hugh 'Sills Variety Store



IWE HAUL ANYTHING-

CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING
WE HAVE GOOD CLEAN BUILDING 'AND FOR SALE
Prompt and Efficient Service Always


SC. W HORTON


PHONE 70


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


SUNNY STATE

GASOLINE y State
"More Miles to the Gallon"

Oil 15c to 35c Qt.
Good Ol 2gal. 5c
Exide Batteries Batteries Recharged

Kelly-Springfield Tires

SUNY TATE SEVIC STATION


"C. H. 'COLLINS, POrp.


PORT 'iT. JOE, PFLA.


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


.FRIDAY, APRIL 21, 1939


PAGE THREE









PAG FORTESAPR T OGL OUT FOIAFIAARL2,13


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla.,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year........ $2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months..........65c

->-{ Telephone 51 }.-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

THE CLUB IN THE CLOSET
Included among the innumerable provisions
of the original AAA was an item giving the
president power to issue $3,000,000,000 in
"printing press money." In other words, the
chief executive had authority to inflate the
nation's money structure by simply ordering
the government printing presses to start
turning out more greenbacks.
Now congress is beginning to realize this
is too broad a power to be left lying around
Washington and wants to take this authority
from the president. Roosevelt refers- to it as
his "club in the closet." The senate has called
it a club that could be used to club economy
to death.
With the way things stand today, the na-
tion going deeper and deeper into debt and
the national debt steadily mounting, this
"emergency power" should be withdrawn
lest the president exercise his authority and
have those three billion dollars printed up
for use in carrying out the numerous federal
projects. In our opinion it is one of the many
,cau-ses for .business uneasiness and economic
insecurity of the nation. ...-...-
t It has been a long time since the United
:States burned its fingers on irredeemabl)
greenbacks. The fiat money of the Civil War
days is a good reminder, however. And so is
the experience of the German people with its
printing press money that followed the World
War. Remember? It took a bushel basket of
marks to buy a loaf of bread, and the editor
*of The Star has a letter kicking about some-
,where received from Germany that cost in
,the" neighborhood of five hundred billion
marks to mail to this country-which was the
equivalent of five cents postage. ,

WE CAN'T CLOSE THURSDAYS
The majority of business houses in Port
St. Joe will start next week closing Thurs-
day afternoons for tle summer season in or-
der to give employes a half holiday.
We regret extremely that we could not
sign up with the rest of the concerns, but
Thursday happens to be the day when we do
most of the work on The Star, and much as
we would like to enjoy a half day of fishing
or take in the baseball games, we cannot
change 'our publication day, so if anyone has
any important news or a last-minute adver-
tisement to get in Friday's paper, the door
of The Star office will be open all day Thurs-
days and most likely most of Thursday night.
We are greatly in favor of this Thursday
closing idea for everybody else. but we just
can't sign up ourselves.

Eddie Cantor says that most of the women
he sees in slacks look like the rear end of a
Greyhound bus. Slacks for women are all
right if they are not too slack in the wrong
places.

Mussolini is now becoming a headache for
the map makers. Looks like that between
Hitler and Il Duce we never will get an up-
to-date map of Europe.

If you want to get his dignity upset-put
him on roller skates.-Florida Times-Union.
Better tie a cushion on in the proper place,
in addition.


INITIATIVE IN THE LEGISLATURE
It is within the limits of self-evident truth
to say that the present session of the Florida
legislature is starting off very tamely. We
are not mentioning this as a criticism-it
may be the very best possible way for it to
start off under present circumstances.
The fortunate windfall from the duPont
estate has been a factor in the hesitancy
manifested. Until that is definitely disposed
of, no very definite steps can be taken to-
ward revising the tangled tax situation ..
From Gulf county comes the first sign of
real initiative in a resolution proposed by
Representative Lewis. In this resolution he
proposes an amendment to the constitution
making it impossible to pass a law providing
for the compromise or cancellation of a tax
when once it has been lawfully charged
against a property.
The object of this amendment is, of course,
s to put an end to the periodic writing off of
delinquent taxes by such measures as the
' Murphy Act. Such periodic action has become
the regular procedure in Florida. Right now
there is beginning the stripping of second
Growth timber from lands "rescued" from
,the state and freed,of tax claims amounting
to thousands of dollars. When this timber is
stripped off, tax payments will cease again
until another timber crop has grown, when,
it is hoped by the exploiters, that another
"relief measure" may give them again a free
hand to waste the growth of a quarter of a
century. It is not too much to say that the
reckless logging and sawing of mere poles
is a sheer waste, so far as the commonwealth
is concerned.
We are not capable of judging the chance
of success of achieving the desired end by
a constitutional amendment, but with its gen-
eral aim and its spirit we are in complete ac-
cord, as are, we believe, practically all good
citizens.-Holmes County Advertiser.

RELIEF INVESTIGATION
The news that the house had voted an in-
vestigationi of WPA expenditures has been
received with evident satisfaction by citizens
everywhere. There seems to be little doubt
fin the popular mind that a great deal of the
'money appropriated has been squandered, not
only on expensive and ill-advised projects,
but in other and less honestly mistaken ways.
The investigation has been ordered; the
facts are easily obtainable. Not a day should
be lost by the house of representatives in
getting the probe under way. The nation has
a right to know what is being done with its
hard earned money. Indeed, recovery cannot
even start until this sore spot on the body
politic has been removed.
According to the latest figures compiled
by the International Labor Office at Geneva,
Switzerland, the total number of unemployed
persons in the world today is 12,580,973. Of
this number 7,215,961 are reported by this of-
fice to be in the United States.
Because of a different definition of unem-
ployment. this figure for Americans out of
work does not tally with those of the Ameri-
:an Federation of Labor or the United States
Bureau of Labor Statistics. However, since
the same method is applied by the labor of-
fice to all 21 major countries of the world
from which .statistics are available, a strik-
ing fact becomes apparent. The U. S. A.,
which has 6 per'dent of the world's popula-
:ion, has 57 per cent of the world's unemploy-
ment-vivid proof that the New Deal agen-
:ies to take up the major employment slack
in, the United States have not yet solved the
)roblem.-Jacksonville Tribune.

Did you ever notice that the man who is
making a large salary goes around bragging
about it, but the fellow who receives a small
alaryy doesn't say much?

Italian industrial workers have had their
pay raised from 11 cents an hour to 12 cents
an hour. We hope Benito Mussolini carefully
weighed the dangers of encouraging profli-
gacy. with all- that money.-Cincinnati En-
q.uirer.


LOCK THE STABLE BEFORE THE HORSE IS STOLEN


College Worker

Gives Points On

Growing Flowers

Horticulturist At State University
Tells How To Handle Some
Jobs of Home Gardening

Getting heat-tolerant annuals
started, protecting roses from dis-
eases, and cutting back evergreen
shrubbery are some of the spring
jobs for the Florida flower gar-
dener. according to John V..WaE-
kins, horticulturist in the Univer-
sity of Florida College of Agricul-
ture, all of which should be of in-
terest to the many amateur gar-
deners who are doing their bit at
the present time to beautify Port
St. Joe.
Zinnias should be well on their
way by this time to take the place
of snapdragons, carnations and
petunias as they die out with ad-
vancing hot weather; torenias
should be planted to take the
place of pansies. and portulacca
are due to be ready for edgings
before long.
Other suggestions Mr. Watkins
offers to gardeners in Port St.
Joe are:
If broad-leaved evergreens in
foundation plantings and borders
are growing out of their bounds in
a new flush of growth, cut them
back with shears and saw, remov-
ing long spindlingA branches so the
result will be informal without
geometrical outline. In this cut-
ting, retain the natural character
-f the plants, except with sheared
hedges.
Spray rose bushes with a good
copper fungicide to control black
spot and with insecticides to con-
trol aphids and, other pests.
An overcast afternoon, with a
threat of rain, which are quite
-ommon in Port St. Joe right now,
is the best time to. transplant
seedlings. Every effort should be
made to do as little damage as
possible to the seedlings in trans-
planting. Plants should be given
plenty of water and provided with
heading if possible, soon after
they are set.
Only a minimum of -cultivation
should be done in Florida gardens
and there are many experienced
gardeners who advocate cultiva-
tion only when necessary to re-
move weeds. A well-designed
scuffle hoe that may be pushed
and pulled rather than used in a
choppiing motion, has been found
very effective for this purpose
and enables one to cultivate very
lightly and close to plants with-
out injuring them. Shallow culti-
vation is much preferred to deep


National Seashore

To Be Considered

For This Section

Caldwell Assured By President
That Project Will Go Forward
If Land Can' R Secured

President Roosevelt has as-
sured Congressman Millard Cald-
well that the proposed Santa Rosa
Island National Monument will
be given careful consideration as
soon as the bureau of the budget
and the attorney general submit
-their recommendation on the mat-
ter of the form of the proclama-
tion.
Arno B. Cammerer, director of
the national park service, told
Caldwell that if sufficient lands
can be' found available along the
Gult .coast of West Florida that
-the park service would give con-
sideration to the establishment of
a "National Seashore." This pro-
posal, advanced by daldwell some
time back, is now being studied
by the department.
Certain portions of the mainland
adjacent to Santa Rosa Sound
and the area west of Choctawhat-
chee Bay were partially investi-
gated in connection with the
Santa Rosa Island monument.
Other sections. including' Crooked
Island and St. Joseph's Bay penin-
sula, will be given consideration
by the park service.
-----------S----
THE REASON
Diner: "I can't eat this soup."
Waiter: "I'll call the manager."
Diner (when manager arrives):
"This soup, I can't eat it."
Manager: "I regret that sir; I'll
fetch the chef."
Diner (when chef arrives): "I
can't eat this soup."
Chef: "What's the matter with
it?"
Diner: "Nothing; I haven't a
spoon."

The ancient Egyptians are
credited with first domesticating
the cat, although the animal was
known to the Aztecs and in the
ancient East.

hoeing.
In sections of their gardens
they do not intend to use in July,
August and September, gardeners
will do well to plant one of the
crotalarias because of their at-
tractive color, easy growth and
tendency to control root-knot.
"Flower gardening is an all-year
affair in Florida, and the gar-
dener in Port St. Joe who would
have flowers throughout the year
must keep at it," said Mr. Wat-
kins.


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE FOUR


FRIDAY, APRIL 21, 1939









I A


PT


, THE TATTLER


SEES ALL-

KNOWS ALL-

TELLS ALL-

ABOUT HAPPENINGS
IN PORT ST. JOE HIGH


LOCAL BAND ELIGIBLE TO
ENTER NATIONAL CONTEST
Tte Port St. Joe' high school
band is now eligible to enter the
national contest at Charlotte, N.
C., to be held May 3, 4 and 5. If
the organization is lucky enough
to go to this contest it will com-
pete against bands of the same
class as they did at DeFuniak
Springs and stands a good chance
to win. or at least come out in
second place in the "C" class.
If St. Joe can win in Charlotte
it will be considered the best
band in the United States in its
class. This would indeed be a high
honor for the band and for the
city of Port St. Joe.
We are hoping that the band
will go to this contest, as some
money already has been raised
for that purpose. o, folks, let's
all work on the Port theater for
the remaining Lucky Star jackpot.
That would help a lot.
Let's all join in boosting the
|2aand as never before!

SONG POPULARITY
"Two Sleepy People"--Martha
Hinson and Brady Nell.
"Ferdinand the Bull"-Joe Lil-
ienfeld.
"Between a Kibs and a Sigh"-
Tuppy Gibson.
"You Must Have Been a Beau-
tiful Baby"-William Trawick.
"Deep In a Dream"--Kathleen
Saunders.
"Simple and Sweet" Myrtle
Whittaker.
"So Help Me"-Marlgene Smith.
"A Little Kiss at Twilight"'-
Murnice Taunton.
"Turn Off the Moon" Dave
Maddox.
"Heart and Soul"-Opal Greene.
"Garden of the Moon"-Win-
ston Jones.
"Say It With a Kiss" Max
Maddox.

' Ed: "Why the toothbrush in
your coat lapel?"
Dick: "It's .my class pin-- go


to Colgate."


GLEE CLUB DOES WELL
AT DEFUNIAK FESTIVAL
We are very proud of our Glee
Club, which participated in the
music festival at Derunlak last
week, even though they received
only honorable menicon.
Virginia Stoutamire. Adelaide
Hardy and Valura Strauss won
second place for the Glee club in
the trio contest.
-------- -
WE WONDER
-if Betty Jo really likes Jim-
mie?
-why Lunnette is looking for-
ward to May 29? (We think Roy
is coming home.)
-why Howard and Melba are
still trying? (Howard must have
been reading love tales you
know: "And they !were married
and lived happily ever after. The
End.")
-if Alice had a -good time in
DeFuniak? Remember, Max was
not there.
-why Mary is always looking
for Joe? It can't always be civics.
-if Dorothy Crockett wished
she could have him or just wanted
him?
-if Dorothy is beating Doro-
thy's time with Dave? (This is
your problem, you figure it out.)
-if Joe really likes Bernice S.?
(Cute couple.)
-if M. S. and D. S. will ever
get over their case of stubborn-
ness and start going together
again? Let's hope so..
CHOICE SELECTION
CHOICE SELECTIlN


She: "The plastic
is going to reshape
fers his clients the
dozen noses."
He: "Have you
nose ?"
She: "Sir!!!!"


surgeon who
my nose of-
choice of a

picked your


-k--
ASK R. H. SMITH
"Have you ever read 'To a
Mouse'?"
"No. How do you get 'em to lis-


ten?"


THE STAFF '
Editor-In-Chief........ Dick Stepp
Assistant Editor.... Bobby Coburn
Sports Editor........Al Schneider
Society Editors............ Opal
Greene and Dorothy Crockett
Joke Editor.........Paul Johnson


HIGH

The


SCHOOL 4H CLUB
ELECTS NEW OFFICERS
4H Club of the Port St. Joe


high school met Tuesday after-
noon at the school, with Mrs.
Pearl Whitfield of Wewahitchka
in charge of the meeting.
Following transaction of regu-
lar business, new officers were
elected as follows: Murnice Taun-
ton. president; Jewel Lewis, vice-
president; Lunnette Hammock,
secretary.
Plans were made for the sum-
mer camp and "Short course" at
Tallahassee, after which the ses-
sion was adjourned.

DICTIONARY
We expect there are more peo-
ple that know how to play the
xylophohe than can spell it.
Miss O'Quinn asked one of the
eighth grade pupils what vulcani-
zation meant, and he promptly re-
plied: "It is a process of impart-
ing to cauotchouc. guttapercha,
etc."
"Void" and "avoid" mean almost
the same thing, as void means
without, and avoid means to keep
away from. So if you avoid you
will void.
Why should we call Ed Hufft
a zouave'? A zouave is one who
wears bright-colored clothes and
thinks about attracting nothing
but the girls.
----.---<--*-----
WE BELIEVE THAT
Some day William Trawick will
own a large shoe company.
That Myrtle Whittaker Will be
Editor of the Sentinel.
Robert Smith will settle down
to married life and take things
easy.
Dick Stepp will own a brand
new car.
Brady Nell will pop the ques-
tion.
LEGAL ADVERTISING


District Court of the United States
Northern District of Florida
Marianna Division
In the matter of Joe Hauser,
trading under the name of Hau-
ser's Department Store, Debtor.
In Bankruptcy. No. 68.
TO THE CREDITORS OF JOE
HAUSER, OF PORT ST. JOE,
IN THE COUNTY OF GULF
AND DISTRICT AFORESAID:
Notice is hereby given that on
the 11th day of April, 1939, the
said Joe Hauser, trading under
the name of Hauser's Department
Store, filed in said Court his pe-
tition praying that he be adjudged
a bankrupt, and with said petition
filed a proposal for an arrange-
ment with his creditors prior to
adjudication whereby his unse-
cured creditors would be paid 15
per cent of their claims, and all
secured and preferred claims and
costs would be paid in full. A copy
of said proposed arrangement, to-
gether with a summary of the li-
abilities and assets as shown by
the schedules, are attached to
such of these notices as are
mailed.
A meeting of creditors will be
held in the Federal Building at
Marianna in said District at 10
o'clock A. M. on April 25. 1939,
at which meeting any action au-
thorized by the Bankruptcy Act
in connection with said proposed
arrangement may be taken, in-
cluding hearing and acting upon
any application to confirm said
arrangement that may be filed, as
well as any objections that may
be made to such confirmation.
Should such proposed arrange-
ment not be accepted or con-
firmed at or prior to said meeting,
the said Debtor may be threat
adjudged a bankrupt, a trustee in
bankruptcy elected or appointed,
and such other business transact-
ed as properly comes before said
meeting.
Dated at Chipley in said Dis-
trict, this 14th day of April, 1939
CECIL A. ROUNTREE, I
Referee in Bankruptcy,


lanters Turning How They Stand

To Raising Pines -
S R W. McL. Christie ......... 6to I
Pat Whitaker ............. 8to 1
Id Timber Business In Good W. C. Hodges ............9 to 1
For Revenue From Sev- D. Stuart Gillis ...........12to 1
eral Sources Fred L. Touchton .........13 to 1
J. Turner Butler ..........14to 1


Planters in the land of cotton
are turning to the pine tree busi-
ness to boost their incomes, ac-
cording to Frank Heyward, state
forester of Georgia. Pointing to a
shift from .emphasis on cotton
growing, he said that private for-
estry in the South is experiencing
a phenomenal growth.
"And why not?" 'he asks. "The
southern planter is learning he
can plant pine trees, go off and.
forget them for a few years, and
then harvest naval stores or wood
for cellulose products like paper
and rayon, or for communication
poles. wharf pilings, .saw timber,
cross ties and the like. Meanwhile
no watering, no fertilizing. no
bell weevils to worry about, and
no .plowing and very easy harvest-
intg."
"The cellulose age is begin-
ninig," continued Heyward. "Pa-
per, conitainer board, plastics.
rayon and. other forms of pro-.
cessed wood Appear destined to
afford even .further outlets for
forest products than now exist."
With a little care and fire pro-
tection, the forester said, a far-
mer can figure on an annual in-
come of from $2 to $4 an acre,
under a conservative estimate,
from his forests without any la-
bor at all.
"And," he added. "there is an-

other factor. These forests afford
good grazing for beef cattle which
in turn destroy combustible ma-
terial. and they are great as game
preserves something else that
Can be figured in dollars and cents
value to a section.
"' The southern former is defi-
nitely becoming a timber cropper.
He has become so interested in
it he is demanding forest legisla-
tion and fire protection, just as he
has demanded plague funds in the
past to protect his cotton."
He said conditions favoring pri-
vate forestry in the South were
year 'round logging because of
mild climate, mushrooming of
pulp paper mills, rapid growth of
valuable species. low taxes and
values of forest lands, low labor
costs and ease of artificial and
natural reforestation.
-.------- ------
A new device for bombing
planes is an automatic sighter
that figures out the speed of the
plane and its altitude in relation
to the target in order that a bomb
may be dropped at the exact sec-
ond to score a hit.


WOOD FIBRE FLOWERS

that cannot be told from the
best product of Mother Nature.

. And they keep indefi-
nitely. If they become droopy
you merely place them in the
refrigerator and in, a brief time
they are as good as new.

SEE

Mrs. W. S, Smith
STAR OFFICE PHONE 51

ink


a*lMa.r t


if


there is one enterprise


upon earth that the quitter should never

attempt, it is advertising. Advertising

does not jerk it pulls. It begins

gently, at first, but the pull is steady;

aid it increases, day by day and year by

year, until it exerts an irresistible power.

-John Wanamaker.


iih~aa IIsq-i ~CgsgOLPl


THE POCKETBOOS


cre KNOWLEDGEA S


G. Pierce Wood ..........17to 1
Fuller W arren ............18to 1
Raleigh Petteway .........18 to 1
Jerry Carter ..............18 to 1
There are 19 other prospects on
Morrison's list with odds ranging
up to 35 to 1.



It's Time To

DINE!!

Where the food is of the
best where the service i
is prompt and efficient
a nd where you get

HOME COOKED
MEALS



TRIANGLE
RESTAURANT
BEER and WINES -




FLOWERS AND

CORSAGES
for

Commencement


TH.E STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, APRIL 21, 1939


PAGE FIVE


w


m


--








E S


Importance Of

Land Is Coming

To Fore Todaj


Country Becoming Land Minded
And Thinking of Conserva-
tion and Deve:opment

"Land, ho!"
This cry issuing from the lip
of a keen-eyed observer wit]
Columbus in his search for a new
world, brought joy to the heart
of his felow sailors. Their lon,
and arduous search had been re
warded at last.
Throughout the ages people
have been land hungry. Nation
have sought and conquered new
territory-and Hitler and Musso
lini are doing it today. Settlers
have gradually pushed in to even
the most wild reaches of this an(
other countries, have risked their
lives to attain the land the3
wanted. Vast sums have been ex
ended in draining swamps ant
marshes in an effort to get more
land and more fertility.
The land is the basis of all life
-of course it must be properly
watered for life to abound. So ii
is only natural tiat peoples thru
out history have sought land
ever more land.
It is passing strange, however,
that on-e we have attained land
we have. in far too many in-
stances, abused it and partially
destroyed it, rather than using it
properly, conserving it. and add-
ing to its fertility. All too often a
heritage of fertile acres has been
drained of its fertility, used un-
wisely, and passed on to someone
else as a heritage of scars, de-
nuded of trees, and barren. There
are a number of tracts like this
near Port St. Joe. but through the
good work of Mother Nature they
will again, within twenty or thirty
years, be again ou me productive
side.
The old order changeth, how-
ever, and a new orcer ariseth in
its stead. This country is becom-
ing land-minded again, but not in
the sense of acquiring new lands,
because all hospitable sections of
the country are now settled.
Rather, everyone is thinking in
terms of proper use, conservation
and development of the land, to
the end that greatest returns may
1b" received from its culture and
that it may be handed down tc
posterity in better condition than
It is now. In Gulf county today
practically all cuttings of wood
for the St. Joe paper mill is done
on a scientific basis, a sufficient
number of trees being left to re-
seed the area and replenish the
sn'nIly of wood.
A program of land-use planning
has been inaugurated in practic-
ally every state of the Union. The
program is just getting under
way in Florida. The plan 'is to
make a study of lands in a county
by types and communities, find
out what they are now being used
'n- and. where' possible. suggest
better uses. It is hoped to aid in
getting each acre of land to grow-
ing the kinds of crops, grasses,
trees or other products for which
it is best suited. Maps will be
made showing soil and crop types
of the. lands in the county. Writ-
ten descriptions, containing opin-
ions of farm people as well as soil
experts. will be included.
"For the land's sake" will be
come more than just by-words if
this program is successful.
--- ----
SENATE GROUP WILL
HOLD OPEN MEETING
ON TAX PROPOSALS

For the primary purpose of
having a complete discussion of
the plan to have Florida voters in
next year's general election vote
on the abolition of ad valorem
taxes, the senate committee on
constitutional amendments will be
in open session at Tallahassee on
the night of April 26, it was an-


Shaggy Zinnia State Had Boom

Wins Award 300 Years A
WinHs Award--


n Zinnia Fantasy White Light
d awarded honorable mention in 1939
r All America trials.
y Most distinct of all the new zin-
- nias is the Fantasy type. Intro-
d duced four years ago as a mixture,
lovely separate colors have been
selected, and for this year a white
variety christened White Light won
a honorable mention in the All Ameri-
7 ca trials.
If among its numerous merits the
t zinnia has. a fault, it might have
been found (before Fantasy ar-
, rived) in the extreme regularity of
its blossom, with flat petals, al-
ways arranged just so. The dahlia
flowered type was a departure from
the original doorknob form, which
was welcome; but the Fantasy type
is a complete change.
7 fantasy zinnias have petals which
t ae twisted, slightly fluted, and
arranged in a shaggy disarray. It
is as easy to grow as any zinnia
and the flowers are of medium size,
three to four inches in diameter.
Besides the mixture originally in-
troduced, which won an award of
merit in the 1935 All America trials,
there are now available Star Dust,
a selection of yellow; Orange Lady,
and Rosalie, a. deep rose.
Another new type of zinnia which
is being rapidly improved is the
scabiosa-flowered, which has a
semi-globular crown of florets sur-
rounded by a row of flat petals, all
of like color. It is obtainable in
a mixture which has most of the
zinnia colors, and makes a most
useful cut flow, ...


Local Chamber


(Continued from Page 1)
n the work now being done by
the organization.
A resolution was passed by the
directors protesting against the
proposed $2 license fee for salt
"ater fishing, and the secretary
was instructed to send a copy of
the resolution to our representa-
tive in the legislature. The secre-
tary was also instructed to pre-
pare data on the early history of
this port, which is to be used in
the forthcoming "History of the
Florida Merchant Marine" being
prepared by the WPA. Any sug-
gestions in regard to this will be
greatly appreciated.
T. H. Stone was named as a
member o the board of directors.
to serve the unexpired term of G.
F. Kaser, who resigned.
New members accepted into the
chamber at Tuesday night's ses-
'ion were E. D. Gallagher of the
St. Joe Gas company, William F.
Poehler of Quarterman's Studio,
and Basil E. Kenney, Sr., and
Basil E. Kenney. Jr., of the St.
Joe Lumber & Export company.
The next regular meeting of the
chamber of commerce will be held
April 28 at 8 o'clock in the old
Masonic hall.

.Helium is the only gas which
cold will not solidify. It has been
carried within a tenth of a de-
gree of absolute zero-273 de-
grees Centigrade.

nounced by Senator D. Stuart Gil-
lis of DeFuniak Springs, chairman
of the committee.
Gillis' announcement was to the
'effect t h a t all constitutional
amendment proposals dealing with
taxation would be considered at
the session, called for 8 o'clock
that night, .


Lgo


II~


Promoter of 1669 Knew How T
Paint Glowing Word Picture,
Old Circular Reveals

Real estf-te promoters of 301
years ago apparently could holi
their own with those in the busi
ness today. An advertising circu
lar of the first boom in Florida
real estate, which was in ful
swing in 1669. has come to ligh
in the historic library of St
John's College in Annapolis. The
circular is in the form or a pamph
let which seems to have beei
bound by accident in a volume of
theological essays, according t(
the Washington Star.
The pamphlet ts entitled: "A
brief description of the Province
of Carolina on the Coasts of Flor
ida and more particularly of a
new plantation begun vy the Eng
lish at Cape Fear on that rivei
now by them called Charles
River, the 29th of May. 1664;
wherein is set forth the healthful.
ness of the air, the fertility of
the earth and waters, and the
great pleasure and profit will ac-
crue to those that go thither,
whether on their own accounts or
to serve another."
The English promoter of 1669
knew how to paint a glowing
word picture. He described in
most persuasive fashion the rich-
ness of the Florida soil, the great
variety of fruit trees, the manner
in which corn. indigo and tobacco
flourished, the fatness of the hogs
and cattle and the abundance of
wild game, and then turned to the
question of climate.
"Last of all," wrote the pro-
moter. "the air comes to be con-
sidered, which is not the least
consideration to the well-being of
'i plantation, for without whole-
some air all other considerations
avail nothing. And this is it which
makes this place so' desirable, be-
ing seated in the most temperate
clime, where the neighborhood of
the glorious light of heaven
brings many advantages and his
convenient distance secures them
from the inconveniences of his
scorching beams. The nights nor
days are so long, when at longest,
as in England, by somewhat above
two hours."
The feminine angle was not
neglected-in the advertising: "If
any maid or single woman hath a


desire to go" over, they will think
themselves in a golden age when
men paid a dowry for their wives;
for if they be but civil, and under
fifty years of age, 'some honest
man or other will purchase them
for wives. Every manser-
vant, at the expiration of their
time, is to have of the' country
one hundred acres of land to him
and his heirs forever, paying only
halfpenny per acre per annum;
their masters also are to allow
*them two suits of apparel and
tools such as he is best able to
work with, according to the cus-
tom of the country."


Tower of East
t


School Band

(Continued from Page 1)
Crestview.
A drum major's baton twirling
contest was held Saturday. with
Miss Helen Barrow of Crestview
as winner in the junior group and
Miss Opal Wilson of Crestview as
winner in the senior group.
Saturday was devoted chieify to
massed concerts, and about 600
women from the sew-ing rooms in
the district were led in choruses
by Miss Jewell Presnell, WPA
area director, assisted by Miss
Annie Merle Simmons of Chipley.
A massed band concert was
held Saturday on Harbeson Field,
directed by Henry Fillmore, noted
composer and bandmaster. He
stated that he had never wit-
nessed a more brilliant or spec-
tacular sight than the perform-
ance of the bands.
Another fine feature of the fes-
t!val was the concert given by the
Florida Federal Symphony Or-
-'- "tra. which is a unit of the
WPA music project. A movement
is on foot by the Port St. Joe
Chamber of Commerce to have
'his organization appear here in
the near future, when seats have
been provided at the Centennial
auditorium;
-- --------0------
WOULD LICENSE DRIVERS
A bill proposed in the senate
Monday by Senator W. W. Rose
of Orlando provides licensing of
all automobile drivers in Florida,
with annual fees or 25 cents for
operators of private machines and
$1 for chauffeurs.
--------------
Cotton pickers in the United
States received an average of
$1.12 per hundred pounds of seed
cotton in 1927. only 41 cents in
1931 and 57 cents in 1938.


The average automobile
sists of 15,000 parts.


FOR


DEPENDABLE

PLASTERING
rS S EE S E E

BAY CONCRETE

COMPANY
PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


IN FEATURES


con


PAGE SIX


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY APRIL 21 199


u


Reminiscent of the Malayan
style of architecture is this beau-
tiful doorway at the base of one
of the Towers of the East at the
1939 Golden Gate International
Exposition. At the door is pretty
Jeanne Bon.

A German scientist reports that
the administration of copper helps
to maintain the blood sugar o
diabetics at a proper level, anc
that the use of insulin can bE
greatly reduced when the copper
is used.