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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00130
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: April 14, 1939
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00130

Full Text




The Star-Florida's fattest grow.
ing little newspaper-dedioated. to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St Joe.


THE


STAR


Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
es growing little city. ni
the heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center

VOLUME II PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 1939 NUMBER. 26-


Wood Pleased

With WorkBeing

Done By House


Urges Members to Continue "Con-
structive Work" In Legis-
lative Affairs


REV. BEATY RETURNED,
TO ST. JOE AS PASTOR
Rev. H. F. Beaty and Clyde
Jones returned yesterday from
Havana, Fla.. where they repre-
sented the Port St. Joe Presby-
terian church at the session of
the West Florida Presbytery held
in that city.
Rev. Beaty was returned as pas-
tor of the local church for an-
other year.


G. Pierce Wood of Port St. Joe, FOrmer Resident


speaker of the house of represent
tatives of the 1939 session of the
state legislature. Monday appealed
to members of the house for "con
tinued constructive work".in legis
lative affairs.
Our organization processes
have been accomplished in
highly satisfactory manner in the
.first few days of. the session.'
Wood..said;. 'ow, it is up to. u
to live up to the fine start w(
have made, with a concentratlor
of our effort 'toward. continued
constructive 'work during the re
niainder of the session."
He stated thab, Florida is faced
by more important problems ol
legislation than it has been at
any time, and the chief one oi
these problems is finances.
S"We must work in unison and
for the future." he said. "By good
fortune the state's financial crisis
was met for the time being last
week. and the deficit that threat-
ened to destroy the state's credit
was averted.. But that in no way
reduces our problem of providing
for the future, and it is up tQ us
to solve it prom.,ptly and :effci~
'ently." ,
"I am more than pleased at the
spirit of co-operation that is eti-
denced in our first few days of
work," he continued. "I can give
assurance that it will be my pur-
pose and that of other members
to keep this spirit alive and
working through the session."
Wood said he believed com-
mittees he has named will work
smoothly and quickly to cull vi-
tal legislation from that of lesser
importance.


Bill Okehed For

Centennial Cost

Money Over $5000 Appropriattion
For Celebration Voted
By House

The Florida house of represen-
tatives Wednesday passed 85 to 2
a senate bill appropriating $7,479
to repay Senator J. L. Sharit of
this city for money spent in stag-
ing the Centennial Celebration
here last Becember. The 1937
legislature alpropriiated $5000 for
the celebration, 'but costs ran
above $12,000, the surplus money
being advanced by local interests.
-- ------
PRIDGEON OFFERS REWARD
FOR GAME 'LAW VIOLATORS
J. K. Pridgeon of Wewahitchka,
state conservation officer for this
section, today publishes a notice
offering a reward of $25 for infor-
mation leading to the arrest and
conviction-of persons violating the
game laws.

ATTEND MUSIC FESTIVAL
Mrs. E. H. Horton, Mrs. Erie
Hickey and the Misses Katherine
Hickey, Adelaide Hardy, Vilura
Straus and Virginia Stoutamire
left yesterday morning for De-
Funiak Springs to attend the mu-
sic festival. Members of the glee
club and the high school band
will leave this morning to partici-
nate in the festival.,


a-

d Called By Death
- -
- Mrs. Georgia A. Arline Died Sun-
day Morning in Mobile
s At Age of 84.
a *~-----
e Funeral services were held last
; Tuesday afternoon from the EpIs-
si copal church in Apalachicola for
Mrs. .Georgia A. Airline, who
passed, away .Sunday morning at
t 9 o'clock in Mobile, Ala.. at the
- advanced age of 84 years.
SMrs. Arline. who lived in Port
I St. .Joe. for some time and was
Sell known to old residents. was
l iorn and raised in Decatur coun-
ty, Georgia. She is survived by
one son, Morgan Arline. chief en-
Sgineer on the S.S. Azealea City.
who was in Lonaon, England, at
Sthe time of her death.
--------
t Measure For Protection
Of Manatees Presented
S By Lewis and Sharit

In order to protect the manatee,
or sea t-ow, a bill' was introduced
in the state senate. last week hy
Senators J. L. Sharit of Port St.
Joe and H. N. Walker of Wakulla
Station which would, permit the
owner of lands adjacent to any
stream or lake to fence off areas
for the mammal, and place super-
vision of such operations under
the state game commissioner.
A similar bill was introduced
in the house by Representative F.
Clay Lewis of Port St. Joe and
other members.

GAG RULE PLAN
IS ABANDONED
Representative E. Clay Lewis of
Port St. Joe recommended to the
house of representatives last week
that two-thirds of the house mem-
bership be required to concur in
order to place on the calendar
any bill disapproved by any of the
various committees.
The rules committee decided
not to report the proposal but
would suggest, instead, that the
rule. of previous sessions be con-
tinued-that a majority of the
house could bring up for consider-
ation any bill unfavorably re-
ported, by committee.
The rules committee adopted
the measure by a 7 to 6,vote, but
some. members protested it as a
"gag rule."
__..... .- .-- --
TO ORGANIZE EPISCOPAL
CHURCH SCHOOL SUNDAY
Announcement was made yes-
terday that a church school will
be organized Sunday morning at
the St. James Episcopal church
and that all bftthose interested in
the church are asked to be pres-
ent.
----*'--- *
BRUSH FIRE
The fire department was called'
out yesterday afternoon to place
under control a brush' fire on Six- e
teenth street, near the bridge.
The siren was sounded at 4:1
and the truck was on its way at
4:17, which should establish some a
kind of a record..


New Furniture

Store Open For

Business Today

Concern Takes for Motto "Your
Home Town Furniture
Store"

The St. Joe Furniture Company.
the latest addition to the business
houses of Port St. Joe. threw open
its .doors at 8 o'clock this morn-
ing in a gigantic opening sale
that sets new low prices for" high
grade furniture in this city.
C. J. Sullivan, the proprietor.
who comes here from Florala,
Ala., has chosen for his mnotto
"Your Home To w n Furniture
Storp."' seating: "My wife and I
have come to Port St. Joe with
the firm intention of making this
rapidly-growing little city our fu-
ture home. This is now a home-.
owned store and we intend to take
our place with the rest of you in
the business, civic and social life
of the community.' This is riot a
cVain store and the money spent
with'us remains right here in Port
St. Joe where it will be recircu-
lated and help in building up our
city."
The new firm stocks a complete
and up-to-date line of nationally
advertised furniture at prices that
will' fit all pocketbooks. Their ad-
vertisement on page six of this is-
sue extends a cordial invitation to
everyone to drop in at the new
store and get acquainted.


New Postoffice

Opened: Tuesday

Provides Box Facilities For All
Patrons and Plenty of Work.
ing Space for Employes

Port St. Joe's new postoffice
was opened for business Tuesday
morning without the breaking of
bottles of champagne or a dedica-
tory address by Postmaster Gen-
eral James Farley. Postmaster H.
A. Drake merely hung a padlock
on the doors of the old building.
tacked a, removal notice on the
wall and started selling stamps at
q dime a dozen in his new place
of business.
The new office, in the recently-
completed Masonic building, will
fill a long-felt want here, as th6
old quarters were crowded as to
working facilities and there were
Insufficient boxes for all the pa-
trons.
The new layout provides virtu-
ally acres of room for emploves,
and the 545 boxes. with plenty of
snace for the addition of 180' more.
should care for needs of, the city
for some time to come, although
Mr. Drake states that the new
boxes available are going like hot
cakes at a hobo's convention.
The practf(e of a 'nuinber of
families using one box will be
discontinued. states Mr. Drake. It
was necessary in th.e old quarters
due to lack of boxes, but with
plenty of boxes now available th
postal regulations' will not permit
of this practice. a
There has been considerable
muttering and outrightcussing by t
patrons in learning their new box
combinations, but things are be-
ginnine, to quiet down now and
everybody is happy over the spa-
cious new postoffice.
------ ~ ----' f
Mr. and, Mrs. T. T. Westbrook t
and Mrs. W. M. Ifoell.were vis- a
1t'i in 'ppnT' Cpity lt, PFriday.


FIREl.NMEN TO ELECT- 'FIRE
QUEEN' FOR NEXT DANCE
Members of th'e volunteer fire
department will meet Tuesday
night at 8 o'clock at the Black
Cat cafe for the purpose of se-
lecting some popular young lady
of the city as "Fire Queen" to
lead the grand march at the fire-
man's ball to be held next Friday,
April 21, at the Centennial build-
ing.
Queens for future dances will be
chosen by popular acclaim at the
dances.
------K---

Easter Fiesta

At Apalachicola

Catholic Church Sponsoring Fair
Which Will End Satur-
"day Night'

According to the yearly tradi-,
tion, St. Patrick's Catholic church
of Apalachicola is sponsoring an,
Easter Fiesta, which' began yes-
terday and will end tomorrow
night.
Tonight a big floor show will be
presented in the armory begin-
ning at 8 o'clock, and tomorrow
night the festivities will conclude
with a grand ball. Many booths
and exhibits and displays have
been arranged in the armory.
--------^------ ,
STATE MAY VOTE
ON CONSTITUTIONAL
CONVENTION IN '40


If a resolution introduced in the
legislature last we k b'r Senators
A. O. Kanner of Stuart and D.
Stuart GIllis of DeFuniak Springs
is' approved and sighed by Gover-
nor Cone. Floridians in the No-
vember, 1940, general election,
will have the opportunity of ex-
pressing themselves on the long-
discussed question of a constitu-
tiodnal convention.
The preamble to the resolution
states: "The present constitution
of the state of Florida was
adopted more than 50 years ago.
On account of the tremendous
growth of the population, and on
account of the many changed con-
ditions of the state, it is necessary
biennially to propose various
amendments to the constitution."
Florida's first constitutional
convention was held in the ancient
city of St. Josepi, .site of the
present city of Port St. Joe, in
1838.
-- ---
HODGES WOULD REPEAL
SUNDAY SHOOTING BAN

Senator Hodges of Tallahassee
this week proposed repeal of Flor-
ida's law prohibiting the dis-
charge of firearms on Sunday.
repeal of the old law would
clear the way for hunting on Suin-
days inn all, counties. At present
it is not against the law to hunt
on: the sabbath, but it is illegal to
fire a gun, although but a few of
the counties enforce this law.
_-----
STUDY COURSE TO BEGIN
AT BAPTIST CHURCH
Mrs. J. S. Vaghts and Mrs. A.
J. Gross of Gainesville will con-
duct a Sunday school study course
Lt the First Baptist church begin-
ning Monday, April 17, and con-
tinuing through Friday, April 21.
Services will be at 8 o'clock each
evening.

VISITOR LEAVES
Mrs. Bertha B issells left Friday
or her home in Fleeting, Va., at'
er spending several weeks here
as the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Rob-
rt Bellows.


Lewis Would

Impound Race


Track Funds

In Event Supreme Court Should
Declare Present Method of
Distribution Illegal

E. Clay Lewis of Port St. Joe,
Gulf county representative to the
1939 session of the Florida legis-
lature, former speaker and one of
the leaders of the small county
block in the house of representa-
tives, Tuestlay introduced a bill
designed to preserve the "status
fuo" of race track revenues in.the
event a supreme court. decision
shouldd declare the present distri-
butibn method unconstitutioqgt.
The bill. by .Lewis: would im-
pound the tax money until the
biiireft legislature or the next has
an opportunity to inaugurate a
hew method of distributing the
funds. The present law., enacted
In 1931 and. now under attack in
the Tallahassee circuit court, pro-
vides for equal distribution of the
money among the 67 counties.
Speaker G. Pierce Wood of Port
St. Joe, commenting on the pro-
posed change in race track taxa-
tion, said:
"If those recommending change
in race track taxation are willing
to sit across the table with the
non-racing county bloc and amic-
ably adjust the issue. I do not an-
ticipate any big arnd little oiunty
fight. '" ..
"I anm hopeful today that the
whole situation can be worked
out in a manner which will pre-
vent bitter animosities develop-
ing. Those representing the non-
racing county bloc have no incli-


nation
able.
small


or desire to be unreason-
but the interests of the
counties must be assured,


and that assurance can be pro-
vided through calm, friendly ne-
gotiations."
S------'

SHow They Stand

Following are the ten leading
1940 gubernatorial aspirants, ac-
cording to A. W. Morrison of Mi-
ami, with their odds:
'W. McL. Christie ......... 6to1
Pat Whitaker ............. 8 to 1
W. C. Hodges ............ 9tol
D. Stuart Gillis ...........12 to 1
Fred L. Touchton .........13to 1
J: Turner Butler ..........14 to 1
G. Pierce Wood ..........17 to 1
Fuller Warren ............18 to 1
Raleigh Petteway .........18 to 1
Jerry Carter ..............18to 1
There are 19 other prospects on
Morrison's 'list with odds ranging
up to 35 to 1.

HOUSE BATTLES
OVER LAW BOOKS

The regular biennial battle over
the matter of. presenting each
member' of the hease of represen-
tatives with a set of compiled
general laws of Florifa with all
supplements, popped up again this
session ard was sent to the com-
mittee on legislative expense by a
vote of 59 to 35, the 35 opposition
votes being sufficient to defeat
its immediate passage.
Cost of the books would come
to about $9,500.

NAMED SECRETARY
Miss Lila F. Carter of Port St.
Joe was appointed last Friday by
Speaker G. P. Wood as his secre-
tary, to serve during the session
of the 1939 legislature.









A


Women's Clubs

In Meeting Here
Representatives from -.he Wo-
men's Clubs of Apalachicola, We-
wahitchka and Panama City were
guests Wednesday afternoon of
the Port. St. Joe Woman's Club
at the Centennial building. A pro-
fusion of amaryllis, gladioli, Queen
Anne lace and ferns were used to
decorate the spacious building for
the occasion.
Mrs. George Patton presided in
her usual gracious manner and
called the meeting to order, which
was opened with selections by the
high school band. Mrs. Patton
gave the address ofinelcome. af-
ter which presidents of the visit-
-ing clubs were introduced and
gave highlights of the year's ac-
complishments of their clubs.
": Each club took part on the pro-
gram, which was as follows:
SReading by Mrs. Charles Marks
of Apalachicola.
tVocal solos by Mrs. G. A. Fel-
lows and Mrs. til of Panama
City. accompanIld by Mrs. J. S.
Wilson at the piano.
Two paino numbers by Mrs. F.
M. Campbell of Wewahitchka.
Piano solo by Mrs. S. C. Parker.
Violin solo by Mrs. Edwin Ram-
sey, accompanied by Mrs. Parker.
Reading and solo by Mrs. W. A.
Smith, accompanied by Mrs. Ram-
sey and Mrs. Parker.
A number of out-of-town guests
were introduced by the president,
who have given outstanding serv-
ice to their clubs this year.
The ladies were then invited to
view the splendid, art exhibit from
the Gulf county 4-H club, sewing
rooms, adult education classes,
the art class of the Woman's
Club and several exhibits by indi-
viduals of antiques and valuables.
The hostesses for the afternoon,
Mrs. C. E. Boyer. Mrs. Fred Cur-
tis, Mrs. Horace Soule, and Mrs.
J. T. McNeill. served the guests
-with sandwiches and tea. The tea
'table was covered with a lovely
hand-made cloth, and beautiful
Easter lilies surrounded by fern
formed the centerpiece. This was
balanced by tall green lighted ta-
pers. bringing out the club colors.
About one hundred ladies were
present on this occasion.

MRS. W. S. SMITH HOSTESS
TO TUESDAY BRIDGE CLUB
Mrs. W. S. Smith was hostess to
the Tuesday Bridge club this week
at her home on Williams avenue.
Two tables were placed for play
in an attractively decorated room
using honeysuckle and woodvine
as the predominating flowers. At
the conclusion of several progres-
sions, prizes were presented to
.Mrs. P. D. Farmer, high and cut
Mrs. T. V. Westbrook, traveling,
and Mrs. C. Trammell. low.
The hostess served salad, jello,
crackers, cake and punch to Mes-
dames C. Trammell, T. V. West-
brook, W. M. Howell, J. Shannon,
P. D. Farmer, D. C. Smitth and
M. Larkin.'
Preceding. play the hostess was
given a surprise birthday shower.

Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Johnson of
Pensacola, and Miss Jeanette
Theobald of Apalachicola were the
guests Sunday of Mr. and Mrs. J.
B. Gloekler.

Mrs. James Kelly, Mrs. Ella
Glenn and Mrs. B. E. Parker of
Wewahitchka attendeding the 0.
E. S. meeting here Wednesday
night.

SMr. and Mrs. Fred Maddox were
in Panama City on business Wed-
nesday.

Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Hodges were
business visitors m the city Wed-
nesday.


At the Churches

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL
Rev. Glion Benson, Rector
10:00 a. m.-Church School.
7:45 p. m.-Evening Worship.

METHODIST CHURCH
D. E. Marietta, Minister
Services Every Sunday
10:00 a. m.-Churcn School.
11:00 a.m.-Morning worship.
7:30 p. m.-Evening worship.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. J. W. Sisemore, Minister
10:00 a. m.--Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.-Morning Worship.
7:00 p. m.-B. Y. P. U.
8:00 p. m.-Preaching service.
W. M. U., Monday, 3:00 p. m.
Prayermeeting Wednesday, 7:30 p.
m. Teachers meeting, Thursday,
7:30 p. m.

ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Rev. E. T. Corbin, Pastor
Full-time services
10:-15 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.-Preaching Service.
7:30 p. m.-Evangelistic service.
Prayermeeting every Wednesday
night.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN,
Rev. H. F. Beaty, Minister
1000 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.-Preaching service.
7:30 p. m.-Preaching service.
---- ---
LINEN SHOWER FOR
MRS. CLYDE GENTRY
Honoring Mrs. Clyde Gentry,
nee Juanita Cooper, Mrs. R. E.
Williams and Mrs. T. J. Mitchell
entertained last Friday morning
with a surprise linen shower at
the apartment of Mrs. Williams at
the Port 'theater. Immediately up-
on arrival of the honoree many
lovely and useful gifts of linen
were presented, after which two
contests were enjoyed. with Mrs.
Frank LeHardy and Mrs. George
Cooper being winners of prizes.
After the contests, Mrs. David
Jones assisted the hostesses with
the serving of a delectable salad
course to Mesdames M. Hurlbut,
W. C. Roche, J. Blount, G. Hud-
con. F. LeHardy. B. H. Graves. G.
Cooper, R. Ferguson, R. H. Out-
law, J. Morrow, R. O. Roberts, C.
A. LeHardy, and the Misses Mil-
dred Rowan, Elizabeth Kenning-
ton, Lillian Ferrell, Mary Edna
Everett and Margaret LeHardy.
-*r *
MRS. JOHN SOWERS
ENTERTAINS AT BRIDGE
Mrs. John Sowers entertained
with two tables or bridge last Fri-
day at her home on Long avenue.
Adding to the attractiveness of
the home were lovely spring flow-
ers. Followingprogressions, scores
were tallied and prizes presented
to Mrs. H. C. Spence, high. Mrs.
Clara Riley. traveling and guest
prize, and Mrs. B. J. Hull, low.
Delicious refreshments of jello,
nut salad, crackers, cake and iced
tea were served to Mesdlames H.
C. Spence, Tom Gragg, B. J. Hull,
W. A. Wood, Clara Riley and Mr.
and Mrs. Ted Frary.

J. A. M. CLUB ENTERTAINED
BY MRS. E. C. PRIDGEON
The members of the J. A. M.
club were entertained Monday
evening at the home of Mrs. E.
C. Pridgeon. Sewing and chatting
were enjoyed, after which the hos-
tess served salad, sandwiches and
coffeee to Mesdames J. A. Connell.
B. A. Pridgeon, C. Boyer, A. D.
Lawson, L. Gainous. W. C. Prid-
geon, and W. H. Howell and Miss
Myrtice Coody.

Miss Idell Murphy of Tallahas-
see and Miss Mercedes Murphy of
Sneads visited relatives in the city
Sunday.

Miss Mary Katherine Blount of
Geneva, Ala., is the guest this
week of Mr. and Mrs. John Blount.


Society Personals Churches

LANETA DAVIS, Editor


Cooking School

Here Wednesday

The Port St. Joe Parent-Teacher
association is sponsoring a free
cooking school to be held next
Wednesday. April 19, in the new
school auditorium from 2 to 4:30
o'clock in the afternoon.
Miss Hewey, demonstrator for a
large flour manufacturing com-
pany and a nationally known food
expert, will be in charge and will
answer all questions on baking
and discuss many household prob-
lems.
All those attending this cooking
school should. bring a note book
and pencil for taking down the
tempting, tasty recipes and prac-
tical suggestions. All food pre-
pared during the demonstration
will be given as attendance gifts.
The P.-T. A. urges every woman
in Port St. Joe to attend this'
school, as the organization will
be paid ten cents for every woman
who registers,

BAPTIST MISSIONARY
CIRCLES MEET
The Lydia Circle of the Baptist
Missionary society met Monday
afternoon at *the home of Mrs. J.
W. Sisemore, with Mrs. Curtis
Palmer presiding. Following roll
call and reading of the minutes,
the personal service report was
made by Mrs. J. F. Miller. Bible
study, led by Mrs. Palmer, was
taken from the Book of Ruth.
Miss Frances Palmer gave an in-
teresting talk of her work and
studies at Florida State College
for Women. New and old business
was transacted after which the
meeting was dismissed. The hos-
tess served ice cream and cookies
to those present. The meeting
next Monday will be at the home
of Mrs. J. O. Baggett.
The Mary Circle was entertained
Monday afternoon at the home of
Mrs. Denver Miller. with Mrs. O.
F. Powell presiding. A short busi-
ness session was held and eleven
members answered the roll call.
The Bible study was led by Mrs.
Grogan, after which the meeting
was dismissed with prayer by
Mrs. Powell. The hostess served
cake and soft drinks for refresh-
ments.
Mrs. Charles McClellan was hos-
tess to the Martha Circle Monday
afternoon. Following regular busi-
ness. Mrs, Sisemore called a
meeting for the society for mis-
sion study at the church Friday
afternoon. Bible study was in
charge of Mrs. E. B. Dendy, fol-
lowing which the meeting was
dismissedd by Mrs. Cason. Mrs.
Patterson will entertain the circle
next Mlonday. Following the busi-
ness session, a social hour was
enjoyed during which the hostess
served delectable refreshments.

MIDNIGHT CHICKEN
DINNER IS ENJOYED
A midnight chicken dinner was
enjoyed Monday night at the
home of Mr. and Mrs.' Paul Far-
mer at "Oak Grove" by a number
of their friends. A delicious dinner
of fried chicken, potato salad, hot
biscuits, cake and coffee was
served by the hostess at midnight.
Those enjoying this affair were
Mr. and Mrs. F. O. Allen, Mr. and
Mrs. Donald Totman, Miss Ruth
Sharit, Herbert Johnson and Ollie
Gunn, all of Apalachicola.

Enjoying a sightseeing tour and
picnic dinner at the cavern park
near Marianna last Sunday were'
Mr. and Mrs. T. V. Westbrook
and Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Smith of
Port St.j Joe, Mr. and Mrs. V. E.
Byrd of Dothan, Ala., Mr. and
Mrs. J. T. Byrd and Mr. and Mrs.
We. S. Davis and son ernard of
Bonifay.


GLEE CLUB RECITAL
TUESDAY EVENING
The high school glee club ren-
dered their first program Tuesday
evening in the school auditorium
before an appreciative audience
which was astonished to learn
that Port St. Joe had so much tal-
ent in the schools.
Following is the delightful pro-
gram rendered:
"Viking Song" ........... Chorus
Mixed Voices
"Benedictus" ............ Chorus
Mixed Voices
Vocal Solo ............. Selected
Miss Adelaide Hardy
Reading ................ Selected
Miss Betty Jo Lane
Shubert's Serenade ...... Chorus
Girls of Glee Club
"Spring Greeting" ....... Chorus
Mixed Voices
"Shortnin' Bread" ........ Chorus
Boys of Glee Club
"Jeanie with Light Brown Hair"
...................... Chorus
Girls of Glee Club
Pian6logue ............. Selected
Miss Betty Jo Lane
"My Wild Irish Rose" ... Chorus
Mixed Voices
"The Night Will Never 'Stay".;
.......... ................ Trio
Miss Adelaide Hardy, Miss Vilura
Straus, Miss Virginia Stoutamire
Medley from the South ... Chorus
Mixed Voices
"My Wld Irish Rose'" will be
used as the contest number for
the music festival at DeFuniak
Springs, and "The Night Will
Never Stay" will be used for the
trio contest number.
Mrs. Erie Hickey. director of
the glee club. acted as accompan-
ist for all numbers. Mrs. Hickey
has worked entirety without sal-
ary in developing the voices of
these students and it is hoped by
residents of the city that some ar-
rangement will be made for com-
pensation, as. the glee club is a
splendid addition to the civic life
of Port St. Joe.

MR. AND MRS. B. H. GRAVES
HONOREES AT PARTY
Mrs. W. S. Smith surprised Mr.
and Mrs. B. H. Graves with an an-
niversary party Wednesday eve-
ning at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
P. D. Farmer in "Oak Grove."
Upon arrival of the honorees,
many -beautiful and useful gifts
were showered on them, following
which card games were enjoyed
until a late hour and refresh-
ments served.
Those enjoying this affair with
Mr. and Mrs. Graves and Mrs.
Smith were Mr. ana Mrs. Monte
Larkin, Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Christ-
mas, Mr. and Mrs. T. V. West-
brook, Mr. and Mrs. D. C. Smith,
Mr. and Mrs. J. Hauser, Mr. and
Mrs. P. D. Farmer and Mrs. W. M.
Howell.
*'* r
Dr. and Mrs. A. W. Jones and
Mrs. Sarah Johnson attended the
funeral services Tuesday in Apa-
lachicola for Mrs. G. A. Arline.

Miss Eileen Arnold, sixth grade
teacher in the local school, spent
Sunday at her home in Quincy.

Mrs. Huel Crockett spent last
Friday In Apalachicola, the guest
of Rev. and Mrs. Glion Benson.


discour-
That is
us give


SCIENTIFIC DRY
CLEANING
especially those woolens you
are planning to store away
for the summer months.
We furnish MOTH-PROOF
BAGS for your clothing in
addition to our clfiiing-a
combination that insures you
against damage by moths.

PROTECT YOUR CLOTHES
FROM MOTHS!




Creech Brothers
TAILORS and CLEANERS
-We Call for and Deliver-

PHONE 102 Monument Ave.


MADAM GORDON
PALMIST. CRYSTAL AND PSYCHIC READER
ce~ She Tells Everything You Wish To Know 3
Without having seen or heard of you before, will
tell you of your private affairs, giving you dates,
facts and figures that will amaze and benefit you.
Strange, true'and fascinating are the words that
flow from the lips of this gifted and unrivaled
Palmist. Not only will she read your life like an
open book, but also help you out of your troubles.
reunite the separated, settle lovers' quarrels, en-
able you to win the esteem, love and affection
of any certain one, restore lost affection, bring
sunshine and happiness to discordant families.
give reliable information and advice on all prob-
lems of life such as love. courtship, marriage.
changes, travel. business, stock and investments.
Permanently Located at
PANAMA CITY, ON ROUTE 98, AT RESTFUL INN
V4 Mile South of Hugh Sills Variety Store
----------------


EPISCOPAL AUXILIARY
MEETS AT CHURCH
The regular meeting of the
Episcopal Auxiliary of the Saint
James Mission was held at the
church Tuesday afternoon with
Rev. Glion Bension of Apalachi-
cola in charge. The regular Bible
study was conducted, after which
a discussion of the organization of
a church. school was held, follow-
ing which the meeting was dis-
missed.

,Miss Amelia Scnneider returned/
Sunday to Tallahassee to resume
her studies at college after spend-
ing the holidays with her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. T. M. Shneider.



CLASSIFIED ADS

FOR RENT -;

FOR RENT Four-room house,
with bath. In 'Oak Grove." See
Karl Knodel, Port St. Joe. 1*

FOR RENT-New houses at Bea-
con Hill. Front lot facing Gulf.
Furnished, running water, sani-
tary convenieIces, electricity.
Apply T. W. Wilson, or Box
495, Port St. Joe. 3-3tf

UNFURNISHED 9 by 18-foot cab-
ins; ceiled overhead and sides;
good water; $6 month. Apply St.
Joe Lumber Co. 12121tt
ROOMS FOR RENT

IF YOU have a room for rent,
why not place a classified adver-
tisement in The Star. The cost is
low and returns are gratifying. .
Try it today. tf
MISCELLANEOUS

$25.00 REWARD
For information leading to the
arrest and conviction of one or
more persons violating any of
the Game Laws.
J. K. PRIDGEON
Conservation Officer


EVERYBODY


KNOWS---

That CLEAN clothes.
qge moths.
why you should let
your clothes our


PAGE TWO


THE STAR, PORT. ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


. FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 1934







RD API 14. TH S P TL


PAGE THREE


Don Bernardo de Galve, Span- Problem have closed their eyes -to the fact NEW ROAD WORK IN
ish governor of Louisiana from Legislature Is Faci g Pro e that-as has been slown in pre- NATIONAL FOREST
1777 to 1785, entered upon his ,- vious articles-the tax burdens of; Congressman Millard Caldwell
high duties at the age of 21. f Solin g Fincial D ilem m a the state have rJeen increased of Florida has been advised of
oa ll m enormously by old age pensions the approval of $38,425 for the
Sand other human factors. Wilma road in the Apalachicola
DR JC C OE Passed On By previous Bod s Many thousands of Florida citi. National Forest. This fund is a
S J a zens have adopted the inconsist- part of the forest highway appor-
D E N T I S T ent attitude that new mone3 tionment of the United States De-
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5 By Florida Research Bureau Imented state and local revenues, should be provided for their pet apartment of Agriculture.
Sunday By Appointment The 1935 legislature did enact a appropriations, but there .should K-
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe There are no tax panaceas. liquor law, and the 1937 legisla- be no new taxes levied on them- Postal regulations permit a
Florida cannot solve its taxa- ture boosted the liquor tax to the selves, mailman to walk right by a house
tion problems by creating a "state highest in the country, but this Certain selfish interests prob- without delivering letters if the
SE AMBIin tax commission" or some other was turned over to a new social ably would, oppose such a program walk isn't cleared of snow.
EYES EXA I D body with a high-sounding title. welfare board for paying old age because it could result in some of
In formulating a sound tax struc- pensions, their tax evasions being dis-
ture these things must be con- Thus the 1939 legislature faces covered and removed. It's Time TO
sidered: the problem of solving a financial In conclusion, most of those
A tax commission is an admin- dilemma passed on to us from who discussed the problem believe D I N E
Glasses fitted wen needed istrative body. It does not make the boom period, that if selfish and hypocritical in-
Made In Our Own Laboratory laws it enforces them. A tax Logical Steps Cited terests prevail, Florida will enter Where the food is of the
All Work Unconditionally commission which does not have; The subjects covered in these another period when the unbal- best.. .where the service
Guaranteed a carefully studied program, and articles have been discussed with anced fax structure will be a
Adequate authority, can be of hundreds of persons and it is stumbling block in the path of is prompt and efficient
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 6 p. m. little value. Before such a body found that few are familiar with growth and progress, and new and where you get
DR. G. T. NEWBERRY can function efficiently the state conditions. The consensus of opin- citizens and new capital will be
OPTOMETRIST must first determine its policy ion of laymen, civic leaders and discouraged Irom developing the HOME COOKED
OPAMA ET FISTLA and write it into statutes. public officials who have given many resources with which cli MEALS
Determination of policy is a the problem thought is considered mate and geography have en-
purely legislative duty. Too great into four sound and sane steps for owed this state.--1939. --
.. ..... ... stress cannot be laid on this fact. businesslike operation of the G L
Unless there is a policy formed by state: When the New York World's T R IA N G L E
F IsHI l -"" the legislislature, no tax commis- 1. Adequate funds for the Fair ground becomes a prma- RESTAURANT
sion can be of great value, next two years. nent park, four buildings will be BEER and WINES -
Spend the week-end in Responsibility With Legislature 2. An unbiased tax survey to kept as a sport arena, auditorium,
West Florida's best fish- While this responsibility prop- be presented the 1941 legisla- field house and boat house.
ing grounds, earlyy rests on the legislature, it is ture. -
not easy for the legislators to de- Ana,,,m,,,r,,..b....ody to. .-- -.
--- termine what to do, and how to Ie created in 1941 to carry out A 'W. .
do it, when voters and taxpayers be created in 1941 t carry out
bombard them with thousands of these laws.
wires and letters, urging them to 4. A method whereby the CAL US FO LIGHT AND EAVY HAULNG
BOATS With or with- vote for larger appropriations and people can check the expendi-
out guide-at reasonable lower taxes. A man does not be- tures of the state. WE HAVE GOOD CLEAN BUILDING SAND FOR SALE
rates. Hotel ac- come endowed with superhuman First, the legislature should
commodations within the power and wisdom when he is provide the funds needed for the Prompt and Efficient Service Always
means of everyone, elected to the legislature. He is a fiscal years 1939-41. That amount
citizen who was elected because must be determined by the legis- W T ~
4 of ability, personal popularity, im- lature after considering all fac- 11
SEE- portant local issues or other fac- tors involved. If these funds are PHONE 70 PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
tors. He may be a successful not provided, the 1941 legislature 7
UJ v ; -' M IH business or professional man or will face an even more desperate .--.". ..---"---"-'" ----- --.--
*. 0, im SMITi farmer, but neither qualify him as situation.
a tax authority capable of solving The 1939 legislature should pro-.T I TAT
SUMATRA, FLA. Florida's problems in 60 days. vide for- a thorough. impartial U iA l S
It might be am.aumed that. be- study of the state's tax structure Sa
cause he is a man of good judg- by an unbiased, competent com- GASOLNE
ERASE the DOUBT nent he will be able, with the aid mittee or group, instructed to "More Miles to the Gallon"
About Your of the information placed before place before the 1941 legislature "Me M s to te
FRESH WATER FISHING him, to determine the correct actual facts bearing on future tax Oil 15c to 35c Qt.
MIDT WA PA policy. This assumption, too, is demands and revenue sources. The
MPAwrong. 1941 legislature must be furnished Good Oil 2gal. 85c
Is In the HEART of the If Mr. Voter was elected to sit accurate information on which to Kel ri n ie re
Dead Lakes Fishing Area cn the board of directors of a determine a sound tax policy. Exide Batteres Batterie Recharged
Gul County's north linecuts "busted" corporation, and at the After the policy has been de- Kelly-Springfield Tires
the Dead Lakes at the first meeting was called upon to termined, and the tax structure
waistline determine a policy from conflict- created in 1941, there should be
Meet Your Friends At ing figures furnished him by fel- created by the 1941 legislature an UNNY STATE SERVICE STAT
M I D W A Y P A R K low directors and others, what administrative body charged with COLLINS, Prop. PORT ST. JOE, FLA
when the season opens June 1. would he do? the duty of carrying out these
-Meantime --- That is what happens to mem- plans. This body can be called a
'FURNISHED CABINS bers of the Florida legislature. state tax commission. This com- AfhAgOeirA
On the Waterfront Because there is no provision in mission will have only such power
J. H. SHOEMAKER and law for furnishing accurate policy- as definitely vested in it by the -MY MEAD-AC4( E'5 MoST BE youR O o
J. P. BRANTON, Proprietors making information to legislators, legislature. GONE! NMY ALKA-5ELTZER ao
WEWAHITCHKA FLORIDA they are bombarded with propa- The three branches comprising MEAD IS CLEAR. DEAR 0
ganda. Legislators are told that our government are represented
------------ the state needs more revenue- in this plan: o o
Sand again that it doesn't. Some The tax survey would be the o
:PU RITY' IS. say a sales tax would yield. $40,- basis for a determination of pol- o ,
S000,000 a year-others say $5,000,- icy. That's the legislative phase.
A SSU RED 000" One group contends the ad The tax commission would
A Uvalorem system is vanishing-an- carry out this policy. That's
Other says it just needs an over- the executive phase.
haul job to be as good as new. The judicial pnase is also .
S. Many contend another $10,000,000 present. The courts are the last
Sa year will be needed for old age resort in questions of law, but
r i) pensions-others say there is no the people themselves should
need for an extra dime. have the final decision as to the
SThe financial condition of the expenditure of tnelr tax money. .
state today presents no factors It is obviously impractical to
which did not exist ten years ago, have a referendum on each item
other than the new expense of of expenditure, hence the nextThere is a modem pleasant way to get relief
Headache, Gas on Stomach. Colds, Heart-
caring for pensioners and added best step is to have a genuine ban, "-Morning After" and Muscular Pains.
state responsibility for schools. state budget board composed of Jst drop one or two ALKA-SELdTZER tablets in-
For Each and Every Bottle Expenditures Mount Steadily citizens in all walks of life, to a glass of water. Watch it bubble-listen to it flzz
of Milk or Cream We Deliver Expenditures of the state have from various sections of the As soon as tablet is dissolved, drink the tangy solution
sl Protected With a mounted steadily, with little new state.
SANITARY PARCHMENT revenue provided. New taxes on Weakness in this is pointed out
Liquor, estates, intangibles, utili- by some of those interviewed.
COVER ties, documents, chain stores and Some contend that the 1939
Use Only racing have been enacted in the legislature should "do nothing" (Analge AMkalling Eervescent Tablets)
last decade, but. most of this was except provide for a tax survey, wi really oy the taste-more like spring
You wil really enjoy the tasted-more like spri
S TO L ^-o' bV/N' S paid out to counties or some other a step which would place the 1941 water than like medicine.
.specific new purpose. legislature mn a desperate posi- ALKA-SELTZER, when dissolved in water, con-
P steurized Each successive legislature has tion. tans an analgesic, (Sodium Acetyl-Salicylate), which
a C u z passed the big financing problem Many legislators promised to ret liever panyday whilments alkaociated with help toeracdit
on to the next one. The 1931 legis- provide "adequate" pensions, reve- Your druggist has ALKA-SELTZER. Get a a0e \
LM ILK lature helped the counties finan- nue for schools and highways, city 6a kage on our "satisfaction-or-money-back
cially, but halted the highway and county governments, and at
Pasteurizd r" Yore building program. The 1933 legls- the same time promised to op- A..
Protection lature evaded the issue, but fed- posed "new" taxation.
- --_ :.a1 tand s pouring in suppl'e- .: --2: ...... h -.duals


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 1939.








PAGE F THE STAR, P S L


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla.,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act Dof March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year....... .$2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months...........65c

-.f Telephone 51 ).-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.


A SLAB-SIDED OCTOPUS
In the old days, and recently, too, it has
been the custom to refer to any trust, com-
pany or combination that was detrimental to
the health, welfare or pocketbook of the
American people, as an octopus.
I now nominate another candidate for the
octopus order, an octopus that is hollow and
constructed of miles and miles of painted
slabs of slashing colors. This eye-shock is of
such huge dimensions that thousands and
thousands of automobiles can and do drive
through the long tunnels of its arms every
day in the year.
In case the reader cannot follow my
whimsy, 1 now baldly state that I am refer-
ring to our billboard plague.
There has grown up in our formerly fair
land in recent years a custom of trying to
il l dnrri/t t4 th +t tt hs rl ht vel b smack-i r nr'-


GET THOSE FEET OUT OF HIS FACE


JEFFERSON, THE MAN ing them in the eye with brilliant-colored re-
Each year on April 13, the anniversary of minders placed by the roadside in every pos-
his birth, the virtues, patriotism and states- sible and impossible location. I do not have
manship of Thomas Jefferson are recalled at to specify the products advertised by these
gatherings of his countrymen, especially of eyesores, as they are all too familiar to the
Democrats, who claim him as the founder of public.
their party, although it 'was known as the If the billboards only destroyed the beauty
Republican party in the beginning. and harmony of the countryside they would
Jefferson's public services are generally be evil enough, but they do more than this-
well known, but a few facts concerning his they constitute an actual menace to the life
personality and private life may be of inter- and limb of the traveling public. They serve
est to readers of The Star. as lurking places, for footpads, they screen
He was born April 13, 1743, the son of- an crossings, they divert the. attention of drivers
obscure and uneducated Virginia planter who, so that crashes occur that often result fatally
however, left Thomas a considerable estate, and they detract from the tone of a neigh-
By his marriage in 1772 to Mrs. Martha Skel- b6r hood so that land values suffer.
ton, a rich and handsome widow of 23, he be- It is my firm belief that there is no evil.
came one ofl the wealthiest citizens of Vir- without a remedy, and I hereby offer two
ginia. remedies for the aforesaid evil:
At the time of Jefferson's admission to the (1) Tax heavily any sign or billboard that
bar in 1767, he was described as -being "6 cuts off the view of any pleasing scenery, or
feet 2 inches in height, slim, erect as an ar- that might menace traffic or be objection-
TOW, with angular features, a very ruddy able for any like cause.
,complexion, an extremely delicate skin, full My second remedy could be applied by the
deep-set hazel eyes and sandy hair; an ex- billboard people themselves. (2) The billboard
pert musician, the violin being his favorite people could tear down any billboard that
instrument, a good dancer, a. dashing rider, obstructed a beautiful, vista and-replace it
and proficient in all manly exercises; frank, with a small sign that would remind the pub-
earnest, cordial and sympathetic in manner." lic that the view was preserved for their en-
During eight years in the active practice joyment by the person whose product they
of law he acquired an extremely large clien-'are advertising. It would be money in their
tele, it being recorded that in a single year pockets to do this, as they would save' up-
he was employed in 430 cases. Yet, in spite keep on the billboard and a grateful public
,of the remarkable facility of his pen, he was would probably buy more of the advertiser's
-no orator, and almost never attempted to product. Then, too, it would be a new and
make a speech., harmless sort of advertising. I hereby pre-
One instance is related in which even his sent the idea to the industry for what it is
-pen failed him, when an address he was com- worth.-James W. North, in The Florida
missioned to write to the new governor of Justice.
.Virginia by the House of Burgesses was re- A more effective method of removing the
ejected and another member was given the billboards from the highways, and one which
task. But he overcame this humiliation and has operated successfully a number of times,
later wrote the Declaration of Independence. is the organization of "Housewives Leagues"
lOnce when a friend asked how he could whose members swear not to purchase any
Teconcile the phrase in the Declaration that articles advertised on billboards. This system
"all men are created equal" with the fact that has brought results, as manufacturers have
lie, Jefferson, was a slaveholder, the author refused to place advertising on billboards in
of the document is said to have replied: "By neighborhoods where such leagues have been
God, I didn't think of that." Later he se- organized.
cured the passage of a law forbidding fur- ..-
ther importations of slaves into Virginia. If you haven't planted flowers yet, now is
By a strange coincidence, Thomas Jeffer- the time to do it-and keep planting 'em the
son and his predecessor in the presidency, year 'round to help beautify our city. Every
John Adams, both died on July 4, 1826, the home in Port St. Joe could be a veritable
50th anniversary of American independence, bower of blooms with little effort, as our
climate here is ideal for the ;growing of al-
With the great improvement in their play- most any variety of flower or shrub.


ing and the high morale given them by their
spiffy new uniforms, the Port St. Joe high
school band should bring back high honors
from the music festival at DeFuniak Springs
this week-end.

Due to appointment of pre-session com-
mittees by Speaker G. Pierce Wood, the house
at this session of the legislature is getting
the jump on the senate in passage of bills.

A New York charity budget council thinks
a brood of five can live on $13 a week-not
on and on; just on.-Atlanta Constitution.

An intolerant person is one who keeps'
right on with the argument after you realize
that you have lost it.-Macon Telegraph.


The Easter parade is over and now the
parade of bill collectors starts following
father about to collect for all that splendifer-
ous Easter finery that ma and the kids were
decked out in Sunday.

A volunteer fireman at Painesville, Ohio,
started five fires just so he could put them
out. You can't criticize burning ambition like
that.-Columbus Ledger.

Chicago man and wife hoped for a daugh-
ter and got three. Why didn't they hope for
twins and put us ahead of Canada?-Cincin-
nati Enquirer.

Trade with your home-town merchants.


CHRONICLES
CHIATER V

(From DeFuntak Springs Herald)
(Being a statement of some of. the.
things that occurred during the
reign of good King FDR.)
1. And after all these things
had come to pass, the king and
the high priest and the scribes and
the chief eunuchs communed with
themselves, saying:
2. Behold, there is too dog-
goned much money in the country.
3. Go to, now; we will gather
up all the gold of the realm and
deposit it under the hand of Phar-
aoh against the day of something
or other, and if any man asketh
us a reason why we do this thing,
we will invite him to go to the
devil.
4. And it was so.
5. And the chariots and the
horsemen, and the publicans, and
the mighty men of valor went
abroad in the land and gathered
up the gold, for the decree of the
king was urgent.
6. And they gathered up all the
gold of the realm, even about fif-
teen billion of shekels.
7. And they- sought a safe
place to hide the treasure, where
realtors, cattle rustlers and other
thieves could not break through
and steal it.
8. And it was their hap to
light upon a certain hill country
in a place midway between Dan
and Beersheba which hath its
name in the Indian tongue as
"'Dark and. Bloody Ground," but
hath the name "Kentucky" in the
English dialect.
9. And many hundreds of WPA
and PWA and BVD and PDQ
workers were summoned to this
place.
10. And all these Taborers
wrought many days, leaning
mightily on their shovel handles,
digging a hole beside which the
cave of Machpelah would look like
the' impression of a raindrop in
the sand. And they digged, and
they digged, and they digged. And
behold, after many days the work
was completed.
11. And thither was brought
all of. the gold-as well the hoard
of the millionaire as the $2.50
gold piece which was given to
lIttle Johnnie on his tenth birth-
.lay.
12. And it came to pass that so
much gol was brought in that it
made tre splendor of Solomon's
temple look like a hobo's under-
shirt or a dime's worth of dog
scraps.
13. And the cave was sealed
up. And there the gold remains to
this day; for what earthly reason
no man knoweth, unless it be the
banker or some other man who


They Advertise!

A hen is not supposed to have
Much common sense or tact.
Yet every time she lays an egg
She cackles forth the fact.
A rooster hasn't got a lot
Of. intellect to show.
But none the less most roosters-
have
Enough good sense to crow.
The busy little bees they buzz,
Burfs bellow and cows moo.
The watch-dog barks, the gander
quacks
And doves and pigeons coo.
The peacock spreads his tail and
squawks.
Pigs squeal and robins sing.
And even serpents know enough
To- hiss before they sting.
But man, the greatest masterpiece
That nature could devise,
Will often stop and hesitate
Before he'll advertise.
---'-
WILT DISEASE MAY KILL
ALL NATIVE PERSIMMONS
Persimmon wilt is spreading
over the Southeastern states with
a rapidity that U. S. Department
of Agriculture workers term "ex-
plosive." This fungus disease, dis-
covered and identified only two
years ago, kills with great rapid-
ity a native American tree that
has high value. Fruit of the per-
simmon tree furnishes winter food
for wildlife. Golf club heads and
shuttle blocks for use In woo-len
mills are made from its wood.
The soil conservation service
rates it highly in controlling soil
erosion, because of its versatility
as to soil and moisture conditions.
It seems to grow well on both
dry and wet, rich and poor soils.
A year ago the federal bureau
of plant industry believed serious
infection was limited to an area
southeast of Nashville, Tenn., but
since then they have found such
infection in western and northern
Florida and in parts of Mississippi
and Alabam, with the most rapid
spread in 1938 in Georgia and
South Carolina. As far as is now
known, no cases have yet been re-
ported in Gulf county.
The symptoms-wilting and dis-
coloration of the leaves and
brownish-black streaks in the
wood-are similar to those of the
Dutch elm disease. Federal path-
ologists hope that one or more
resistant American persimmon
trees may be discovered and
propagated.

Send The Star to a friend.

occasionally seeth as much as
twenty-five dollars in cash.
Selah.


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


,FqIDA.Y, 6FF!r 14, 1939


PAGE FOUR








FRDY PI 4,13 H TRPR T O, UFCUTFLRD AEFV


I. THE TATTLER

SEES ALL- THE STAFF &w
SKNOWEditor-in-Chief .........Dick Stepp
KNOWS ALL- Assistant Editor....Bobby Coburn
E TELLS ALL-- Sports Editor........Al Schneider
Society Editors............ Opal
ABOUT HAPPENINGS Greene and Dorothy Crockett
SIN PORT ST. JOE HIGH Joke Editor.........Paul Johnson


Annual Banquet BAND ANEF GLEE CLUBPRNGS Operetta Is To Be

Held at Port Inn This morning the and anda glee Presented Tonight
club of Port St. Joe high school
left for DeFuniak Springs to par-
Junior Class Entertains Seniors ticipate in the West Florida Mu- Elementary Students Will Stage
Monday Evening With Love sic Festival which is held every "On Midsummer Night" At
Feast and Dance year. School Auditorium
S--Both organizations left with the
SThe dining room of the Port avowed intention of bringing back The grammar grades of the
Inn was the scene Monday night awards, and have an excellent Port St. Joe school will present
of the junior-senior banquet. The chance of doing it. an operetta, "On Midsummer
U-shaped table was beautifully They will stay in DeFuniak to- Night," in the auditorium of the
decorated with, the class colors of day and tomorrow, returning to budi tonight
blue and silver with attractive this city ,:Sunday. new school building tonight at 8
place cards ofor each and. lovely The school and the city is back Th students have been prtic
flowers for those present. A:'de- .of them 100 per cent and we hope ing on this play for more than a
vicious dinner was. served. during they. will bring. back honors, as onthi p ormo than
which tiiie the"following' prograili they, did last year. entertainment well worth going
:. ., : ... II- '. 1 *_ entertainment well Worth going
wa~s. presented:; '' : I to 'see.
Welcome .by :junior .class presi- : WE THANK YOU Everyone is urged to attend
dent, Edward Hufft, with: response ".We *ish t0':thank all those who Price. of admission is ten and
by Howard Taunton, senior presi- purchased tickets or attended the twenty-five cents.
dent. Jamboree last Friday night' which ____ _
.Song by the juniors. ehabled.'us to give the customary HISTORY OF "T D.
Toast tb- the faculty by Virginia dinner and' dance for the' seniors .HISTORY OF T.
'ttoutamlre. Response by Prof.'D. We hope that the junior class fol- Born-Port St. Joe Fla
B: MccPherson. lowing us will have as much sue- Date-August 3, 1922.
"Prophetic Seeds," by seniors. cess as we believe we had. Favorite Color-Red.
Talk by Chauncy Costin, county The Junior Class. Antipathy-Daylight
superintendent of schools. ---- ---- Antipathy-Daylight
Song by all present. We wonder if it was so when Hobby-Tending to babies.
Immediately following the ban- Ed said. he had been with bru- '
quet the junior-senior prom was nettles, blondes and red-heads, but It seems that Winston Jones
held in the lobby of the inn, which that he had never been with a still likes brunettes. He -has M. S.
was also decorated with garlands brown-haired girl? What's the on the string now. All you girls
of blue and silver crepe paper and matter with you, Ed? There are without a beau better look out, as
balloons of the same colors. About plenty of pretty brown-heads in it seems that blue eyes and
75 enjoyed this delightful affair. school. blonde hair are irresistible.


EDWINA HOWELL HOSTESS
TO LOTTIE MOON GIRLS
The Lottie Moon Junior Girls
Auxiliary of the Baptist church
was entertained this week by Ed
wina Howell. Topic for the meet
ing was "Missionary Flashes front
Latin America.' The meeting war
called to "'*~o by Hazel Cason
pr' irman. and opene<
witll song and prayer. The devo
tional was given by Carolyn
Trammell, "One Way of Salva
tion." "Radio Flashes from Latii
America" were given by the In
termediate girls through a radio
set, announcements were also
made in this manner. The story
"Half a Pig." was given by Mrs
E. C. Cason, councillor. The
meeting was dismissed by Mrs
Kate Harrell. The young hostess
served cookies, sandwiches and
iced drinks to 17 present.

Mrs. W. F. Randolph and Mrs
F. Richardson of Apalachicola
were visiting in this city Wednes
day.

Mr. and Mrs. Y. L. Sharit and
son, Joe, Jr., and Bobby Bellows
arrived from Tallahassee last Fri
day to spend the week-end here.

Mr. and Mrs. L. vonWeller and
Mrs. Elvie Brooks of Tallahassee
were the week-end guests of Mr,
and Mrs. Huel Crockett.

Mrs. Lewis Perritt returned to
the city Saturday after spending
a week in Tallahassee.

Mrs. Oscar Roberts and chil-
dren attended the funeral of Mrs.
Georgia Arline in Apalachicola
Tuesday afternoon.
*t ,r f


METHODIST MISSIONARY
SOCIETY MEETS
SThe Methodist Missionary so-
b city held a joint meeting Monday
- afternoon at the church. The ses-
. sion was opened with song after
Which Mrs. J. C. Bradbury read
s the scripture, taken from Amos.
Mrs. -George Patton presided
d and gave a splendid talk on "Con-
- secration and 'Guidance." Mrs. W.
n E. Boyd gave an interesting talk
g. on "What are the Basic Human
n Needs." Mrs. S. C. Parker then led
- in prayer, after which Mrs. Pat-
o ton read a poem, "Easter Time."
o Mrs. R. A. Swatts was in charge
.of the second part of the program
which was opened with discussion
e of tire introduction to a detailed
Bible study. Mrs. M. L. Fuller
s gave "Israel's History. Briefly
d Sketched." a song was sung and
the meeting concluded with prayer
by Mrs. Patton.

S Mr. and Mrs. Oros Miller of
SBlountstown were guests Sunday
- of Mr. and Mrs. J..F. Miller and
Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Dendy.

S Mr. and Mrs. Dan Robbins of
i Jacksonville and Mrs. J. 'D. Mc-
- Kitheryn of Panama City were
guests last Thursday of Mrs. T.
V. Westbrook and Mrs. W. M.
S.Howell of this city.

S Mr. and Mrs. Paul Farmer and
daughter spent Saturday evening
and Sunday in Apalachicola visit-
ing friends and relatives.

Mr. and Mrs. F. O. Allen. Mr.
and Mrs. Donald Totman, Miss
Ruth Sharit, Herbert Johnson and
Ollie' Gnnn, all of Apalachicola,
were visitors Monday in Port St.
Joe.
ff te of


Mrs. Eff ie White of Wewa-
W. J. Anderson of Chicago, who hitchka and Mrs. Roy Gibson of
has been 'wintering in Miami, vis- this city left Monday for Tampa
cited in Port St. Joe one day last tend the Grand Chapter of
week with J. L. Kerr. to attend the Grand Chapter of
week with J. L. Kerr th Order of Eastern Star.

Mrs. Fred Maddox and Miss Mercer Spear of Apalachicola
iyrtice .Coody spent Monday in was in this city Wednesday on
\farianna. business.


'Mrs. J. J. Perritt of Panama
City was the guest Wednesday of
her son, Jim Perritt.

Troy Beaty and Wallace Wor-
sham of Camilla, Ga., were guests
Sunday of Billy Coody.


STAR HAS NEW P. O. BOX


Along with
Port St. Joe -
the postoffice,
new postoffice


everybody else
who has a .box
The Star has
box number.


stead of the "484" which we have
used ever since the first issue,
our "number" is now "EE." The
editor done some plain and fancy
cussing in learning the new com-
bination and at times was tempted
to blast or use a crowbar to get
into the durned thing, but now we
can casually twist the dial this
way and that and the lid pops
open like a jack-in-the-box.
------*-----
NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH
A policeman, whose evidence
was taken on commission, de-
posed: "The prisoner called me
an ass, a precious dolt, a scare-
crow, a ragamuffin and an idiot."
And, this being the conclusion of
his deposition, his signature was
preceded by the formal ending:
"All of which I swear is true."-
Montreal Star.

BUYS HODGES HOME
Miles Hurlbut last week pur-
chased, the newly-built home of R.
R. Hodges on Eighth street and
is now "at home" there.

W. H. Linton or -Wewahitchka
was a visitor .in the city Tuesday.

".fefty".. Wadsworth 'returned to
the. city Tuesday after spending
the Easter holidays in' Roanoke,
Ala., with his parents.
ftr f ..f
Gus and Kenneth Creech and
Miss' Julia O'Quinn spent Sunday
in Dothan visiting relatives.

Earl Rollins of Gordon. Ala.,
spent the week-end here as the
guest of his family.

Mrs. "Buck" Norton of Wewa-
hitchka was a visitor in the city
Wednesday;

Buck Spooner visited relatives
in Dothan, Ala., last Sunday.

C. G. Costin was a business visi-
tor Wednesday in Panama City.
--It pays to advertise-try It!
It pays to advertise-try it!


South Ameri-an countries are
exchanging with United States
government plant scientists some
of the ornamental trees and plants
of each country.


IF ANYBODY HAS-
Eloped
Married
Divorced
Had a Fire
Sold a Farm
Been Arrested
Been Your Guest
Started in Business
Left You a Fortune
Bought a New Home
Swiped Your Chickens
Met With An Accident
Had a Visit From the Stork
THAT'S NEWS

TELL THE EDITOR'.
Phone 51-The Star



FLOWERS AND

CORSAGES


WOOD FIBRE FLOWERS:
that cannot be told from the
best product of Mother Nature,
. And they keep indefi-
nitely. If they become droopy
you merely place them in the
refrigerator and in, a brief time
they are as good as new.

SEE

Mrs. W. S. Smith
STAR OFFICE PHONE 51


THOUSANDS OF WOMEN DISCOVeR



ELECTRIC "COOKING


cs 1 AS MUCH AS
cos 2 THEY THOUGHT *


Come in today and get ac-
quainted with the modern
electric way of fast, clean,
low-cost cooking. See the
brilliant, beautiful new 1939
Electric Ranges. Learn
how to save money and
save work in a kitchen that
all your friends will envy.
Ten minutes at our Range
Display will bring you up-
to-date on electric cooking
... .may give you more


FAST. Just flip the switch
. a new Electric Range
gives you COOKING heat
quick as a flash I


leisure and cooking pleas-
ure than you have ever
known ... as it has for so'
many other women.
Come in today. Find out
how LITTLE it REALLY
costs to cook electrically.
*Although millions know the
LOW COST of electric cook-
ing, a national survey shows
that GUESSES of those who'
DON'T KNOW average-
TWICE the ACTUAL
average cost.


CLEAM. Electric heat is LOW COST. Midget bills
flameless heat. It cannot mean real economy when
blacken pots, pans; kitchen you cook on a modern
walls or ceilings. Electric Range.


See the 1939 ELECTRIC RANGES at your DEALERS or


FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, APRIL 1i4, 1939


S" 'PAGE FIVE






I 1 s -,w.---~--~sA -


S FRIDAY
S A";^\ ^

SALE STARTS PROMPTLY AT 8:00 O'CLOCK
On Our Complete Stock of Modern and Up-to-Date
Furniture.. All Prices GREATLY REDUCED
In Order to Allow Residents of This Section to Be-
come Acquainted With Us and Our
Style, of Merchandising


LADIES!
WE WILL GIVE TO THE FIRST 50
LADIES WHO VISIT OUR STORE ON
OPENING MORNING A BEAUTIFUL
LIFE-TIME GIFT! BE PRESENT!
,wl


EVERYBODY INVITED TO SEE US!!
CHEERFUL GREDIT---NO MQgY WllNOt N 'ACCOUNTS

SBed Room Suit s
Sp p'sing ly moderate prices for.pieces
7 I of such ready. igh Qualit. '. A
choice of Maple or Walnut finish. Splen-
dd didfurniture, guaranteed tolee the
most discriminating taste.
SUITES PRICED FROM
$2995 to $79.95
.,, -----. EASY TERMS
S NOTHING DOWN!-


Living Room Suites
Suites that you will love, at prices you can afford .to pay! Something you
have always wanted and now offered for the first time in Port St. Joe at a price
within your means! Two big lhxurious pieces-sturdy frames, finest work-
manship and a range of colors from 'which to make your selection.


Two-Piece
1


Nesco Oil Ranges
and Stoves


Solid Car of


Red Mountain
Wood Ranges
AND COOK STOVES
FREE!!I
WITH EACH RANGE
9x12 FELT BASE
Congoleum, Rug


ST.


Suites $39.95 to $99.95


CHIFFOROBES
Plenty of them in Modern-
istice Lines Priced from
$16.95 up
NO MONEY DOWN
50c PER WEEK
OCCASIONAL
CHAIRS
Priced from
$5,95 to $9.95
OCCASIONAL TABLES
Priced from
$3.95 up


R UVGS
9x12,
$5.95 to$7.95
FELT. RUGS
$13.95 up


JOE


KITCHEN
CA, INETS





"ly
AS, LOW AS
$24.95
FREE!!
6x9 CONGOLEUM RUG
With Egch Cabinet.
END TABLES
$1.25
CAS H:


BED SPRINGS
We have a large assortment
for this Opening Sale at
Unusually Low Prices.
NO MONEY DOWN!
MATTRESSES
We Have 50-Pound All
Cotton Mattresses for
Only $5.95
Also Nice Assortment of
INNER SPRING
MATTRESSES
High Grade Beds
As Low As
$5.95
Made By Well-Known
Manufacturer
NO MONEY DOWN!


RADIOS
Westinghopse and Sentinel
ELECTRIC AND BATTERY SETS
The Leaders In Radio
Priced, from $14.95 up
See Our ENAMEL TOPKITCHEN TABLES at prices
W Well Within Your Means


FURNITURE


"YOUR HOME TOWN FURNITURE STORE"'


PORT ST. JOE


Phone 59


CO.

FLORIDA


p I II~II


: .~ ..............~..


PAGE SIX


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 1939


AL M IL