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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00125
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: March 10, 1939
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00125

Full Text





The Star-Florida's fastest grow-
Ing little newspaper-dedicated to
Sthe betterment and upbuilding of
-the City of Port St Joe.


THE


STAR


Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast.
est growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center

VOLUME II PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, MARCH 10, 1939 NUMBER 21


Lumber Company

Will Make First

Shipment Soon

.St. Joe Lumber & Export Com-
pany Expected To Be Finished
Within Next Thirty Days

/Basil E. Kenney, general man-
ager of the St. Joe Lumber and
Export company, told your 'roving9
Reporter that the company ex-
pects to make the first shipment
oft lumber of any consequence be-
tween March 12 and 5., nd that
'the final touches to the, wodikng
mechanic:; of the huge sa8 mill
*will be.. Qmpleted within thd next
30 days
: Mr, Kerney states' that at the
'present, time the mill -I getting
most of its -log from Gulf and
Liberty counties. In .about thrfit
years they .expect to brig in logs
by water, but: t present~ they're
going to ship and receive logs and
'lumber by truck. rail and boat.
There are 110 houses on the
property of the St. Joe Lumber &
Export company at the present
time, aid they are expecting to
build more. .
The company puts out approxi-
mately 7000 feet or lumber per
ho'r. Three hundred men are now
employed ,and later on they are
expecting to ,~epoymore. The
'mill will -soon be',oper!ting 44
hours a .week.'- ,
Mr. Kenney said .there bouldd
"bb a road paved to the mill for
thf benefit not only of the.St.'Soe
Lumber & -Export company, but
for Port St. Joe..

'New Postoffice

Will Open' Soon


Postmaster Drake Expects To.
Move. About April 1

Port St. Joe will soon have a
new and modern postoffice that
will .compare favorably with that
in 'many cities of much larger
size. Work on the, new building,
which is being built by the Ma-
sonic lodge, is nearing completion.
The concrete floor has been laid,
'-walls plastered and much of the
woodwork put in.
According to Postmaster H. A.
Drake, he expects to move into
the new quarters about April, 1.
We will all be glad when it' s
ready for occupancy, for a new
postoffice is something we have
been needing; because as rapidly
a growing city as Port St. Joe
needs a larger postoffice to care
for the increasing population.
In the new building Mr. Drake
.states that the present over-
crowded situation will be relieved
and that boxes will be available
for everyone.
----S ./
TEACHERS WILL LEAVE
TO ATTEND CONVENTION

The following teachers w ll1
leave next Wednesday afternoon
to attend the annual teachers'
convention to be held in Tampa:
D. G. McPherson, T. A. Owens,
Mr. and Mrs. S. C. Parker, Collis
Land, Mrs. Helen Allen, Mrs. W.
J. Ferrell, Mrs. Thomas McPhaul,
Mrs. P. A. Howell. Mrs. B. A.
Pridgeon, Mrs. E. C. Lewis and
the Misses Lillian Thompson, Er-
line McClellan, Eileen Arnold,
Louise Soloman, Avaryee Collier,
Juanita Gunn and Julia O'Quinn,
and Bandmaster Dan Farmer,


THE STAFF

The following members of the
junior class of Port St. Joe high
school made up the staff issuing
this edition of The Star:
DICK STEP
Editor-in-Chief
AL SCHNEIDER, EDWARD
HUFFT, OPAL GREENE
O T DORT+Y'CRKETT '
Advertirsng Solicitor
PAUL JOHNSON -'ad JOE
LILIENPELO
Reporters
DOROTHY TRAWICK -nd
M4ARTHA HIN0ON
Society Editore
BOSBY COGBURtN
Sports Editor


"PORT NEWS

1. 'J.9E I!I ENFELD
By JlE II,.ENFELD


Interview With

H. A. Kidd of St,

Joe Paper Mill

Concern Is. Greatly Interested In
Building Up 6f Port
St. Jo0

By JOE LILIENFELD
In an interview .Wednesday with
H. A. Kidd. superintendent of the
St. Joe Paper conipany mill, we
learned that th6e ill puts out,
about 350 tone of paper a day and
employs approximately 525 men.
At the present timae the huge
warehouse facing of the Gulf is
about half full of paper in rolls.
"Mr. Kidd.. when, asked. stated
thit there Isn't mudi truth In the
Statement that thh mill can be
converted Into a .,munitions fac-
tory on short notice, but he said,
that it wad quite possible to con-,
vert the mill into auch a factory,
should the need artse.
He said further that it is quite
possible Port -St. Joe will get6


The ol tanker L.L. Abshire of more matiufactiHng eetablish-
Port Arthur, Texasj docked Wed- ments, as d. hae- one of the fin.
nesday at the, dock of the St. Joe est harbors and one of the best
Paper company to discharge 48,. docks on the northwest coast of
OQ0 barrels of fuel oil for the mill. Florida.
This was the second largest ves- Mr. Kidd also said that the St.
sel to ,put in here; being 450 .tet- -Joe Paper company is greatly Inl
long. It carried a ore*.of.36, and terested in the buldling'up of Port
the pcatain- was :a forrrr resident St. ,Joe, and Is: doing everything
of Port St..Joe, The Abehire left possible to aid in developing the
here for Houston, Texas. city.
SThe,,Sq.S. Lacomo from New Or- -.
lean< docked Wednesday to take Music M rt t O e
on 500 tons or paper, sailing the O
same day' -fr Los Aigeles and In Panamaa Cit
San Franciscco. In a talk with the In
captain -he stated that our bay
would make an ideal air base. He In this issue of The Star ap-
said all we, needed in our harbor pears announcement of the open-
now to make it one of the finest ing on March 15 of Philips' Mu-
On the Gulf was lighted buoys. He sic Mart in Panama City. The
said we needed a first-class gas new concern will handle a com-
and whistle buoy. plete line of pianos, musical in-
This ship carried a crew of 37 struments and supplies. It will be
and had a top speed of 11 knots. operated by Fred: Philips, former-
The S. S. Jean of the Bull Line ly connected with the Panama
arrived Monday morning for a City News-Herald and well known
cargo of paper. She took 2500 tons in Port St. Joe.
and sailed Tuesday morning.
eretta, "Midsummer's. Dream." and
CAST SELECTED FOR rehearsing will begin at once.
SCHOOL OPERETTA The operetta will be presented
the first week in April, and the
The cast was selected. Wednes- proceeds will go to buy new equip.
day for the grammar school op- ment for the grammar school.

Final Results of the Questionnaire,

"What Is Wrong With Port St. Joe?"


The questionnaire published in
The Star of February 24 headed
"What Is Wrong With Port St.
Joe' brought forth replies from
63 individuals, and while all of
them did not give their opinions
on all of the 20 questions, the re-
,sults as finally tabulated give a
pretty fair idea as to what the
people think.
The questions with a general
outline of opinion are as follows:
1. How do you feel about Port
St. Joe as a place to trade?
All answered this question with
a general summarization that con-
sidering the size of the city the
stores should handle a more com-
plete line of goods.
2. What do you think about the
stores here in. general?
The consensus of opinion is that
prices in our grocery stores com-
pare favorable as to prices with
those of neighboring cities, that
the drygoods stores are somewhat
higher with their prices than
seems reasonable, the drug stores


are quite modern and up-to-date
and that the furniture and hard-
ware stores are good.
3. How could these stores be
improved?
Here again the matter of better
quality goods at more moderate
prices pops up in. regard to the
drygoods stores.
4. Which are the best stores in
your opinion, in Port St. Joe?
. This question was placed on the
questionnaire for the private in-
formation of The Star and was
not for publication, but the results
show that practically all stores of
the city have their friends.
5. What criticisms or com-
plaints have you o" Port St. Joe
stores?
Very few complaints were
voiced, a few stating that they
believed some clerks in some of
the stores could show a bit more
courtesy to customers'
6. What difficulties do you find
in trading in Port St. Joe?
(Continued on Page 6)


Incorporation Election



Held at Highland View


Academy Head In Ted Richard Ia Elected A
Mayor; Officers To Be

City Looking For Swor in aTonight
Winter Quaffa roe time past residents of
..'Winter are Highland View, lying west of Port
St. Joe, hqve been talking of in.
Col. Tillette of Shenandoah Mill- corporatiig their. 'little town and'
having it take its place. among the
tary Schotl .l Enthuslastio cities of the state of Florida, and
Over Port St. Joe Monday evening this dreaia was
-realized 'irhen a mass meeting of
Col. Boone D. Tilletts, superin- citizens was held in Wtllailnj
tendent ot the Shenandoah Valley skating rini, ni.dilatiniu nlade
Military Academy at -Winchester, and a corpii4te roster of city of-
.Va;. was in Port St. Joe *ednes- ficialselected.
day in regard to the establisheaent FiVe candidate wedre nominated
of a branch academy .iere for win- for mayor, being W. C. Forehand,
ter use of the school He had en- Fritz Chrslatansen, Ted Richards,
deavored to bring his adets here A. H. Matthews and Mr. Sikes,
this winter, asas s stated in The The balloting resulted. n. Fore.,
Star of January 6, but no 'suitable hand and Richards receiving the
building was. available, and they highest number of votes and in
are wintering at Lake Wales. the runoff Richards was elected'
Colonel Tilletts had heard much with 35 votes to 25 for Forehand,
of this section and decided to in- The names of 10" candidates for
vestigate In person. ,He became the five city commissioner posts
quite enthused over Port St. Joe were on the ballot and those se-
and its future prospects. He was elected were Mack Miller, A,'..
introduced -to a number of local -Soderberg ?aid E~ulls Anderson to
citizens and they promised to do serve t.,year terms, and W. C.
all they can/with a vyiw .to having Forehan'"and A. H. Mattlhews' t-
suit*ble ,bpildings and a paradie4 81 sqg 9 ear. OB the fftrt bal-
ground ready foi ibte-6.f r acad- lot, Miller, Soderbier,. -Forehand
emy by next winter. A study will ,nd Matthews were deletedd anld'
be made of available sites and on the second ballot for the'ffth
,one will be selected offering the seat Eulis Anderson won out over
best advantages. J. S. Bhirey by two votes.
------ For the city clerkship the race
Ta ersiHod L d mmered down to Paul Brigman
Tappers 'Hold Lead and' Fritz Christiansen and on the
final' ballot Brigman won out by
In Hom e Stretch a majority of two votes.
A considerable number of can-
didates' names appeared on the
Papermakers and Merchants Put ballot for the office of constable
On Exciting Contest and in the runoff Christiansen
-was elected with 29 votes to 27
By BOBBY COBURN votes for H. L. Bozeman. The of-
With the City Basketball League fice of constable is the only one
games nearing a conclusion Tap- with a salary connected with it,
games nearing a conclusion, Ta a
per's Oldtowners continue to hold all other city officials to serve
their lead with 10 games won and without pay.
none lost, which clinches their Robert Mathis, Panama City at-
hold on the title honors. torney, drew up and handled all
An exciting game was staged details of securing the new city's
Monday night when the Paper- charter and also acted as chair-
makers and Merchants tied by man at Monday night's organia-
quarters for the full game with tion meeting. Another meeting is
the score 19-all at the final period, to be held this evening, at which
An extra/three-minute period saw time the new officials will be
the Papermakers win out on a sworn in and assume their duties.
sensational shot by Bounds, who The area taken in by the city
accounted for 10 of the 21 points. f Highland View is described as
For the Merchants, Cawthorn put follows: "Commencing at a point
away 11 points. on the west side of government
In the second, game Tapper's lot 3 in Sec. 35, Twp. 7 S., Range
Oldtowners torpedoed the High 11 W, where the north shore of
School boys and sunk them 27-6. the new intra-coastal canal which
The High School also lost Wed- leads from St. Joseph's Bay to the
nesday night to .the Merchants by Apalachcicola-Panama City canal
a score of 28 to 15, which was the intersects the water's edge of St.
first win of the season for the Joseph's Bay as a point of begin-
bookkeepers and clerks. The high ning, and running thence in a
school lads were tired from a northwesterly direction, along the
So meanderings of said bay to where
hard fought game with th'e Paper- meanderings of said bay to where
makers which preceded the tilt. the west boundary of Sec. 26,,
In the first game the Highs won (Continued on Page 7)
from the Papermen by the score
of 23-20 in a game that was any- Mrs. M. B. Smith left Wednes.
body's up to the final whistle. day for her home in Dothan, Ala.,
Forehand was the outstanding after spending the past week in
point-maker for the high school Port St. Joe.
with five sensational field goals.
Al Schneider, always counted on owners is played off.
for points, dropped in three hard
ones, and Dick Stepp got his usual LEAGUE STANDING
three scores. Team- W L Pet.
The league season will close Oldtowners ......... 10 0 1.000
with next Monday night's games Papermakers ........ 7 4 .636
unless the postponed game be- High School ........ 3 8 .273
tween the Merchants and the Old- Merchants ... ....... 1 9 .10k


'r





L







RPAGE TWO -


T~HESTAR ~OT ST JOE GUF CONTY FLORIDAr F !DA. MAR:A- IA.) 1Q~


THE ,STAR
W. S. SMITH, Editor and Publisher
SIssued every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida,--:
from The Star Building
Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at.the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
undtr Act:of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One: Year ......$2.00 Six Months ....$1.25
Three.. Months ......65c

-q Telephone 51 j--

,The spoken word is .given scant attention;
the printed woi*d is thoughtfully weighed.
. Che spoken word barely asserts; the printed:
word thoroughly. con.vincs. The spoken Word
is lodi;. the printed. ord remains :


CONGRATULATIONS, STUDENT STAFF
'Th .hg itOb. f j:le ir t feels that the staff
s:.el.ted ,from Ahe; jpqiqr.lass'bf' theiPdtt"'St
'; -l.:i', igh *school- t' solicit advertise?' N r it
*the.'eTditbrials and"gather the n&ws~ 'r thi:
'"isue'bf Tlih Stii h'las' dord an excellht'~ot
,wlh'en' w'sfiqp to. consider that none of then
^.:S hbaAgmghexpprieqce ia thes'i'linds. '
..,All seeded to:'he,.enjoyaog fhle n.def'e.
'er flietile.L('t them) of getting .outi., ,e wspj-
*." p ,t d'ad tbi~ greatat d1at of integkcesjd,. th,
Sinehncal work' aHec r' *irtitS publita-
ti~n; .'pt ..iIy, flie students, Ot' Printipalr D.
..Q.:cheqrso. has ::asQ been getting .a"'kick"
ouut1-of'ithe iwoarkand heh~ as:beep just as en-
' thi'siastic'over the job 'as'the .youngs.ters:-:
W'. We extend sincere congaftiilatioristo i the
Members .of. the junior 'staff arid can', truly
.% -ay- that .:their.. work.: represents a job ell
.dotiei= .. R -
.. I **#,,

KNOW YOUR SCHOOL
T: he people of Port St. Joe should know
more about their school system, as the. city
s inade up of people who come' fiom all sec-
i~'a. of the country and are accustomed to
_many different systems of education.
') In the first, place, it is' important that the
:newcomers know that the Portt St.'Joe 'high-
-school IS'. ACREDED D BBY THE STATE
.DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION. '.This
means that graduates, of our high school are
accepted without entrance examination into
all the colleges and universities of the' state
arid rarely are they questioned by any college
or university in the country.
Port St. Joe high school offers courses in
science, English, social sciences, home eco-
nomics, commercial subjects, .; music and
mathematics. The Port St. Job-band is rated
as one of the best in the state, according to
size of the school and length of time it has
been organized.
All' teachers of the high school must have
specialized' in their particular work, and all
have at least four years of college work with
an A:B. or B.S.'degree.
The high school is doing well in inter-
scholastic athletics, having teams in football
and basketball 'for boys, and basketball for
the girls.
Our school has been handicapped because
the increase in population has been more
rapid than the increase in funds to take care
of the increasing school attendance. The
county school board is working now to find
some way to run the school for a full term
and will 'soon announce whether the school
term will have to be cut short. It is time
for everyone interested in the school to offer
suggestions as to what course to take at this
time.
What we need in- Port St. Joe is .a more
intelligent and a more co-operative desire to
make this one of the best high schools in the
state. We can do this if we forget'about the
schools in the towns we came from and all
work together to make this the ideal school
in which to be educated.

The world's armament bill will exceed 17
billions this year, and not a nation on earth
is prepared for war. Well, anyway, its co-
lossal.-St. Louis Post Dispatch. .
: : .,


THE 'NEED FOR A RECREATION CENTER
The'ydungerh oys and g' rs of high schli,:,
age -need,'some"place ere they may go
during their leisure hours. Having .a place to
go for gooQd.,cIap fuin plaes apy boy or girl
a better citizen.
Poit St.' JoI' has: an ideal location at 'the
Cehitennial build Ing for a recreration center,
and the-giot'nds could be turned into many
different types of courts. For example, we
could I'ave "a tennis court, a diamond ball
field afid' 'many .odters. Shuffleboard could
also be enjoy. .by, the elderly as ,well as
the young.
;There is a great need for this movement.
Everyone, both men' and women, 'young or
old, would profit by this.'We'.feel 'that if we
'~ai8a ;tiee'places to go that it. would not only
a.ffrd us,.: something to. o, but would also
iii~;ke fir city a very attractive place 'for
visitors. Every' ciy't h~s a' recreational center
which is very well patronize 'at all.times b
someone in the gityj ,as .wgl ,is visitors .
,. .WP4 is, balding Apalachicola a gy.m-
,n'pi .',which wer kbt~i willbe 'a -wontderful
,gift,to the ct ahd ''il :e greiy apprecr'-
.ated,by all.
y-.,,eyeryPony ;pte t:ly t wplId Ipe i[a
p jysP toi .e. stpdut. hav .g t .i Ppe,. we .l1
:that soon we. -should- have something ..of
Azhitel 'yiy ait wbiild be' proud. -'Port *St: .'Joe
lmreay_ offers man opportunitiess toilit' resi-'
d'ents, and thi could: take the highest"hondrs.
--Dorothy, Crookett:r : ,..

LET'S ALL ,:WORK TOGETHER.: 0.,
For the past fk.o. years the Port St. Joe -
high school has been, run by .the factlty and
nmeteibers of the P.-T. A. without any.outside 19
help.' The school' b6ard has'takeft care of the '
most essential things, such as books, 'school' dlo
buildings and heating, but with ihe support ra
:of the town citizens, we .-could have school.
sports such is football, basketball, baseball i,


and volleyball. Such sports are what the' sti-
den-ts want. After a hard day -at school the
boys and girls Jike recreation, so why
'couldn't the town citizens co-operate with
the school faculty and attend these games.
The school grounds could- be greatly im-
proved by planting a hedge that could be
trimmed for the,purpose of a; fence. 'Then
there could be flower beds in the school yard
and cement walks between buridings so the
grass would not be walked on.
Theie are two buildings in fairly good con-
dition, but improvements could be made on
them. The plain brick building could be stuc-
coed outside, and the interior, could be re-
plastered, the woodwork painted, floors could
be waxed, new desks could replace the old
ones, blackboards could be repainted, and all
the buildings could be painted the same color.
This would make the school plant very at-
tractive.
Even if we can't do all of this, let's do
what we can-and start now.
Let's all work together.

We object to the proposed cross-state Flor-
ida canal being referred to as a'ship canal, as
.uch designation implies it is to be built for
the use of ships, when a study of the map
and the figures of shipping companies prove
that referring to it as a ship canal is like
talking of the milky way-that is, it would
be a canal with ships about as plentiful as
milk in the milky way. If built, there is no
loubt but that some pleasure craft would use
'it for the novelty of the trip. But as a com-
mercial route-that is another story which is
so novel that it should have a cloth binding
and be in every fiction library.-Highlands
County News.

Post-dated New Year resolution: To do
more fishing in 1999.-Florida Times-Union.
Come on over to Gulf county, brother, and
do some real fishing!

Florida should impose no general retail-
sales tax until the constitutional inhibition on
an income tax has been removed.

-'Trade with your hore-town merchants.


po
ag
34
as
to
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de
be
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ap'
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gat
lay
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HE HAS SUCH TAKING WAYS


enson tFund Short o

CMeeting Requirement


Fy Florida Rese arh Bureau thaLt at present T not in sight.
The close of" the calendar year During. fhe last year the state
38 found recipients -of public weltare beard was allocatd the
sis-taice in Florida eceitig net even es: of the beverage de-
it stae ind Feri4a t pmtment,; receiving, s-anll some
int state, and federal aiai at *t e $; 000 'Wih the'iqo' tax i
te or ,approximately' $6,000,0 00 e i
nually, but this was some $3.FTlbrida :-already ,ighr than fWr
S. 1_. 4 p~rivate-llcense state in the
)6006 less than will be required l st
1939 'n then ibast -f ipredsen Union, it is apparent 'that the only
tential ne es and present aver additional financial relief that can
tential needsan present aver- be expected: omth
e grants. For in addition to the be cte from this source
,130 persons receiving old age would' -ome from increased con-
sistance, the 2,21'4 receiving aid gumption. Many students of goy-
the bln a 64 families ernmient assert that the present
the blind and, 564 families
,681 children) receiving aidt t high tax will cause sales of legal
pendent children during Decem. liquor in Fporida. to continue to
ftal off, rather than Increase.,-
r, there was then' on file 8,15 fal of rather than -
plications 'for aOd age" assist- : f.MiL Add .MBre Pensiona'
ce, 448 applications for aid to President Roosevett hao pro-
nd and 2,749 (7,039 children)' posed to congress that the huge
plications for aid to dependent sending, program, of the Town-
ildren. To meet this new obli, sendites be countered by payment
tion would require a yearly out- of a $50 monthly pension to the
r of $9,500,000, of which $5,400,- oldsters, of which.it may be as-
0 would be state funds. sumed the state would continue


May Expand Aid to Children
This isn't all. There is a pros-
pecct that the aid to dependent
children program,: which is yet in
its infancy and which has been
held back because of limited, al-


to pay at least half. Few legisla-
tors would dare vote against it.
In that event, $85,000,000 would
-be required for FI'rida pension-
ers, the state required to raise
;close to $20,000,000.


locations by the 1937 legislature, While this latter sum is ti,-
may be largely expanded. In that 000,000 more than the state has
event, a larger outlay would, be been able to raise so far for pen-
required. With au average grant sions, it still doesn't end the
of $15 a month for 40,000 needy story. The Confederate pension
aged, 2,500 needy blind and $10.50 funds are becoming exhausted,
for 23,700 dependent children- and the state will have to raise
and. these are conservative fig- that $750,000 annual sum in some
ures-the yearly cost would be manner. Whether the state mill-
$10,650,000, of which $5,825,000 age can again be raised from %
would' be state money. to 2%' mills as was done in 1935
It must be added that the is problematical, in view of the
sorely pressed s t a t e welfare determined efforts to abandon
board, in an effort to make its state village on real and personal
funds last, has kept the average property. :
grant down to less than .$15 per Where is this money to com-
month, when consensus of opin- from? That is what voters elected
ion is that It should be at least legislators to worry about. By a
$20, no princely sum. Should the two to one vote in 1936 legisla-
grant.be boosted to $20 for the tors were instructed to pay pen-
number .of, persons listed In the sions to old folks, but forgot-to
evi,,u nsDa.nnnh the neat ,,m tell where to get the money. The


of $14,700,000 would be required
annually, with the state, called
upon to provide $8,200,000. The
federal government. will match
state funds for old age assist-
ance and aid to the blind dollar
for dollar up to $30 a month; and
state funds for aid to dependent
children one dollar ror two, with
a limit of $18 a month for the
first child in each dependent fam-
ily and $12 for .each additional
child. For the state to secure the'
maximum available amount, it'
would be required to dig down
into its treasury for a dizzy sum


1937 legislature raided the gen-
eral revenue fund and took the
liquor revenue for pensions after
boosting the tax 50 per cent. New
funds can't come from thin air,
and no matter whether the state
or federal government collects it,
the taxpayer will have to pay the
bill for these added pensions.
Must "Find" More Money
Consequently the 1939 legisla-
ture must "find" from three to
twelve million dollars more a year
to meet pension requirements.
It's' easy to say the state doesn't
(Coatinued on Page 3)


THE: ST4A, FORT ST'. JOF-. GULF COUiNTY, F.LORID.


FRIDAY. MARCH'10. 1939~


I








FRIDAY, MARCH10, 1939 THE. STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PA~IE THREE


THE PORT ST. JOE SENTINEL
"St. Joe's Original Newspaper"
MISS LILLIAN FERRELL, Local Editor PHONE 28

"Adequate Publicity for a Thriving Metropolis"
.< Local and County-wide News Intelligently Presented b'
C
$2.00 A YEAR, INVARIABLY IN ADVANCE



COMPLIMENTS TO THE JUNIOR CLASS FROM


SHAUSER'S
DEPARTMENT STORE

"WHERE YOUR DOLLARS DO
DOUBLE DUTY"


r .

COMPLIMENTS OF



Princess Beauty Parlor

MRS. VOTIE GIBSON




FE R T L I ZERS
MAKE YOUR LAWNS AND FLOWERS BEAUTIFUL


VIGORO
(The Complete Plant Fod)



ST. JOE HARDWARE COMPANY


PORT ST. JOE


FLORIDA


COMPLIMENTS OF



CHAVERS-FOWHAND



FURNITURE CO.


All Success to the Junior Class of

Port St. Joe High School







Steel Flex Piston Rings


For Bad Oil Pumper

or Extreme Tapered

Cylinders


Motor Parts



IMotor Parts


PHONE 54


Port St. Joe, Fla.


Monument Avenue at Second Street
'~--i l~------------.\--------------I,,.


T. H. Stone Relates Some

Interesting Incidents of the

Early Days of Port St. Joe


By PAUL JOHNSON


Monday afternoon your reporter
called on Mr. T. H. Stone, an old
settler of Port St. Joe, and got
him started on the early days of
the town. Sitting on his porch we
were carried 'way back to the
early days of the city by his
stories, and how it grew up.
Mr. Stone told us that he came
to Port St. Joe in 1904 when
there were but few houses here,
and in 1905 opened a turpentine
still, which he operated for some
time. He owned about 8000 acres
of land in this section which he
had inherited from his father, and
he gave the Apalachicola North-
ern Railroad company an option
on the land, which was taken up
by the railroad in 1908 at $2 per
acre. In 1909 the railroad company


extended their line from Apa-
lachicola to Port St. Joe, and i
1910 the town began to build up.
"Work was brisk and plenty of
it," said Mr. Stone. A free public
school was established and a
Methodist church built. The pres-
ent Port Inn hotel was built and
other businesses were started.
In 1911 the postoffice, of which
Mr. Stone was postmaster, was
changed from the name of Indian
Pass to Port St. Joe by authority
from the postoffice department at
Washington, D. C.
During 1912 the town was in-
corporated and became a city.
The war scare came in 1914
while a large saw mill employing
between 1000 and 1500 men was
being built. Work on the mill pro-
gressed during the war, but after
the war the mill shut down, and
never reopened. Business also
slumped at this time and every-
thing went dead and people be-
gan to leave.
Then came the Doom, Property
values jumped wonderfully, and
this continued off and on until
1928. During the boom, property
valuations soared so high that
the owners didn't know the real
value of their property.
Then all the years after 1928
until the duPont interests started
plans for their paper mill, Port
St. Joe was almost forgotten by
the outside world. During and
after construction of the mill
property values again jumped.
In answer to our question as to
the future prospects of Port St.
Joe, Mr. Stone replied:
"As you see today, Port St. Joe
is a city of considerable popula-
tion and has a great opportunity
of future developments in indus-
try. It is inevitable that new fac-
tories and industries will locate
here, because industries of the
North are rapidly coming to the
South." Mr. Stone said he be-
lieves that some day Port St. Joe
will extend from Panama City on
the west to Aparachicls. on the
east.


In 1916 Mr. Stone was elected
as mayor of Port St. Joe and
served in that capacity for twenty
years. He also served as city com-
missioner.
According to Mr. Stone up until
1909 there was no mail service
for Port St. Joe, -ut in 1909 a
mail route by wagon was estab-
lished from Apalachicola.
Mr. Stone stated that his father
told him about the so-called tidal
wave that was supposed to have
swept over the old city of St.
Joseph in 1856 and destroyed the
town. He said that people talking
about it today exaggerated the
facts of a heavy storm, and that
there ever was a tidal wave here
and never will be one. He told us
that we, are entirely out of that
zone where tidal waves occur.
------C------

Pension Fund

(Continued from Page 2)
have the money, but if past ex-
perience is a criterion, it is safe
to predict the legislature will see
that all eligible old folks are put
on the rolls, and money appropri-
ated ,tb pay them a reasonable


'


We Would Have You Know That

Your Prescriptions Will Be Filled

Accurately
And at the Lowest. Possible Cost, By a
Registered Pharmacist at

CARVER DRUG COMPANY



COMPLIMENTS OF


GULF HARDWARE & SUPPLY CO.

PHONE 2 PORT ST. JOE, FLA.

SUCCESS TO THE JUNIOR CLASS-
OUR FUTURE (CITIZENS




COMPLIMENTS OF



QUALITY GROCERY



To the Juniors of the Port St Joe High School

-Our Citiens of Tomorrow


COMPLIMENTS OF




ST. JOE BAR
ED GEORGE, Proprietor


HAIL TO THE JUNIOR CLASS OF PORT

ST. JOE HIGH SCHOOL


sum. As little as many taxpayers
Like the huge total above, $20 a
Month is not much to attempt to
live on, even in Florida's balmy
climate.
Each of these 66,000 eligibles
has at least three friends or rela-
tives who want to see them cared
for, and when more than 200,000
people want something, the legis-
lature is pretty sure to try to give
it to them.
These are pretty steep figures,
but the cost of operating under
the Townsend plan as Introduced
in congress by a Florida senator
and congressman reaches genuine
astronomical heights. To pay $200
monthly to each present eligible
in Florida would require at least
$125,000,000, or twice the total
revenue of ihe state for 1938.
This does not take into considera-
tion the vastly increased number
that would probably be qualified
under the proposed law.
Few people question the neces-
sity for aid to aged, dependent
children and blind. This country
is far behind other nations in tlis
respect, most of them having for
years provided mean whereby
every citizen pays into the treas-
nry enough to cover Tis pension
requirements when he gets old. It
Wil' take a generation- for the
United States toreach that 'point,
and' in the meantime every, tax-
payer is called on to contribute
,his share of the cost of retiring
those over 65, the Florida mini-
(Continued on Page 7)


-- -------------------------------


FRIDAY, MARCH2 1( .1939


THE -STARi,.. PORT ST. JO E,-cUU.L;. COUNTi,' FIdD, :


PAG.E .,,t.HRE E







PGE.


MISS ELVY BROCK AND
MAYO JOHNSON MARRIED
Miss Elvy Brock and Mayo
Johnson were quietly married in
Wewahitchka Monday at the office
of Judge Alton Denay. Miss Brock
wore an attractive outfit of Ja-
ponica crepe with matching ac-
cessories. Immediately following
the ceremony the couple left for
Pensacola to spend this week and
upon returning wiii make Port St.
Joe their home.
Miss Brock is from Marianna.
having come to this city several
months ago, and has been em-
ployed' at the Triangle restaurant.
Mr. Johnson is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. George Johnson. Is a gradu-
ate of the Port St. Joe high
school, class of '32, and has for
the past year been employed at
LeHardy's bar and billiard parlor.
The. Star joins their many
friends in wishing them a happy
married life-

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Nedley
and Mr. and, Mrs. Mannie Brash
of Apalachicola were guests Sun-
day of Mr. and Mrs. N. Comforter.






SPE C L




SALE o"


MAGIC. CHEF

GAS RANGE


SOUTHERN LIQUID GAS
COMPANY
"Your Gas Company Since 1932"


Port St. Joe
Florida


Panama City
Phone 168


At the Churches

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
Rev. H. F. Beaty, Minister
10:00 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.-Preaching service.
7:30 p. m.-Preaching service.
Visitors are expected from Tal-
lahassee to speak at the morning
service.
All members are urged to be
present. Visitors are cordially in-
vited to attend.


METHODIST CHURCH
D. E. Marietta, Minister
Services Every Sunday
10:00 a. m.-Churcn School.
11:00 a. m.-Morning worship.
7:30 p. m.-Evening worship.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. J. W. Sisemore, Minister
10:00 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.-Morning Worship.
6:30 p. m.-B. T. U.
7:30 p. m.-Evening Worship.
W. M. U., Monday, 3:00 p. m.
Prayermeeting Wednesday, 7:30 p.
m. Teachers meeting, Thursday,
7:30 p. m.

ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Rev. H. P. Money, Pastor
Full-time services
10:15 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.-Preaching Service.
7:30 p. m.-Evangelistic service.
Prayermeeting every Wednesday
night.

MRS. WESTBROOK HOSTESS
TO TUESDAY BRIDGE CLUB
Mrs. T. V. Westbrook enter-
tained the members of the Tues-
day Bridge Club at tne home of
Mrs. P. D. Farmer in Oak Grove
this week. Three tables were in
progression and arter tallying of
scores, prizes were presented to
Mrs. W. A. Wood, high; Mrs. H.
C. Spence, cut, and Mrs. W. S.
Smith, honor. Following presenta-
tion of prizes Mrs. W. M. Howell
was given a surprise birthday gift
by each member of the club.
The hostess,. assisted by Mrs.
Farmer, served fruit punch and
cake to Mesdames J. Shannon, C.
Trammell. E. Curry, D. C. Smith,.
H: C. Spence, W. S. Smith, W. M.
Howell, W. 'A. Wood and M. Lar-
kin.

BAPTIST MISSIONARY
SOCIETY MEETS AT CHURCH
.Members of the circles of the
Baptist Missionary Society held
their regular business meeting at
the church Monday afternoon with
Mrs. J. O. Baggett, president, pre-
siding.
The meeting opened with the
W. M. U. hymn, "I Love To Tell
the Story," followed by the devo-
tional from I Corinthians 13. Mrs.
Charles McClellan led in prayer
and was followed by the roll call,
minutes and reports from officers
and chairman. It was voted to buy
tablecloths for the Baptist Chil-
dren's, Home. A visiting committee
was appointed, after which the
meeting was dismissed by Mrs.
Daisy Staten.

LEGION AND LADIES
ENJOY CHICKEN SUPPER
The members of Gulf County
American Legion Post held their
regular meeting Monday night at
the .hut, to which members of the
Auxiliary were invited, and after
the business session, a delicious
chicken supper was served as
only Arthur Lupton and Bob Col-
lier can prepare. All reported an
enjoyable evening.

WEINER ROAST ENJOYED
BY SCHOOL STUDENTS
A weiner roast was enjoyed by
students of the high school last
Friday night at Beacon Hill. Af-
ter roasting weiners and playing
games on the beach, dancing was
enjoyed at Van's until a late hour.
About twenty boys and girls at-
tend'ed this affair


METHODIST MISSIONARY
SOCIETY IN MEETING
The regular business meeting of
the Methodist Missionary Society
was held Monday afternoon, with
Mrs. W. E. Boyd in charge.
The meeting opened with "Res-
cue the Perishing," followed with
prayer led by Mrs. G. A. Patton.
A. short business sessloni followed
at which reports were given *by
Mrs. R. R. Hodges, chicken sup-
per; Mrs. Patton, parsonage and
Mrs. H. C. Spence, treasury.
After the business meeting Mrs.
Hodges, invited tne ladies to the
Sunday school room where stood
a beautifully appointed table cen-
tered with a puncef bowl sur-
rounded by japonicas. Everyone
was seated and enjoyed a.social
with Mrs. Hodges as hostess. Mrs.
Roy Gibson and Mrs. Edwin Ram-
sey sang "I'll Take You Home
Again, Kathleen," a contest was
played with prizes being won by
Mrs. D. H. Bartee and Mrs. Mc-
Neill, and Mrs. Boya gave a read-
ing'and song in negro dialect.
,Mrs. Patty Lovett was then
given a surprise birthday shower,
of which the Susannah Wesley


Society Personals Churches
LANETA DAVIS, Editor


Circle was in chargeI Mrs. Lovett This party has been planned for
cut a beautiful cake and everyone a long time. The McNeil home is


sang "Happy Birthday to You." A
love feast was then had in honor
of Mrs. Hodges, wr.o is moving to
Marianna. Many kind and thought-
ful things were said of her, after
which she was presented with a
coffee table.
Mrs. Hodges served, delicious
cake and punch to thirty members
of the society.

Miss Myrtle Whitaker and Miss,
Iva Mae Nedley attended the mill
tary ball in Gainesville during
the week-end.


an ideal place for such an affair.

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Ferrell made
a business trip Sunday to Wewa-
hitchka.

Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Smith are
expecting Mrs. Smith's mother,
Mrs. Wava E. Gordon, for a visit
within the next few days.

Miss Jewel Presnell of Panama
City, field' supervisor of music,
Federal Music Project, visited in
this.city Wednesday.


BAPTIST W. M. S. IN
WEEK OF PRAYER
The circles of the Baptist Wo-
man's Missionary Society ob-
served their week of prayer last
week at the church.
The subjects ana leaders of the
meetings, were as follows: Mon-
day, Mary Circle, leader, Mrs. A.
L. Ezell; subject. "And Seeing
the Multitude." Tuesday, Lydia
Circle; leader, Mrs. H. N. Ham-
mock; subject, "Say Unto Them
the Kingdom of God Is Nigh."
Wednesday, Martha Circle; lead-
er, Mrs. L. R. Holliday; subject,
"That In the Name of Jesus Every
Knee Shall Bow." Thursday, lead-
er, Mrs. J. W. S:-emore; subject,
"That Every Tongue Should Con-
fess That Jesus Christ Is Lord."
Friday, day of prayer, leader, Mrs.
W. C. Pridgeon; subject, "Ye
Shall Receive Power, Ye Shall Be
My Witnesses."
Following the Friday services
the Girls' Auxiliary presented
their week of prayer program, the
subject for their program being
"Go Forward."
*
JIMMIE McNEIL GIVING
PARTY TONIGHT
Jimmie McNeil of Indian Pass
is giving a party tonight at his
home. This promises to be a big
occasion. A number of games will
be played and dancing will prob-
ably be indulged n.


OPEN
7 a. m. 2 a. m.


OPEN
7 a. m. 2a. m.


HELLO

EVERYBODY!
St. Joe, everywhere-it's the
MIDGET on the airl
5c Hamburgers and Hot Dogs
on the grill doing the Black
Bottom and singing, "Eat
me! Eat me!"
Clean bowls dancing with joy
full of our famed Chili and
Soup, sing "Sip me! Sip me!"
join the Midget's band of
famous foods.'
Vitamins and a Smile served
with all our Specials

Our grill is hot with music!
The Kid does your tuning.
Your -

THE MIDGET
SANDWICH SHOPPE
of Port St. Joe-
Three doors from Schneider's
Department 'Store


MRS. LEWIS ENTERTAINS
THURSDAY BRIDGE CLUB
Mrs. E. C. Lewis entertained
the members of the Thursday
Bridge Club at her home on Gar-
rison avenue this week. Follow-
ing several progressions, prizes
were presented and delicious re-
freshments served by the hostess
to members present.

Roy Gibson, Jr.. spent the latter
part of the week with his parents,
Mr. and Mrs. B. R. Gibson.
aaai
Mr. and Mrs. Orin L. McCranie
of Valdosta, Ga., were week-end!
guests of Mrs..Sallie Montgomery,
Mr. McCranies mother.


WE COMPLIMENT THE JUNIOR CLASS OF

PORT ST. JOE HIGH SCHOOL
/







St. Joe Paper





Company



PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA



This great industry has been established at Port St. Joe by

ALMOURS SECURITIES, INC., and the MEADE COR-

PORATION as one of the units of the long-time plan of the

late ALFRED I. DuPONT for the rehabilitation and the eco-

nomic development of West Florida.


So far as possible preference in employment is being given

to residents of Florida, and so far as possible all business is

being transacted with residents of the territory this mill is

intended to help rehabilitate.



Visitors Welcome At the Paper Mill On Fridays

/


rolt-suptit'PEIRFOR N
SEETHE, NEW. 'MAGIC CHEIr
MA: CE,


TkE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, MARCH 10, 1939


PAGE FOUR








R M


Mr. and Mrs. Joe Hauser and
daughter visited Sunday in Pan-
ama City.

Miss Elizabeth Hanford is visit-
ing. in Blountstown this week
with her grandmother.

Tommy Guertin was a visitor
Sunday in Bristol.

Wylie Collinsworth has accepted
a position with the state road de-
vartment as operator of the new
bridge across the canal west of


An Interview With Port St. Joe's

Chamber of Commerce Secretary

By JOE LILIENFELD


Interviewing T. W. Wilson, sec-
retary of the Port St. Joe Cham-
ber of Commerce, I discovered
many things of interest. I wonder
if everyone realizes what will
be coming to Port St. Joe and the
many things that the chamber of
commerce is endeavoring to get


in new businesses and residents.,
and we are looking forward to
having more and better homes.
Planning for Park
Establishment of a park and
playground area is also planned,
with the Centennial building and
grounds as a nucleus. A public


Port St. Joe. for us? library, new city hall and Im-
Mr. Wilson states that the com- provement of the fire station are
Sheriff B. E. Parker and family mittee investigating sites for a also on the books.
of Vewahitchka visited relatives naval air base in Florida will con- The chamber of commerce has
and/ attended, the theater here side St. Joseph's Bay and that h
helped the high school band in
Su day afternoon. we will hear definitely from this helped the high school band in
by April 18. The chamber of many ways, and was instrumental
Sc ri t ha et in construction of the band stand
commerce is trying hard- to get
fCL ASSITED ADS the air base here and I think we the prk for resentation of
should back them up. 100 per cent. outdoor concerts.
., Mr. Wilson has written many let- The chamber is now carrying
FOR RENT ters to high officials in Washing- on an intensive campaign for con-
Ston trying to get this air base for trol of the dog fly, states Mr. Wil-
FOR SALE OR RENT Port St. Joe. son, and also mosquito control,
House (concrete) on Hunter's Cir- Other Things Expected which would necessitate draining
cle, with living room, dining room, The chamber of commerce is of swamps, and the oiling of
kitchen, two bedrooms, closets, working to get a ship yard located open water where mosquitoes
bathroom, shower; Ruud water here, a rayon mill is expected to might breed. In this connection a
heater. Immediate possession. be erected, things look good foi request has been sent to Wash-
L. T. LAYTON a box and bag factory and a fur- ington for scientific research aid
Licensed Real Estate Broker niture factory. Efforts are also to determine the breeding place
Sentinel Office Phone 28 being made, according to Mr. of the dog fly.
FOR RENT--Five-room cottage Wilson, for establlsmment of a The chamber is also doing its
with sleeping porch and bath refrigerating plant here to handle best to promote the beaches of
in Oak Grove. See Karl Kno. fish and other products. Whole- this area for recreational pur-
-del. 1* sale grocery distributors are ex- poses. It is also carrying on a
Spected to locate here, as well as campaign of advertising and pub-
.FOR RENT-New houses at Bea- bulk oil distributors, and .the pos- licity pointing out the advantages
bon Hill'. Front lot facing Gulf. sibility of a fertilizer plant being of this section as a fishing and
Furnished, running water. sani- opened is in the air. hunting area. This campaign will
tary conveniences, -electricity. The chamber or commerce is Include literature to be distributed
Apply T. W. Wilson, or Box continually working for a more free at the New York World's
495, Port St. Joe. 3-3tf beautiful city, street paving and Fair. In all of this work, the
UNFURNISED 9 by 18-foot b-the laying of sidewalks, planting chamber of commerce has had the
ins; ceied overhead and sides; of trees and shrubs aia a general fullest co-operation from the dn-
good water; $6 month. Apply St. plan of beautification. Pont interests.
'Joe--Lumber Co. 12121tf The greatest thing the chamber The officers of the Port St. Joe
ROOMS FOR RENT of commerce has done to date, ac- Chamber of Commerce are as fol-
cording to the secretary, is get- lows: W. W. Barrier, president;
IF YOU have a room for rent, ting the Federal Housing Admin- J. 'L. Kerr, vice-president and
why not place a classified adver-
tiwhy not place Star. The cost ad istration to grant loans here, rais- treasurer; Horace Soule, vice-
low and returns are gratifying.., ing the percentage from 60 to 75, president; G. Pierce Wood, W. O.
Try it today. tf with a good chance of raising it Anderson, G. F. Kaser, Robert
MISCELLANEOUS even more. Bellows and T. M. Schneider, di-
The chamber has also brought rectors; T. W. Wilson, secretary.


Services Offered
ELECTRIC WIRING-In all Its
branches, reasonable. Fixtures
and Fans. Repairs
HENDERSON ELECTRIC/
COMPANY Port St. Joe
Home Office, Apalachicol. Box 313


D. B. Lewis spent Sunday in
Tallahassee, the guest of his fam-
ily.


Mrs. F. A. LeFHardy,
Miss Margaret LeHardy
urday for Jacksonville.


Sr., and
left Sat-


Colors Sparkle Like New---

SWith Our Scientific Dry Cleaner
:Preserve Original Lustre of Fashion's Finest Fabrics
4. a

: CREECH BROTHERS
STailors and Cleaners *
PHONE 102 PORT. ST JOE, FLA.



Compliments of


BLACK CAT

CAFE

SEAFOOD DINNERS
OUR SPECIALTY.



Compliments to the Junior Class

of Port St. Joe High School



PETE'S CASH AND CARRY


VISIT OUR STORE FOR GROCERY AND MARKET
SPECIALS TODAY AND TOMORROW!
N'


Comedy Baseball

By MARGIE KIRKLAND
A comedy baseball game be-
tween the teachers and mothers
in the Band Boosters club washed
Saturday afternoon, February 18.
It was a benefit for the Port St.
Joe high school, band to raise
money or the purchase of uni-
forms for the band.
The teachers' team was made
up of Miss Erline McClellan, Miss,
Julia O'Quinn, Miss Eileen Ar-,
nold, Miss Lillian Thompson, Miss
Avaryee Collier, Miss Louise Sol-
omon, Miss Juanita Gunn, Mrs.
Leroy Gainous and Mrs. Lankta
Davis.
The mother's team: Mesdames
S. M. Overby, Horace Soule, C. P.
VanHorn, John Lane, B. M. Kel-
ley,.H. M. Hammock, J. Myra, H.
C. Spence and others.
It was a fast game, the teachers
winning by one point. There was
a large crowd in attendance, con-
sidering the time that was chosen
for the game. It -vas enjoyed by
all who attended. The score was
7 to 6.

DISAPPOINTED
I have been reading "The Web"
for the past few weeks in order
that I could get first-hand infor-
mation regarding the social scan-
dal of the community. Much to
my disappointment, the "Spider"
did not add to its "web" last
week. I wonder if our little ar-
thropod friend spun so much -of
its silvery threads that it was
strangled' to death by its immense
and death-dealing web. Poor little-
thing! "The Bug."

Mrs. R. E. Rollins and daughter
Peggy and Miss Julia O'Quinn
spent the week-end in Gordon,
Ala., euest. of relatives. .


Mr. and Mrs. T. M. Schneider W. B. Ferrell or this city has
spent Wednesday in Tallahassee. taken a contract to build a five-
Miss Amelia Schneider. a student room dwelling in Miami, Fla.
at F. S. C. W., returned with them A A r
to spend the week-end. Miss Hazel Register spent a de-
lightful week-end in Panama City
Jimmie Moore visited relatives with her grandmother.
in Tallahassee over the week-end. *r
r I Dallas Howard of Panama City
Eli Hauser of Panama City was was a visitor here Sunday eve-
a visitor in this city Monday. ning.


We are doing our level BEST to

give you HONEST VALUES and

DEPENDABLE SERVICE

We Sell "STAR BRAND" Shoes






Costin's Dept. Store

PORT ST. JOE FLORIDA



Danley's ANNIVERSARY SALE
Brings Never-to-Be-Forgotten Values to All Homes!
For several months now we have been contacting the leading
furniture manufacturers in an effort to secure the greatest bar-
gains of our history! We were successful beyond our fondest
dreams! Factory after factory has( co-operated with us and we
are now ready with a huge stock of the newest designs in fur-
niture, rugs, etc., at prices that will write a new page in bargain
history! Come and share in the savings!
CONVENIENT CREDITTERMS ARRANGED ON ANY ARTICLE



DANLEY FURNITURE COMPANY
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA

..... --.


"Sells for Less"


The Season's Finest at the Town's
Finest Store

COME IN AND VIEW OUR COMPLETE STOCK
OF SPRING AND SUMMER MERCHANDISE





Compliments to the Junior Class


of Port St. Joe High School

0




ST. JOE LUMBER &



EXPORT COMPANY

PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA



MANUFACTURERS AND EXPORTERS OF


Long Leaf Yellow Pine


Tidewater Red Cypress

- - .- -- -- .
.,,, -, 4.,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,


- a ftfa I A~ a


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA'


FRIDAY, MARCH 10, 1939


PAGE FIVE







- FRIDAY MARCH 10, 1939


AT T P GT F LORIDA


Final Results of the Questionnaire,

"What Is Wrong With Port St. Joe?"


q
(Continued from Page 1)
Here again the matter of lack
of larger lines to choose from
seemed to be the main complaint.
7. What articles fto you buy
elsewhere because you cannot get
them 'in' Port St. Joe?
Clothing predominated, wit h
select groceries running a poor
second.
8. Do you trade with mail or-
der houses? If so, why?
Answers to this question, from
those who stated that theY' did
trade with mail order houses,
brought out the fact that they be-
lieved they were getting a higher
quality of merchandise at a lower
price than it would have been
necessary to pay nere. Forty-five
replies stated that they did not
trade, with mail order houses.
9. How often do you go to
Panama City to trade? ToApa-
lachicola? To Marianna? To Do-
than? .
The majority stated that they
made no regular trips to these


cities to shop, merely doing their
purchasing if they happened' to
be in these cities. Panama City
ranked first, Apalachicola second
and Dothan third.
10. Do you prefer to buy on
credit or cash?
Here opinion was almost evenly
divided, with the credit buyers
having ,a slight edge over those
who preferred to pay cash.
11. Have you been refused
credit by any of the stores in Port
St. Joe? Which ones?
This was another question that
was inserted strictly for confiden-
tial information of The Star.
12. Would you trade in Port
St. Joe if offered more credit?
This brought very few replies,
it apparently manrng no differ
enee whether or ,not credit were
extended.
13. In what way can The Star
be improved?
We don't like to boast, but of
the 63 replies received 56 thought
The Star was an excellent paper


Wishing the Jumor Class of the


Port St. Joe High School a


Successful Future






JUDGE R. ALTON DENDY


;-I~-- ~-.~.----- ------- ----------



Compliments to the Junior Class


of Port St. Joe High School



J. R. HUNTE


Clerk Circuit Court

GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA





Our Compliments to the Junior Class of Port St Joe High




WE REMODEL THE DEMOLISHED

Complete Auto Repairing


WRECKER SERVICE DAY OR NIGHT

PERFECT CIRCLE PISTON RINGS






City Service



Garage

GEORGE WIMBERLEY Proud.

Port St. Joe, Fla.


as it is. four thought -a' serial
story would be some improve-
mentI 'two thought the paper
ought to be published in regular
newspaper size instead of tabloid,
and one failed to answer.
14. What advertisements do
you read in The Star?
The majority read all the ads
each week, some stuck strictly to
grocery and dry goods specials.
15. What improvements would
you like to see made in Port St.
Joe?
The majority of replies stressed
the need for more paved streets
and sidewalks in the residential
sections, better street lighting
and the demolishing of the many
old wooden buildings in the main
business section.
16. What streets would you
like to see improved?
Apparently every individual de-
sired to have the street upon
which they lived improved. Sixth
street led with Eighth in second
place and Reid avenue a close
third.
17. .What improvements would
you like, to see in the schools? In
amusements and recreation and
social facilities?
In regard,. to. the. schools, it
seems that our present system is
approved' by all; though some
would like to see teachers hold
normal graduates' certificates.
A park should be provided, ac-
cording to ,most replies, where
tennis, shuffleboard' and other
games could be enjoyed. One per-
son suggested that a quiet nook
be provided where bridge games
could be held by those so inclined.
18. What- do you think of Port
St. Joe as a place in which to
live?
Most replies were to the effect
that Port St. Joe is a good place
in which to live, but that housing
accommodations were not of the
best and rents too high. Climate,
St. Joseph's 'Bay:'and fishing were
praised by several.
19, What. does Port St. Joe
need to make: it a better place in
which to live?-
Majority would like to see more
houses and .apartments for rent,
at a rental that would fit the in-
come of the average person. Sev-
eral would like to see more busi-
ness houses here. Three suggested
a stricter regulation of traffic on
the city's streets, particularly in
the business section.
20. Would you build a home
here if proper financing to fit
your income could be arranged?
Twenty-two answered this one
by stating that they already were
home-owners, while the greater
portion of the remainder answered
in the affirmative. Several stated
that they preferred to rent.

False Alarm

By PAUL JOHNSON
Out of the quiet of a peaceful
Monday afternoon, while we were
getting the low-down on the city
of Port St. Joe from Mr. Stone,
we heard, the shrill scream of the
fire siren. Everybody followed af-
ter the fire truck in their cars,
only to find that the fire depart-
ment had stopped at the so-called
"'Gator Hole," close to the Cen-
tennial building, to test the pump
on the truck. So it was
only a fire drill.
Your reporters hurriedly caught
a ride to the scene, hoping to get
a scoop; Although we didn't get
a good story on the fire (there
was no fire) we did have some ex-
citement, as a telephone company
truck got out of the ruts and was
stuck in the sand. We did have
some fun getting it out, even
though we were disappointed in
0the fire.
------K--~----
OUR FIRE DEPARTMENT
The Port St. Joe fire depart-
ment consists of ten volunteer
firemen, made up from all walks
of life, and they are headed by
Troy Jones as chief, and Lovett
MahoA as assistant chief.


MILES 5'c AND 10c STORE

With Compliments to the Junior Class
of Port St. Joe High School




WE HAUL ANYTHING-

CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING
WE HAVE GOOD CLEAN BUILDING SAND ,FOR SALE
Prompt and Efficient Service Always

C. W. HORTON
PHONE 70 PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
,-

4O e *********.SERVICE S.....*


'DEPENDABLE SERVICE"
*
* .

: Wewahitchka State Bank
,* *, a i e '


* WEWAHITCHKA FLORIDA
* o ,
* * *. .* : S*S** S * *


If It is a Photograph We Make It!
HIGH CLASS PORTRAITS
KODAK FINISHING AND ENLARGING




QUARTERMAN STUDIO
: PORT ST. JOE '. '-- : FLORLDA ,.




Compliments to the Junior Class

from -


BAYSHORE GROCERY & MARKET

HIGHLAND VIEW, FLA.


Specials for Fri., Sat., Sun.






GAULDING'S SUBDIVISION *
ADDITION TO HIGHLAND VIEW


LOTS FOR SALE CHEAP

gW CASH OR EASY TERMS


BUCK GAULDING, Prop.


HIGHLAND VIEW


M. G. Lewis & Sons



Garage

EXTENDS CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
JUNIOR CLASS, ST. JOE HIGH


See Us for Your Car Repairing


WRECKER SERVICE
PHONE 6 '6 PORT ST. JOE,


FLA.


,-. LI. - - I- c


PAGEli6:i L


I


THE STAR, POP.T,,ST..JOE, GULF C.ONTY~r:TLORIDA








L F1 ST. -,,O U COUN y, L P SEV-N


Flinders Petrie, in 1890, was the
first archaeologist to dig into the
ruins of Palestine m quest of
buried evidence of the past.



DR. J. C.COE
-- DENTIST--
S Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment:
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe



EYES EXAMINED


/Glasses fitted when needed
Made In Our .OwnvLaboratory
All Work Unconditionally
Guarahteed E
SOfQAf Hours,-'9'a..m. 'to 6p.m.


OPTOMETRIST
S PANAMA CITY,; FLA,

V e. '. 4.. ,- ..



S Spend th week-end ,t
S West Fliriie' ilbet fih;



I BASS ;.
B A 5 S j





. 0 I 'H.
SR'EAM c


out guldeC-at' reasonable
rate. C. .iof ac-:
eo nmmodation d .ni thnltith
S. means of tllvryonLe,
S SEE- i
i, out Lnw ou
J. O. 'Jim' SMITH '




Why Not YOU, Too?
Elrjoy,* a day's Fishing and
Picnic Dinner at .

MIDWAY PARK
On Gulf County's World.
Famous DEA' LAKES
Our BOATS are New, Dry, d
and Kept Clean. .. Our
CABINS, are New, with New
Beds and Furnishings.
This FRIENDLY CAMP is
Midway of the Lakes, at the
County 'Line, where your
Visit is Appreciated
J. P. BRANTON, Owner i
Postoffice Address b
WEWAHITCHKA, FLA8...

S i----------- ---7r1-, IT

PURITY IS

ASSURED!


Budget Commission Would

HikeReal Estate Tax; Idea

Brings Forth Opposition


Board Would Increase Levy
6% Mills To Relieve
$2,000,000 Deficit

The state budget commission
last week recommended an in-
crease of 6% mills in real es-
tate taxes to support nine gov-
ernmental functions and relieve
a $2,000,000 deficit in the gen-
eral revenue' fund.
It "would raise property taxes,
from $1,250,000 to about $3,225,-
000 annually 'by boosting the pres-a
ent!"3%i mill' levy 'to 10 mills.
Approval' by -the state lagisla-
'ture which meets 'April 4, is
necessary' 'Vt"put wio effect ihv
proposed increase.
.-Alojpg with the suggested htke
in .4th real state tax the cabinet
members, who :make up the bud-
get commission along with GCv-
ern. Cou, who, was not present
aLt meeting, as ed that their
present salaries 'be increased trom
5000 : to' "00)o a year and the
governor's from $7500 to $9000h -
The budget commission wopld"
use thbe increased real estate
taxes' to support-the state board
of health, cattle .lic' eradicati6on
free school -:tmexooks, the tuber-.
culosis sanitarium, aid to crip-
pled children, the forest and paik
service, state prison 'and the con-
stitution-required"I 'one U0ll for
public 1ih6..s.
This would relieve the general
revenuenfund .-of :'abouti.'$1,000,000
aiyear which it now supplies be-
cause the property tax. is: not suf-
icient td:' maintain institutions for
which. it is levied.
Should the legislature allow
the Increase, lit, will 'reverse a
downward trend in real, estate
taxes which started in 1931 when
the mileage was reduced from 14
to 4%. It went up in 1933 to 6%,
and' thea was dropped to 2% in
1936. itwwas 3% in 1937 and 3%
last year.., 'Each mill produces
about $322,500.
The budget' commission asked
$9,630,878 annually for the major
departments of government in
1939 and 1940, against $8,660,878
provided for 1937 and 1938.
Charts in the commission's re-
port, labeled "The state dollar-
where it comes from," show a
grand' total of receipts of $49,-
850,579 for 1937 and $62,744,036
'or 1938. Other charts show grand
total 'disbursements of $49,857,-
867 for 1937 and $61,480,226 for
1938. The latter figure does not
Include $937,374 of unpaid bills
against the general revenue fund
on June 30, when the fiscal year
ended.
Principal items in the 1938 in-
creases over 1937 were $5,100,000,
for old age pensions and aid to
special classes, $5,600,000 for un-
employed compensation and other


Organizations and Individuals
Are Against Proposed
10-Mill Levy

Following announcement by the
state budget commission of a pro-
posed increase in the real estate
village, statements were issued
by the heads of several state or-'
ganizations.
6. H. Bowman of Clermont,
president of the Florida Associa-
tion of Real iEstate Boards, de,
cleared, that nullification of .the
:homes.td .exemption amenda~i't
would, result from any attempt to
increase te levy, on -real'aestate.
*The c ssiq's p r to
boost the.in lla ,on Kal estate,"
said Bowan. f'will in effect iti
lify th. homestead exemption
amendmentt, against .thes expreses
wishes of t 1e property owners of
Florida. Recent court$ decisiodi
have topped gradually to whittle
.wa.y the home owner's tax ex-
,emption. The village hike' for
4tate purposes would be thi laBt
.straw ... ......
.'Recently the.'tai t ;.Aas8clatioi,
of Coun t'y :Commimiisioners re-
aolved forg, mIe., salary. coupled
ith a demand 1fpr, an additional
tlyo.mnllls on real ata e. Now the
office-holding' frternity at Talla-
hassee aeeks:morer salary and an-
oyr,ehike .,,1x te ipillage- on
reQlty. It seems, that It these pub-;
lie office holder- need, more sal-
ary,. they .should .not tiake iti out
of the thide I 'ral estate' which
is already bearing..more than its
share of taxes." .,
Ol- American "Custom
"A'statement on the matter was
Issued by E. H. Ramsey. execu-
tive secretary of the Florida Tax
Revision League, stating "hat the
-budget commission's recommenda-
tio-i' "mnay 'tave-:comenas" a pain-
ful surprise to property owners,
but it really isn't surprising. The
commission is merely tpllowing an.
old American custom which has
been the practice of both state
and local units of government or'
over a hundred years.
"Under our present tax system
the state, counties and cities fol-
low a definite line of procedure
in making up' their budgets. They
first make an estimate of the
amount -they need or want to'
spend, as the case may be; they
next estimate the anticipated rev-
enue from all definite tax sources.
The balance is levied as an ad
valorem tax on property. .
"In our opinion, the proposed
increase in state expenses is un-
necessary and the recommended
increase in the real estate tax
cannot be justified on any basis
of equity. If the people'of
Florida want tax relief for real
estate, the only logical method to
pursue is to insist that our tax
.h d d


s
public trusts, and $3,000,000 from
ystem be revised an mo ern-
h f d t


SFor Each and Every Bottle
of Milk or Cream We Deliver
S Is Protected With a
SANITARY PARCHMENT
COVER

Use Only .

SOLOMON'S

Pasteurized

MILK
SPasteurized for Your
Protection
-............... .


Of its total 1938 receipts, the
state returned to counties $22,-
183,236 for public schools and
highway bonds. State highway op-
erations received $11,819,850, and
the colleges cost $2,138,195.

Pension Fund

:(Continued from Page 3)
mum.
Previous articles of this educa-
tion series of factual analyses of
state governmental affairs have
treated the financial demands
which will be made. on the state
by other groups, and later ones
will outline the various sources
from which the legislature might
secure added funds, for it seems
certain that economy alone could
not produce these huge sums from
present revenues.--1939.


,No New Taxes Needed
The Florida Taxpayers' Associ-
ation issued a statement from
Tampa through its executive sec-
retary, Robert L. Newman, saying
that "the opportunist criticism
which the Tax Revision League
of Jacksonville directs at the
state cabinet for recommending
increased tax levies on real es-
tate would be amusing if its po-
tential results were not so tragic."
"We are also vigorously op-
posed to the cabinet's recommen-
lations, but we oppose all new
taxes, including the tax league's
proposed sales tax the poor
man's income tax because we
can prove by official records that
Governor Cone and Comptroller
Lee -are right when they say no
new taxes are needed."
General Tax Strike
'Mr. Newman further stated that
the increase might bring on a


."general tax strike."'
"'Departnmeuts .wil have. to s'ioW
down in expansion and extending
lec3use" the taxpayers' a al-
ready extended beyond* the abil-
'ity to pay," he said, "and the n-
vitation for a general tax strike
is 'just beneath the, surface."
Newman said the budget com-
mrision's recommendation to in-
crease the' real estate tax would
"work a double hardship on those
who: faithfully pay taxes, because
only half of the land in Florida
is paying taxes today."

* Incorporation

(Continued from Page- 1)
Twp. 7 S, Range 11 W. intersects
the' waters 'edge of St. Joseph's
Bay, thenceo -north along the west,
'boundary iof said Sec. 26 .to the.
southwest::icorner of the' north?.
.west, Qquarter ofe ..said- Sec.. -26,
thence east' .2640' feet- 'to the: cen-
ter of said- See'. 26, -thence 'south
1320 feet,- tbence eaatr: 66&, feet,
thence south to the north shore-
line of said Iptra-coastal canal,
thence 'les,t following the 'oprth
shoratia'e; of sald canal '1340: eet,'
more or less, to point oft begWi
ning, said *dlribed tiad&' lyingt
and being in Sections 26 and-35
of Township-7 south, Range- 11
west In Gulf county,, Florkld."
It sl estimated .thai .the new
city contains In Its confines a
population of approximately" 1000
gfersons.'^f- .^'^ -^


E r


PORT ST. JOE
Florida


I'M 'So YOUHAVENT USED
NERVOUS THAT NERVINE
COULD It BOUGHT YOU
SCREAM

f eA%


:Do yufe tense and keyed-"
.up,.Do,te care of the home and
ld thobligation of social
or community Ilfe, ethe:wory of
nances, .";gt ..on your nerves"?
S "Ni .....VE.S"
SMay spell the -diference b-
tween happine'and'inlmr f-et
you and you family. '
1fou are Nervous, 1seplM
Irritable, ttleu. It may be due
to an oer ught nervous e&-.
ditoom. l u, you wllfbd de.
llw Nerrin a rel hltp.

veses-t Tabl-t.
aview w bamwI


P, 0 ....


PORT IN N
', ..r: .B

Glean Beds anid the Best

^. .- : _. ..
of Meals ''
I
', i '. '' : -:- "



With Compliments to Junior Class





Compliments to the Junior Class

of Port St. Joe High School





CHAUNCEY COSTIN


WHEN YOU COOK WITH GAS

WE GIVE YOU:
Experienced sales counsel.
Service by a company that is financially
responsible
No deposit required-Just pay for your gas.
A low gas rate, guaranteed not to be increased.
Prompt response to your service calls.
Expert service on your appliances.
Courtesy always.

0-

SOUTHERN LIQUID GAS CO.
YOUR GAS COMPANY SINCE 1932


County Superintendent of Schools

GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PANAMA CITY
Telephone 168


THE STAR, POjRT ST.'JO)E,-GULF COUNTY 7LORIDA


.i: PAGE 8EEYIN


FRIDAY, MARCH 10, 1.039


I


I I


I


e






PAGE EIGHT


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, MARCH 10, 1939


Review of St. Joe's
Basketball Games

By BOBBY COBURN
Basketball season for Port St.
Joe high school began with two
games played on the high school
outdoor court with the Vernon
team, which motored 75 miles to
play St. Joe two games. One was
played Friday afternoon, which
was won by St. Joe, 25 to 14. The
second game was played the fol-
lowing morning, and again St. Joe
won, 44 to 31.
The next game was played with
Carrabelle at Carrabelle. Port St
Joe was taken by surprise in the
first quarter. The tilt was rough
and tight from the beginning to
the-end. Carrabelle won, 18 to 10.
The fourth game was played-at
Blountstown. This -was a tough
game for our high school team.
. and they fought hard but could
not break through their oppon-
ents' defense. Blountstown took


the game.
St. Joe was beaten the next two
games by Panama City, 25 to 13,
and by Wewahitchka.
The next game was played with
Apalachicola here. It was fast and
hard-fought from the starting
whistle to the end of the game.
St. Joe lost to Apalach, 28 to 21.
Carrabelle was next in line and
was beaten by St. Joe 18 to 5 in
a nip and tuck game played here.
Panama next won over St. Joe,
16 to 7, with an unbreakable de-
fense and a quick passing of-
fense.
St. Joe played Apalachicola a
return game and won, 19 to 16. St.
Joe was; breaking f&se and pass-
ing with great skill to win this
game.
Wewahitchka played St. Joe a
return game and lost, 14 to 9. The
local, team broke Wewa's strong
defense the whole game, and they
were held fast and could not
break open for many shots.
Save by re-adin the
Save by reading the dsa!


Compliments to .the Junior Class
of Port St. Joe High School


SLeHARDY'S PHARMACY
"Where Friends Meet"


C. A.LeHARDY G~ 1
E. B. MORGAN


CLYDE GENTRY
JAMES MARTIN


We have Easter Candy and Cards

----------------


Victorious Defeat

By MARY GUERTIN.
Judging by the scores that our
girls made this season one would
not associate them with victory.
But by the spirit the girls showed
in their playing we are certain
that each and evegy one is a good
sport.
We are surem that throughout
the entire year every player did
her best. The St. Joe high school
girls' basketball team is noted for
the spirit with which they ac-
cepted defeat.
Our high school did not have
many girls who went out for bas-
ketball, but those who did go out
were very dependable.
The coach, Miss Julia O'Quinn,
said that although she would have
liked to have won more games
slat is very pronu of, .the '-girls,
since "thiey have proved to be
such clean 'and fair players.
The Sharkettes played two
games each with Carrabelle, We-
wahitchka, Blountstown and Apa-
lachicola, and one with Panama
City and the town team. They'
won the last two, though not by
any overwhelming scores.
To me the school seems some-
what more sportsminded, than for-
merly, and I .for one, am looking
forward to a girls' team next year
that' will be' equally as good ih
spirit and perhaps a little better
in strength and speed.
Luscdus Allen of DePualak
Springs was visiting Sunday with
Miss Alice taggett,"
Mr. and Mrs. Victor Anderson
spent :Sunday with relatives in
Apalachicola.


Miss Katherine McCall of Pan-
ama City was visiting Sunday af-
ternoon with Martha Hinson.
Mrs. Ynelle Holton spent Sun-
day at Wakulla Springs.
Mr. and Mrs. Philip Lovett, Mr.
and Mrs. E. Wages and Mrs.
Emma Farr spent Sunday in We-
wahitchka, guests of Mr. and Mrs.
Willie Rowell.


1939

Norge Refrigerators

ARE HERE!

LOW IN PRICE
Big Trade Allowance On Your
Old Ice Box

SSEE THE

SNORG E
'BEFORE YOU BUY



ROCHE'S

Appliance Store
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
^- 1, -* t *- o ** -- .^--tl A.


Compliments to the Junior Class
of Port St. Joe High School


B. E. Parker

SHE RIFF
OF GULF COUNTY


-----,,,,,,..,,1---.--.----------



Announcing

Opening of


PHILIPS


MUSIC MART


Wednesday, March 15

Pianos, Musical Instruments and
Musical Merchandise


118 Fourth Street

PANAMA CITY, FLA.
------------------ -------


THESE ARE CASH PRICES

FOR FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
MARCH 10 AND 11


FLOUR
JUNE BRIDE
Self-Rising

24 lb 65 12 lb 350


CORN FLAKES 2 xes '15c
Octagon Soap, 5 small bars....lic
P&G Soap, 3 large bars.........13c

Water Ground Meal L:. 25c

TURNIPS-3 No. 2 cans........25c


Cooking OilGAL 80cs ,. 48c I IISH
TOMATOES-3 No. 2 Cans 254
DILL PICKLES-Quart Jar 15 POTATOES
EARLY JUNE PEAS-2 No. 2 Cans -........ :..---.15
DRY SALT MEAT-Per lb...15c 10 POUNDS 23c
MILK 3 Tall Cans 20c


SUGAR
S-BULK-

10 lbs. 48c


SALMON


ALASKA PINK
2 CANS


25c


DESSERT PEACHES- 29c
SILVER BAR-2 No. 2V2 Cans...
Indiana SWEET CORN- 25c
3 No. 2 Cans ........ ..........
Phillips Pork and Beans- 1lc
No. 2V2 Can .....................


Owens & Murdock


PORT ST. JOE


,


FLORIDA


Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Outlaw were
visiting Sunday in Dothan, Ala.
Collis H. Land spent the week
end with relatives in Quincy.
Miss Margie Kirkland and Miss
Mary Guertin were business visi-
tors Monday in Wewahitchka.
Acey Montgomery and famlt
motored to St. Andrews Sund


i


Pi