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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00124
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 1939
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00124

Full Text






The Star-Florida's fattest grow-
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port .St Joe.


THE


STAR


Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
est growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


VOLUME II PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, MARCH 3, 1939 NUMBER 20


TAXREFORMSTO

BE PRESENTED

TO LEGISLATURE

Include Transaction Tax and Tax
On Hotels, Apartments and
Restaurant Meals

TALLAHASSEE, Mar. 3 (FNS)
-Tax reform programs, ranging
all the way from the abolition of
all ad valorem levies and the sub-
stitution of a proposed transac-
tion tax to a 5 per cent tax on ho-
tels, apartment and rooming house
accommodations and restaurant
meals, will be passed into the
legislative hoppers during .the
S1939 session, convening here next
month.
Advanced .by the Florida State
Chamber of Commerce, the trans-
action tax proposal is expected to
take the form of a double-bar-
reled referendum, one to abolish
all ad valorem taxes and the other
tp substitute a tax upon all retail
and wholesale transactions. DiM
rectors and members of the state
chamber are expressing their
-opinion on the transaction tax in
a referendum, which will be com-
pleted shortly. Harold Colee, pres-
ident of the organization, recently
'went on record as opposed to the
single tax plan.:'.
Representative J. Ed Stokes of
.Panama City is proposing the tax
on hotels, apartments and room,
ing houses and restaurants. In ex-
plaining his plan at the recent
,county commissioners' association
meeting in Jacksonville, Stokes
said he believed the tax would be
paid chiefly by Florida tourists.
'Meanwhile, reports were, current
here that efforts will be made to
re-enact in modified form the
present Murphy law, which grant-
ed low settlements of delinquent
taxes. The law has been blamed
by many city and county officials
as being responsible for compro-
mising tax debts running into the
millions. Proponents of the law,
however, defend the measure as
having restored to the tax rolls
vast areas of "dead" property.
;Gasoline tax 'diversion, also is
in prospect, chiefly a plan by a
group of good road advocates to
impound part of the gas tax money
now going to the state road de-
partment as Florida's contribution
towards a gigantic federal high-
way program for the entire state.
Re-enactment of the seventh cent
gas tax, originally levied as an
emergency, appeared a certainty,
visiting legislators declared, in
view of the state's financial
plight.

Questionnaire

S Getting Results

Results Will Be Tabulated and
Published Next Week

The questionnaire on "What Is
Wrong With Port St. Joe" pub-
lished last week in The Star, is
bringing in results, but due to a
rush of job work this week, the
,editor has not had sufficient time
to analyze the returns.
Fifty-three letters have been re-
ceived to date, and occasional
stragglers are still expected to
,come in, which should give us a
pretty good idea of the public's
opinion on this matter.
Anyone desiring to get their
opinion in on this poll still have
time, as the deadline has been set
for next Tuesday. Blanks are still
available.


LEGION POST WILL HAVE
FEED MONDAY EVENING

A call is issued for all members
of Gulf County Post, American
Legion, and their wives and
I sweethearts, to be on hand next
Monday evening as the regular
meeting will be followed with a
chicken and rice dinner with all
the trimmin's.
--K-


Local Chamber

Asks Change In

Criminal Code

SCalls Upon Legislature to Enact
Bill Sponsored by State
Bar Association'.

Considering the matter of de-
lay and cost to the taxpayers of
criminal cases in our state-counts,
and having before them a copy of
proposed changes drawn up by
the Florida State Bar association,
the directors' of the Port St. Joe
Chamber of Commerce at their
meeting Tuesday passed the fol-
lowing resolution:
"Whereas, The administration
of criminal justice in Florida is
subject to much criticism because
of its cost, delays and seemingly
useless technicalities; and,
"Whereas, This condition tends
to bring about disrespect for our
courts and the general adminis-
tration of our laws; and.
"Whereas...- t has come..to the
attention of the Pert St. Joe
Chamber of Commerce that the
Florida State Bar association has,
during the last stx years been
working on a criminal procedure
bill which it is thought will sim-
plify and make more definite the
procedure in criminal trials; and
it appears to use that the Florida
State Bar association is the best
agency to render this needed
(Continued on Page 5)
-----4-----. .

District Meeting

Of Legion Sunday

To Be Held In Graceville; Many
Local Legionnaires To Attend

A Third District constitutional
conference of the American Le-
gion, Department of Florida, will
be held next Sunday in Graceville
with Graceville Post No. 42 acting
as host to the visiting Legion-
naires and members of the Auxili-
ary.
The session will open at 10
o'clock with a joint meeting of
the Legion and Auxiliary in the
high school auditorium. Following
the invocation and a program of
music, the address of welcome
will be made by A. D. Burns,
mayor of the city of Graceville.
Response in behalf of Third Dis-
trict Legionnaires will be made
by A. D. "Pop" Harkins, past de-
partmental commander, of Green-
wood.
Principal speaker of the day
will be; by Colin English, state su-
perintendent of public instruction.
Following luncheon the Ameri-
can Legion will hold a business
session in the high school audi-
torium, and the Auxiliary will
meet in the woman's club house.
A number of members of Gulf
County Post are planning to at-
tend the conference, and any
members having no means of
transportation and desiring to at-
tend are asked to report to Post


Commander T. M.
will endeavor to
are taken care of.


Schneider, who
see that they


Florida, which 'he


anticipated.


would be in the near future, he
would include Port St. Joe on his
itinerary.
The directors thought it a good
idea if a ladies' auxiliary to the
chamber could be organized, and
it was pointed out that such an
organization would be a tremen-
dous asset, for only by concerted'
action and a union of ideas can
any city go forward. All ladies in-
terested in the formation of such
a body are requested to see the
secretary of the chamber of' com-
merce, who will be glad to assist
in organization of the auxiliary.
George Hudson, manager of the
Suwannee store, was elected to
membership in the chamber.


Tappers Win From

Merchants 56 to 15

And Continue Undefeated; Paper-
makers Hold to Second Place

The two leading teams in the
City Basketball League increased
their leads by winning their tilts
Monday night. Tapper's Oldtown-
ers. made it eight straight by
almost playing the Merchants off
the court, winning by a score of
56 to 15. The only player failing
to score for the Oldtowners was
Dendy, but to offset that, Boyer
made high individual score for the
season with 12 fie'd goals and
one point from the foul line. Tap-
(Continued on Page 8)


FHA MAPS CITY FOR



ISSUANCE OF LOANS


C. C. DIRECTORS

TALK MATTERS

OF IMPORTANCE

Attempt Will Be Made to Secure
Federal Aid for Elimination
Of Dogfly Pest

At the last regular meeting of
the Port St. Joe Chamber of Com-
merce on February 17, it was de-
cided to hold but one meeting a
month, and to change the night
of meeting. The matter of select-
ing a date was left to the direc-
tors, and at the meeting of that
body Tuesday evening the date
selected for the next meeting was
March 9. As a consequence there
will be no meeting of the chamber
tonight.
The directors discussed and

acted upon a number of \matters
Tuesday. Among the most import-
ant was receipt of a letter from
the FHA declaring approved areas
in the city for home loans. The
gist of this letter appears in an-
other column, as does also a reso-
lution sent to the state bar asso-
ciation in regard to legislation to
speed, up criminal trials and re-
duce costs.
A donation. was made to the
Stephen C. Foster Memorial, to
be erected on the banks of the
Suwannee river.
It was decided to take up with
authorities in Washington ,the
matter of Investigating the dogfly
that infests the coastal regions
for a portion of the year and at-
tempt to get an investigator to
come here and study the habits
of this pest, learn its breeding
places and establish a method of
control.
A motion was carried 'to invite
Dr. Townsend to come to Port.St.
Joe and explain his old age pen-
sion plan, but when Dr. Townsend
was contacted Wednesday by tele-
phone he stated that he would be
unable to stop over in this city at
this time, but on his next trip to


Tovey Reports On

Waterway Meeting

Will Endeavor To Have Local En-
tries In Regatta Next Year

C. A. Tovey returned to Port
St. Joe Tuesday from Mt. Dora
where he attended the fourth an-
nual meeting of the Florida Wa-
terway Congress and Orange Box
Regatta held in' that city Febru-
ary 22.
At the session George W. Gibbs
of Jacksonville gave an interest-
ing address on the subject of
"Yachts Develop Florida." He
called attention to the fact that
the "yacht is a Isymbol of suc-
cess" and said: "All rich men do
not own yachts, but all yachts are
owned by rich men."
"General Sanford first came to
Sanford in a yacht.
"Henry Flagler first saw Miami
from his yacht.
"John Ringling first saw Sara-
sota from the deck of his yacht.
"Carl Fisher sailed by what is'
now Miami Beach and this de,
velopment was forthcoming.
"Alfred I. DuPont sailed his
yacht over near Port St. Joe and
today there is a huge paper mill
there.
"When yachtsmen can move
from one beautiful body of water
to another, the number who come
to Florida will be greatly in-
creased."
Claude F. Lee of Gainesville
brought a forceful appeal in com-
plimenting the waterway congress
on its leadership in uniting the
various sections of the state into
a compact unit at work for the
development of Florida's water-
ways. "Such unity of purpose and
determination is the spirit which
has built and will continue to
build this state," he said.
While the number of boats par-
ticipating in the Orange Box Re-
gatta was not large, the event was
most successful in demonstrating
what Florida boys can do in build-
ing and 'sailing their own craft.
It is the plan of Mr. Tovey to de-
'(Continued bn Page 4)


D
Students To

Issue Star
th
Co-operating with the mem.-
of
bers of the junior class of
the Port St. Joe high- school,
who are endeavoring to raise
th
money to carry out a number t
of entertainments, and also t
to give those students inter- ag
ested in journalism an oppor- i
tunity to get some down-to. J
Ja
earth newspaper experience, th
the editor of The Star will
turn the paper over to these th
aspiring journalists : next th
week and go off on a fishing e
av
trip. av
The co-operation of busl- n
ness concerns and residents
of the city is asked in this pr
Jo
venture.by the students, both d
in the way of advertising and e
news, and we feel sure that an
.th
they will put out an issue
that will be a credit to both a
the school and the city. ga
no
W1.


esignates Areas Where In-
sured Mortgages Up To
75% May Be Secured

As the result of efforts during
e past three months of residents
Port St. Joe to secure Federal
using Administration loans in
i sections of the city in order
at more homes could be built
take care of the housing short-
:e,' a letter was received this
eek by the chamber of com-
erce from M. M. Parrish of
,cksonville, state director for
e FHA, stating that insured
mortgages up to 75 per cent of
e FHA valuation with up to 20
ars' time for repayment will be
'ailable here in certain deaig-
Lted areas.
Mr. Parrish states that a blue-
int has been made of Port St.,
e and four sections outlined,
designated as areas 1, 2, 3 and 4,
Id' that his office has been a -a
orized to recommend the insur-
.ce of loans which after investi-:,
tion are determined as eco-'
omically' sound. in' accordance
ith the following limitations: :
Area No. 1-No loan is accept-
lIe for mortgage siuourance in
itlined area No:. 1, which 4,-
udes the business section pat
the industrial section and
terogeneous residential sections.
Area No. 2-Insured mortgages
n properties fronting on IVMominu
ent avenue between Eighth aid,
enth streets shall not exceed
600. Insured mortgages on other
operties in this area shall not
ceed $2400 as a maximum.
Area No. 3- Consideration of
is area shall be as follows:
(a) Insured mortgages on prop-
ties on Garrison avenue between
enth and Sixteenth streets, in-
uding Hunter's Circle, shall not
ceed $3000 as a maximum.
(b) Insured mortgages on prop-
ties on McClelland avenue, be-
een Tenth and Sixteenth .streets
all not exceed $2200 as a maxi-
im.
(c) Insured mortgages on prop-
ties on Garrison avenue and
arvin avenue shall not exceed,
600. (Note: Woodward avenue
this area is chiefly low, swamp
id and will probably not be
ed as building sites for some
ne, and insured loans on prop-
ties on this avenue are unac-
ptable at present.)
Area No. 4 Consideration of
s area shall be as follows:
(a) Insured mortgages on prop-
ties on Long avenue between
nth and Twentieth streets shall
t exceed $2700 as a maximum.
(b) Insured mortgages on prop-
ies on Palm boulevard between
nth and Twentieth streets shall
t exceed $2400 as a maximum.
(c) Insured mortgages on prop-
ies on Monument avenue be-
een Tenth and' Twentieth
eets shall not exceed $3600.
rhe letter states that in no
ie will a loan be recommended
Insurance in excess of the
ount established as the maxi-
m limit for a specified area,
gardless of the value of the
operty, and that amount of the
.n will not exceed 75 per cent
the FHA valuation. It is also
'initely required that restric-
e covenants meeting the objec-
es of the FHA must be a"
(Continued on page 8)









r!O, M., .--'Jy


THE STAR
W. S. SMITH, Editor and Publisher
Issued every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida,
from The Star Building

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at' the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year ......$2.00 Six Months ....$1.25
Three Months ......65c

-4{ Telephone 51 j

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

CAN IT BE DONE?
Present indications point to a determined
effort on the part of several organizations
to have the 1939 legislature tighten up on
delinquent tax collections and for a more
uniform system of making assessments and
tax valuations. This effort will go hand-in-
hand with a state-wide demand for more
economy in the operation of the state gov-
ernment and the keeping of the state budget
within the limits set by the 1937 legislature.
But we doubt very much that this can be
done? The way things stand now the state
treasury is going to show a good sized deficit,
and the legislature will be required not only
to find funds for the budget for the next two
years but must also appropriate sufficient to
make up this deficit. And, as far as we can
see, there is no way by which the forthcom-
ing legislature can effect economies that will
take care of this deficit, meet the budget re-
quirements and reduce taxes.
On the contrary, we believe that more rev-
enue will have to be produced from some
hitherto undiscovered source to meet the de-.
r. ands. I :
i Our schools, which now are a responsibil-
ity of the state, lost a huge amount through
the Murphy Act, and replacement revenue
will have to be found to make up this. Our
highway system is badly in need of repairs
and must be fixed up or allowed to disinte-
grate with a consequent loss of tourist busi-
ness. More names are continually being
added to those receiving old age assistance,
'id to the blind and those with dependent
children. Ad valorem revenues are declining
every year due to homestead exemption and
the Murphy Act. In all probability the gross
receipts tax wlil be repealed at the coming
session of the legislature, which will mean a
loss of two or three million dollars of reve-
nue which will have to be found elsewhere.
From the looks of things the members of
the 1939 legislature will have to be ma-
gicians to meet the new demands for more
revenue, make up the deficit that is staring
them in the face, and provide sufficient cash
for the proposed budget for the next two
years, and at the same time make a reduction
in taxes which will be demanded by the tax-
payers.
Perhaps it can be done-but we doubt it.

If a general retail sales tax is to be im-
posed in Florida, an income tax should also
be provided in order that the larger part of
the burden will not fall on the shoulders of
those with small incomes.

There isn't any way hardly to explain the
epidemic of child brides over: the country
unless maybe the men think when the girls
get old enough to have good sense they
won't marry them.-Macon Telegraph.

Idle thought: Why don't those fellows'
,ver in Europ-: just w ite their treaties with
disal rearing ink, and save themselves em-
barrasment ?-Cincinnati Enquirer.

Some folks have to work for a living -
others raid the pie counter.-Florida Times-
Union. And some raid the nork barrel. t


MANY HAPPY RETURNS!
The Congress of the United States has a
birthday tomorrow-March 4. That date
marks the 150th anniversary of this greatest
of all great American institutions-an insti-
tution of the people, by the people and for
the people, as Lincoln so aptly described it.
No elaborate ceremonies will mark the oc-
casion, but Americans can well pause tomor-
row and reflect that it is a joyous occasion.
Congress, they, should remember, is the
elected voice of the people in government. It
is the people's servant. In other lands, the
citizen has no voice in government. Instead,
the citizen is the servant of government.
Born of the Constitution, the congress is
the world's best example of self-government.
And under self-government America has pro-
gressed, in this century and a half, to first
in rank as a nation of freedom, equality and
justice for all. It has made America the envy
of all other peoples.
So, tomorrow, we whose freedom is the
envy of the world, pay tribute to the institu-
tion that exemplifies self-government.
Many happy returns of the day! 1May a
free congress never perish!

WHERE YOUR MONEY GOES
Many oil companies advertise the price of
gasoline in this fashion: "Gas, 15 cents a gal-
lon; state and federal tax, 6 cents; total 21
cents."
If similar methods of illustrating the price
of all products were employed, the American
consumer would get the shock of his life.
When you buy a five dollar pair of shoes,
a dollar or more is for taxes. When you pay
a three dollar electric bill, 50 or 60 cents rep-
resents taxes. When you buy a $40 suit, close
to $10 goes for taxes.
You can't dodge taxation unless you're a
hermit living in the hills. On a normal day
you pay taxes a dozen times, though you may
not know it--when you drive your car, go to t
a show, eat lunch or make a purchase. When
the American people geft this truth through
their heads, there will be a drive for economy
in government that will get somewhere. For
ignorance of the facts is a wasteful govern-
ment's best friend.-Winter Haven Herald.
Should the proposed sales tax piss (which t
we doubt very much) at least the people of
Florida will get it through their heads, for
on every purchase, regardless of the size,
they will be forced to "kick in." If you want
to have this demonstrated, just drive up into
Alabama and buy a five-cent cold drink. You t
will have to pay six cents and get back a
handful of aluminum tokens for change. 2
e
CUTTING EXPENSES u
The state legislature convenes again in
April, and Florida citizens are already won-
dering what kind of a new scheme will be a
concocted to raise taxes during the next two t
years. In the state and national governments f
the cry always seems to be: "How can we
raise more taxes so we can create more t
bureaus and commissions?" instead of "How n
can we cut the expenses of government to s
fit our budget?" d
After all, it's largely the fault of the peo- c
a
ple. We holler for this and that and the other f
thing and expect the government to put up
the money. We expect all the cutting to be c
done on the projects that are favored by.
someone else, while we raise a howl if we a
don't get what we want. r
One encouraging fact on the horizon is
that most of the talk during the opening days ii
of congress dealt with the vital problem of
excessive federal spending. It is an apparent s
and hopeful sign that a strong congressional c
bloc intends to make a determined drive for
economy and efficiency.-Eustis Lake Re- p
gion.
t.
Keeping your chin up helps made the sun-
;hine brighter.-Florida Times-Union. And
ilso gives you a blistered nose. fi
Add smles: Tasteles as akiss oer the h
Add similies: Tasteless as a 'kiss over the h


telephone .


a'


ONE WAY OF LOOKING AT IT


Legislative Appropriations

Expected to Exceed Income

From Present State Levies


By Florida Research Bureau
Despite the fact that Florida's
state government collected more
than $59,000,000 in the 1938 fiscal
year, compared with $48,000,000
the year before, it is indicated
:hat when all the appropriations
of the 1939 legislature, are added
up, they will exceed income. But
by how many million dollars? The
previous two articles of this se-
ries have shown the 1938 reve-
nues and disbursements of the
state. Because of anticipated fu-
;ure demands, and' in spite of
greatly increased revenue, deficits
ire expected in a number of
'unds, unless the state receives a
windfall from estate taxes. The
general revenue fund will be
about two million dollars short.
he Confederate pension fund will
be exhausted, social welfare will
lot have enough money to pay
ill its pensioners, anv the teach-
ers' salary fund will be depleted
unless the sale of motor vehicle
ags exceeds expectations.
Must Make Up Deficit
'The legislature must appropri-
.te ,sufficient money to make up
his deficit, and balance these
unds for the next two years, or
ind' some method of cutting ex-
penses. It would be misleading to
ell the taxpayer that any econo-
cies will be effected in the 1939
session that can materially re-
uce taxes. State governmental
osts have been insufficiently an-
lyzed for an intelligent and ef-
icient trimming of expenses.
,Seven principal causes will in-
rease demands on the state:
Social welfare, including aid to
ged, blind and unemployed.
Schools, now a constitutional
responsibility of the state.
Highways, which need rebuild-
ng.
Conservation and advertising of
tate resources.
Ad valorem revenues, now de-
reasing.
Proposed repeal of retail occu-
ational (gross receipts) tax.
Increased cost of administering
tate departments and' Institu-
Ions.
Welfare Largest Item
The largest item is, social wel-
are. A $30-a-month pension rate
'as authorized by the 1937 Icgis-
ature. The social welfare board
as been able to pay less than an
average of $15 a month to the 38,-


000 aged, blind and dependent
children now receiving aid, and
there are 15,000 more just as
eligible who are not on the rolls
because of lack of funds. MIany
.state and national legislators ad-
vocate raising the old age pension
rate to $50 a month.- The question
is discussed in detail in a later
article.
Grouped under social welfare is
aid to the unemployed and Injured
workers. Both these fields of pub-
lic activity are too new to esti-
mate future demands accurately.
Local school revenues were cut
approximately three million dol-
lars by the Murphy Act. it is es-
timated. The school group will
undoubtedly ask Ifor replacement
revenue. An amendment to the
state constitution voted in Novem-
ber makes schools a state respon-
sibility on a parity with govern-
mental departments. Unless the
schools seek new special taxes
for their use, they will have to
strive to see that the general
revenue fund is large enough to
take care of future requirements.
Not only must the existing deficit
be covered, but enough revenue s
provided to assure future, solv-'-
ency.
Highways Wearing Out
Florida has a boom-built high-
way system which is fast wearing
out. High speed cars and' heavily
loaded trucks are putting on the
finishing touches. The $200,000.000
highway investment must be re-
stored and extended, or Florida's
income from tourists, business
and agriculture will suffer. Be-
tween 1923 and 1929 the state
spent (with federal aid) an aver-
age of $19,000,000 annually on
construction of new highways.
Last year, despite greatly In-
creased traffic, It could spend
only about half that sum on new
construction and failed to receive
several million dollars of match-
ing federal funds as a result. The
balance of the income of the state
road department went for main-
tailing the state highway'system,
including the hundreds of miles
of highways and bridges taken
over from the counties in recent
years.
Highway planners have been at
work for months, and their report
is being analyzed, by a special
legislative committee. The meth-
(Continued on page 7)


PAGE TWO


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY MARCH 3 1939


I


r


II_


---~--- t ---'--- : -








FRIDAY, ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ MAC ,139 H TRPR T OE UFCUNY LRD DtFT4F


State May Claim


South Grew Living Bank Night Funds


And. Enjoyed Abundance; Famil
Of Today Can Do Same

SLiving at home and boarding at
the same place have been recom
mended 'to farmers for so long
that th recommendation almost
has lost its effect. Those who
hear the expression are too ap
to shrug their shoulders and gc
ahead, much like the little fellow
who knows he shouldn't filch
cookies from the cooky jar, and
yet does it every time he has a
chance.
Examples of those who practice
a live-at-home program are not
hard to find, however. Many farm
families in Gulf county grow their
own food and feed crops, and over
a period of years they profit by
doing so.
One of the best examples, on a
large scale, takes us back to the
old South before the Civil War.
The agricultural South at that
time enjoyed a period of prosper-
.ity that was the envy of the whole
"nation. Some may say this was be-
cause the farmers had free or
.slave labor. When it is recalled
that the farmer paid from $15 to
$2000 for a man to labor in the
fields and had the responsibility
of clothing, housing and feeding
that laborer, it is seen that the
labor could hardly be called free.
One of the main ?actors in this
ante-bellum prosperity was the
fact that the Southern planter
was forced by circumstances to
raise food for his slaves. In the
process- of raising this food he
naturally raised feed for his live-
stock. His own family became a
-art of the live at-homd system.
The money received for cotton
was used to enlarge his -holdings,
build beautiful homes and make
life on the old Southern planta-
tion something to be immortalized
in song and story and acclaimed
by the world as one of the most
magnificent civilizations of the
ages.
However, after tne terrible de-
struction of war, prices of farm
products rose to new heights. An
all-cash system of farming came
into vogue in the South. Mayhap
the southern farmer has been suf-
fering from it ever since.
----
Nearly half of the food eaten in
the United States 'comes out .of
cans or jars.


Y Attorney General Discovers 1895
Statute Providing for Confis-
t cation of Lottery Prizes

g All of you people who have won
t cash awards at the bank night
0 drawings in Port St. Joe and' else-
t where had better be prepared to
o dig down in your jeans and hand
Over to the state of Florida the
Amount won, for civil action may
I be started in the courts, under a
Slaw passed in 1895, to collect for
the state all money paid to bank
night winners' in Florida. Which
t would be one way of wiping out
I the state's deficit this year.
Under -a recent ruling of the
state supreme court bank night
drawings were decided to be lot-
teries and, therefore, outlawed un-
der the constitution, and' Attorney
General George C. Gibbs reports
that the old 1895 statute requires
his office and every state attor-
ney to start action to get for the
state money collected from thea-
ters or money ordered at bank
nights but not awarded because
the drawings were stopped.
The statute (chapter 7670, Com-
piled General Laws of 1927) under
which Gibbs started his investi-
gation, was passed almost forty
years before bank night was or-
iginated. It was designed to pre-
vent lotteries of any kind in the
state of Florida.
It declares forfeit "all sums of
money and every other valuable
thing drawn and won as a prize,
or as a share of a prize, in any
lottery, and. all property to be
,disposed of, or offered to be dis-
posed of, by chance or device'un-
der any lawful pretext by any
person being an inhabitant pr
resident within this state, and all
sums of money or other thing of
value received by such person by
reason of his being the owner or
holder of any ticket or share of
a ticket in a lottery, or pretended
lottery, or a share or right in any
.such schemes of chance or such
*device .contrary to the provisions
of this article."
The, state attorney general has
written all the state attorneys in
Florida to investigate the "prob-
ability of collecting any moneys
which were offered or won as
prizes in such schemes." Until
the attorneys report, Gibbs states
he will not decide whether to or-


Why Suffer Longer Than Necessary?
Dr. Miles Anti-Pain Pills Relieve Quickly
DR MILES ANTI PAIN put you"back on your fe
PILLS were made for just one again "rarin' to go".
purpose-to relieve pain. Users DR. M ILES ANTI PAI
write that they "work like PILLS act quickly. You don
magic". They contain an ef- have to wait forty minutes 1
an hour for them to take effect
fective, quick-acting, analgesic an isthe casefor the many ana
-pain reliever. gesics. You'll get action in front
Try Dr. Miles Anti-Pain Pills ten to twenty minutes.
before you lose a day's work- DR. MILES ANTI PAIl
and pay-or break a social en- PILLS- are pleasant to tak
gagement because of HEAD- handy to carry, prompt and eJ
ACHE, MUSCULAR, PERIOD- fective in action, and do no
IC, OR NEURALGIC PAINS. upset the stomach. Their co!
They may be just what you is small. One, or at most, tw
need to relieve your pain and is usually sufficient to relieve
At your Drug Store. 25 for 25c. 125 for $1.00.
BS8Al _


et
N
L't
to
ct
L-
m
N
e,
f-
ot
st
0,
e.


Farmers of the Old


1. C

2. P
ti
3. L
in


I I


4'


der cases filed against theaters
and individual prizes winners.
If money is recovered under the
old law, it will go into the usual
fine and forfeiture funds.
-- K-S---

Crippled Tots

Clinic Will Be

Held March 17

Gulf County American Legion
Post Will Furnish Free
Transportation

The crippled children's clinic.
sponsored tach year by the Amer-
ican Legion and Auxiliary, will be
held March 17 in Panama City.
The clinic will be conducted .un-
der the direction of Dr. F. L.
Forte, orthopedic surgeon from
Jacksonville.
Children from Gulf, Franklin
and Bay counties are eligible for
examination at this clinic and the
Gulf County American Legion post
will furnish free transportation, to
all children in Gulf county whose
parents desire to have them ex-
amined. Parents are requested to
get in touch immediately with T.
M. Schneider, commander, in or-
der that transportation may be
provided for all.
-4-
AMATUNGULU TREE
AT WORLD'S FAIR
Among the oddities in Florida's
exhibit at the New York World's
Fair will be an amatungulu tree.
The amatungulu, or Natal palm,
is a little-known Florida fruit
which resembles the Damson Blum
a.d is used mostly for jellies.

INTERNAL UPSET
Motorist (after knocking down
a butcher's boy): "I'm sorry, my
boy. 'Are you all right?"
Boy (picking up contents of his
basket): "Dunno. Here's me liver
and me ribs, but where's me kid-
ney?"-Montreal Star.

i


1




APALACHICOLA



STATE BANK


We Solicit Accounts of

Corporations, Firms Partnerships

and Individuals



APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA



Member: FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION
S


St. Joe Paper





Company




Port St. Joe, Florida


All pulpwood used in the production of paper at the plant of the St. Joe
Paper Company is harvested and bought only from those who strictly com-
ply with the conservation and SUSTAINED YIELD plans of the Federal
and State Forest Service.
The St. Joe Paper Company and affiliates have acquired approximately
500,000 acres of good pine reproducing land along 100 miles of public high-
way, not only as a perpetual reservoir of supply, but as a practical demon-
stration of what can be accomplished in Florida with Forestry conducted
on a SUSTAINED YIELD basis.


We Invite the Public To Inspect the Cuttings On

the Properties From Which This Company

Is Purchasing Pulpwood


WE REQUEST THOSE FROM WHOM WE PURCHASE WOOD
TO OBSERVE THESE RULES

ut your timber conservatively. 4. Plant where there is no hope for

reserve and protect young, natural reproduction.
thrifty trees. 5. Prevent and suppress forest
fires. ; :;'
eave vigorous trees for reseed- 6. Ask your state forester for as-
ig your lands. distance in forestry problems.


lanb ~ ~sBI~A 'IBI e i


FRIDAY, MARCH 3, -1939 -


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY,.FLORIDA


PAGE THREE









A O


ZONE MEETING HERE OF
METHODIST W. M. S.
The first zone meeting of the
year of the Methodist Woman's
Missionary Society was held here
Tuesday at the Methodist church.
Churches represented were St. An-
drews, Parker, Mlllville, Panama
City, Werwahitchka and Port St.
Joe.
The morning session opened at
11 o'clock under the direction of
the zone leader, Mrs. R. E. Brown
of Panama City. The opening
prayer was given by Rev. J. Y.
Sellers of Millvillie, followed with
song, "I Love to Tell the Story."
The address of welcome was
delivered by Mrs. W. E. Boyd, local
auxiliary president and the re-
-.sponse was given by Mrs. Felix
Moates, president of the Panama
City W. M. S. Mrs. T. M. Cox,
district secretary, of DeFuniak
Springs, conducted an interesting
study on the book. "Modern Mes-
sage of the Psalms," using as the
basis of her talk the 1st and 15th
Psalms.
The program which followed
consisted of two playlets, "Conse-
cration," presented by the Marie
Jones Circle of Port St. Joe, and
"Christian Social Relations," pre-
sented by the Millville circle.
Mrs. W. A. Smith of Port St.
Joe delighted her hearers with a
vocal solo, and a talk was given
by Rev. Shirah of the mission in
Panama City on "The Need of
Missionary Education In the
Churches."
Roll was called and counts made
as follows: Parker, 6; Wewa-
hitchka, 8; Port St. Joe, 20; Mill-
ville, 13; Panana City. 19, and St.
Andrews, 10. A number of visi-
tors from the local Baptist church
and the Methodist church of
Blountstown were also present.
Mrs. Cox announced that an in-
teresting program was being
planned for the missionary confer-
ence to be held in Andalusia, Ala.,
and requested that all auxiliaries
send a list of delegates. Luncheon
was announced and the group was
dismissed by Rev. Sellars.
The afternoon session was also
conducted by Mrs. Brown and was
opened with song, "The Rock That
Is Higher Than I," followed by
the devotional by Rev. H. P.
Childs of Panama, who chose for
his theme "Missionary Thoughts."
The auxiliaries were asked to
make their reports and introduce
their officers and then a rising
vote 'of thanks was given the hos-
tess society.
-The meeting was. turned over
to Mrs. Cox, who announced the
pledge for the year. An appeal
was made for organized work
among babies, and children. "The
Study of Psalms" and "A Real
Prayer" was recommended as a
Bible study book. It wasalso an-
nounced by the secretary that
"India" would be the subject for
the spring mission study course.
The meeting was dismissed by
a consecration service by Rev. D.
E. Marietta, local pastor.
The next zone meeting will be
held in the First Methodist church
in Panama City, the date to be
announced later.

MRS. LEWIS PERRITT IS
HOSTESS TO J.A.M. CLUB
Mrs. Lewis Perritt was hostess
to the J. A. M. sewing club Mon-
day night at the home of Mrs. B.
A. Pridgeon on Fourth street. A
delightful social hour was enjoyed
in sewing and Chinese checkers
after which a delicious buffet sup-
per of baked ham, pea salad, hot
rolls, nut .cake and coffee was
served to Mesdames J. M. Smith.
H. A. Drake. J. A. Connell. W. C..
Pridgeon. C. Boyer, S. C4 Prid-
geon and B A. Pridgeon and the
Misses Myrtice Coody and Edna
Davis. .-... I .


At the Churches


ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Rev. H. P. Money, Pastor
Full-time services
10:15 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.-Preaching Service.
7:30 p. m.-Evangelistic service.
Prayermeeting every Wednesday


eight.

METHODIST CHURCH
D. E. Marietta, Minister
Services Every Sunday
10: 00 a. m.-Churcn School.
11:00 a. m.-Morning worship.
7:30 p. m.-Evening worship.


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. J. W. Sisemore, Minister
10:00 a. m.-Sunday School.'
11:00 a. m.-Morning Worship.
6:30 p. m.-B. T. U.
7:30 p. m.-Evening Worship.
W. M. U., Monday, 3:00 p. m.
Prayermeeting Wednesday, 7:30 p.
m. Teachers meeting, Thursday,
7:30 p. m.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
10:00 a. m.--Sunday School.
11:00'a. m.-Preaching service,
7:30 p. m.-Preaching service,
---- ---- -
MRS. BRINSON HOSTESS TO
MARIE JONES CIRCLE
Mrs. R. H. Brinson entertained
the members of the Marie Jones
Circle of the Methodist Mission-
ary society at her home on Sixth
street Monday afternoon. Mrs. J.
C. Bradbury was m charge of the
program. which was opened with
the Lord's Prayer. followed by a
reading of the 101st Psalm.
Program for the afternoon was
taken from the Missionary Bulle-
-tins, as' follows': "The Christian
Japanese Teachers." Mrs. J. L.
Temple; "Florid a Conference -
Rural Work," Mrs. S. C. Parker;
"Message from Generalissimo and
Madam Chiang-Kai-Shek,' Mrs. J.
C. Bradbury; "Celebration 'of
Christmas In India," Mrs. R. W.
Smith; "Arbr. Day Celebration,"
Mrs. R. A. Swatts.
Mrs. J. L. Temple took charge
of 'the short business session. The
minutes were read and approved,
and the treasurer gave a report,
stating that $15 had been paid the
-Susannah Wesley Circle, leaving a
balance of $2.21 in the treasury.
Plans were made to hold another
rummage sale in two weeks. All
members were urged to attend the
zone meeting at the church, -
Cake and coffee was served to
fourteen members and one visi-
tor, Mrs. F. M. Rowan.

SURPRISE PARTY FOR
MRS. VANLANDINGHAM
-Mrs. Ivey Vanlandingham was
the honoree Tuesday evening at
.a surprise party given by her hus-
band at the Stoutamire boarding
house on Reid avenue. She was
the recipient of many beautiful
gifts, including a handsome wrist
watch baked inside a cake, the
gift of her husband.
Present at this enjoyable af-
fair were Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Out-
law, Mr. and. Mrs. Strauss, Mr.
and Mrs. E. H., Vanlandingham,
Mr. and Mrs. George Cooper, Mrs.
R. H. Bell, Mrs. G. W. Whitaker
and the honor guest arid her hus-
band.

TUESDAY BRIDGE CLUB
MEETS WITH MRS. CURRY
The Tuesday Brilge club met
this week at the home of Mrs. E.
Curry on Twelfth street. Two
tables were placed for play and
after several progressions, prizes
were presented to Mrs. P. D. Far-
mer, high, and Mrs. W. S. Smith.
cut.
The hostess served as refresh-
ments coffee" and cake to Mes-
dames P. D. Farmer, T. V. West-
brook, W. M. Howell, M. Larkin,
D. C. Smith, W. A. Wood. W. S.
Smith. T. Hull and C. Trammell.


ni


Society Personals Churches

LANETA DAVIS, Editor
i'


PARENT-TEACHERS IN
REGULAR MEETING
The Parent-Teacher association
held their regular meeting Thurs-
day afternoon of last week at the
high school auditorium with Prof.
D. G. McPherson presiding in the
absence of the president.
After reading of the minutes, a
motion was made and approved
that the P.-T. A. pay for the mu-
sic for the Glee club until they
could be reimbursed. A motion was
also made and carried that the
organization pay for tonsilectomys
for five needy chitlren.
A general discussion was held
as to the P.-T. A. aiding the Band
Boosters club, the Founders pro-
gram and the Stephen Foster Me-
morial, and a motion was made
and approved to send check of $2
to each cause.
A nominating committee was se-
lected for the naming of new of-
ficers, after which the meeting
was adjourned.

Mrs. Terry Hightower of Perry
was the week-end guest of her
husband, T. Hightower.
*
Chapman Milligren of Wewa-
hitchka visited Saturday in Port
St. Joe.


ni


STUDENTS ENJOY DANCE
AT CENTENNIAL BUILDING
Students of the junior and se-
nior high schools were the guests
last Saturday evening of D. B.
Lewis, in charge of construction
of the Centennial building, at a
dance in the building which was
hugely enjoyed by the young
folks under the supervision of a
committee of chaperones made up
of Mr. and Mrs. Sammie Davis,
Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Vandegrift,
T. W. Wilson and C..H. Brammar,
with Ted Richards assisting at
the door and with the refresh-
ments.
Mrs. Lawrence Stepp furnished
an electric phonograph for the
music and made he sandwiches,
the money for which, as well as
the soft drinks, was contributed
by R. S. Carver, Cecil Costin, N.
Comforter, George Wimberly, J.
L. Sharit, George Tapper, T. M.
Schneider, B. W. Eells, M. Ross
Watson, Robert Bellows, Miles
Hurlbut, C. A.- LeHardy, W. O.
Anderson and Dwight Marshall.
Ice for cooling the drinks was
contributed by Max Kilbourn of
the St. Joe Ice company.
' The students began gathering
at 7:30 and soon the hall was a
scene of gaiety, with many of the
latest dance steps being staged.
At 10 o'clock T. W. Wilson
spoke briefly concerning the spon-
sors of the event and of future
plans for recreational programs,
and then invited all present to
partake of the lunch provided.
Following lunch, dancing was
resumed and continued until ap-
proach of midnight. A few par-
ents dropped in at the height of
the festivities and evidently were
pleased to see the young folks
having such an enjoyable time.
Mayor Sharit and Commissioners
B. W. Eells and B. A. Pridgeon
also came in and paid their re-
spects.
The students were loud in their
praise of the sponsor of .the af-
fair and his assistants. It is hoped
that another dance of a like na-
ture can be held before the end
of the school term.

WOMAN'S CLUB TO INSTALL
OFFICERS MARCH 16
The Woman's Club held its
regular meeting Wednesday after,
noon at the Methodist church with
Mrs. G. A. Patton presiding. Dur-
ing the business hour Mrs. Ross
Coburn of the werrare committee
reported five needy families that
were receiving aid through the
club.
Installation services of the or-
ganization will be held in the Port
Inn dining room on March 16, with
Mrs. Robert Bellows in charge of
the luncheon.
The club will entertain clubs
from Apalachicola, Panama City
and Wewahitchka at the Centen-
nial building on April 5 and each
visiting club is asked to take part
in the program. At that time an
exhibit of arts and hand-work will
be on display for the visitors.
Following the business meeting
'an interesting program was- pre-
sented by the conservation and,
natural resources committee.

MRS. GLOECKLER HOSTESS
TO THURSDAY BRIDGE CLUB
Mrs. J. B. Gloeckler entertained
the members of the Thursday
Bridge Club yesterday at her home
on Sixth street. Following the
hour of play, prizes were pre-
sented and delicious refreshments
served by the hostess to the mem-
bers present.
**
Mr. and Mrs. G. L. VonWellen
of Tallahassee arrived Tuesday to
spend several days in the city as
guests of their son-in-law and
daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Huel
Crockettt.


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ida


MESDAMES SHARIT AND
BELLOWS CO-HOSTESSES
Honoring Mrs. Bertha Bussells
of Fleeting, Va., who is their
guest, Mrs. Robert Bellows and
Mrs. J. L. Sharit entertained at
tea last Saturday afternoon be-
tween the hours of 3:30 and 5:30,
with Mrs. B. W. Eells and Mrs.
Ross Watson pouring. Over on'
hundred called during the after-
noon. I

Jesse James is coming!? '.

Mrs. J. L. Kerr arrived in the
city Wednesday.from Chicago for
a visit with her husband.
r ft ...
TOVEY REPORTS ON
WATERWAY MEETING

(Continued from Page 1)
velop interest in this event here
in Port St. Joe. and endeavor to
have one or two entries in the re-
gatta next year, which is sched-
uled to take place February 3,
1940, at Mt. Dora.
Mr. Tovey and W. T. Edwards
of this city, and W. P. Dodd of
Apalachicola were elected to the
board of directors of the Florida
Waterway Congress.
/


V V


c
---------------------------------T-


L---l-l --~---f-~ ~L ---------1~-------


PAGE~i FOUR


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, MARCH 3, 1939


LOUIS' CAFE
TRY OUR
PLATE LUNCH 25c
TASTY TOASTED SANDWICHES SEA FOOD
APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA




MARKS BROKERAGE COMPANY
WHOLESALE GROCERS

Happy Feeds in Red Ball Bags
Fancy TLPELO Honey

APALACHICOLA, FLA.




The NEW G. E. APPLIANCE LINE
IS HERE!


GULF HARDWARE & SUPPLY CO.


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


T T









FSC


THE TATTLER
SEES ALL- E THE STAFF t'
KNW ALL- //^Editor-In-Chief.........Dick Stepp
KNOWS ALL- Assistant Editor... .Bobby Coburn
STELLS ALL Sports Editor........ Al Schneider
^^^^ Ih A*[ Society Editors............ Opal
ABOUT HAPPENINGS Greene and Dorothy Crockett
IN PORT ST. JOE HIGH Joke Editor.........Paul Johnson


St. Joe Sharks

I Win from Wewa

Nip and Tuck Affair Until Last
Few Minutes of Play

Tuesday night at the Centen-
nial building the St. Joe Sharks
basketball quintet avenged their
loss to Wewahitchka at the begin-
ning of the season by trouncing
the invading Demons 14 to 9.
It was a nip and tuck affair un-
til the last few minutes of play,
when the Sharks sank two field
goals and a foul shot to clinch
the game. With the score tied 9-9,
Fowhand dropped in a pretty one-
handed shot from "way out to put
St. Joe ahead by two points.
Schneider then sank a free shot,
which was followed with a field
goal ly Stepp that wound. up the
scoring for the night. With .still
three and a half minutes to play,
the Sharks- gave a pretty exhibi-
tion of freezing the ball that kept
Wewahitchka baffled until the
final whistle..
At the half-way mark St..'Joe
was leading the Demons, 6 to 5.
With a one point disadvantage
Wewa tightened down and held
the Sharks to but three points
during the entire third quarter.
Whitfield. speedy little forward,
sank two long srots for Wewa
that tied up the ol' ball game.
Then St. Joe really started click-
ing and scored the winning five
points in a hurry.
The large crown that attended
got their money's worth as far as
thrills and excitement was con-
cerned, and there was plenty of
both throughout the game.

TRUE TO LIFE

Movie Star: "Have you many
lines, to say in that new picture?"
Male Star: "No; I'm playing the
part of a husband."
--------- -
Prof. D. G. McPherson, Coach
Tom Owens, Miss Alice Gibson,
Miss Allah Mae Darcey, Miss
Kathleen Saunders *wa dd Miss
Marigene Smith accompanied the
basketball team 'to the tournament
at DeFuniak Springs.


OPEN
7 a. m. 2a. m.


OPEN
7 a m. 2 a. m.


SOS
(SAVE OUR STOMACHS)
HELLO! HUNGRY?
Hurry and try The Midget's
Varieties of Foods

Tasty and Delicious Hot
Dogs and Hamburgers
On Toasted C
Buns c


Best Nickle Sandwiches in
town. They melt in your mouth.
Our Chili and Soup homemade.
THE REAL THING!
That empty feeling satisfied
When You Eat At

THE MIDGET
SANDWICH SHOPPE
Stop In Soon and Try Our
Specials
Two doors from Miles 5 & 10
Reid Avenue


OUR APPRECIATION
Every member of the junior and
senior high school wish to express
their appreciation to M.r. D. B.
Lewis for making it possible for
us to enjoy ourselves. at'the new
Centennial building.
We are sure that everyone at-
tending this informal gathering
enjoyed the evening.
We also wish to thank the busi-
ness houses of the city who con-
tributed refreshments, for the eve-
ning.
Our sincere thanks to them all.
Junior and Sehior Classes.

Tattler Staff

Will Edit Star

Through the courtesy of Edi-
tor# Bill, next week's issue of
*The Star' will be in charge of
The Tattler staff. All news and
advertising will be handled by
the staff, and we ask the co-
operation of everyone in order
that we make this an issue to
be proud of.
-K
G-O-S-S-I-P
The Eyes and Ears of the School
--- *
At last we have found out who
B. L. K. has fallen for (?)
Well, folks, E. H. and M. T. are
getting along pretty well (thank
goodness). They had us worried
-for awhile.
We' wonder if that look on L.
H.'s face is because R. G. is com-
ing home this' week.
We are wondering why M. N.
and H. T. aren't so happy lately.
(Could it be a misunderstanding?)
One way to get boys is to flirt
with them, as some girls did at
the basketball game Thursday
night. (Look out. B. J. N.)
A way to get a ride is to ask
for. it-as a certain sophomore
girl does.
We wonder why D. M. always
picks up D. C. Could it be a new
affair? Well. let's hope so.
M. T. told K. S. that she liked
W. T. better than any other boy,
but she didn't know why. .
If everyone in our school was
as good as they thought their
neighbor ought to be, our opinion
is that we would have a very
good school.
"Come on, rat, squeal-we're out
of news."

SOME INTIMATE NOTES ON
SATURDAY NIGHT'S DANCE
,From what we can gather. J. L.
had a grand rush Saturday night
by the little girls (B. S. and G. H.)
Many of the girls say they won't
go to another dance' without a
date. (It's about time for you
boys to wake up!)
The girls say that a lot of the
boys learned how to dance Satur-
day night.
But we heard one boy. say that
he wished he could dance with
some light girls- for a change.-
We surely don't see any use
dancing when there is a chair
nearby.
Jesse Stone is stepping out
lately. Just a few more dances.
and none of the boys will have a
chance.
R. H. Smith seems to be giving
Elsie Nichols the grand rush. Or
we might say two at a time. (G.
Spencer and Elsie). Boy, he must
love to dance!
Jesse and Dot C. were dancing
a new creation Saturday night
called the "Colum'bian Waltz." (I
know, because. I saw them.) ;


Apalachicola Is

Taken In Stride

Shark Quintet Invades Neighbor-
ing City to Win 19 to 16

In a hard-fought game last Fri-
day night the St. Joe Hi Shark
basketeers defeated Chapman Hi
at Apalachicola by a 19-16 score.
St. Joe was never headed but
once throughout the whole game,
starting off with a 10-9 lead at
the half. Apalach tied the score
with a free throw at the start of
the second half. but St. Joe tight-
ened down and ,made two baskets
and a foul shot to take the lead.
Chapman came back with a fast
rally and made three field goals
to take thie lead, 1645.
With two minutes to play, the
Sharks worked a fast break that
saw three boys handle the ball
twice each inside a minute to
make a field goal and come out in
front by a nose. Just as the final
whistle shrilled, St. Joe dropped.
in another long shot to clinch the
game.


Roy Gibson, Jr., a student at
the Georgia Military Academy,
Barnesville, Ga., is expected to ar-
rive today to be the guest of his
parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Gib-
son, over the week-end.

Tortoises do not keep down in-
sect pests iA a garden, because, a
tortoise is vegetarian in diet.



CLASSIFIED ADS

FOR RENT


FOR RENT Five-room cottage
with sleeping porch and bath,
in Oak Grove. See Karl Kno-
del. 1*
FOR RENT-New houses at Bea-
con Hill. Front lot facing Gulf.
Furnished, running water, sani-
tary conveniences, electricity.
Apply T. W. Wilson, or Box
495, Port St. Joe. 3-3tf
FURNISHED APARTMENT for
/ rent. See T. V. Westbrook, Port
St. Joe. 2-1Otf
UNFURNISHED 9 by 18-foot cab-
ins; ceiled overhead and sides;
good water; $6 month. pply St.
Joe Lumber Co. 12121tf
ROOMS FOR RENT
IF YOU have a room for rent,
'why not place a classified adver-
tisement in The Star. The cost is
low and returns are gratifying. .
TIrr i totdav tf


CHAMBER ASKS Iand copies be sent to the local
CHANGE IN CODE newspapers for general dissemi-
nation to the public."

(Continued from Page 1)
The Misses Myrtle Whitaker,
service to the state; Iva Mae Nedley and Melba Ned-
"Now, Therefore, Be: It Re- ley will leave today to attend the
solved by the directors of the military ball at the University of
Port St. Joe Chamber of Corn-.Florida, Gainesville.
merce in regular session on this r *
28th day of February, 1938, that
we call upon the legatue of Mrs. M. B. Smith of Dothan ar-
we call upon egisature rived Wednesday to spend several
this state to enact into law some
more simplified procedure for our days in the city.
criminal courts, one which disre- *
gards useless technicalities, and Mayor and Mrs. J. L. Sharit
avoids needless delays, and especi- are spending this week in Fort
ally call upon said legislature to Lauderdale, Miami and other
give sympathetic consideration to points in the southern part of the
the bill prepared, by the Florida State.
State Bar association. -
"Be It Further Resolved, That a Mrs. H. Larkin of Bristol is
copy of this resolution be spread the guest of her husband here this
upon the minutes of this meeting, week.


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MISCELLANEOUS ... .. .. .. ..


A TRUE EPIC OF FLORIDA
"The Rise and Decline of the Old
City of St. Joseph," the only au-
thentic history of the long-dead
birthplace of Florida's first con-
stitution. Bound in kraft paper
from one of the first test runs
made by the St. Joe Paper Co.
mill. This interesting booklet
may be secured at The Star of-
fice or LeHardy's Pharmacy for
15 cents per copy. Send them to
your relatives and friends out-
side the state. t tf

Services Offered
ELECTRIC WIRING-In all Its
branches, reasonable. Fixtures
and Fans. Repairs
HENDERSON ELECTRIC
'COMPANY Port St. Joe
Home Office, Apalachlcol. Box 313


IN APPRECIATION

Of Your Past Patronage

WE SOLICIT YOUR CONTINUED GOODWILL

We have the latest styles and designs
of High Quality Jewelry and Gifts
for your approval

Elgin Hamilton Harvard


WATCHES


MOON JEWELRY COMPANY

PANAMA CITY FLORI


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-


- - -


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE FIVE


FRIDAY, MARCH 3, 1939







, f-


SThe strange O POSSUM, like the
Kangaroo of Australia, carries its young
after birth in a pouch. When the young-
sters grow larger they climb aboard the
mother's back for free transportation and
.where they can see what's going on. There
are about 20 different species of o pos-
sums, some with pouches some without;
but all do their gadding about at night.
,They are found in practically every sec-
tion of Florida. 0


When the status of Florida was
changed in 1846, from a territory to a
state, a state seal was provided for, it be-
ing stipulated that the first governor of
the state should approve the design. Gov.
Moseley was the first governor of the
state and it is presumed that he suggested
the design of the seal. It was officially,
adopted in 1847. This seal was used un-
til supplanted in 1866 by the present state
seal.


COOPER'S STYLE SHOP
APALACHICOLA, FLA.
READY-TO-WEAR FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY
Home of Freeman Shoes for Men
LATEST SPRING STYLES JUST ARRIVED
CALL -BY AND VISIT US



The LORA LEE
PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA
Ladies' Ready-to-Wear
DRESSES COATS
HOSE MILINERY
LORA'S UNDERTHINGS


STANDARD OIL COMPANY

CROWN GASOLINE


C. F. MARKS APALACHICOLA, FLA.



DIXIE THEATRE
PRESENTING
ALWAYS-HIGH CLASS ENTERTAINMENT
APALACHICOLA, FLA.



TALLAHASSEE AUTO COURT
INSIDE CITY LIMITS
EXCELLENT ACCOMMODATIONS
Catering to Bonafide Travelers Only
TALLAHASSEE FLORID




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TALLAHASSEE, FLA.


"Florida's Oldest Bank"




SWE HAUL ANYTHING-
CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING
WE HAVE GOOD CLEAN BUILDING SAND FOR SALE
Prompt and Efficient Service Always

C. W HORTON
PHONE 70 PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


a


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORMAA


FRIDAY, MARCH .3, 1939


PAGE SIX


CAMOUFLAGE MAYBE TWO DOZEN
Waiter: "My customer says his First Hobo: "It sez here that
S steak is too small." there are many cases of menin-
OAA e- O C Proprietor: "Take it back to the gitis reported at tme hospital."
N kitchen and put it on a smaller Second Hobo: "An' how many's
_OF p plate." in a case?"

O A' o / l/ f I'OW1D WHEN IN APALACHICOLA EAT AT THE
RIVERSIDE CAFE
.".OROHN LAVONTAS, Prop.
"3 We Specialize In All Kinds of Sea Food &
WATER 'STREET APALACHICOLA, FLA.


AUSTIN'S

Apalachicola's Favorite Shopping
MR Place
MAKE OUR STORE YOUR HEADQUARTERS
WHEN IN APALACHICULA








M RTPJC ..NY .L..


Expect Legislative

Appropriations to

Exceed Income

(Continued from Page 2)
ods of developing a sound highway
System will be before the legisla-
ture, but the means of financing
this program are still unrevealed.
A number of tentative sugges-
tions have been made. All will,
directly or indirectly, require new
state revenue.
While actual facts are lacking
-on conservation, development and
advertising, it is not amiss to say
that money spent for these three
purposes can pay handsome divi-
dends to taxpayers. A total of
$2,500,000 was thus expended in
-1938. Florida's tremendous agri-
cultural. and horticultural re-
sources are not fully known. The
state produces too much of some
crops and not enough of others
to feed its own. citizens. Its fish-


DR. J. C. COE
-DENTIST --
Offlce Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5'
CSundays By Appointment
Coetin Bldg. Port St. oe


Glasses fitted when needed
Made In Our Own Laboratory
All Work Unconditionally
Guaranteed
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 6 p. m.

DR. G. T. NEWBERRY
OPTOMETRIST
PANAMA CITY, FLA.



Why Not YOU, Too?
Enjoy a day's Fishing and
Picnic Dinner at

MIDWAY PARK
On Gulf County's World-
Famous DEAD LAKES
Our BOATS are New, Dry
and Kept Clean. Our
CABINS are New, with New
Beds and Furnishings.
This FRIENDLY CAMP is
Midway of the Lakes, at the
County Line, where your
Visit is Appreciated
J. P. BRANTON, Owner
Postoffice Address
WEWAHITCHKA, FLA.



PURITY IS

ASSURED!


For Each and Every Bottle
of Milk or Cream We Deliver
Is Protected With a
SSANITARY PARCHMENT
COVER

Use Only

SOLOMON'S

Pasteurized

MILK

Pasteurized for You
Protection


series and forests have been de
pleted through wasteful methods
and a number of small Florida
counties cannot prosper until na
tural resources have been reha
bilitated.
Must Advertise
Florida cannot compete with
other states for the tourist dollar
if it does not keep its advantages
before the nation by constant ad
vertising. Florida has no state ad
vertising fund. Its only advertis
ing expenditures' in 1938 were
$800,000 for citrus advertising and
small sums expended by the corn
missioner of agriculture from the
general inspection fund. Advo
cates of a liberal state advertis
ing fund assert that five or ten
million dollars coual be profitably
spent each year in advertising and
fostering of proper use of the
state's resources. Those who have
fought and blocked such expendi
ture contend that government
economy is more importantt than
such advertising. It is one phase
of governmental expenditure whici
can yield dividends to taxpayers
if properly administered.
Administrative expenses of the
state government will be in
creased approximately a halt mil
lion dollars during the next tw<
years because of 'the hundreds ol
thousands of pension and com
pensation claims 'which must be
received" add audited, and, the war
rants issued' and delivered. Eleven
times as many. state, warrants
were issued in 1938 .as in 1932
The 1939 budget report will also
ask funds for new buildings at
.state institutions. The total new
requirements of the general gov-
ernment will be at least a million
dollars.
Assessments Decline
Ad valorem revenues have de
lined steadily. In 1917 the total
property assessment valuations
were $322.000,000. In 1937. with
more than $2,000,000,000 of fire
insurance in effect, the total ;as
sessment roll was Only $515,000,
000. The cause is a story in itself,
The steady decrease m assessed
valuation since 1926, accelerated
by the 1937 tax adjustment law,
has caused schools, counties and
municipalities to lose a large
amount of income, which has re-
sulted in demands for new reve-
nues to replace these losses.
Cities 'have ,suffered from every
attack which has been made on
the ad' valorem system. and have
yet to receive relief from the state
in the way of replacement taxes.
Most of the revenues of the
state -board of health, livestock,
sanitary board, state prison, Con-
federate pension board and 6 per
cent of the state contributions to
schools, have come from the ad-
valorem tax. Should the state ad-
valorem be abandoned (proposed
as a means of encouraging the
counties to equalize their assess-
ment rolls) it means the state
will have to find another one and
a half or two million dollars of
replacement revenue.
People Must Pay Bill
Agitation for repeal of the re-
tail occupational (gross receipts)
tax law is well known. Propon-
ents of repeal report that a
large number of legislators have
pledged themselves to vote for it
on request of both chain and in-
dependent merchants. Repeal is
entirely dependent on the finding
of replacement revenue, unbiased
observers believe, as the school
interests are not going to sacri-
fice this revenue without 'a fight.
The receipts in 1938 were $2,500,-
000. Some claim the future reve-
nue would be -as much; others
contend it would not be over a
million dollars annually.
To what total does' all this add?
That can only be estimated, un-
til the legislature acts. If the peo-
ple of Florida want all eligibles to'
receive old age pensions. if they
want to be sure that the schools
operate for the full school year,
if they want the highway system
o 'be modernized, they must be
prepared to foot the bill. If the


SBill Provides

SGovernment To
L,-
Pay Tax Losses

I Occasioned Counties By Acquisi-
r tion of Private Lands; Is
S Caldwell's Measure
I-
- WASHINGTON, March 3-Rep-
- resentative Millard Caldwell has
e introduced. a bill for the purpose
Sof authorizing the federal gov-
- ernment to reimburse the counties
Sfor the loss of taxes occasioned
- by the acquisition of private lands
- by the government.
S Caldwell's bill provides that
Y "the secretary of the treasury is
Authorized and directed to annu-
B ally pay to each county wherein
a are located federally-owned lands
- 'acquired and held by the' govern-
t ment for forest, park, monument,
i wildlife refuge, or land utilization
0 purposes, an amount equal to the
Amount of taxes payable to such
5 county on account of such lands
for the tax year immediately pre-
D ceding the tax year in which such
- lands were acquired by the gov-
- ernment."
D Following a series of confer-'
f ences with federal officials, Cald-
Swell said that he felt some legis-
Slation could be passed, but was
- not certain just how far it would
Sgo nor how much relief it weoud
afford.
One of the chief obstacles is
That the western states, where
Sthe federal government holds
Large areas of public domain,
* which has never been in private
ownership, insist on benefiting by
the legislation. If they are suc-
cessful in their efforts to be in-
- cluded, the amount involved will
I be so large as to endanger the
Passage of any worthwhile bill.
Caldwell takes the position that
i the western public domain lands'
- were never in private ownership
- nor on county tax rolls, that no
States were ever paid on them, and,
I that therefore the government is
Sunder no obligation to compen-
,sate for a tax loss.

OLD AGE RECEIPENTS IN
GULF COUNTY RECEIVE
$20,051 DURING 18 MONTHS

According to figures of the state
welfare board, old age recipients
of Gulf county received an ag-
gregate sum of $20,051 between
July 1, 1937, and December 31,
1938.
Warrants received by Gul f
county recipients ror last Decem-
ber amounted to $1,502. This was
the largest amount paid. out dur-
ing any one month since the pub-
lic assistance! program was in-
augurated.
Total payments for the state
during the 18 months were an-
nounced as. $6,679,294.74.

200 KINDS OF FLORIDA
WOOD AT WORLD'S FAIR

Over 200 varieties of wood found
in Florida will be shown in Flor-
ida's exhibit at the New York
World's Fair by the state school
of forestry. The display will in-
clude woods having a particular
economic value, such as cypress
and slash pine; odd colored woods
like magnolia, lignum vitae and
bay; wood from trees, producing
lac and oils, such as tung oil,
chicle and rubber; peculiar for-
mations, such as cypress .burls
and fibres and rattans.


gross receipts tax is repealed, an-
other big hole will have to be
filled.
Florida, citizens and taxpayers,
will have to study each of these
probable causes of new expendi-
tures and decide for themselves
if they want them more than they
want economy. Taxes can be kept
down only by sacrifices.
Next week The Star will out-
line for its readers the needs of
the social welfare boar'. @1939


Will Discuss Road

Needs at Marianna


eting Scheduled for March
And Invitation Extended
To Everyone


"The Road Needs of Florida"
will be the subject of a district
road conference to be held at the
Chipola hotel, Marianna, Wednes-
day, March 8 at noon.
The meeting will be a joint
civic club luncheon under the
aspices of the Florida Highway
Council, which will be represented
by its ,secretary, Karl Lehmann of
Tavares, who will be the princi-
pal speaker.
This will be one of a series of
meetings planned throughout the
state in advance of the legislative
session, where roads will be a
matter of major consideration.
.Similar meetings are scheduled,
in Pensacola and Tallahassee on
March 6 .and 7, respectively.
'The purpose of the meeting will
be to acquaint the public with the
state-wide highway planning sur-
vey which has been in progress
for nearly three -years. The sur-
vey, which is being made jointly
by the United States Bureau of
Public Roads. and the state road
department, is a comprehensive
investigation of our present road
conditions,.and future road needs
and covers a 'study of our road
needs as related to agriculture,
industry, business, recreation and
other factors of our economic life.
All interested citizens, are cor-


PORT ST. JOE
Florida


ii'


Me


PANAMA CITY
Telephone 168


there is one enterprise


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


WHEN YOU COOK WITH GAS

WE GIVE YOU:

Experienced sales counsel.
Service by a company that is financially
responsible
No deposit required-just pay for your gas.
A low gas rate, guaranteed not to be increased.
Prompt response to your service calls,
Expert service on your appliances,
Courtesy always.

0--- ---4


SOUTHERN LIQUID GAS CO.
YOUR GAS COMPANY SINCE 1932


upon earth that the quitter should never

attempt, it is advertising. Advertising

does not jerk it pulls. It begins

gently, at first, but the pull is steady;

and it increases, day by day and year by

year, until it exerts an irresistible power.

-John Wanamaker.







THE STAR
"Your Home-town Newspaper"


.. i


III 1~ r4r -


it --- .90Lp


dially invited to -attend this dis-
trict conference. Special invitation
is extended to legislators and pub.
lic officials, according to Tom
Yancey, secretary of the "Marianna
Chamber of Commerce, who is in
charge of arrangements.

SOUTH AFRICA USES FLORIDA
PLANTS IN WORLD FAIR SHOW
Norman Yule, originator of a
model of Victoria Falls, South
Africa, is in Florida collecting
tropical plants and trees for a
background of jungle growth for
the famous falls. Mr. Yule ex-
plains that many trees in the
heart of Africa, such as the mi-
mosa and sausage tree, are identi-
cal with those in Florida.



IFISHING--

Spend the week-end In
West Florida's best fish-
Ing grounds,

TROUT
BASS

BREAM

BOATS With or with.
out gude--at reasonable
rates. .. Hotel ac*
commodations within the
means of everyone,
SEE-


SJ 0 'Jim' SMITH

SUMATRA, FLA.


PHONE 51


THE STAA, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE SEVEN


FRIDAY, MARCH 3, 1939







A EIGH TE R R S O


fact there may still be in the des-
ignated areas certain locations
TH E I`0 IrIEV W 1 that have adverse influences that
SWE D E r will not permit the insuring of
0 JOW LEDC E TOPS mortgages on these specific lots,"
said Mr. Parrish, "and each case
S *44 will be determined on its own
merits."
The director pointed out that
C," rulings on the areas outlined are
not to be construed as binding on
the Federal Housing Administra-
o tion, but are only given to indi-
cate the probable locations that
will be acceptable for mutual
mortgage insurance. "Any loca-
SoD 1A FvOR IE tions in Port St. Joe not included
SETIOPIA NS in these areas will not be con-
/y jrED PEPPER sidered for insurance at this
SPRINKL.EDIN
A. Z Ass OP time," he said.
THE STANDARD OUTDOOLR WA -In conclusion, Mr. Parrish said:
ADVERTISING INDUSTRY ANNUALLY "The Federal Housing Administra-
SPENDS OVER #I, 000, 000
FOR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIALS tion has certainly demonstrated
SUCH AS LUMBER, STEEL,
PAINT, LUE, STEEC. under this new rurtng that it is
their desire to extend the full
Benefits of' our program without
prejudice to the entire community
Sand the writer hopes this will en-
TH WITHA HOULSE TeAERIINALLY able many of your citizens to be-
PAiINTED# wV rs 'To come home owners under the
H* eLACK smUG ES o FHA' system of financing."
MADE BY AAMsE
Ss UILDING DURINGe The restrictive covenants men-
THE WAR OP tioned by Mr. Parrish were pub-
.- A. .lished in full in The Star of Feb-
ruary 17 and pertain'to the size
rC- "' of lots, type and size of buildings
"t.-- to be erected. provide that no
talade shall be carried on in areas
AMERI CA rFCTORY WORKER 4vE UY specified, that none but the Cau-
IN CH INA, TH V i FAMERCIC4 FACTORS WC ORXIN ,r BUY AN
1CO., o 7WI rnIImNSw .1 OR ,A AN O AN S qO / casian race shall use oT occupy
4 TIMES AS MUC HN EAPTA, SAUC AiS
.g. roC... epr a AR sH WS. ~A S buildings. that no trailers,. tents,
I S YFLLOW" AND IN wopIteR AND "i/ TIMES AS "
TURwen woear.. MUCH AS A IrAU4LA WORKER. -. dr garages shall be used for place
S of evidence, and that a commit-
tee be nailed to inspect and ap-
SMrs. A. M. Mitchell returned to Prove plans for. the erection of
PE S o AL her home in Dothan last Thursday any building.
SPER SO A L -after. spending several days here With 75 per cent loans..now
visiting. available, there should be many
new dwellings started, and the
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Chapman D. B. Lewis spent the week-end housing shortage, which has been
and children of Tallahasspe were in Pensacola. a "great drawback to'development
the guests Friday and Saturday o- --" ofs the 'city, should soon be a
of Mr. and Mrs. Sammie Davis. FHA MAPS f CITY FOR thing of the past, with a conse-
.g e ISSUANCE OF LOANS quent plickit in business' and
Mrs.. Leroy. Qainqus, and son Le- trade here, which has \been suf-
roy spent Sunday in, Panama City (Continud from Page 1) fearing greatly due to the lack of
ted from Page 1) mes' for workers, who have
as guests of her mother, Mrs. J. corded as a blket encumbrance e for t o nwho have
J. Perritt. against each lot in the specified been forced to live in neighboring
against each lot In the sped towns 'nd drive to and from
*area prior to insurance. their work.
Miss Marion Aileen Wing and The program as outlined will wor-----k.
August Mahon of Apalachicola at- apply only to applications sb- Jesse es is coming!
tended the. high school dance Sat- mitted for consideration after Je s s co.
urday at the Centennial building. February 20 and will not apply to
Sa o commitments now outstanding. TAPPERS WIN FROM
T. M. 'Schneider was a business Mr. ,Parrish has requested T. MERCHANTS 56 TO 15
visitorr Tuesday in Wewahitchka. W. Wilso, secretary of the chaim-
S* ber of commerce, to send him (Continued from Page 1)
Mrs. J. E. Rollins and daughter blueprints of the city in order per followed closely with;seven,
Peggy were week-end visitors in that the areas may be outlined and Wads rth sweetened his'
Gordon, Ala. thereon and, returned to the cham- season's average to the tune of
ber so that anyone in the city in- four field goals and one foul.
Wilbur Wells was in Panamad terested in building a home may The Merchants were handi-
City on business Wednesday. know just how much they can se- capped by having but five men
S* r cure in 'the way of FHA assist- available, and even played the
Rev. Glion Benson of Apalachi- ance. game with one of them in a crip-
cola wag visiting Tuesday in Port "I, would like to call your spe- pled condition.
St. Joe. cific attention, however, to the In. Monday's closing game the
Papermakers ran their total to six
won and two lost, by a score of
Theatre Theatre 25 to 11 over the High School
g team. This game was fast in spite
opeN Opens of the score, but the schoolboys
Sunday Saturday were off in showing, missing
Many seemingly sure shots. The
1:45 p.m. 1:15 p.m. playing of Coburn and Lane stood
Daily 2:45 Daily 2:45 out in this game. These boys are
going to be heard from for some
SUNDAY and MONDAY MARCH 5 and 6 time in, scholastic circles, as they
Y are always on top of the ball and
1-.^ do not let up for a moment. Tra-
wick covered a lot of ground in
If this game, but left it to .his mates
SM : to do most of the shooting.

A pin Tec olor laying a strenuous season, with
LORETTRA RICHARD two games a week in the league
and twio with school opponents,
YOUNG GRE E and they' are showing the strain
,somewhat.
SOwing to the high school team
Cartoon Latest News Events having o go to the conference
games Thursday, the game they
WEDNESDAY, MAR THURSFRI, MAR. 9-10 were scheduled to play with tfe
WEDNESDAY, MAR. 7 THURS-FRI,.MAR. 9-10 Merchaits Wednesday night was.,
JOHN GARFIELD Y.i postponed.. A substitute game be-
FLORENCE RICE POWER tween the Merchants and the Pa"-
BUD)Y EBSON iFONDA permakers was played after the
u:r c ;" .regular (game between the Old-
'The Made Me LLY townersi and the Papermakers.
SCOTT The Oldtowners won from the
i Paperm'kers by a score of 34 to
Criminal --- 26. Thigaine was very fast:an :
for a tihne the result was in some


doubt. but at no time were the stitutes. The game resulted iii a
Oldtowners headed. Wadsworth defeat for them, and the. first win
was high scorer with seven field of the season for the Merchants
goals and a couple of foul shots, by a score.of 28 to 19, though it
Talley followed with five from the will not go on the record. Cothern
field, Tapper and Wood with four and Williams starred for' the Mer.-
each, and Adams, Boyer and Ma- chants with six each fron
hon with two each, Hidalgo bring- field.
ing up the rear with one.
LEAGUE STANDING
The Papermakers, after playing LEAGUE STANDING
this hard-fought game, elected to Team-- W L
play the Merchants to fill in the Oldtowners .......... 9 0 ..(Oli?
canceled date of the high school Papermakers ........ 6; .66
team, but were seemingly winded High School- ...... 2 6 .250
and were forced to use many sub- Merchants. .......... 0 8 .000


SPECIALS I
FOR FRIDAY, SATURDAY AND SUNDAY
Where Business is Brisk You Will AlwaYs Find Fresh Goods

MILK-6 Small or 25e Ice Cream Powder- 24c
3 Tall 3 Boxes for --....... ---
TEA FLAKE CRACKERS-1 pound box 10c
Sailorman CROWDER PEAS-No. 2 Can 10c; 3 Cans 25c
SHAVER'S FIELD PEAS-No. 2 Can 10c; 3 Cans......-2c
PORK AND BEANS-Z No. 3 Cans 25c

Irish
PotatoeslO lbs. 23'


TOM A TO E S- C
6 Small for ............. -
MAXWELL HOUSE .9C
COFFEE Lb. ....
COOKING OIL, gaL _.90c
Post Toasties, 3 for-....25c


CATSUP- 1lc
14 o. bottle ..........
FLOUR-G od grade 5
12 Ibs. .....35c and-
MATCHES, -3 boxes .....10c
SARDINES, 3 can s.. -:.- 9c
5c Macaroni, 3 boxes-i.10C


FANCY CHUCK ROAST- VEAL CHOPS and ROUND
Cash Price 15 T STEAK-Wilson orfi
per pound ..... .....--. Swift's, per lb......... -

SWEET SIXTEEN MARGARINE-2 pounds ......_.....25c
FANCY SLICED BACON--Per pound 25c

Best Grade WHITE 7C OIL-ALSAGE-,,
MEAT,'Sliced; lb. ...... ,Per. 6-lb. can ..... 85
WE SELL ONLY 'GOVERNMENT INSPECTED MEAT

BAY SHORE GROCERY
Location: First Store on Right on Panama City Road. After
Crossing Carrna West of Port St. J'oe.-'
Highland View We Appreciate Your Patronage-



March Sale of
NEW SPRING


SHOES


LADIES' SHOES

$1.95 $2.19 $2.95
$3.75 $4.50 $4.95

MEN'S SHOES

$1.95 $2.25 $3.00

$4.00 $4.40 $8.75


Complete Line of
CHILDREN'S
SHOES


"Spring Footwear Parade" Leaders

Always First at Costin's


Brighten up.-your Spring out-
fit! You'll need shoes for
'street wear and 'dressing up.'
You can find what you want
in only such a collection as
,displayed at Costin's.




Costin's .

PORT ST. 'JOE. \


* Oxfords, Pumps,
Novelty Slippers! I
* Blue, Brown,
Black, Tan!
* All sizes, in-
cluding yours!




Store

FLORIDA
'\ -. *


PAGE EIGHT


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, MARCH 3, 1939