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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00123
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: February 24, 1939
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00123

Full Text





The Star-Florida's faptet grow-
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterhient and-upbuilding of
the City of Port St Joe. T


E


: Port;St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
'eat growing little city. In
Sthe heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of \Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center

VOLUME II PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1939 NUMBER 19


What Is Wrong With Port St. Joe?



There is something radically wrong in Port St. Joe
alt the present time in regard tobusiness and trade, and
The Star is submitting the questionnaire below in an ef-
fort to discover just where the trouble lies. We ask that
all our readers, as well as anyone else, answer these
.onestions and bring or mail them to The Star office. No
name need be signed to your letter, and you may answer
as few or as many of the questions as you like. Copies
of this questionnaire will be found in practically every
business house in the city.
1. How do you feel about Port St. Joe as a place to
trade?
2. What do you think about thestores here in gen-
eral? Why?
3. How could these stores be improved?
4. Which are the best stores, in your opinion, in Port
St. Joe?
5. What criticisms or complaints have you of Port
St. Joe stores'? Which ones? Why?
6. What difficulties do you find in trading in Port
St. Joe?
7. Whai articles do you buy elsewhere because you
cannot get them in Port St. Joe? I
8. Do you trade with mail order houses? If so, why?
'9. How often do you go to Panama City to trade?
To Apalachicola? To Marianna? To Dothan?
10.- Do you prefer to buy on credit or for cash?
11. Have you been refused credit by any of the stores
in Port St. Joe? Which ones?
12. Would you trade in Port St. Joe if offered more
credit?
13. In what way can The Star be improved?
14. ,What-ad'ertisementsdo:you red.in TheStar?.
15. What improvements would youf like to see made
in Port St. Joe?
16. What streets would you like to see improved?
17. What improvements would you like to see in the
schools? In amusements and recreation and social fa-
cilities?
18. What do you think of. Port St. Joe as a,'place in
which to live?,:
19. What does Port St. Joe need to make it a better
place in which to live?
20. Would you build a home here if proper financing
to fit your income could be arranged?
The Star will publish a general story covering replies
to these questions and will publish in full any replies that
are of an outstanding character.


Oldtowners Lead

At Halfway Point

Papermakers Hold Second Place,
With High Scchool Coming Up

With conclusion of the games
Monday night the city basketball
league of Port 'St. Joe reached the
halfway mark, ane the games
played Wednesday night carried
the teams into the second half.
The league has furnished sport
for about 50 players and has been
the means of entertainment for
many of our citizens.
In Monday nights games the
High School defeated the Mer-
chants. 17 to 10, principally by
means of one of the finest pass-
ing games to date. The school
'boys have rapidly responded to
.the coaching of Tom Owens and
are putting up an almost unbeat-
able brand of ball. The Merchants
took many shots, but the hole in
the basket seemed to be sealed to
them most of the time.
In the other game the Oldtown-.
ers made .it a runaway from the
Papermakers by a score of 24 to
4. The first quarter of this game


METHODIST LADIES TO
GIVE CHICKEN SUPPER
Tomorrow night the ladies of
the First Methodist church will
have a chicken supper in the
store building on Reid avenue
formerly occupied by Petes Cash
and/Carry. Supper will be 'served
from 6 o'clock until the chicken
runs out. Price will be 40 cents
per plate, and everyone is urged
to take their supper tomorrow
evening with the Methodist ladles.

LARGE SHIP IN PORT
The S. S. Amasis of the Ham-
burg-American Line arrived in
port Monday from Hamburg with'
a cargo of salt cake for the St.'
Joe Paper company. Pilot Fred
Maddox, who brfugnt the vessel
in, stated that it was the largest
ship yet to dock here, being 455
feet long and having a draft of
27 feet.
The S.S. Dorothy of the Bull
Line docked Sunday and sailed
Tuesday with a cargo of paper.
;------94- --
Chief of Police Troy Jones. was
called to Quincy Monday due to
the serious illness of his mother,
who recently underwent an opera-
tion at a hospital in that city.


was exciting, ending by a score -- -----
of 3-2, and for the first half it W. F. Canova of Tallahassee,
seemed that the Tappers might commercial agent for the Sea-
stand a chance of losing their board Air Line .railway, was a
first game of the season. The Pa- business visitor Monday in Port
(Continued on Page 8) St. Joe. ,


ChamberCommerce ill

Discusses Housing


I Probably

Get Ships Here


Problems f City Senators and Navy Ifficials Re-
1Problemso01C ty port Favorably On Cruisers


Report Presented of Plans For
Establishment of Naval
Air Base'Here

The Port St. Joe Chamber of
Commerce met in regular session
at the Legion hut last Friday eve-
ning asd a number. of questions
were brought up, among them be-
ing the very pertinent one of
housing, and it was brought out
that plans are going ahead rapidly
toward getting approval for loans
in various parts of the city. The
chamber had appointed a commit-
tee at a previous meeting to co-
operate with the Bay Ridge own-
ers in getting that section prop-
erly restricted in order to make
available loans there, and these
plans are far advanced. A chart
has been prepared' of lot owners
in that section, and many of them
have been contacted and have ex-
pressed approval of the plan. It
is hoped that all owners there
will join jn this movement, for it
is -generally conceded that it is
the. delay in getting this area ap-
proved by FHA that is handicap-
ping the natural growth of the
city.
Many sidelights were brought
ouit, on-"the. Bay -Rtdge sectiori by-
several members who spoke on
the subject, among them being
B. W. Eells, Dr. L. H. Bartee, T.
M. Schneider, Dwight Marshall, C.
A. Tovey, T. W. Wilson and Rev.
D. E. Marietta.
B. D. Smith having resigned as
chairman of the housing commit-
tee, G. F. Kaser was appointed in
his stead. This committee is made
up of Mr. Kaser, B. W. Eells, Dr.
Bartee, Dwight Marshall, T. H.
Stone and T. W., Wilson. Mr. Mar-
shall also replaced Mr. Smith on
the committee assisting with the
Bay Ridge endeavors.
It was decided that since the
need for meeting frequently had
been dissolved by the ending of
activities in connection with the
Centennial, that only one meeting
(Continued on page 8)

Dance for Students

At Civic Building

Tomorrow Evening

Affair To Be Given By Mr. Lewis
In Appreciation of Assistance
Given By Citizens of City

Through the courtesy of D. B.
Lewis, supervisor of construction
.for the WPA during erection of
Other Centennial building, there
will be a ,dance given tomorrow
night at the building for all high
school students. Mr. Lewis has
arranged this affair in apprecia-
tion of the good will of the citi-
zens of Port St. Joe who have co-
operated with him in the work he
has done here, and is an effort to
.see that the children will have at
least one good time before the
building is turned over to the
city. After that is done there will
be so many organizations clamor-
ing for use of the civic center
that it would be hard for the stu-
dents to secure a night.
Mr. Lewis, having children of
his own, is interested in their
having plenty of amusement and
play time, and wishes to do his
(Coatlnued on Page 8)


Letters have been received by
T. W. Wilson., secretary of the
chamber of commerce, from Sen-
ators Pepper and Andrews, and J.
I. Richardson, acting secretary of
the navy,'in regard to having.U.
S. navy ships stop over for a visit
at Port St. Joe 'following maneu-
vers in the Caribbean.
Senator Andrews stated that he
had requested! Admiral William D.
Leahy, chief of navy operations,
to order the Minneapolis and the
Portland into Port St. Joe for a
visit.

McPherson Heads

Foster Memorial

Drive In County

Mrs. Patton Acting for Woman's
SClub and City In Drive
To Raise Funds

A campaign is being conducted
this wiek in Port St. Joe to raise
funds for the erection of a me-
morial on the banks of the Su-
wannee river at White Springs to
the memory of Stephen Foster,
composer of "WIy Down Upon
the -Suwannee Rivel' ands oflfer
well known bsngs -of the South.
D. E. McPherson has been ap-
pointed as chairman for the drive
in Gulf county and Mrs. G. A.
Patton is acting for the Port St.
Joe Woman's Club and the city of
Port St. Joe. In Wewahitchka
the president of the woman's club
is in charge of the drive in that
city.
Mrs. Patton states that a house-
to-house canvass -will not be made
but that all civic organizations
are being contacted. She urges
everyone to make contributions to
the memorial fund, and if checks
are sent in hhe asks that they be
made out to the Stephen Foster
Memorial, Inc., and mailed to her.
The memorial shrine is designed
for a 'cultural center with a real
purpose of musical development
and enjoyment where large num-
bers of persons may participate in
the performance of music. It will
include a giant.carillon and ampi-
theater.

CANAL EXTENSION
ENDORSED AT MEET
Members of the Northwest Flor-
ida association at a meeting Tues-
day in Panama City voted unani-
mously to endorse a plan. for com-
pleting the Gulf coastal inland
canal from Apalachicola to St.
Marks.
The meeting was presided over
by G. Pierce Wood of Port St.
Joe in the absence of R. G. Pat-
terson, association president.
-K
EXPRESSION OF THANKS
FROM COOPER'S STORE
We wish to express our sincere
appreciation to the people of Port
St. Joe for the complimentary
cards and personal greetings re-
ceived on the float entered in the-
Apalachicola Mardi Gras.
Elizabeth Cooper.
-------
BRUSH FIRE
The fire department was called
out yesterday afternoon to ex-
tinguish' a brush fire at the inter-
section of Monument avenue and
Eighth street. ,


MayGet Air Base

Commission Here

To Look Over Site

Members Will Leave Washington
Next Week To View All
Proposed. Sites

In an endeavor to have the
congressional 'commission which
will pass on the site for a pro-
posed naval air base in Florida
come to Port St. Joe to look over
St. Joseph's Bay and surrounding
territory, the chamber of com-
merce has sent letters to Senators
Claude Pepper and Charles O. An-
drews, Representatives Caldwell,
Hendricks, Peterson, Oreene and
Cannon, Admirals Leahy and Hep-
burn, Postmaster General Farley
and Carl Vinson, chairman of the
investigating committee. It is pro-
posed to have these letters fol-
lowed with telegrams from Mayor
J. L. Sharit, W. T. Edwards and
L. W. Owens.
As it was' pointed out in The
Star two weeks ago, St. Joseph's
Bay is an ideal location for such
a base and should meet all re-
quirements laid down by the navy
technicians.
Chairman Carl Vinson plans to
bring the entire committee to.
Florida for an inspection of sites
at Jacksonville and Miami,, and it:-..
is .thought possible that they -?0.
be persuaded to come to bPrt ':t.
Joe if enough pressure is brought'
to bear from the right' quarters.
The committee will meet in
Washington today to make ar-
rangements for the trip, and it is
planned to leave that city either
next Tuesday or Wednesday, the
committeemen traveling in a spe-
cial Pullman car in which they
will live during the. tour.
It is known that the navy de-
partment deems an air base in the
southeastern area of vital im-
portance and it is believed that
high ranking officers of the de-
partment were disappointed when
action was deferred because of
the controversy as. to whether Mi-
ami or Jacksonville should get
the base.


Teachers Winners

in Ladies'Ball Tilt

Defeat Mothers 7-5 In Exhibition
Game To Raise Funds

The Teachers came out victori-
ous with a score of 7 to 5 in the
ladies' baseball game held Satur-
day to raise money for the fund
to purchase new uniforms for the
band.
The game was scheduled for
four innings, but at the end of the
fourth the score was tied 5-5, so
another inning was called by the
referee, Dell Mahon, and after a
hard-fought battle the Teachers
bested the Mothers.
The players are planning on
staging another game in the near
future, but not without some prac-
tice, as they would rather be in
better form next time and maybe
not be so sore and stiff after the
game.
Many witnessing the game said
that it was money well spent, not
only for the purpose of aiding the
band., but witnessing such a comi-
cal sight.

H. B. Windham and family of
Tampa moved to this, city Satur-
lay. I, *







E O TH S O 1


THE STAR
.... S...SMITH,. Editor. and. Publisher
Issued every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida,
..from The..Star.. Building.......

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postofficp,.. Port_ St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 187P.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year .......$2.00. Six Months: .. $1.2s
-Three Moriths ......65c

-.f Telephone 51 >--

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

A TAX ON THE POORER CLASSES
A.timely comment on taxes was made at
the recent taxpayers' institute at Rollins,
College by Dr. E. R. A. Seligman, profes-
sor 'of economics, emeritus, at Columbia
University and recognized dean of contem-
porary American tax experts. An excerpt
from his address follows:
"We have heard a good deal about the
favorable state tax laws.. I am, ,mdlned to
believe. that unless you are very careful here
in Florida, you will have a 'sort 'of boom-'
erang.. "
"I entirely approve of the efforts of the
Florida legislature in making Florida a
more attractive place for people from *the
rest of the country, but you must be care-
ful of two things.
"In the first place, you must be careful
that while being favorably inclined to the
wealthy northerners who come down here,,
that you do not put the burden upon the
poorer and less developed elements in your
own state, and one of the plans that we
- heard earlier today, the pl4h of int jdrc-
ing a general sales tax, is .to be criticized
ironm that point of view '
1 '"The tax on sales is always a tax pri-
-marily upon the poorer classes."
The transactions tax, of, course, on
-which members of the state chamber of
commerce are now conducting .a referen-
dum, is even worse, because it pyramids
taxes on buyers, processors, wholesalers
.and retailers and forces up the price to con-
sumers, reducing their purchasing, power
and decreasing sales volumes.-The Tampa
*; ....

STEPHEN FOSTER MEMORIAL WEEK
,The week of February 19 to 25 has been
set aside by Governor Cone as Stephen Fos-
ter Memorial Week, and a drive for funds
is now underway to build the Stephen Fos-
ter Memorial Park. The memorial will be
started this year on the banks of the Su-
wannee river, at White Springs, Fla.
Foster was the composer of many of
the finest and' most beautiful negro folk
songs, some of the best known being "My
Old Kentucky Home," "Come Where My
Love Lies Dreaming," Suwannee River"
and "Darling Nellie Gray."

Merely out of curiosity we would like to
know why the board of county commis-
sioners of Gulf county should give one
newspaper all legal advertising, commercial
printing and the publishing of the delin-
quent tax list. If we remember rightly, the
commissioners are elected by the people and
supposedly are servants of the people. In
thatcase, they would save the people cash
money if such work were to be offered
for bids and the lowest bidder awarded
the order.

Why don't those fellows over in Europe
just write their treaties with disappearing
ink and save themselves embarrassment ?-
Cincinnati Enquirer.

Read the ads and reap:


CISTERNS FO FLORIDA
Over 20 years ago when we first visited
Key West, every house on the island'had a
cistern to catch rainwater from the roof for
drinking purposes. We ,were Informed that
due to..the geology of .the, island,, wells were
out of the question.
Now we are not going to say that if they
dig the cross-state' canal it will rtin all the
wells: in South Florida, but,. on the other
hand, if we don't stop digging canals, every
'citrus grove in the ridge 'section will need an
irrigation systeim-the engineers' and experts
notwithstanding.
We have seen engineers, experts and other
theorists proven wrong by practical people
too many times to take their findings 'with-
out a grain-yes, we would even say a sack
of salt.
We have talked with old settlers in this
and other sections of the state and, they all
agree that something is lowering the water
table in this section of the state, and there
was a time when it was never necessary to
'haul water for citrus trees.
In these days of extensive public works,
everyone who lives near a body of water ap-
parently ,wants a canal 'dug to drain it; and
there is talk of straightening every river in
.the state; that is not being made into a canal
itself.
-- :We know that what we say will have no
effect on the matter, and that as long as
there is money to. be spent for ditches and
side money to be chiseled from the appropri-
ation, "there will be ditches -dug regardless of
whether there is water to run in them or not.
But we would much rather, see a system of
canals dug through the great American des-
ert, where they at least would do no harm.
We would like to see some political sub-
division of the'state, or the state itself, spon-
sor a PWA project to fill up canals and save
central Florida from becoming an arid coun-
try of sand dunes.-Highlands County News.

LIVERY STABLE, FILLING STATION
SForty years ago we didn't know a darned
thing about automobiles and filling stations.
Instead, people traveled in buggies and horse-
back. Every town as big as a pocket handker-
chief had a livery stable where the wayfaring
man could stable his team and rig, or hire
one, as the case might be. The wayfaring
man might also, if he had a hangover from-
the night before, find something more potent
than branch water at many of these old livery
stables. At least it didn't hurt the stable
man's feelings any to ask him about it.
Now the livery stable is gone.
Gone also is the rich aroma of perspiring
horses and mules and other pungent odors
peculiar to a livery stable.
Gone also are the flies, for which let us
give thanks.
Now we have at convenient intervals along
the highways filling stations of, every con-
ceivable type, some of them with jook joints
and hootnannies. And ("tell it not in Gath,
publish it not in the streets of Askelon) we
are told by some people who ought to know
that at some of these stations the wayfaring
man may slake his thirst with something so
ardent that a drink of it would make a rab-
bit spit in a bulldog's face.-DeFuniak Her-
ald.

A 180-pound truck driver of Newark, N. J.,
wants a divorce because he is afraid his 100-
pound wife will "maim, cripple and injure
him," the big sissy.-Macon Telegraph.

Steady, consistent advertising with care-
fully prepared copy, backed by reliable mer-
chandise, always makes a successful busi-
ness.

SLatest purge victims reported from Russia
are two astronomers who have been studying
eclipses. They know about them now.-Bos-
ton Transcript.

Successful business men and firms attribute
a large amount of their siiccess to the proper
use of newspaper space.


. HOLDING THE RUNAWAY


Gonorrhea and Syphilis

Lead Among Commnnicable Diseases


GONORRHEA E3 ngi~gigitwitgi i


SYPHIL13~1r

r~nn
'tu 6E Pr-t- ij)nn-.
LOSIS, 1

SCARLET L [1111
FEVER.

DIPHTHERIA


aH IYaSYBOL PaMNBSeBNS t UI T .. AMBSanC
50,000 NEW CA RAM ECH 1TEAR D1. TIM IUC Sf oNg" M 10AM, IiS *DCIOB
The all-time peak in the num-1 -born dead or diseased every year


ber of Kahn tests. (blood tests)
being made by Florida State
Board of Health laboratories is
believed to be a direct result of
the educational campaign now in
progress in Florida and the na-
tion in connection with venereal
diseases.
This is the opinion Dr. W. A.
McPhaul, state health officer, ex-
pressed at the state board of'
health headquarters in Jackson-
ville this ,week when he was in-
formed that the laboratories have
been running approximately 200'
more 'Kahn tests every day than,
has ever before been handled
over a sustained period of time.
The demand upon the state
laboratories is so great that doe'
tors and public health officials in
every section of Florida have been


in America, victims of untreated
syphilis in their mother; 25,000
stillbirths or miscarriages an-
nually are attributed to syphilis.
Fifteen per cent or all blindness
and 10 per cent of all insanity
comes from syphilis. ,
In Florida 36,000 persons are
known to have syphilis.
During the first 11 months of
193 3,861 persons died in Florida
of various heart diseases, and
syphilis' is known to be a direct
cause of many diseases of the
heart. e
Syphilis, if discovered in its
early stages and treated accord-
ing to the instructions of the fam-
ily physician, is curable. The
great trouble is that people do
not go to their physician soon
enough or.they become impatient


asked to distribute the taking and .and cease treatments rore thei
sending of blood specimens over physician discharges them.
the entire week instead of con- -
iMUIrI' AUVnxI=DOIQP41


tmneratinz nnun Thursdav aonl Fi-


day takings that necessarily tax IS PLACED BY STATE
facilities and personnel of the
The annual report recently
laboratories. made by W. E. Ellis, president of
Cause of Most Disease the Marion county chamber of
The need for continued vigil- commerce, contained many things
ance in fighting syphilis is based of interest to Florida as a whole.
upon various reports by the Am- Among others, the figures on ad-
erican Social Hygiene association vertising and publicity are par-
and the Florida State Board of ticularly worthwhile.
Health. Among them: Advertising, according to the
Every year there are twice as report, was carried in publications
many new syphilis cases as tu- with a total annual circulation of
berculosis, 13 times as many as 15,000,000. A specially printed
diphtheria, 28 times as many as "Welcome" card, which was hand-
typhoid, 50 times as many as in- ed to tourists and placed on their
fantile paralysis. cars, proved highly successful. In
Of the 1,000,000 new syphilis in- addition, a specialized advertising
fections occuring each year in campaign costing $10,000 was
this country 750,000 are found in launched with the aid of the city
young men and women between of Ocala and help from the own-
16 and 30. years of age, which is ers of Silver Springs.
the same age limits that show the *
highest percentage of marriages. The Star is $2 per year-sub-
Twenty ,thousand infants are scribe now!


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE TWO


FRIDAY, ~FEBRUARY 24, 1939


! MUCH, ADVERTISINGr~









I E T


SENATOR PEPPER SEEKING
FLORIDA CASSAVA STUDY
;Senator Claude Pepper has an-
nounced that he intends to seek
an appropriation of $50,000 to con-
duct experiments in the growing
and manufacture of cassava pro-
ducts in Florida.
He says that the United States
is now paying $9,000,000 annually
cassavaa products produced in
foreik-countries for use in the
manufacture of paper and textile
products. 'it also produces starch
for laundries and is used for the
making of glue.
Cassava is often used as food
and it is believed that this use
can be widely expanded, through
proper experimentation.
Senator Pepper stated that he
was convinced Florida possesses
ideal advantages for cassava pro-
duction on a large scale.

Do you need Letterheads and
Envelopes? Let The Star print
them.

, CALM THOSE BY USING
NERVES, DOCTOR
BE SWEET-T MILES'
SERENE/ I NE RVINE


Can you afford to be
NERVOUS?
Perhaps y ou could afford
those attacks of Nerves if you
were the only one affected.
Tense nerves make you a nui-
sance to everyone with whom
you come in contact. No one
likes you when you are jumpy,
irritable and nervous.
N DR.MILES'
ERVINIL
DR. MILES NERVINE has
been recognized as effective for
more than 60 years by sufferers
from Sleeplessness, Nervous Ir-'
ritability, Nervous Headache,
Ner v o u s Indigestion, Travel
Sickness.
LIQUID NERVINE
Large btl. $1.00, Small btL 2M
EFFERVESCENT TABLETS
Large pkg. 75, Small pkg. 35%
At your drug store


~ara-gMa


CONSERVATION

GROUP TO SEEK

$1 ANGLER'S FEE

Would Affect Only Sport Fisher-
men and Not Those Using
Only Line and Pole

A dollor fishing license for all
residents of Florida will be
sought at the forthcoming session
of the legislature, it has been an-
nounced by officials of the Flor-
ida Wildlife Federation, who will
sponsor. the bill.
At present there is no license
fee for citizens fishing in their
own counties, but there is a $2.25
license charge if persons fish out-
side their home counties. Under
the new proposal the $2.25 license
law will be repealed and replaced
by the $1 law. This license would
permit fishing in any fresh water
in the state.
The bill would apply to persons
over 15 years of age and only
those persons fishing with a rod
and reel,- artificial lure or fly.
Florida Wildlife Federation offici-
als said the bill in; substance was
designed to affect only sports
fishermen and not those who fish
with a line and pole.
It is reported that I. N. Ken-
nedy of Tallahassee, executive
secretary of the Florida game and
fresh water fish commission, has
approved ,this dollar license law
legislation.
The state federation will also
ask lawmakers to revise the fish-
ing license charges for non-resi-
dents. Under existing laws a
three-day trip license is available
for $1.75. This would be changed
to $2 for a 10-day'license.
Revenue from the various li-
censes, under the bill, is allocated
to the state game and fresh wa-
ter-fish commission, and used for
conservation purposes only.

BATTLE SCARS?
Miss Jones: "You must have
had some narrow escapes in the
war."
Veteran: "I did, miss."
Miss Jones: "Did you get that
scar during an engagement?"
Vet: "No. I got it when I
broke an engagement."

The white-tailed deer has be-
come a common wild animal in
Wisconsin.


Wengrow's Offer the growing miss, and Doris Dod- age of a host of customers from
Sson for the stylish young lady. our own immediate and surround-
Co m lete Line These and many others make ing neighborhood.
lune p the stock of Wengrow's, which
has been serving the buying pub- MERRIE MONTH OF MAE
Wengrow's Department Store in lic in this area for over five Teacher: What caused Colum-
Panama City carries a complete years with merchandise of quality bus to discover America?"
line, of clothing for the entire fam- at reasonable prices. Johnny: "The call of the West."
ily, consisting of nationally adver- It is the opinion of the, editor Teacher: "And what is the call
tised lines, such as Shirley Tem- that this is one of 'the outstand- of the West?"
ple and Nannette dresses for chil-Iing' stores of its kind in North-1 Johnny: "Comb up an' see me
dren, Deana Durbin dresses for west Florida, having the patron- sometime."


NEVER before in our experience has a tire
met with such instant and unanimous approval
as the new Firestone Champion Tire. It's the
Safety Sensation of 1939! Our customers have
started a word-of-mouth campaign
that is making this the biggest
selling tire we've ever had. Motor car
manufacturers have been so impressed
by its superior performance thatrthey ,
have adopted it for their 1939 models.


WE HAUL ANYTHING-

CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING
WE HAVE GOOD CLEAN BUILDING SAND FOR SALE

Prompt and Efficient Service Always

C. W. HORTON


PHONE 70


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


More Non-Skid Mileage. The w Safety-Lock cord
construction provides the extra strength'needed for the use of
the new, thicker, tougher, deeper Firestone Gear-Grip tread
which delivers remarkably longer non-skid mileage. This
sensational new tread is called "Gear-Grip" because of its
unique design it has more than 3,000 sharp-edged angles
which grip the road with a sure-footed hold to protect against
skidding and assure a safe stop.

Drive in today and equip your car with a new set of
Firestone Champion Tires the only tires made that are
safety-proved on the speedway for your protection on the highway. ~


Ihir i. wh\ iheVy elect anj buu.
SFrestone Tires for Iheir i ;,r;.

Pirestone
UFE PROTECTOR
the Tire within,
a Tire
This amazing
new Firestone
development makes
a blowout as
harmless as a slow
leak.
Should a blowout
occur the exclusive
Firestone Safety-
Valve holds sufficient
air in the inner
compartment to
support the car until
it is brought to a safe stop.


To give him a better chance
"in life, start now on. our
systematic plan which will
enable your child to obtain
a college education at ,amaz-
ingly small cost

Ask our local agent
or write
Sfl. A.. P P tLI4PSO C


.1.?M *

S {
-3.-- -


H. J. GOLDTHWAITE, Agent, Box 725, Panama City, Fla.


irestone CHAMPION TFirtston HIGH SPEED 'Frestone CONVOY
5.25-17.814.65 6.00-18.817.15 5.25-17.$11.00 6.00-18.$15.45 4.50-21. $8.35 5.50-16.$10.60
5.50-16. 14.15 6.25-16. 17.95 5.50-16. 12.75 6.25-16. 16.15 4.75-19. 8.60 5.50-17. 11.00
5.50-17. 14.65 6.50-16. 19.35 5.50-17. 13.20 6.50-16. 27.40 5.00-19. 9.35 '6.0-1l6 1i.95
6.00-16. 15.95 7.00-15, 21.35 6.00.16. 14.35 7.00-15. 19.20 5.25-17. 9.65 6.25-16. 13.45
6.00-17. 16.50 7.00-16. 21.95 6.00-17. 14.85 7.00.16. 19.75 5.25-18. 10.90 6.50-16. 14.50
TRUCK TIRES AND OTHER PASSENGER CAR SIZES PRICED PROPORTIONATELY LOW

Listen to The Voice of Firestone with Richard Crooks, Listen to The Firestone Voice of the Farm-Everett
hMargaret Speaks and 4Alfred Walleastela. Monday Mitchell Interviews a Champion Farmer each week
evenings over Natlonwide N. C. Red Network. during noon hour. See local paper for station and time.



ST. JOE TEXACO



SERVICE STATION


Phone 100


Port St. Joe, Fla.


r


spb~-~a~ar~b~


~--- --- -- ---- --- --- --- --~-- -----------


-I .~ s~ PiB1Skl~s~ L~ ~J~q~ I --CI II~ I~a~ ,


I


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


I PAGE THREE


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24,1939,


m


m








FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1939


S. O 1


METHODIST MISSIONARY
CIRCLES IN MEETING
The Methodist Missionary So-
ciety held a joint meeting of the
circles at the church Monday af-
ternoon with Mrs. R. R. Hodges
in charge of the .program.
Music was played softly, after
which Mrs. Hodges announced the
subject for the afternoon, "Widen-
ing the Horizon of the Home."
Mrs. Roy Gibson and Mrs. Ed.
Ramsey sang "Home, Sweet
Home" and Mrs. J. L. Sharit read
the scripture, followed with prayer
by Mrs. G. A. Patton. Mrs. Roy
Gibson gave a talk on "Wide
Walls of the Horizon," after
which a "Love Offering" song
was sung. Mrs. J. T. McNeill and
Mrs. A. M. Jones gave splendid
talks on the subject for the meet-
ing, Mrs. Hodges led a home dedi-
cation service, and a short talk
from. Rev. D. E. Marietta com-
pleted the program.
The meeting was then turned
over to Mrs. W. E. Boyd, presi-
dent, and the minutes were read
and recorded. The treasurer's re-
port was given and accepted. Mrs.
Hodges discussed final plans for
the chicken supper to be given to-
morrow night.
Those attending the district mis-
sionary institute yesterday in Chip-
ley were Mrs. Patton, Mrs. Roy
Gibson, Mrs. McNeill,, Mrs. Boyd,
and Rev. Marietta. Mrs. Boyd an-
nounced that the zone meeting
will be held' at the church next
Tuesday, February 28, and circles
will be represented from Wewa-
hitchka, Panama City, Millville
and Parker.
A'Blessed Be the Tie" was sung
by the 29' members present,
which concluded the program.
The Susannah Wesley Circle
will meet next Monday with Mrs.
A. M. Jones -and the Marie Jones
Circle will meet with Mrs. R. H.
Brinson.


MRS. CARL TRAMMEL
ENTERTAINS CARD CLUB
Mrs. Carl Trammel entertained
the members of her bridge club at
her Beacon Hill home Tuesday af-
ternoon. Several progressions were
enjoyed, after- which prizes were
presented to Mrs. T. V. West-
brook, high, and Mrs. W. M. How-
ell, cut.
Delicious grapefruit marachino,
stuffed dates, crackers and coffee
was served to members present.

ANN TREADWELL IS
HOSTESS TO FRIENDS
Miss Ann, Treadwell entertained
a number of friends Friday night
at the home of her parents at
Beacon Hill. Contests' and games
were enjoyed, after which the
mother of the hostess, assisted by
Mrs. R. E. Rollins, served the
guests with :delicious refresh-
ments.

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT r
Mr. and Mrs. Coy E. Martin an-
, nounce the arrival of an 81-pound
'son at Oneida, Ky., on February 8,
1939. Mr. Martin is an employee of
the St. Joe Hardware company.
T ii *
LUNCHEON FOR VISITORS
Mrs. H. D. Marks of Apalachi-
cola entertained last Friday with
a four-course luncheon at the Port
Inn, honoring Dr. and Mrs. C. D.
Sherbekoff of Knoxville, Tenn.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles McClellan,
Miss Erline McClellan, Miss 'Julia
O'Quinn,, Mrs. Helen Rollins and
daughter Peggy, Gus Creech and
Kenneth Creech spent Tuesday af-
ternoon fishing at Dead Lakes. A
nice catch was reported.

Mrs. Edith Stone Daffin of Pan-
ama City is spending a month in
this city and is a guest at the
Port Inn.
: a *


S* Mr. and Mrs. Thos. R. L. Carter
Sarvis and family bf Apalachj- spent Wednesday in Wewahitchka
moved to the city last week. on business.


LET US SET YOUR TABLE WITH


America's Finest Dinnerware


TO OUR CUSTOMERS

We are co-operating with the manufacturers of the
famous Royal Chinaware in a plan which makes it
possible for us to give each of our customers and
those who would become our customers, a beautiful

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AT LESS THAN WHOLESALE COST
All you do is to concentrate your buying with us

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DON'T FORGET OUR FOUNTAIN DRINKS!
o


PHON


i-


MARTHA CIRCLE MEETS AT
HOME OF MRS. PRIDGEON
The Martha Circle of the Bap-
tist church met Mdnday afternoon
at the home of Mrs. W. C. Prid-
geon with Mrs. Charles McClellan
presiding.
The devotional was read and
followed with prayer by Mrs. L.
R. Holliday. The minutes were
read and approved and the roll
called with ten members and one
visitor present.
Regular business routine was
carried out during which three
members were selected to sell
subscriptions to Hollands maga-
zine to raise money to purchase
equipment for the church kitchen.
The Royal Service program was
planned for next Monaay, with the
Martha Circle in charge. Mrs.
Dendy conducted the Bible study
from the Book of Numbers after
which the meeting was dismissed
by Mrs. McClellan.
A social hour followed, atwhich
time the hostess served a salad
plate and soft drinks.
a
LYDIA CIRCLE MEETS
WITH MRS. L. W. OWENS
The Lydia Circle of the Baptist
Missionary Society met Monday
afternoon at the home of Mrs. L.
W. Owens on Seventh street, with
Mrs. Curtis Palmer presiding.
The meeting opened with song,
followed by the devotional by the
chairman. The Bible study from
the Book of Joshua was also led
by the chairman. Regular busi-
ness was discussed ana open dis-
cussion of selling subscriptions
to Hollands magazine to. raise
money to equip, the church kit-
chen was held.
Mrs. Owens was presented with
a "love, gift" from each member,
after which the. meeting was dis-
missed to meet at the church next
Monday afternoon.

MRS. VANLANDINGHAM
ENTERTAINS MARY CIRCLE
Mrs. Ivey Vanlandingham was
hostess to the Mary Circle Mon-
day afternoon at me home of Mrs.
O. F. Powell, who was in. charge
of,the meeting. The regular busi-
ness session was held after which
the personal service committee
prepared a basket of groceries,
brought by the members, for a
needy family. Mrs. Powell led in
the Bible study from the last
chapter of the mission study
book.
Following the business session,
a social hour was enjoyed at
which time the hostess served ice
cream and cake to the members.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
10:00 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.-Preaching service.
7:30 p. m.-Preaching service.
At the night service Rev. James
O. Reavis, D.D., will preach. Be
sure to hear him.
f Miss Pauline Arnold and Mitzie
Arnold of Quincy were the week-
end guests of Miss Eileen Arnold.
Miss Arnold returned to Quincy
with them Monday to attend the
Spitz-Arnold wedding.

Kenneth Creech was transact-
ing business Saturday in Panama
City.

Miss Juanita Gunn will leave to-
day to spend the week-end with
her parents in Perry.

Cecil Costin, Jr., left Tuesday
for Gulfport, Miss., after spending
several days here with his par-
ents, Mr. and Mrs. C. G. Costin.

Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Sharit, Mrs.
Robert Bellows and Mrs. Bertha
Bussells spent yesterday in Mo-
bile.

Jesse James is coming!


Society Personals Churches
LANETA DAVIS, Editor


Lloyd Motor Co.


Cadillac- Pontiac LaSalle
SALES and SERVICE

Northwest Florida's Finest Equipped Shop


We Never Close


Phone 9178


PANAMA CITY


BRAKES FUNERAL HOME



AMBULANCE SERVICE


PHONE 55


PANAMA CITY, FLA.


ATLANTIC



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QUALITY

PROPERLY AGED

SUPERB FLAVOR





Atlantic Company
ORLANDO, FLORIDA


Mrs. Bernard Pridgeon and. son, vis spent the week-end in Way-
Bernard, Jr., and Miss Edna Da- cross, Ga.


SHARRISON BEAUTY SHOPPE
SHERMAN ARCADE BLDG. PHONE 305 >
Louise Bush Lucille Bruce Martha Sue Harrison

MARIE BEAUTY SHOPPE
OPEN AT NIGHT BR APPOINTMENT PHONE 930
Pinkie M. Cutchins, Lennie Wilson-All Professional Operators
MRS. ROY HARRISON, Mgr. PANAMA CITY




The LORA LEE
Ladies' Ready-to-Wear

DRESSES COATS
HOSE MILINERY
LORA'S UNDERTHINGS



THE

BAY NATIONAL BANK

MEMBER
FEDERAL RESERVE
SYSTEM

Panama City, Florida"

Harrison Avenue and Fifth Street




DAFFIN'S STYLE SHOP
PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA


Classy Jean Dresses

Georgianna Frocks

SLarkwood Hosiery


LeHardy's Pharmacy

NE 5 Prescription Druggist PORT ST. JOE


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA



PAGE FOUR








F 2


lAv T7141 TPTTU L'1T


a aA A a


SEES ALL-
KNOWS ALL-
TELLS ALL-
ABOUT HAPPENINGS
IN PORT ST. JOE HIGH


E
A
S
So

Jo


Earl Rollins has returned to his the week-end in the city with his
home in Gordon, Ala., after spend- family.


THE STAFF FREEMAN'S SEED STORE
ditor-ln-Chief.........Dick Stepp
assistant Editor.... Bobby Coburn PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA
ports Editor........Al Schneider
society Editors............ Opal SEED FEED FERTILIZER
Greene and Dorothy Crockett
oke Editor.........Paul Johnson Everything for Field, Garden and Yard


Basketball Team G-O-S-S-I-P Washington and ******* **-** ******
The Eyes and Ears of the School .
-Wins Two Games Lincoln Honored Wayside Nurseries and Florists
The road to thte sawmill isn't "Flowers For All Occasions"
being traveled as much lately as a
Downs Carrabelle 18 to 5 and it used to be. In Chape Program Presented By WE TELEGRAPH FLOWERS ANYWHERE
Take Merchants In City League D. M. has hooked his wagon to The Eighth Grade W F
another star. AA Complete Floral and Landscape Service
The St. Joe High basketball M. S. keeps reminding us that The high school band opened FLA
't.arn defeated Carrabelle this her ring is an engagement ring the chapel program last Friday by PANAMA CITYFLORIDA
*week by a score or 18 to 5. We (but we know thra her dad gave playing "Good Fellowship" while 4 4as-$ 4 C 0 0 <4 -
believe this was the fastest game it to her). the students marched into the as-
oof the season. At the end of the A certain boy living in St. Au- sembly. After everyone wasseat-
first quarter the score was 1-0 in gustine received a letter ending: ed the band continued with "On SA X(1ON 'S SH ST O R E
favor of St. Joe. The game went "See, I'm still true to you." the Halls of the mountain King"
on with the locals, scoring 12 Some say B. L. K. is in love. and "Indian Boy."
points in the second quarter and Could it be? (But who is B. L. K. The eighth grade had charge of Complete Line of
Carrabelle one. At the beginning and whom does he love?) the program. Haskel Overby read SHOES, HOSE AND BAGS
of the second half the score was If several girls hadn't been at the 121st Psalm and led the as- IStd Shade
J.3 to 1 in favor of St. Joe. the show Friday night they could sembly in prayer. He then intro- I ew Spring Styles and Shades
Monday night the high school have gone to the tance. What a duced Mary Johnson who gave a PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA
team beat the .Merchants of the shame! very interesting reading on "The
city league 17. t;' 10. John Lane Why can't A. S. behave in last Life of Abraham Lincoln." After
was high point man for the high period study hall? this "Yankee Doodle" was sungby
school. L. H. is all a-flutter since R. G. a group of eighth grade boys with
is coming home. .Ed ones accompanying them on
BASKETBALL TEAM LEAVES K. S. should know better than his guitar. Lenora Johnson gave S CC o r
FOR DEFUNIAK TOURNEY to chaperone a party of young an outline of George Washington's
boys and girls (there must be two life. PANAMA CITY FLORIDA
The high school basketballteam chaperones). Ed Jones was called back on
Se ft yesterday for DeFuniak E. H, had better get busy if he the stage by loud applause from
Sprinks where they will partici- doesn't want to lose M. T. (or has the audience. He sang and played YOur GENERAL ELECTRIC Dealer
pate in the basketball tournament, he?) "Gold Mine .In the, Sky," which
St. Joe's first game will be with If anyone should want to know was greatly enjoyed by the audi- REFRIGERATORS RANGES
Crestview. If they win this game where M. H. is at any time of the ence. After this, everyone stood
they will play Chipley--and we day, ask B.N. and sang "Columbia the. Gem of AIR-CONDITIONING HEATING
believe they can. We wish our two editors would the Ocean," "Old Folks at Home"
.acquire heart interests. We'd like and "Auld Lang Syne."
gWs"sd'- .the. opportunity to make THEM "The Pilot" was played by the
suirm band while the assembly marched
_____ _- from the auditorium.
PLAYS O R M D rom theL MdStoCium. O The EMBASSY BAR AND CLUB
BAND PLAYS FOR MARDI
GRAS AT APALACHICOLA WELCOMED BACK TO SCHOOLWELCOMES YOU!
We are glad to see Raymond
The St. Joe band journeyed. to Hardy, a sophomore, back in
Apalachicola Tuesday school after his long illness. Ray- FLORIDA'S MOST COMPLETE STOCK OF
played and marched in the Mardimond has been absent for more FINE WHISKIES
SUN. MON.-FEB. 26-27 Gras parade. We are proud to say than two months because of meas- With Amrica's Best Bar Service
that when our band plays in an- an mon t b o With Amencas Best Bar Service
JACK J other city they always return with les and pneumonia, but he is back
BN compliments and are always el- now and looking fine, and we be- PANAMA, CITY, FLORIDA
\ s S icome for a return visit. lieve he will make up for all the
1^ 1 come for a return visit. o h st Umee wispa ^ inhe final
About 35 of 65 members of the lost time and pass in the final
z mw Uexams. We. wish you the best of
band took the trip. We do hop ex We e e
luck, Raymond.
that the rest of the band will be
able to play and march when it NEW
LUISE TRAINER Festival at DeFuniak. CLA SIFIED ADS
PAULETTE GODDARD --------
ALAN MARSHAL WE WONDER FOR RN H O T
FOR RENT
"DRAMATIC SCHOOL" Was the date between B. J. N.
NEWS MUSICAL and C. B. a myth? 0. G. says so. FURNISHED APARTMENT for F EPR
Can it be that students have rent. See T. V. Westbrook, Port
.a-a* iis* S now divided themselves into what St. Joe. 2-10tf
is known as the "High Society PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA
and the Low?" iUNFURNISHED 9 by 18-foot cab-
OPEN .OPEN nd the Low? ins; cei;ed overhead and sides;
7 a. m. 2 a. m. 7 a. m. 2 a. m. Why many of the school girls good water; $6 month. Apply St. EVERY ROOM WITH PRIVATE BATH
prefer to go with the town boys. Joe Lumber Co. 12121tf
Is it because they are more intel- ROOMS FOR RENT Free Auto Storage Under Cover for Guests
ligent?
S JWhat boy applied for book- IF YOU have a room for rent,
(SAVE OUR STOMACHS) keeper in Miss Thompson's post- why not place a classified adver- Rates $150 Up
tisement in The Star. The cost is Up
office? (Smack). Better look out low and returns are gratifying..
HELLO! HUNGRY? J. L. Try it today. tf
*Hurry and try The Midget's MISCELLANEOUS
Varieties of Foods DAIRY USES SANITARY-
PARCHMENT COVERS TO A TRUE EPIC OF FLORIDA IN APPRECIATION
Tasty and Delicious Hot PROTECT CUSTOMERS "The Rise and Decline of the Old I A PA
Dogs and Hamburgers City of st. Joseph," the only au-
On Toasted In order to afford greater sani- thentic history of the long-dead Of Your Past Patronage
Buns S c tary protection for their custo- birthplace of Florda's first con-
mers, Solomon's Dairy, distribu- stitution. Bound in kraft paper WE SOLICIT YOUR CONTINUED GOODWILL
tors of grade A pasteurized milk, from one of the first test runs
Beet Nickle Sandwiches in now provides a sanitary parch- made by the St. Joe Paper Co.
Best Nickle Sandwiches in now provides, a sanitary parch- mad h e r We have the latest styles and designs
town. They melt in your mouth. ment cover on every bottleof milk mill. This interesting booklet W hav th lat welry and esigs
Our Chili and Soup homemade. and cream delivered.ma be secured at The tar of- o Hgh Qualty ewery and Gts
THE REAL THING! "This is not required by state fice or LeHardy's Pharmacy for for your approval
health laws," says Ivey Vanland- 15 cents per copy. Send them to
That empty feeling satisfied hah la s sas alad your relatives and friends out- Elgi Hamilton Harvard
ingham, local distributor, "butwe sfE n H amilton Harvar
When You Eat At provide it without extra cost side the state WATCHES
THE MIDGET order to assure our customers of Services Offered
a clean and sanitary bottle when 4
SANDWICH SHOPPE they get their milk."
__ ELECTRICC WIRING-in all Its
Stop in Soon and Try Our branches, reasonable. Fixtures MOON JEWELRY COMPA
Specials Miss Flavelle Campbell, Miss an an. Fr
Doris Davis and Floyd Lister of and Fans. Repairs M J
Two doors from Miles 5 & 10 Wewahitchka attended the dance HENDERSON ELECTRIC
Reid Avenue given here last Friday night by COMPANY Port St. Joe PANAMA CITY FLORIDA
.' the volunteer fire department. Home Office, Apalachicol. Box 313 ,,


. I


FRIDAY, ftBRUARY 24, 1939


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE FIVE





FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1939


A T S PORT ST. J


LeHardy Offering
Fine Dinnerware

LeHardy's Pharmacy is offering
to their customers a line of fine
dinnerware manufactured by the
Royal China company, of Sebring,
Ohio.


BUICK
SALES


PHONE 89


This is high grade chinaware
with 22-carat gold trim and may
be secured in sets of 80, 57, 76
and 116 pieces. Mr. LeHardy re-
quests ihat all his customers come
in and see this beautiful ware and
let him explain how a complete
set may be acquired at a price
way below what would have to be
paid for ordinary ware elsewhere.


,CHEVROLET
id SERVICE


NIGHT PHONE 875


Daffin & Cogburn Inc.

"THE TOGGERY"

"Dress Well and Succeed"

PHONE 319 PANAMA CITY


FOR QUALITY WORK
SEND YOUR CLOTHES TO


MONARCH

DRY CLEANING

PANAMA- CITY




Wengrow's Dept. Store
PANAMA CITY'S SHOPPING CENTER

Complete Line of Clothing for the

Entire Family



WILSON UNDERTAKING CO.
/

"AMBULANCE SERVICE"
DAY AND NIGHT


Night Phone 111


Day Phone 33


NELSON CHEVROLET COMPANY
PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA


Luise Rainer
fully and lavishly produced, plays
Tuesday only at the Port theater.
Luise Rainer and' Paulette God-
dard head a large cast and per-
form with the finesse indicated
by the screenplay, an adaptation
from the Hungarian play, "School
of Drama." Rainer works in a fac-
tory by night and attends the na-
tional dramatic school by day. To
cover her poverty she builds elab-
orate lies for her cassmates, all
of which miraculously come true.
Others in the cast are Alan Mar-
shal, Lana Turner, Genevieve To-
bin and Henry Stephenson.
Jack Benny and Joan Bennett
will be seen at the Port Sunday
and Monday in "Artists and
Models Abroad.''
.------y~------
CARP SWALLOWS GLASSES
A doctor of 'Murphysboro, Ill.,
dropped a pair of trifocal spec-
tacles into eight feet of water
while On a fishing trip. One Week
later the doctor received word
that his spectacles had been dis-
covered in the gills of a six-ipound
carp caught in' the Kaskaskia
river.
Send The Star to a friend.
Send The. Star to a ifrind.


Health Officer
Boosts Citrus
Juice Drive

States That Regular Consumption
Of Large Quantities of Citrus
Is Highly Beneficial
Dr. W. A. McPhail of Jackson-
ville, Florida state health officer,
gave' a decided boost to the state-
wide and national campaigns to
increase the consumption of citrus
juices. Emphasizing the fact that
citrus fruits contain vitamins A,
B, C and G, the health officer
pointed out that regular consump-
tion of large quantities of citrus
is highly beneficial,
Dr. McPhail's statements, com-
ing as they do in the midst of the
five-cent citrus juice drive, should
go far to add effectiveness to the
canipaign. The health officer said
that not only were citrus fruits
good for the normal person, but
that they were excellent in com-
bating colds. His advice, if you
have a cold, is to go home at
once and remain there. Drink as
much citrus juice and water as
you can. Go to bed and call your
doctor.
Which reminds the editor that
when he was a small boy and
took down with a cold his grand-
mother always insisted on making
up a big glass of hot lemonade-
without sugar-and forcing him
to drink it, much against his will.
And on top of that she insisted
-on rubbing his throat and chest
with goose grease.

'Dramatic School'
Coming Tuesday

Features. Luise. Rainer, Paulette
Goddard and Genevieve Tobin

While the highbrow critics and
the carriage trade will probably
acclaim "Dramatic School" a tri-
umph in artistry, the great mass
of ticket buyers are very apt to
miss it subtleties and fine-drawn'
nuances. The picture, thought-


SHEET METAL WORK

Freeman Neon Sign Company
Otis Freeman, Mgr. 29 Harrison Ave. Panama City
Electrical Contractors *
Motor, Generator, Transformer Repairing
NE ON SIG NS
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PHONE 808



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D .

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SPANAMA CITY, FLORIDA
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PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA



McCALL'S CAFE
At the Sign of the Bathing Girl
POPULAR PRICES OPEN FOREVER
"He profits most who serves best"
PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA


BOOKS GREETING CARDS GIFTS AND GIFT
WRAPPERS STATIONERY
Complete Line of Office Supplies
WE DELIVER
Panama Book and Stationery Co.
PANAMA CITY, FLA. PHONE 592


COMPLIMENTS OF


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PANAMA CITY


THE GLEN
MODERN TOURIST COTTAGES
SERVICE STATION AND CAFE
DANCE HALL' ,
DANCING EVERY NIGHT'
PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA


NEHI BOTTLING COMPANY
PANAMA CITY
Bottlers of
ROYAL CROWN COLA
NEHI, UPPER 10 and PAR-T-PAK
BEVERAGES


PANAMA MACHINERY & SUPPLY

COMPANY

Mill and Railroad Supplies

Building and Hardware Supplies
PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA


24-HOUR WRECKER SERVICE


PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA


SElgin Anniversary Watch Values

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THIS OFFER ENDS MARCH 18

STERLING SILVER SPECIAL
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26-Piece Serviec for $39.75
IN GIFT CASE


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Panama City, Florida,


""""""""""""""""""""


THE STAR, PbORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY,- FLORIDA


PAGE SIX







A.: TH-E 'STAR, PORT..ST; JOE, GULP~R-OUNT;Y ,:FLORIDA


4


HOUSE LEAD S ?
AN EY e b l ELL

A recent issue of the Washing-
ton Treadmill," Frank Kennedy's
column, carried, the, following: .
"Useful Timber-Resident Flor
idians long have been aware thai
house leaders, always on the
lookout for useful timber, have
been grooming Congressman Cald-
*ell.
"It is becoming increasingly
apparent, now, that the party big
shots are pleased with their work
Caldwell's statesmanlike bearing,
his demonstrated ability, and his
taciturnity (a rare attribute in lo
quaclous Washington) mark him
as the type which eventually
rises to the speaker's chair or the
floor leader's desk.
"This estimate of the Third dis-
trict member is held generally by
the Floridians here. A fair job of
reporting requires dissemination
in the state, a job he never would
perform for himself."

Advertising, pays-try it!


DR. J. C. COE
- DENTIST T--
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment ,
'Costin Bldg. Port St.. Joe



EYES EXAMINED




Glasses fitted when needed
Made In Our Own Laboratory
All Work Unconditionally
Guaranteed
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 6 p. m.

DR. G. T. NEWBERRY
OPTOMETRIST
PANAMA CITY, FLA.



Why Not YOU, Too?
Enjoy a day's Fishing and.
Picnic Dinner .at .

MIDWAYPARK
On Gulf County's World-
Famous DEAD LAKES
Our BOATS are New, Dry
and Kept Clean. .-. Our
CABINS are New, with New
Beds and Furnishings.
This' FRIENDLY; CAMP is
.Midway oi the Lakes, 'at the
County Line, where your
Visit' Is Appreciated
J. P. BRANTON, Owner
Postoffice Address
WEWAHITCHKA, FLA.


Best for Purity, Quality
and Taste

PURITY IS

ASSURED!
; **A -. *t


SOLOMON'S:

Pasteurized

-MILK |


Pasteurized for Your
Protection


*Tei Million Staf o I

Aid Boosto 6rced b

.." Local Revenue Drop


3


t










i


Total ................$10,425,00
Lunds' required for social we
fare, which includes pensions fo
aged and compensation for ui
employed, increased greatly. I:
1934 the state spent less than i
million dollars for pensions, mos
of this~, for Confederate veteran
and. their widows. In. 1938 $12
0.00,000 .was collected for distri
bution .in the form of pension;
and compensation, but the bal
ance was paid out during th<
year. In fact, as will be show
in a later article, this, revenue is
inadequate to meet the demand;
for 'pensions already existing.
These .two items'-aid to 6'
counties land social welfare-to
taled $35,000,000 m .1938, and ab
sorbed 60 per cent of the state'i
revenue. They also account fo:
93 per cent of the total increase
of expenditures from 1934 tc
1938. *
Relative Cost
Many Florida citizens are in
clined to feel that these increased
expenditures point to extrava
gance on the part of "the'state'
or "politicians," and :it might be
well to clarify the situation. For
purpose of comparison the years
1917 to 1938 show the relative
cost of administering the state
government.
In 1917, when the state col-
lected less than five .million dol-
lars, total cost of the general
state government was about $1,-
150,000, or' 23 per cent of the
state's total revenue. In 1938 the
cost of the same items was $3,-
000,000, or 5.2 per cent of the to-
tal income.,
Analyzing the total 1938 ex-
penditures reveals the following
distribution:


Compa
we find
1938

24,000,0

23,000,0(

3,000,00

50,000,00


ar-
d:


00

00

r00

00


It is plain that expenditures for
operation of schools and county
Governments have not increased
greatly in -recent years.
The simple truth is that the tax
burden has been shifted. The
counties formerly raised all their
revenues locally, principally from
ad valorem taxes. Today almost
half of their Income is derived
from excise taxes levied by the
state and distributed to the couhn-
ties.
The Star, pointed out last week'
that federal tax collections- 'in
Florida for the fiscal year 1938
were $42,000,000 dollars. The fed-
eral expenditures in Florida dur-
ing that same period were about
$46,000,000, of which 50 per cent
was outright relief and the bal-
ance was for matching certain
expenditures.
While it is impossible to defi-
nitely allocate all the hidden taxes
levied by the federal government
on commodities sold in Florida,, it
can be safely stated that Florida
taxpayers paid into the federal
treasury last year as much money
as was spent in the state for re-
lief and all other purposes.
Federal Aid Lowers Local Taxes
Here again is an instance where
the tax burden has been shifted,
not lessened. The expenditure of
federal funds in Florida, and the
financing of a numberof munici-
pal and county projects with PWA
funds has been a definite factor
in keeping the local tax bill down
for the last four years. When
the federal government ceases
"these expenditures it will force
the cities and counties to find
new revenue sources- from which
to. finance future repairs, im-


provements and extensions.


Administration of state government ..........
Collecting state revenue .,.....................
New buildings, investments ..........;..........
Regulatory boards ....... .... .....-...........
Social welfare, pensions and compensation ......
Education ............................. ...... .. .
Public health and sanitation ..................
Conservation and development ..................
Advertising citrus fruits .....................
State highways ............................
County governments ..... ......... ..........
Prisons and corrections .........................
Miscellaneous ............ ........ ............. .


$ 1,685,000
1,350,000
800,000
1,450,000
11,3'50,000
14,000,000
1,650,000
1,725,000
800,000
12,000,000
10,500,000
700,000
420,000


Total ...... $58,430,000 100.0


Government Absorbed 6.6%
The state government itself,
and all its departments, together
with cost of collecting revenue,
took 6.6 per cent of the state's
income. Another 12 per cent was
spent for services which are
usually regarded as state func-
tions. The remaining 81 per cent
was paid out, for services which
were considered purely, county re-
sponsibilities 25 years ago.
It can readily be seen that the
actual burden carried by the tax-
payer cannot be judged accur-
ately by his state tax bill, or by
his local tax bills. These must be
combined with the federal taxes
(as was done in our first article)
in order to reach some conclusion
as to what our total tax bill really
is-
Burden- Is Shifted
Funds collected by the state
and distributed to counties in-
creased over the four-year period
but county ad valorem (real and
personal tax) Inite6 6 dedrea'ciM


Next week The Star will begin
a study of the demands which
will probably be made on the
1939 legislature for revenue for
old age pensions, schools, high-
ways and other purposes. Possible
sources of revenue will be dis-
cussed in a later article. 1939

McCall Saved By

Last-Minute Move

Governor Cone Postpones Execu-
tion Until 11 a. m. Today
-,
Franklin Pierce McCall, ransom
kidnaper, was temporarily saved
from death in the electric chair
at Raiford Monday about an hour
before he was scheduled to die, by
postponement of his execution by
State Prison Supetintendent L.F.
Chapman until 11 a. m. today.
Chapman said that McCall's ex-
ecution was held up after he'had


tail
Co:
dal
ch;
the
mil
the
wa


By Florida Research Bureau !Iduring that same time.
Funds collected by the state ing the two fiscal years
and distributed to Florida's 67: 1934
counties- increased from $12,500,- County ad
000 in. 1934 to $23,000,000 in 1938, valoiem levy 34,000,000
a gain of $10,500,000. The in- Received from
crease was as follows: state ....... 12,500,000
Gasoline revenues ....$ 3,125,000 Licenses, misc.
School funds ......... 6,250,000 revenue .... 3,000,000
Racing and miscellan-
eous revenues ....... 1,050,000 Total ......49,500,000


ked with Governor Fred P.
ne'by' telephone; r !F 6a vin the
te. -f McCall's death forward,
apman 'saldi be 'adt, d under au-i
ority of. the .death warrant per--
tting. the prison official to fix
actual d-4y 'f- execution. The
rrant signed by Governor Cone
rely set the weeK of February

Whether or not a further re-
eve will be granted remains in


the laps of the goas and Governor
,Cone".- - v

_p qARMCt RN GEOGRAPHY
Sdbacher:' t"Where is Detroit?"
VWllie: "In Chicago playing' the
*hee ox."K'
------' "-
An Egyptian pharaoh founded
one of the world's earliest botanic
gardens over' 3000 years ago, at
Karnak.


WHEN YOU COOK WITH GAS


WE GIVE YOU:


me
20.

pri


Br

vv
le


PORT ST. JOE
Florida .


PANAMA CITY
,. Telephone 16


Vast tracts of Southern phieland are important in
the industrial progress of this area. Newsprint mills
are already trending South, the naval stores industry
is widening its marketing horizon. On the threshold
of new commercial growth, Florida is faced by need
of increased forest consciousness.


The future of our pine resources depends upon three
vital measures. (1) Our forest acreages must be
protected from uncontrolled forest fires. (2) Must
be protected from damaging insects and diseases.
(3) Must be left, after cutting, with seed trees suf-
ficient to produce future forests.


If treated as a crop, our forests can become increas-
ingly productive and will satisfactorily meet indus-,
try's every demand.

As a public utility we aim at furnishing a
type of electric service which cannot be du-
plicated-as a local citizen, we aim at assisting
in sound community development which
will benefit all.


As grows the pine tree tall and straight,
so shapes the future of our State.





FLORIDA POWER


Corporation


JI


-iii-


P~Llr"sF% --


* Experienced sales counsel.
* Service by a company.that is financially
responsible
* No deposit required-just pay for your gas.
* A low gas rate, guaranteed not to be increased.
* Prompt response to your service calls.'
* Expert service on your appliances.
* Courtesy always.

0-


FRfiDAY,-FEff9U'UARVI,24,FP ,S39


i. PAGE SEVEN


SOUTHERN LIQUID GAS CO.
YOUR GAS COMPANY SINCE 1932Z








PAEEGT H TRPR T.JE UL ONYFOIA RDY #BUR 2,13


ChamberCommerce

Discusses Ho0 using

Problems of City

(Continued from Page 1)
each month would be held for
some time. The directors will
meet as usual every Tuesday to
transact the immediate and press-
ing business of the chamber. The
meeting this week was called off
to permit those directors who so
desired to attend the celebration
at Apalachicola and assist our
sister city insofar as possible.
C. A. Tovey made a report on
the development of plans to at-
tempt to gain recognition for
some type of defense setup here,
possibly a naval air base. He pre-
sented a sketch of the bay and a
tentative layout for such defenses
as this bay seems to be splendidly
fitted for. The matter was called
to the attention of naval officials
some time ago by Senators Pep-
per and Andrews and has already
received favorable comment, and
it is hoped that a commission
will come here shortly .to make
extensive investigations.
Plans were discussed regarding
an oyster supper which the cham-
ber will hold in the near' future.
A committee appointed to handle
this is composed of Joe Hauser,
T. M. Schneider, C. A. Tovey, T.
W. Wilson and Rev. Marietta.
---*(----
Jesse James is coming!
----------- .
Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Mitchell of
Dothan, Ala., were visiting in the
city Sunday. Mr. Mitchell re-
turned to Dothan while Mrs.
Mitchellremained for a few days
as the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Huel
Crockett. i -1 '?

R. H. Logian and family of At-'
lanta, Ga., moved to this city last
Wednesday.

Rev. Glion Benson of Apalachi-
cola was visiting in this city
Tuesday.
----------- -
It is estimated that 10 million
Christmas trees are harvested
every year to make an American
Christmas.


Florida's School

Revenue Drops

But Expenditures In Gulf .County
Increased By $900 Past Year

Florida school revenue declined
$1,795,000 during the last school
year, according to a summary of
county reports released yesterday
by State Superintendent Colin
English. ,School revenue from tax
redemptions was $1,330,000 less
during the year 1937-38 than the
previous year. This decrease of
66 per cent is attributed princi-
pally to the operation of the Mur-
phy act.
Prior to removal of the poll tax
as a requirement for voting, the
schools .collected at least $300,000
on a general election year from
this source. During 1937-38, a gen-
eral election year, collections from
poll taxes came to $54,000.
Current county and district tax
collections were almost exactly
the same as the previous year and
were $96,000 less than the year
1935-36. There was an increase in
racing commission funds available
for school purposes of $103,000 as
a result of special acts of the last
legislature to aid schools in cer-
tain counties.
Funds from all sources avail-
able for schools during 1937-38 to-
taled $22,587,817. In 1936-37 the
total was $24,372,600, and in 1935-
36 this total was $23,159,542.
State sources provided 52 per
cent of all revenue. Local county
a:nd district sources available for
support and maintenance of the
schools provided 30 per cent of
the total. Local revenue for debt
service was 17 per cent. Other
sources, including federal funds,
provided, less, than one per cent
of the total.
Total revenue for Gulf county
schools and school debt service
was $48,434 in 1937-38 and $47,503
in 1936-37.

Mr. and Mrs. A. Dragoin and
children of Cowarts, Ala., were
guests .Sunday of Mr. and Mrs. R.
E. Rollins.

Mrs. Bertha Bussells of Fleet-
ing, Va., is .the guest of Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Bellows.


SPECIALS
FOR FRIDAY, SATURDAY AND SUNDAY
Where Business is Brisk You Will Always Find Fresh Goods

MILK--6 Small or 25cl Ice Cream Powder- 24c
3 Tall 3 Boxes for --....... .
SHAVER'S FIELD PEAS-No. 2 Can 10c; 3 Cans.-....25c
Sailorman CROWDER PEAS-No. 2 Can 10c; 3 Cans 25c
TEA FLAKE CRACKERS-1 pound box 10c
PORK AND BEANS-3 No. 3 Cans 25c

IrishO bs. 23
Potatoes,,10 lbs. 230

TOMATOES- 25c FLOUR-Good grade 45C
6 Small for .............. 12 lbs. .......35c and
MAXWELL HOUSE SUPER SUDS, 1
MAXWELL HOUSE 29c large, 1 small .......
COFFEE Lb .... MATCHES, 3 boxes _..10c
COOKING OIL, gal.......90c SARDINES, 3 cans ......10c
Post Toasties, 3 for .....25c 5c Macaroni, 3 boxes...l10c

FANCY CHUCK ROAST- VEAL CHOPS and ROUND
Cash Price 15c STEAK-Wilson or 9fl
per pound .........-.... Swift's, per lb......... tVU

SWEET SIXTEEN MARGARINE-2 pounds ............25c
FANCY SLICED BACON-Per.pound 25c

WHITE BOILING 1 c OIL SAUSAGE- 85C
MEAT-Per lb .... IPer 6-lb. can .........
WE SELL ONLY GOVERNMENT INSPECTED MEAT

BAY SHORE GROCERY
Location: First Store on Right on Panama City Road After
Crossing Canal West of Port St. Joe
Highland View We Appreciate Your Patronage


Dance for Students How Farm Shares Oldtowners Lead


Civic Building


(Continued from Page 1)
bit toward seeing that all the
children have this one night of
joy. They can dance, play games
or ,do anything that suits the ma-
jority of those present. Music will
be provided through the courtesy
of Mr. and Mrs. Stepp of Stepp's
cafe, who will donate the use of
their electric victrola used at the
cafe for dancing, which with its
large volume can be heard all
over the Centennial building.
Hearty co-operation to this pro-
gram is being given by Mayor J.
L. Sharit, who states that he will
do all in his power to help the
young folks have a splendid, time.
He will also have Chief Troy
Jones or one of the other officers
present to maintain order and see
that those not entitled to admis-
sion can crash the gate.
Mr. Lewis is to be commended
highly for this fine act, which is
entirely at his own expense.
Doors will open at 7:30 and the
fun will start promptly at 8
o'clock.

FISH RINGS OWN KNELL
A lazy man's, touch has been
added to fishing in the Rock river
at Sterling, Ill., by William "Pop"
Hill, who lives in a riverside
cabin. A double line on a pulley,
equipped with a bell, runs from
his cabin to a post in midstream.
When a fish is hooked the bell
rings, and Hill pulls in the lines
and removes the fish without
leaving his chair.
Save by reading the ads!
Save by reading the ads!


In Auto Profits At Halfway Point


Interesting Almanac Is Put Out
By Ford Motor Company
Results of the Ford Motor com-
pany campaign to develop new
farm crops that industry can use
are indicated by an article in the
1939 Ford Home Almanac, now
being distributed throughout the
United States and which may be
obtained in Port St. Joe at the
St. Joe Motor company.
For every million Ford cars
and trucks built, the company
uses 89,000,000 pounds of cotton-
the crop from 585,000 acres-the
almanac article shows. Other pur-
chases of farm products necessary
for the manufacture of a million
Ford units are as follows:
Five hundred thousand bushels
of corn, for making rubber sub-
stitute, butyl alcohol and solvents;
2,400,000 pounds of linseed oil, for
making paints, core oil. soft soap
and glycerine; 2,500,000 gallons of
molasses, for making antifreeze,
shock absorber fluids and sol-
vents.
One million five hundred square
feet of leather, for making up-
holstery and hide-glues; 3,200,000
pounds of wool, which helps to
make upholstery, gaskets, anti-
rust, floor coverings and lubri-
cans; 20,000 hogs to supply the
lard oil for lubricants, oleic acid
and brush bristles, and 2,000,000
pounds of soybean oil for plas-
tics, enamel and many other uses.

Mrs. H. N. Hammock and chil-
dren attended the Mardi Gras in
Apalachicola Tuesday.


(Continued from Page 1)
permakers were let down with
one field goal and two from the
foul line. -
Results of the games Wednes-
day night were as follows: Old-
towners 36, High School,-44; Pa-
permakers 33, Merchanti 11.
The first game was fast and
clean, with but eight fouls called
during the entire play. Both teams
excelled with smooth, fast team-
work. The school boys show so
much improvement that they
should win most of their scholas-
tic games. Breaks were against
them in shooting, but both Stepp
and Trawick made fast dribbles
the length of the floor followed
by caging the ball. George Tap-
per played an even better game
than usual and was the star of
the game with eight field goals.
The Papermakers trebeled the
score on the Merchants, leaving
them still floundering at the bot-
tom and with several members
crippled. Maybe by next week luck
will change for them. .

LEAGUE STANDING
Team- W L Pet.
Oldftowners ;.......... 7 0 1.000
Paperrmakers .,..... 5 2 .714
High School........ 2 5 .286
Merchthts .,....;.. 0 7 .900

Dave Brown and. Mercer Spear
of Apalachicola attended the fire,
man's ball last Friday night.

Albert Hickey spent Tuesday in
Apalachicola with friends.


FLOUR
JUNE BRIDE
Self-Rising

24 lb 65 12 lb 35
!


CORN FLAKES 2 Boxes 15c

Octagon Soap, 5 small bars....llc

P&G Soap, 3 large bars..........13c

Water Ground Meal Ls. 25c

TURNIPS-3 No. 2 cans........25c


Cooking Oil GA 80c 4: ,.48c P TATOES
TOMATOES-3 No. 2 Cans 25
DILL PICKLES-Quart Jar 15 POUNDS
EARLY JUNE PEAS-2 No. 2 Cans ..----...--15 IRISH c

DRY SALT MEAT-Per lb...15c 10 POWUS 15C
Tomato Soup-3 No. 1 cans..13c


SALM 0 N ALASKA PINK 25
SUGAR 2 CANS
S U 'A DESSERT PEACHES- 2?C
SILVER BAR-2 No. 2/2 Cans...
-BULK
SUIndiana SWEET CORN- 25e

10 bs. 4 83 No. 2 Cans....................
10 lbs. 4 Phillips Pork and Beans- 10o
No. 2V2 Can ...................



Owens & Murdock


PORT ST. JOE


U


FLORIDA


/------- -- - ----r1 -


FOR FRIDAY AND SATURDAY

FEBRUARY 24 AND 25


PAGE EIGHT


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FL~ORIDA.


FRIDAY, FfEBRUARY 24, 41939