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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00118
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: January 20, 1939
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00118

Full Text




T1he Star-Floridals O Ifgtet grow-
9ng little newpgper-dAddicated to
the betterment and upbullding of
the City of Port St Joe.


THE


STAR"


Port St. Joe-Slie of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florlda's fast-
est growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center

VOLUME -II PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FlLORI.DA, FRIIAY, JANUARY 20, 1939 NUMBER 14
', '' ~


-lUGE LUMBER MILL


BEGAN OPERATIONS


IN ST. JOE MONDAY

SST.'dJOELUMBER AND EXPORT
ITMACH OF -IMES. COMPANY EMPLOYS OVER
CA PAI lT W 30 MEN AND LL RELEASE
CAMIAININ OW $40Qp00 PAYROLL MONTHLY


UNDER WAY HERE

Ball 'Wil Be Held January 28 in
Centennial Building, Marking
President's Birthday


T-he St. Joe Lumber and 'Export
-oo'mpany started operations. Mon-
day at their 'huge mill on the"
western ,ofty. ~UmtS, wtth nmerdhant-
'able tibeer rtesoutrces of. more:


han 00,000,00- teet -of pine, cy-,
:E. Clay 'l-ewi, r., 'Gifl county, press itd' 'haidwtood~s, nn 500,000
chairman 4 the. committee for the asres,'of Sand, the largest holding
celebration of the president's of virgin timbember der one owner-
birthday in (the 'campaign to .fight, ship anywhere -in the South at the
infantile paralysis, yesterday said present -time.
that the campaign here teia pro. '-he mill, which 1i' under 'the
ceedi.ng nicely, .' management of Basil E. ;XEnney,
SThe eniapalgh Is b.eing.' spon. Sr., a veteran lumberman, employs
'*ore@ inh -a number of ways: iut- approxilnately .800 men.fat the mill
tons ay be purchased tor a dimft liad in the forests with an esti-
-at almost any drug store, cafes mated monthlyy payroll io the
-or public places in the county; neighborhood of $400000,.which will
cards' :hich ill cositain ten dimes mean much to the future prosper-
.and 'which are mailed directly to ;ity and developine.ft 'ot Port St.
the president, may also be ob .Joe and Gulf county.
teailne at these places in the I.'00,0d.o Pet, fPer'iMofth
"March of Dimes" campaign. 'The mIll is'a single band. and
Paperriakers. Sponsor Dance resaw, constructed to take tim-
..:.The International Brotherhood ber.s ul to 45 teei in length, with-
qft Papermakers.ai'aW spbnoring -a two Ilarge brick dry kilns, huge
dance, to be -held at"the Centen- ~iTugh sheds, planing mill and dress
.nial Tbufiling 4n Port St. Joe on sheds. It i'fl P toatuce approxil-
Saturday night, January 28, at mately 67,000 feet per hour, or 1,-
which 'Bill' fariiner's orchestra will 500,000 feet per month.
.play. Admission -price will be $1.50 .The editor 'isite-l the mill yes.
and tickets are now being sold by ter~ay ahdA the caeashdny 'of 'esas,
a committee of the papermakers' hains, iteamn and 'whistles was
union,* the Port St. Joe Woman's .niifc. to ,is.'eais, for tt all meant
clib, or may hbe secured from E., that Port St. Joe wvag advalncing
dlayg Lewis or Gorg~ e tapper in' toward her rightful place in the
ihis city, or from W. R. Connell sun. He went-through the entire
in Wewahitchka. ( onttnued on Page .2)
Fifty per cent of all proceeds of ': .. .
Ahe sale of buttons, 'cards mailed .p S/lmno
S kdl hbOl


to the White House, and the dance ---- --- -
will be retained by.the local com.- v n S i
mi'ttee lor use in Gailf county. The erlce 1 Onigh
remaining 50 per cent will be for-.
warded to the national committee At Revival Being Conducted At
for use in research on ways to Presbyterian Church
cure -and eliminate this dreadful
diseaset. Rev. H. F. Beaty reports that a
Vants To See Gulf County at Top great deal of interest is being
Mr. Lewis. stated. that he hoped taken in the revival services' be-
:that Gulf county's response would; ing held at the Presbyterian
b e at the head of the list of all church this week. "Anyone who
. counties iin -Florida, according to has not attended is missing much,"
' population, and requests that each stated Rev. Beaty.
: nd every person who possibly can gipeciali service for teachers
'o so, purchase a ticket to the and school children will be held
'dance, whether they can ,'go or .tonight, and a cordial invitation is
not; purchase a button, and, if extended everyone to be present.
possible, -mail 'a card of dimes di-. Services will be held tomorrow:
:roct to the president. at 9 o'clock in the morning and at'
United States Senators Charlesr 7:)0 'in the evening.
S0. Andrews and Claude Pepper Preaching services will be at'
O'Ire appealing to the people of the 11 a. m. and: 7:30 p. m. Sunday,
:'tate to support and aid, the cam. the concluding day of the revival.i
ipaign against infantile paralysis, A special offering is requested fori
: bd G -6ernori Cone as also is- Sunday for expenses of the meet-i
';sued an appeall for support of this ing and a thank offering for the;
:' -hmanitarian movement, visiting minister.


--)
'TRIANWlit SEt VItC STATION
UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
'The Triangle Service Station, at
h..e corner of Reid avenue and
' first street, this week was taken
over by Cy Williams, who will op-
.erate it in future.
As -a special inducement to cus-
..tomers. Mr. Williams Is offering a


PETE MOVES STORE
'Pete's Cash and Carry grocery
moved Wednesday from its loca-
tion -in the store building adjoining,
Miles 5 and 10 to the recently-.
completed building next to Roche's
Appliance Store on Reid avenue.


r'.ee grease< Job when 50 gallons BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT
''of gasoline have been purchased Mr. and Mis. A. G. Montgomery
by aty one customer. are announcing the arrival of a
S" 6%-pound boy, born Monday, Jan-
Hitler and Mussolini are sure uary 16, 1939. "The baby has'beeh 1
'giving the map-makers a headache, named -Jamea Oliver.
..- ^ ~ -* id '


State HealthBoard

Asks Local `elp In

Syphilis Problem

Needs Assistance In Making the
Public at. Large Coriscious of
Seriousness of Disease

(Special to The .Star)
Civic organization of Port St
Joe are asked by the Elorida State
Board of Health o tb ok at the
state's syphilis control problem as
it confronts' them toda. :and. to as
sist in making the public at large
conscious of the seriousness of
that problem by joining in the ob
servance of the Third Nationa
Social -ygiemle Day, which falls
on February 1 this year. e
Port St *Jo,e. citUzens.re. re
minded by Dr. W. A MiPhul
state health officer, that around
36,000 persoisa In *lorlda a'e
known to .h'havie syl~bills. This does
;not, take into aceognt many who
'mAy -b in the early; s.ges of the
disease and thereforee do not k~ow
they ihae it, nor dpos it lncludI
cases treated wlbiout being re
ported to thte .btmreauqO t epidemic
ology of the state board of health
Worse'Than 'taiktjib Show
The bureau of vital statistics at
tle state :boar, 'of health head
quarters a I Ja cksenvile show thai
-(Cqtinied .op Page 4)

Ask $25,0 0 'For :'

Maintenance of

t Joseph's Bay

Other Sums Recommendbd by War
b9paiitiebrit 'For 'iWtefs
Nwer 'Port 5t. Doce

The stinh of t i5,d000 fdo maintn.
incce of St. Joseiihs ']aly during
41939 'has' beginn tecoutniende.d by
water departmentt einetiers in; their'
arnjmal recommendations to 'con-
gress this week.
The engineering department
'recommended a total 'of 14,525,000
for projects in Florida waters dur-:
Ing the year, Including the amount'
for maintenance of the local har-'
bdr.
Other sums fedommendied for
waters in -nd near Port St. Joe
included $3,750 for the Apalachi-'
cola river, $24,000 for Carrrbelle
bar and harbor, $30;000 for Apa-'
I1ahicola 'bay, $25;000 for the up-:
per Apaichicola river, $5000 for;
the Chipola river, $30.000 for the.
intracoastal waterway from Apa-
lachicola to St. -Marlks, bay, $40,000:
for the waterway from Cnocta-
whatchee bay to West bay, $50,-,
000 for St. Andrews bay, $5000 for
East Pass channel from the Gulf'
to Choetawhatchee bay, and $53,-
rSb for Pensacola bay.

Free Movies

Monday Night

Presented Through Courtesy of
Murdock Chevrolet Company


Residents of Port St. Joe will
be treated to a free moving pic-
ture show Monday evening on the
vacant lot across the street from
the postoffice -on Reid avenue
when the traveling theater of the
Chevrolet Motor company plays
here, brought to Port St. Joe by
the Murdock Chevrolet company,
local, dealers. .
(Continued on Page 6)


i"















f

I
I


BEAUTY PAGEANT AND


AMATEUR CONTEST


TO BE HELD TONIGHT


WPA Pl0JE CIT UNDER AUSPICES OF LEGION
.AUXILI.ARY.; BABY CONTEST
FOR PRT ST. JOE T BE FEATURE ALSO; 8S
-- 'J GORGEOUS GIRLS COMPETE

COME TO $145,238 of St.
TO $145138 Eighteen beautiful young ladIde
Sn of Port St. Joe have entered ,the
Two .biteAdinstrarg Aithored beauty. pageant to be hel hltonight
Slte Administrator Willhu
Blipisy '031 -Worker. in 'the high 'school auditorium 'un-
'der the direction ot the Ameican
Plorida WPIA Administrator Rob-, n L&giqiiAuxiliary and upon the
:'et, J.: Il this wOwtok authoitfzed Judges Will rest the decision :as t
two-.projects ,flr Pjrt St. Joe at a who is the most beautiful'l giri i
bt6tal :cot o f.41A5,2t8, which Will the city-a, mighty hard task
ie"e eniploomiment to 23,1 workers. when one dlifit~rs thiB array 'of
The daneest -roWect. improve-. ulchriltude 'enfer'ed.


Smeont and widening of 'Fifth street Thbe thsrlit
from Monument :aOenue to ths .'he- e entries in the contest, to0-
eastern city limits, calls for. an gether with their sponsors, are as
Sempeuditure of $1h8;921 for the follows:' 4
construction of curbing, gutters Opal Green, Suwannee Store;
and sidewalks and will .give em- Betty Darcey, Florida Power Cor-
'~lyme1t ito 176 t~ofwesi'for a pe- portion; Myrtle Whitaker, Port
t ~od. of eight months. The WPA al- Theater; Martha Hinmon, Schnei-
locatloh ~for. this 'ill be $50,113, der's Department St6ra; Allah
and the balance will be taken care Mae lDarcey, Roche's' Appliance
of by. local interests, ..hi. will S t or e; Betty Temple, Htaer
give a 120-boulevard as an.east en- Department Store; Murnice Taun.
trance tthe ity; ,. ton, Pete's Cash .aI .(a_.rfUn-
f(. The'second project, costing $16,- nette Hammock, tiiras'' Jewelry
'217 and 'givitg employment to 61 Company; Kathleen Saunders, St.
Workers for five months, is- or ex- re:i Moto or Company; Ay S .Wilsoh,
tension of the city's sewer mains' Quality Gfocery; Virginia Stouta-
* to the amount of "9500 lineal feet, mire, Daniey Funiture 'Company;
;or almost two miles of new mains. Katheriqe ickley, Princess Beawity
The WPA allocation on this *proj- Shop; Adelaide Hardy, St. Joe
Sect is $10,966. "d'iwakre Comipany; Alice Ruth
--- --- ::--- Gibson, illBer's Drug tore; Doro.
.lty : a 'thy 'Crockett,,, rVir Drug Com-
t pany; Marigene Smith, Gulf Hrd-
ague i s Formed ware Compady; Elaine Gore, Solo-.
Leag 8 mans Dairy; illy JaTe ;Nobles,
Chavers-Fowhand Furniture Comrn
FoUr teams Will Btle PFor Pany-
ChampioHaship lithors Atiaheu' Confert
The amateur conite'sti il givie
At a meeting held in the high local talent an opportunity to sTrut
school auditorium Monday night, their stuff before an admiring.and
which was presided over by.D. G. appreciative audience.
MoPherson, a city basketball league Entries up to yesterday evening
was formed. were as follows: Ann 'Treadwell,
Jake. Belin was selected to act tap dancing; Geraldine Parker,
as temporary chairman of the or- songs; Erie Duke Gulledge, vocal
organization n and teams were en, solo; Fay Nell, violin solo; Arthur
tered by the St. Joe Paper corn- Forehand, mouth harp; Betty Jo
pany, St. Joe high school, George Lane, reading; Albert Gagneaux,
Tapper (town team). A fourth mouth harp; Mrs.' Helen Curry,
team will be entered, but has not banjo: Abe Sable, mandolin; 'Ger-
yet been sponsored. It is antici- aldine Parker and Marion Van-
plated that the games /will be Horn, vocal duet: Cornelius Van-
played in the Centennial building Horn and Jessie Stoii, instru-
and a committee was named to se- mental duet; Gwendolyn Howell,
cure permission for use of the vocal solo. :
building. Baby Contest
Committees were also appointed The high school band will play .
to draw up a set of rules and a several numbers to open the eve-
schedule of games. A meeting ning's program, which vwil be fol-
was held last night to pass upon lowed by introduction of the en-
and adopt the rules and schedule tries in the beauty pageant, and
and to elect permanent officers of then the baby contest will be held.
the league. A beautiful loving cup, which is
-- on display in the show window of
REGULAR MEETING OF the Lilius Jewe~ry company, will
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE be given to the winning baby in
The regular scheduled meeting this contest
of the Port St. Joe Chamber of The iihateur numbers will be in-
Commerce will be held this eve- terspersed with judging of the
ning at the Legion Hut. entries in the beauty pageant, and
All members are requested to be the three events should provide a
present, as a number of matters full evening of excellent enter-
are to come up that are of inter- tainment for those attending.
est to all residents of the city. Tickets are now oh sale at the
Special music will be a feature low admission price of 25 cents for
of, entertainment. adults and 15 cents for children,
and it is anticipated that the audi-
Stanley 'Hidalgo returned Mon- torium will be crowded to ca.
day from New Orleans where he pacity by 7:30, the time the cur..
visited with his mother. tain is scheduled to go up .


....









pA T ...O.. F


MASTER TOMMY OWENS
CELEBRATES BIRTHDAY
Tommy Owens, son of Mr. and
Mrs. T. Owens, celebrated his
ninth birthday Saturday by enter-
taining a number or his friends
with a theater party. Following
the show, the host and guests
went to LeHardy's drug store
where Mrs. Owens awaited them
with a beautiful birthday cake,
which was cut by tne honoree and
served with ice cream to Huel
Crockett, Marion VanHorn, Hugh
McPherson, Sonny Pridgeon, Ben-
ton Kelly, Charles Spence, David
Malone, Tommy Bartee, Edward
Bartee and Buster Owens.

MRS. HICKEY HOSTESS TO
WEDNESDAY BRIDGE CLUB
The Wednesday Bridge club met
this week at the home of Mrs.
Erie Hickey on Eighth street.
Potted plants were used for dec-
orating the living room where the
guests were entertained. Follow-
ing several progressions, prizes
were presented to Mrs. W. S.
Smith, high, and Mrs. E. Curry,
cut.
Chocolate pie and coffee was
served as refreshments to Mes-
dames D. C. Smith, E..Curry, W.
S. Smith, P. J. Farmer, T. V. West-
brook, W. M. Howeti, W. A. Wood
and B. Shannon.

MRS. LEROY GAINOUS
ENTERTAINS J.A.M.CLUB
Mrs. Leroy :Gainous delightfully
entertained the J. A. M. club Mon-
;day night at her home on Eighth
street with a buffet supper. Sew-
ing and chatting were enjoyed).af-
ter which the guests were invited
to the dining room to. a delicious
supper of chicken, salad, crackers,
creamed peas and mushrooms,
olives, celery, cream cheese sand-
wiches, ambrosia, cake and cof-
fee. '
Enjoying this, affair were Mes-
dames J. A. Connell, B. A. Prid'-
geon, L. Perritt, J. M.' Smith, H.
A. Drake, C. Boyer, E. C. Pridgeon,
W. H. Howell and Miss Myrtice
Cooty and guests, Mrs. J. W. Wells
and Miss Lillian Thompson.

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Hauser and
baby returned this week from Chi-
cago, where they visited with rel-
atives.

It pays to advertise-try it!


Society


SPersonals


LANETA DAVIS, Editor
/


'AMERICAN CITIZENSHIP' IS
TOPIC AT WOMAN'S CLUB
Topic of the Port St. Joe Wom-
an's Club meeting Wednesday af-
ternoon at the Methodist church
was "American Citizenship." Mrs.
Fred Curtis, program chairman,
was in charge. The keynote of the
hour was: "Breathes there a man
with soul so dead who never to
himself hath said, This is my own,
my native land!"
In keeping with the subject pa-
triotic songs were sung by mem-
bers present. Mrs. Roy Gibson and
Mrs. Edwin Ramsey rendered a
duet, "Suwannee River," which
was greatly appreciated by the
members.
An interesting address on "Am-
erican Citizenship" was splendidly,
presented by Mrs. Basil E. ,Ken-
ney, Sr. Another interesting talk
was given by Mrs. L. H., Bartee on
an article published in the last is-
sue of The Clubwoman, written by
the state chairman of the Ameri-
can citizenship committee.
Following the program, Mrs. G.
A. Patton took charge of the busi-
ness session at which it was de-
cided to sell sandwiches at the
President's Ball, to be held Janu-
ary 28, the proceeds to go to the
'infantile paralysis foundation fund
as the club's contribution. It was,
also voted to give something to
the chamber of commerce on the
expense of the community Christ-
mas tree.
Mrs. Joe Whitfield made some
timely suggestions ror the forming
of a public library, pointing out
that it would be of great benefit
to the city.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wither-
spoon and Mrs. A. Hinckley of
Apalachicola were visiting in this
city Wednesday.

Elmer F. Irwin of Jacksonville,
public accountant, was in the city
Wednesday on business.

Mayor J. L. Sharit and Robert
Bellows returned Monday from a
week's business trip to Washing-
ton, D. C.


HERE MONDAY!
















.I -










Be our guest at a sound-movie

presentation that will amuse you, thrill you, surprise you.

Fun for all-free to all! Bring your family and friends to

enjoy themselves with you.

The Traveling Theatre is brought to you through the courtesy of


Murdock Chevrolet Company



/-AMM FuB E
,:''~.1 :.3p


At the Churches

METHODIST CHURCH
D. E. Marietta, Minister
Services Every Sunday
10:00 a. m.-Churcn School.
11:00 a. m.-Morning worship.
7:30 p.,m.-Evening worship.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
10:00 a. m.-I-unday School.
11:00 a. m.-Preaching service,
7:30 p. m.-Preaching service.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. J. W. Sisemore, Minister
10:00 a.-m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. m;-Morning Worship.
6:30 p. m.-B. T. U.
7:30 p. m.-Evening Worship.
W. M. U., Monday, 3:00 p. m.
Prayermeeting Wednesday, 7:30 p.
m. Teachers meeting, Thursday,
7:30 p. m.

ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Rev. H. P. Money, Pastor
Full-time services
10:15 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.-Preaching Service.
7:80 p. m.-Evangelistic service.
Prayermeetin'g every Wednesday
night.
C_.4_--'
HUGH McPHERSON-IS
HONORED WITH PARTY
Honoring her son,: who cele-
brated his ninth birthday Monday,
Mrs, D. G. McPherson entertained
at her home on Woodward avenue
with a birthday party.
Games were enjoyed during the
afternoon, after which the guests
were invited to the dining room
where a beautiful birthday cake
formed the centerpiece for the
table. Vari-colored balloons were
presented to each guest and de-
licious fruit jello and cake was
serVed. i- ,
Enoying the affair were Wayne
Taunton, Tommy Owens, Buster
Owens, Geraldine Sowers, Edwina
Howell, Dudley and- Othe Powell,
Charles Spence, Gene Chism, War-
ing Murdock, Wade Barrier, and
Tommy Hull.
The young honor guest was the
recipient Of many gifts.

GIRLS' AUXILIARY OF
LEGION MEETS
The Girls' Auxiliary of the
American Legion met last Friday
night at the Legion hut with Sarah
VanHorn, president, presiding.
The meeting opened with the
pledge of allegiance, followed by
the regular routine of business.
Reports were heard from Secretary
Gwendolyn Spencer and Treasurer
Dorothy Trawick. The meeting
was : dismissed by the chaplain,
Gwendolyn Howell. Twelve mem-
bers were present.
All the girls brought sandwiches
and ingredients for punch, and fol-
lowing the business, refreshments
were served and a delightful so-
cial hour enjoyed.

THURSDAY BRIDGE CLUB
MEETS WITH MRS. T. OWENS
Mrs. T. Owens entertained' the
Thursday Bridge club yesterday at
her home on Seventh street.
Tables were placed for play and
after several progressions scores
were tallied and prizes presented.
Delectable refreshments were
served to members present.
S ."- -2

Alvia Thomas of Panama City
was a business visitor Tuesday in
Port St. Joe.

Miss Julia O'Quinn will leave to-
day to spend' the week-end in
Troy, Ala.
fr A, r
Selwyn Chalker, Bill Huggins
and the Misses Louise Soloman
and Avaryee Collier visited in
Panama City Sunday.

Gus Godberg of Pensacola was a
business visitor in the city Tues-
day. -


METHODIST MISSIONARY
SOCIETY MEETS
The Methodist Missionary so-
ciety met Monday afternoon at
the church with Mrs. W. E. Boyd
presiding. The meeting opened
with the hymn, "He Leadeth Me,"
followed with prayer by Mrs. G. A.
Patton. A motion was made by
Mrs. Patton to increase the pledge
from $50 to $60, and a motion was
also made to contribute $1 for the
lights on the community Christ-
mas tree. A report was heard
from the treasurer for the year's
work. Mrs. Patton announced that
the Woman's Club would meet at
the church Wednesday, after which
the following program was pre-
sented:
Topic, "The Widening Horizon
Through Personal Service." The
scripture, Mark 10:35-45, was
read by Mrs. R. R. Hodges. "The
Poor She Has Always With Her,"
by Mrs. Tom Gibson. "Whosoever
Shall Lose His Life for My Sake,"
by Mrs. Jones. "Looking for La-
vender Mountain," by Mrs. Nei-
dig. Mrs. Boyd read the de-
votional from The World Outlook,
after which the meeting was dis-
missed with prayer by Mrs. A. M.
Jones. Twenty members were
present.

Miss Gladys Musgrove arrived:
Sunday from Munroe, La., and
will be the guest of Mr. and Mrs.
John Sowers while in the city.

Rob Miller of Jacksonville spent
Tuesday in the city, the guest of
Mr. and Mrs. T. M. Schneider and
family.

Mrs. Philip Lovett, Mrs. B. 3.
Conklin and Mrs. Sammie Davis
and son, Carlyle, spent Monday in
Panama City.

The Misses Emeline and Martha
Belin spent the week-end in Pan-
ama City as the guests of their
parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Belin.


PORT ST. JOE


FLORIDA


Would You,--


Send news of a death in a circular letter?



Put news of your wife's party on a moving

picture screen?



SUse a hotel register to tell that you had en-

larged your tore?



Tack the news of your daughter's'wedding

on a telephone pole?




THEN WHY THE HECK DON'T YOU PUT YOUR
ADVERTISING IN THE NEWSPAPER, TOO?

PHONE 51 NOW and a representative will call on
you and help lay out your ad







THE STAR

"Your Home-town Newspaper"


HUGE LUMBER MILL BEGINS
OPERATIONS IN PORT ST.JOE

(Continued from Page 1)
mill from the log pool on the in-
tracoastal canal \to the drying
sheds, and. with every step his es-
timation rose for the men who had
the faith in Port St. Joe to invest
such a huge sum in the mill here.
In all this great mass of clank-
ing machinery, one thing in par-
ticular took the editor's eye-the
automatic saw-filing machine. We
could use that to good advantage
right here in The Star office.
LEGAL ADVERTISING

NOTICE SALE OF BONDS
Sealed bids for the purchase of
$175,000.00 of dredging bonds,
1937, of the City of Port St. Joe,
Florida, will be received by the
City Commission, of the City of
Port St. Joe, Florida, at the City
Hall, in said City, until ten o'clock
A. M. (E.S.T.), Friday, February
3, 1939, at which' time and place
all bids will be publicly opened and
read aloud.' I
The bonds will be dated January
1, 1937, in the denomination of
$1,000.00 each, numbered in order
of their maturity ,from 1 to 175,
both inclusive, bear interest at the
rate of four percentum per annum,
payable semi-annually on January
1 and July 1 in each year from the
date thereof until maturity, pay-
able as to both principal and in-
terest at the office of the City
Clerk, in. the City of Port St. Joe,
Florida, or, at the option: of the
holder, at the Florida National
Bank in Jacksonville, Jacksonville,
Florida, in such coin or currency
as is, on the respective dates of
payment of principal thereof and
interest thereon, legal tender for
the payment of- public and private
debts; .shall be in coupon form,
shall be registerable as to princi-
pal only at the option of the hold-
er; and shall mature serially on
January 1 in the years and amounts
as follows:
Year Amount
1940, 1941, 1942, 1944,
1945, 1946, 1948, 1949,
1950, 1952, i1953, 1954,
1956, 1957, 1958, -each..$9,000.00
1943,. 1947, 1951, 1955,
1959, each .............. 8,000.00
The City Commission reserves
the right to waive any informall-
ties in, or refuse any or all bids.
CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, Florida.
By M. P. Tomlinson,
City Auditor and Clerk.
1-6113[20127


-


FRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 1989


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA)


PAGE TWO









FRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 1939
FRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 1939


THE STAR, PORT ST., JOE, FLORIDA


PAGE THREE


Caldwell Urges

Sweet Potato

Starch Factories

Would Be Step Toward Diversifi-
cation of Agriculture In
The South

WASHINGTON, D. C., Jan. 19-
In answer to the insistence of
Representative Millard Caldwell of
Florida that sweet potato starch
factories be established in the
South, the department of agricul-
ture and the Works Progress Ad-
ministration point out that the
only existing plant of that type, lo-
cated at Laurel, Miss., has not yet
proven its earning capacity.
Caldwell contends t h a t the
sweet potato cro" grown for
starch purposes would' be one
more step toward worthwhile di-
versification of agriculture in the
southern region.
Under the Tariff Act of 1930,
arrowroot, tapioca and sago
starches (the last two being used
synonymously with cassava and
sago flour) are duty-free and ac-
tually compete with potato starch'
Under the same',act, potato starch
is duitabe at 24 cents per pound
'and other starches not specificallyy
provided for at: 1% .cents per
pound. Under the Netherlands
trade agreement tapica and sago
starches were continued on the
free. list and potato starch re-
duced to 1% cents per pound.
Economists say':the soil, water,
Sorest, mineral and other natural
resources of the United States are
sufficient for the highest living
standards known -to civilization.


Why Not YOU, Too?.
Enjoy a day'. Ftshing and
Plcnic.; inner a...

MIDWAY PARK
On Gulf County's World.
Famous DEAD LAKES
Our BOATS are New, Dry
and Kept Clean.. :. Our
CABINS are New, with New
Beds and Furnishings.
This FRIENDLY GAMP is
Midway of the L'aket, at the
County Line, where your
Visit Is Appreciated
B. F. CROCKER, Owner
Postoffice Address
WEWAHITCHKA, FLA.


Development of

River In Prospect

Congressional Bill Would Provide
Deeper Channel from Apa-
lachicola to Columbus

Brightest news to date pertain-
ing to the Apalachicola-Chatahoo.
chee river canalization and de-
velopment plans was an Associ-
ated Press story last week in
which it was, stated that Chairman
Mansfield (D-Tex.) of the house
rivers and: harbors program antici-
pated early action by congress in
examining this project along with
similar projects in about 30 states.
The Texan said it was import-
ant that congress pass the meas-
ure which would provide a deeper
channel from Apalachicocla to
Columbus and the construction of
locks and ,hydroelectric plants on
'the river.
He placed in the congressional
record a list of the projects; cov-
ering 30 states, plans and reports
for which have been submitted' or
are expected to be submitted to
hist committee.
Like a .tough jigsaw puzzle
which is slowly being pieced to-
gether, against political, legal and
financial obstacles, river and har-
bor developments in Franklin
county are emerging for the first
time as tangibilities this year.
Carrabelle'a deep water channel is
now complete, with an announce-
ment from Washington that a $60,-
000 city dock had eeen approved
by. WPA. The a.nii&iificement De-
cember 16 from Columbus that a
towing service would start early
this year on a regular schedule
over the river, parallels the dock
project and further improvements
mow under consideration in con-
gress.--Apalachlcola Times.

HANDS OFF PEANUTS
A visitor'strolling through the
shops of Florida National Exhibits
ati DeLand, picked up one of a pile
of peanuts lying on a table. He
spit the peanut out quickly; its
taste was wax. The peanut is one
of the many fruits cast by Wil-
liam Ellich of the exhibit studios,
and the incident illustrates how
real they appear,,.
-------."*--.-----* '
Some rodeo riders smear chew-
ing gum in their stirrups to keep
their feet'from "blowing," an ex-
pression' that means the rider's
foot 'slipped from a stirrup, dis-
qualifying him.


There is a modern pleasant way to get relief from
'UHeadache, Gas on Stomach. Cds, Heart-
Sbzm, "Morning After" and Muscular PaBinL
S Just drop one or two ALKA-SELTZER tablets in-
S to a gla of water. Watch it bubble-listen to it fin
S As oon as tablet is dissolved, drink the tangy solution.


Alka- Seltzer
(Analgesic Alkaling Efervescent Tablets)
You w'l really enjoy the taste-oe like print
water than like medicine.
ALKA-SELTZER,' when dissolved in water, con-
tains an analgesic, (Sodium Acetyl-Salicylate), which
S relieves pain, while its alkaliig agents help to cor-
ret everyday ailments associated with hperacidity,
Your druggist has ALKA-SELTZER. Get a 0c
or s0c package on our "satisfaction-or-money-back"
guarantee.


Costin To Direct

SMarch of Dimes In

County's Schools

Teachers Will Stimulate Interest
In War Against. Infantile
Paralysis

C. L. Costin of Wewahitchka,
superintendent of schools for Gulf
county, has been. appointed by
State Superintendent Colin Eng-
lish to direct the "March of
Dimes" campaign in the schools of
Gulf county in which children will
participate in the president's or-
ganization for combatting infantile
paralysis.
School teachers throughout the
slate have been urged by Mr. Eng-
lish to observe, the president's'
birthday in the classroom by stim-
ulating interest in the war against
a disease which hasmade 600,000
children! its victim., Materials have
been made availablefor use in as-
sembly programs, discussions in
health classes, and, themes con-
cerning the need for scientific re-
search, first aid, care and clinics.
Gulf county children will be
given an opportunity to join in
the "March of Dimes" to help
swell the national fund. Cash
prizes are offered for winning es-
says.

Governor Cone
Extends Time to
Buy Motor Tags

Decides At Last Minute To Give
Florida Motorists Fifteen
Days Additional

Many motorists rushed to buy
their 1939 automobile license tags
Saturday after no word was heard
from Governor Cone. 'n regard to,
extending thte January 15 dead-
line. But the governor evidently
was playing foxy, n an endeavor
to swell the license fund, which
goes to pay teachers', salaries, for
after county tax collectors' offices
and the state tag commission's of.
fice in Tallahasse had closed for
the week-end, he announced that
motorists would have 15 days ex-
tra time in- which to: secure .their
tags.
The law gives the governor au-
thority to make extensions up to
30 days. Last year he allowed but
15 days, and it is understood that
this one extension to February 1
would be the only one this year.
So it you haven't got your tag
yet, you have ten more days in
which to fit the expenditure into
your budget.
------*--(----
Death Takes 11

Receving Old

Age Assistance

In Gulf County During Period
From July 1, 1937, Through
December 31,i 1938

Death has removed slightly more
than 10 per cent of those granted
old age assistance in Florida since
the state welfare board was in-
ducted into office on July 1; 1937,
according to figures made public
at the Jacksonville headquarters
Wednesday.
In Gulf county 11 recipients of
old age assistance passed on dur-
ing this period.
During the 18-month period, 27,-
973 individuals were granted this
form of public .assistance, and of
these 2,956 have since' died. Deaths
during the first year totaled 1,956
and during the last six months an
even 1000, indicating that the mor-
tality rate is being steadily main-
tained.
Old age assistance cases are
closed for a number of causes, but
all the others combined do not
reach a total equal to the toll
taken by the Grim Reaper.,


Westers On Trial

For Third Time

Ralph and Woodrow Wester are
again on trial at Marianna for the
third time, charged with the mur-
der of their kinsman, W. W. Wes
ter, in June of 1938. The trial
opened Wednesday.
On two previous occasions, after
hours of testimony and argument,
juries have found it impossible to


DR. J. C. COE
-- DENTI ST -
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe



EYES EXAMINED


Glasses fitted when needed
Made In Our Own Laboratory
Office Hours: 9'a. m.: to 6 p. m.

Dr. Newberry
OPTOMETRIST
PANAMA bltY, FLA.


reach a decision. Inm the, first trial
the jury is said to have stood six
to six and in the second, eleven
to one in favor of acquittal.
It pays to advertise-try it!


Best for Purity, Quality
and Taste

PURITY IS

ASSURED!


Even the
Cows Are
S Tested,

se Only

SOLOMON' S

Pasteurized

MILK


Pasteurized for Your
Protection


-- -- -- --- -- -

WE HAUl;ANYTHING--

CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING
WE HAVE GOOD CLEAN BUILDING SAND FOR SALE
Prompt and Efficient Service Always i

C.W WHORTON,
PHONE 70 PORT ST. JOE, FLA.




NATURAL GAS SERVICE

Now Ready for Every House In

Port St. Joe

COOK ING- WATER HEATING-
REFRIGERATION HOUSE HEATING
o
NO EQUIPMENT TO BUY
NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED
JUST PAY FOR YOUR CAS
-4 A full line of gas appliances in stock jI-
RITZ THEATER BUILDING
Phone 168
PANAMA CITY


SOUTHERN LIQUID GAS CO.
YOUR GAS COMPANY SINCE 1932









1a;t 0B it



What more could
you ask *for?

S.....A GULF PLIE
RIZP3BMNTATIVE I. bne-m tc OmTar &SDe.

13 ,&OGRAWM 4, *t N" %Nam e Jsr T."
IOggPggI ggagga gg 8 Lrr')r~c










'PG -OJ J-I. PQR ST ...~ JOE FLRD FRDA- ..N~ 1939


THE STAR
W. S. SMITH, Editor and Publisher
Issued every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida,
from The Star Building
Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year ......$2.00 Six Months ....$1.25
Three Months ......65c

-4 Telephone 51 ji- "

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; 'the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The 'ipokeen word
is lost; the printed word remains.-

NEW GAMBLING RACKET
Members of the quick-witted gentry who
dislike working for a living are springing a
new slot machine gag on the public. The ma-
chine, a miniature three-fingered wheel, used
in connection with a board on which, odds
are represented, is called "Brodi." It was de-
veloped as a parlor game, but.:the slick rack-
eteers quickly saw the possibilities of the de-
vice and they have invaded Florida with the
"Brodi" boards.
The machine in itself is all right, but it
comes under .the slot machine ban. But the
way :the ,Xacketeers work. it, it's 'a'sure thing
-for them. Here's what they do: One man
goes into a city and places the boards with
merchants, stating that it will. bring them
good returns. Shortly other members of the
group show up and play the "Brodi" board,
They place a few small bets and lose. The
size of the bets are gradually increased, and
soon they begin w nninnng the larger wagers.
These devices have been turned up ii$aria-
sota, Tampa. and Bradefitqn, and in several
instances inmrchants got 'wise to' the i-acket
'and had arrests made and the "winninis" re-
-tprned to them. The machines were confis-
,cated by the police. : I
I. t's a slick racket, all right, but the mer-
clhants who take on the machines deserve to'
lose, for they know it is illegal and that op-
,erating the niachines in their places,,of busi-
ness is direct violation of the slot machine
law.

!i N4EW PAPER FOR PANAMA CITY
Comes to our exchange desk this week a
breezy little sheet chock full:of live news-
volume one, number one of the Panama City
Times, published by Lynwood Bussey. If the
new Panama City paper lives up to its ideals
as set forth on the editorial page, it ought to
have a great future before it.

The DeFuniak Springs high school band
has been selected to represent the state of
Florida-at the New York World's Fair. In
our opinion no better choice could be made.
The boys and girls of tie band put on a dem-
onstration here at the Centennial Celebration
that would have been a creditto a: band or-
ganization of many years' .standing.. We
extend our congratulations. Perhaps. at, the
next world's fair Port St., Joe's band will be
chosen. It has made remarkable progress ini
the short time"it has been organized .,

Larkin Cleveland, publisher of the De-
Funiak Springs Herald, has been editorializ-
ifig recently on home-made smoked sausage,
and as a result has been presented with nu-
merous samples of the "real thing," for which
he gives mention to the donors in the edi-
torial columtin We go for home-made saus-
age in a big way, too, and will gladly-.devote
some of this space to anyone who would like
to see their name mentioned prominently onr
this page. In fact, if the sausage were up to
the high standards we believe such a delicacy
should attain, we might get in a poetical
mood over it.

Trade at home and. keep the dollars circu-
lating in Port St: Joe.


COMMENT ON THE SALES TAX
There is no excuse for imposing a token
tax on any state, but if the .powers that be
should put it over, there is sure to be a re-
bound that will make the tax dodgers wish
they had used better judgment.-Bowling
Green Exponent.


Before the legislature of Florida
sales tax the solons ought to find
how popular with the consumers a
is in a state that has one of the
Jacksonville Times-Union.


passes a
out just
sales tax
things.-


In becoming a political organization and
lining up to foist upon Florida the ignomini-
ous general retail sales tax, the state cham-
ber of commerce made a colossal blunder.
That organization's future usefulness is liable
to be seriously impaired as a result.-Punta
Gorda Herald.

Floridians with more or less "fixed".annual
incomes, in wages, pensions or small salaries,
are apparently quick to realize that they
would be the. hardest hit by any general state
sales tax. i, '
The state 'federation of lalor is on record
as opposed- to.sales taxes and the Florida Vet-
erans of Foreign Wars, in convention here
last week, condemned any proposal that sales.
taxes be levied in Florida. '
Persons with relatively small annual in-
comes would be forced to pay sales taxes on
all their earnings, while persons with larger
incomes would be taxed_6oly on the amounts
which they spend.
This would .obviously,tend to decrease re-
tail. sales and thus retail merchants would
be the next' group tb' feel the depressing
blow of sales taxes, through decreased pur-
chasing power and decreased sales.
This puts over the third strike on sales
taxes-they are a tax on busy dollars: instead
of idle dollars-besides' violating the two' fun-
damental principle's) of taxatioii, ability' to pay,
and benefits received.-Tampa Times.

SEVEN FOOLS THERE WERE
Not that here were not more than seven.,
fools. Nay, there were seventy times seven'
and then some, but an aged corn-belt editor
did a good job when he summed it up this',
way:
(1) The.fellow who, always puts the big
apples on top,. (2) The man who always sees,
happiness in another town. (3) The man who:
believes that everybody else is crooked. (4)'
The man who thinks that the world owes
him a living. (5) The.~boy who knows more
than his father. (6) The girl who can "take
care of herself." (7),The man who tries to
match wits with his Creator.
The soundness of this classification is certi-
fied by the fact that each one of the "fools"
had the idea that he was smarter than anyone
,else. That is the beginning of folly. The
Bible is, of course, true when it says "the
fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom,"
but the knowledge that one does not know
it all is a close second. Of course there is some


-hope for the fellow who is obsessed by his
own .wisdom, but the trouble is, it takes him
so-lbng to learn that he is mistaken that
there is. not much of life, or of him, to build
a new life on. Fortunate indeed, is the per-
'son who learns this lesson early in life.-
l-olmes County Advertiser.

Maybe everybody doesn't know it, or if
they do they don't take the time to go, but
there are some mighty fine sermons being
preached by Rev. J. W. Marshall at the re-
vival services being held this week at the new
Presbyterian church.

In -West Florida the other day a mule ran
away with.a wagon and tore down a barber
pole.' Greatest excitement in that section
since 'the armistice.-Florida Times-Union.
Must have been in Crestview.

New Deal tax program believes in priming
the pump by pumping the primer.-Dallas
News.


'Modnshine
By The Other Fellow


A friend .of mine-I wont tell
you his name, for inn many ways
his is a .sensitive .spoul-ell, for
one of these adyertsements you
see, in, the p.ulp magazines .
"Look W'hatYou.:gt for. Oly $1-.
All Hot Staff!-Tillie and Mae,
M.ut and .Jeff, Maggie and Jiggs,
20 Actaal-Photographs'.of Beauti-
ful ,Fren.ch :-Models,. In .,pDring
Poses,, and Other .Tlems. .All sent
postpaid in .,a .plain envelope for
ONLY $1'!"', You've alli
seen similar ads.
Well,, this ellow mailed in. his;
dollar: bill;:with' great.ianticipation.
and, when the,.".lain; envelope" ar-
rived he tore itopen eagerly. ....
Imagine: his. chagrin, disappoint-
ment, or what have you, when he
found ,the. "Tillie and Mac, etc.,"
were.:merely oadinasry- jkea, andi
the photographs ;,were of girls.
wearing bathing suits of'. 30 years
ago in poses that. probablyy were.
'darign" in 1908, but were Ilugh-?
able in 1939.
'"Tere ought to be a law agin '
such things,' he sputtered to .me.
"Taking my dQtliar and sending
me this mess of trash."
"You're not the only sucker,": I
told him. "Do, you:-realize that it
costs good money to run those ad-
vertisements in those magazines,
and if the dollars didn't come. roll-
ing in froni suckers like you, the
firms that advertise this s6~alled
'hot stuff" would soon stop adyer-
tising. .. ,And another thing.
If you had stopped and thought a
momentt: before rushing down to
the postoffiee to mail yor'. dollar,
you would have realized that if
these \stories and pictures had
been what you thought they were
-and the -ad was soq ,worded that
you would think what you .did-
the IUnited States Postoffice De-
partment wouldn't let.them send
the stuff through the mails, even
in a 'plain envelope.' You
yourself were to blame-you be-
lieved you were going to get
something vulgar, similar to pic-
tures and stories we have all seen.
Consider that dollar well spent,
for you probably. won't -fall for
anything similar again for a long
time There, are bright
boys who don't like to work, cook-
ing up schemes, like that all. the
time. And, by the way, I
have ten shares of doggone good
stock in the Phantom Gold Mine
Corporation-you wouldn't by. any
chance like to take them off my


State Health Board

Asks Ical Help In

Sy-phi lis Prolem

(Continued from Page 1)
there', were :4T 4 deaths from syph.
ills.. alone ., ,ingy 1937, and .345
.deaths' during the first 10 months
.,of 1938, Here again,, the' picture is
not quite an .accurate one, accord-
ing to" D;r McPfi~li, because syplh-
ilis, rings ,on many fatal compli-
cations, such ,as diseases of thel
heart. which; whea reported' to- the
.vital statistics bureau ar@e charged'
against those diseases instead of
the syphili's which caused them.
Cbnsi deration- of the syphilis
problem is "imperative, Dr. Mc-
Phaul. says,. because each year,
doctors diagnose_, one ..and a half:
times as, many new caes of syph-
ilis as tuberculosis; twice as many
as scarlet fever: and- almost fifty-
-times as many as, infantile paraly-.
:sis; because fi veout:of.six babies
,of untreated syphilitic- mothers
are bor,, dead or diseased, and'
because sazyphfbs is an enemy.' of
youth, 75 per cent of .the new
cases each year occurring among,
those from...16 to 30 years of age.
PUblic .COnscience Awakened
The fact,that public: educational
campaigns of the past few years
are bearing fruit is evidenced! by
the vast increase in blood tests
for venereal diseases being made
-by laboratories throughout the na--
tion. The Florida State Board of
Health's five laboratories report a
total 'of 240,483 Kahn tests for
1938 against 145,928 for 1936, an
increase of 9'5,234.
Thi iis regarded as a distinctly
encouraging sign because venereal
diseases are known to, be curable.
It a person follows the treatment
prescribed by his doctor when the
disease is discovered, there is
.every reason to believe the person
will eventually be entirely free
of the infection, Dr. McPhaul says..
---------
PUBLICITY FOR FLORIDA
According.to Perley Boone, di-
rector of publicity for the New
York World's Fair, Florida has re-
ceived more publicity to.date than
all the rest of the states com-
bined.

Soap can be made from coffee
grounds treated with potash lye.

hands for $2.50 a share, would
you? It's a million dollar corpora.
tion and their prospectus is a
glowing one. Here, read it over,
Thanks-five, ten, fifteen
twenty, twenty-five-right! Here's
your stock. Barnum was
right!"


THE ONLY ONE


.......,.... 1 .:


:'PAEf ,F.O VR


$Tt~~ gc.,P RT ST S 4J.F4..F 0-9DA


FRI DAYi -J.AN Y!P20, -1939









RIDAY JAUR 0 99TESAPRTS.JE LRDAEFV


STHE TATTLER
SEES ALL- THE. STAFF ,
SKNOWS ALLEditor-lt-Chief .........Dick Stepp
KNOW ALL Assistant Editor.... Bobby Coburn
TELLS ALL- Sports Editor........AI Schneider
i Society Editors............ Opal
ABOUT HAPPENINGS Greene and Dorothy Crockett
IN PORT ST. JOE HIGH Joke Editor.........Paul Johnson


G-O-S-S-I-P
The Eyes and Ears of the School

What would happen if-
Ed Hufft was a little quieter.
Florence Facion wasn't bashful.
Opal Greene was a blonde.
Leo didn't get any demerits for
a month.
Margie Kirkland would talk
more.


Final Score of Fast and Furi-
ous Game Is 22-20; Altha
Forfeits To Locals

The basketball game scheduled
for last Tuesday was not played
due to the fact that Altha did not
put in an appearance. The game
was supposed to be played at 2:30,
but after waiting until 4 o'clock,
Coach Owens -called on the town


Lillian Chandler went without team to play.
Ausley. The game. started with William
Al Schneider had straight hair. Trawick' at center; Dick Stepp
Dot Trawick didn't have a baby and Al Schneider, forwards, and
face. .. Bobby Coburn and Ed 'Hufft;
Paul Johnson didn't know his guards.
lessons. At the half the score- was 8 to
David Maddox went. without. a 10 in favor of, the high school and
hat. at the end of the third period the
Allah Mae was tall.. score was 11 all. ;:
Ausley didn't want to. meet Lil- Then, with only a matter of set-
lian. onds. to play, and the town team
William Trawick had curly hair. leading 17 to 18, Al Schneider
Howard lost his line (soft- made a beautiful field goal, and


soaper).
KCnthlpf didn't womrrv about D.


St. Joe went shead to stay there
ht e remainder of the game When


aiLLULacU UIfl I- fnt wr v -1. -- ---~----- -- --- 0-.
M. the final whistle blew a few sec-
Myrtle fell in love. onds' later, the score was St. Joe
Brady didn't walk home with High 22, Town Team, 20.
Martha. The scheduled game with Altha
-- was automatically given to St. Joe
What certain Junior boy (E. H.) High, according to conference
is trying to be courteous by- pick- rules.
ing up girls' books? -
It looks as though an old ro- COMING IGAMES
mance has' come back between a The Vernon team is scheduled
Junior boy and a Senior ,irl. to play here today.
It seems Winston, likes girls' Blountstown meets the local
practice nowadays (we wonder, if team here next Tuesday.
A. M. D. has anything to do with St. Joe High plays Carrabelle at
it). '' Carrabelle next Friday.
We have no new ,love affairs
(puppy love) to "offer & you this A JUNIOR' HISTORY
week-but' watch ior next week! .
Name-Dorothty Trawick or
NEW JUNIOR. Shirley.
Born-Port St. Joe, Fla.
The Juniors have a new student Age-16.
who enrolled Monday; Favorite Color-Red.
Name-Joe Lilenfeld. Antipathy-Conceited people.
Born.-Boston, Mass. i ,Ambition--Stenpgrapher.
Age-16.' -- .
From-Tampa, Fla. CONTENTS NOTED
Last school attended Hills- The contents of Winston Jones?
borough High. locker for the basketball season is
Joe's opinion f ,Port St. Joe, three pairs of:.silk socks, two pairs
when asked, was:- "I think that of black leather gym shoes, one
Port St. Joe is a coming little can of black leather polish, one
town and will grow to be one of comb, a bottle of brilliantine, one
the largest cities on the Gulf. I suit of basketball togs and a pic-
like it very much,, everybody is so ture of .his, best girl:
nice and friendly that I feel. like. '__
I have lived here all my life." AN, ENTITY
----~-- .--- ~ s We are very proud to hear that
IT SUREL" ':ES "' Willard Gilbert is coming to
Jim: "You sboulao.. smoke so school in the- mornings for a
much." change. Maybe now we can think
Slim: "Tobacco helps people to of him as a whole instead of a
think, and yet they say that to- half.
bacco is injurious. How do you, .
account for that?" COMING SOON!
Jim: "Well, you know it hurts Coming soon: "Who's! Who" in
some people to think." St. Joe High' School
some .e, to .!D 0


Silent Prayer

,By ROLAND PENN "'
A tomb-like silence enveloped
the prison. Three men loafed near
the west gate. Big Jack, self-
elected leader of the prison in-
mates,/was talking. "It won't come
through," he said. "How can it?
When the Supreme Court upholds
a judge's decision, even the Gover-
nor won't touch it."
-.The Governor was thinking along
the same lines. "What'can I do,
James?" he asked his secretary,


New Report Cards

Explained Monday

During Chapel By Mr. McPherson;
Ministers Talk Before
Student Body

Monday began a new semester
in Port St. Joe High School.
At chapel Monday we were hon-
ored with a visit by Rev. H. F.
Beaty and Rev. James W. Mar-
shall. Rev. Beatr invited all of the
young people to attend the special
services at the Presbyterian
church during the week, and Rev.
Marshall'.gave a Bible story which
was greatly enjoyed by everyone.
'Mr. McPherson announced that
we :would. have new report cards.
We -will be graded not only on
scholarship but also on our atti-
tude toward our teachers and
classmates. There will be given a
report from every subject, and on
each card will be grades for cour-
tesy, scholarship, dependability
and neatness.
After Mr. McPherson had ex-
plained these new report cards
to the student body, Dorothy Tra-
wick was elected as new cheer
leader for the basketball season.
Next Mr. Pearminter, the county


health officer, was introduced by
Mr. McPherson.
The health officer: was here to
test students of the tenth, eleventh
and twelfth grades for tuberculo-
sis. First there is.a serum injected
into the arm, then after three or'
four days the doctor will come
back for an examination. If the
place where the serum was in-
jeeted turns red, an X-ray will be
taken, which determines whether
the subject has T.B.
"Chapel exercises concluded by
Miss McClellan playing a marcn
while 'the students left for their
classes.

HONOR POINT CONTEST

'A contest between the eleventh
and twelfth grades has ,'been
started. Thedohject is for. one! lass
to'get more hdzior poInts accord-
ing to precentage, than the other.
The losing class is to give a
party for the winner. The contest
is to end with'the last semester.

She: "If I ever marry again I
think I shall, marry, a sea: captain.',
'He: "And you are a widow?"
She: "Yes, I'm a'widow."
He:' "Then you don't 'want. a
captain."
SShe: "What'then?' .
He: "You want a second mate."

Dorothy Trawick: "Martha, do
you know you're as prettY as a
picture ?"
Paul Johnson: "Sure she does. I
told her she was myself.":


"His parents are dead, your hon- ing something back."
or, he saA; I : ...'John Burton looked up with a
"Yes, yes, I had forgotten,'",re- stnile as the cell doot. opened,
plied the Governor.. "There is "Hello, Father," he said. "Come in.
nothing I can do-. I'm glad his I'm sorry I haven't a chair to of-
parents are not here to see this- fer you; have a seat on the cot.
and such a young man, too-" This food is gooe. I've always
"News flash," the radio blared.. :heard that they feed you good-
"The .CGvernor refuses, Turtnn 'the last meal."


pardon-kidnaper of Simms child
to pay extreme penalty in exactly
fifteen minutes-"'
To Fath-_r Miles,. of the State
Prison; it .was astounding. "To
think," he" said, "of :a young man
beiig so callous-it's put on. I


"If he only had some influence- don't believe'it."
maybe his parents have some!" "I agree with you, Father," the
James looked up fromhis work. guard replied. "I think he is', teep-


Father Miles .lookOd at ,Burton.
"Son, there's something I want to
ask you," he said. "Why do you
put on so much; there 'is some
good fn you.. Your English and
mannerisms shbow raas."
Burton looked at Father Miles a'
long time; finally he asaid, "Father
-its ,hard to say-I told a lie
about! my parentts--my mother is'


*dead, yes, but she loved my father The announcer didn't know that
and when I was a year old his par- Father Miles was praying for the
ents separated them. Mother never father of John Burton the man
spoke about it, but I do know that that everybody smilingly called
once when she reach an article "O1' Crip, our Governor."
about a man stricken with paraly- ---
sis, and not expected to live, she A. D. Lawson of Sarasota was
cried a long time." Burton, look- the week-end guest here of his
ing at Father Miles, said curtly, family.
"Father, I've said too much; you r A


know! Father, please keep my
secret-he doesn't know me!'
"Ladies and gentlemen," the
radio blared, "John Burton .died
after 'two and one-half minutes In
the chair. Father Miles stood
near in silent prayer-"


Miss Mildred Rowan spent Mon-
day and Tuesday in Panama City,
thte guest of Miss Viola Barber.
-----------
The first woman suffrage con-
vention was held at Seneca Falls,
N. Y., in 1848.


KAYSO and CROWN GASOLINE
AT PRICES YOU. CAN AND
AFFORD TO PAYC

WE. SPECIALIZE IN

Washing, Polishing and Greasing

S Have That Old Battery

RECHARGED
and Save the Price Guar-
of a New One anteed

TRIANGLE SERVICE STATION
CY WILLIAMS, Manager


mmrmm mmm,'mm eJ


I'


Don't Touch a Match


to the Future


- --,. -I.n.-1936, only a small percentage of Dixie's .100 ..
million cutover acres were properly productive of
a new. crop 'of trees;. Today,' faced with increasing
demand fdr-prime timber,: many are seeking: ways
.and means to make their woods tractss more
productive. *

Forest agencies maintain that fire, prevention
must precede all other measures of forest manage-
ment. A damaging fire will considerably lower
the value, of a turpentine forest. Pulp manufac-
iturers are not in the market for charred trees.,
Fire-scarred butt longs' are worthh much less as
lumber., Reforestation efforts' may be wiped out
by one uncontrolled fire.

Today, all Central and Northern Florida are
realizing the need for the prevention of uncon-
trolled fire..


A a, public utility we aim at furnishing a
type of electric service which. cannot be' dupli-
cted--as a local citizen, we aim at assisting
A$ sound community development which will
benefit all.


As grows the pine tree tall and straight,
so shapes the future of our State.



FLORIDA POWER

Corporation


iitt'---~ L ~iir iir .1 .L


High School Quintet Noses Out

Town Team With Seconds to Go


FRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 1939


THE STAR,-PbRT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


PAGE FIVE


*B~Bi~j







A E IXTH-SAR POR.S...O... ...... .Y,.AN AR 2, 98


Port St. Joe To
Be Featured In
World Fair Book

Picture of Constitution Monument
Will Be In ~ooklet Distri-
buted In.New York
T. W. Wilson, secretary of the
chamber of commerce has been
'requested by Nathan Mayo, com-
missioner of agriculture, to send
in photographs of local :points of
.interest for use in a booklet to be
distributed at the New York
World's Fair.
The secretary will send in :a
photograph of the Constitutional
Monument, taken by The Star
photographer, as Port St. Joe's
chief' point, of interest, with the
knowledge that this will receive
exceptional display as this was,
"the place where the state begam"


The first ;t material
duct electricity was
a linen thread.


used to con-
not wire but


CLASSItIEI ADS

FOR SALE
FOR SALE--Three practically new
33x6.00 tires. Good tread. At at
bargain. C. F. Stebel, ,W4mico
Lodge, White City. 2-3*
FOR RENT
FOR RENT-5-room house with
bath and sleeping porch; Foui-
room cottage with bath. -Three-
room cottage .i.tth ,bath. See
Karl Knodel, Oak Grove Subdi-
vision. 1*
UNFURNISHED 9 by 18-foot cab-
ins; cBl:ed overhead and srdes;
good water; $6 month. Apply St.
Joe Lumber Co. 12121tf
ROOMS FOR RENT
IF YOU have a room for rent,
why not place a classified adver-
tisement\ in The Star. The cost is
low and returns are gratifying.. .
Try it today. ti

Services Offered
ELECTRtC WIRING-Ini all its
branches, reasonable. Fixtures
i 1 and Fans. Repair;
HENDERSON ELECTRIC
COMPANY Port StL Joe
Home Office, Apalachicol. Box 313


Winter Time To
Thin Timber For
Proper Growth

The best time to .thin crowded
stands of timber is during the
winter months, according to L. T.
Nieland, farm forester with the
F 1 orida Agricultural Extension
Service. This work can not only
be done more conveniently during
winter slack times on the farm,
but cool weather after the thin-
ning operation keeps insect dam-
age down to a minimum.
On many farms there are areas
where young forest trees, particu-
larly pines, have come in too
thickly. .Usually such crowded
stands 'occur in old clearings'
where there are plenty of old seed
trees nearby. While nature's. me-
thod of thinning by the old law,
of survival of the fittest is sure,
it is exceedingly slow, and many
years must elapse before mer-
chantable timber is produced un-,
ter this process.
It will. pay the owner of farm
timber well to thin young crowd-
ing stands to a proper spacing so
that .each remaining tree will have
room 'for maximum .growth. Care
should be exercised to cut out the
weaker Individuals in so far as
possible, and leave strong, thrifty,
straight trees with sufficient room
for proper growth.' While good
judgment in thinning is necessary,
the following simple 'rule for spac-
ing may be useful as a guide. Add
four to the _breast-high diameter
bf the" tee n laches. This figure
will represent ;the proper number
of feet the trees should be spaced
apart. For example, the spacing of
trees measuring ,six inches in di-
ameter at breast height would be
six plus four, or 10 feet.
Wherever it is possible, thin-
nings should 'be utilized for pulp-
wood, poles or fuelwood. Often
the sale of 'such products can be
made to pay for the thinning op-
eration and, at the same time, re-
duce the fire hazard. Great care
must be taken to prevent fire
from getting into the topleft in
thlnning, or severe damage to the
remaining timber might result.
Farmers interested In thinning
their timber stands should consult
-their coflty agent or write to the
extension forester at GaLnesville,
Florida.


pIG*IAQ& A (* 6WA f, AV
5ff C~~i~Aiopc CAA P*I/
*~CWAP*~Sf o~Ot'~O OFA /;C3IWO
CAdFC 9"OeAWAVMOWO


T-f 5 OM c Of






jeeoLV4( e/~rfr 4'OP/m/

OPIF~R szoal-Allelwa~rr
f/tsr D6"OA1-6fON7A'AO IN 1 LO4/OA
06-e/4-- T k-/N,r$4fM/*O/F


FREE MOVWISE'MNDAY MWtIT educational character, according to Mr. Murdock has also. asked
Prof. DM riarmer~'toibring:.~at the
,.. ,, .W. -E. 'Murffock, who extends a "-
(Contined'fri h ?ge ) W- 'MT ck. h eend a high school band to play a numbp
( .ot.ed t. Page 1) cordial Invitation to ever~ ye t of selections.
These are -sound pictures anht be present, especially .students of
tre 16at 4'., .entertaining and the schools.. Save by reading the ads!,





g 3 .. ; r .* .
*- .^ r : :***'.***'
., a : ^ .- ** y i ; .; .


THESE Ai CASH PRICES

FOR FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
JANUARY 20 AND 21


THE POCKETBOOKS

bo KNOWLEDGE 4S


FLOUR
SJUNJE BSRi-.t E
F Self-Ris0g

24-B$OW 12h 370,


RICE IISPIES 2 Boxes 25C

Octagon Soap, 5 small bars....lie
P&G Soap, 3 large brs, .........l3e

Water Ground Meal, pkg. 25C

TURNIPS-3 No. 2 cas........25


Evaporated Milk 4Cans 29c POTATOES

TOMATOES-3 No. 2 cans..,25c .
DRY SALT MEAT-Per lb...15c 1lO0 "" 20c

cooking 0il ^'. 35490 10 W"ET!" l ""Ic

Tomato Soup-3 No. 1 cans..13e


S--- --BULK --

5 Ibs. 25c


SALMON


Phillips

hIndiana


ALASKA PINK
2 CANS


Pork&Beanoo Joe
No. 2Y2 D .~~...... ..... I .........


SWEET CORN-
No. 2 C. 2 Can .....................


DESSERT PEACHES-
,Eliver BarN t/2 d"an ........


Owens & Murdock


25c


10C

15c


"- ir


- ~~ --


PAGE SIX


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 19839


P0RT ST. JOE '


FLORIDA