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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00117
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: January 13, 1939
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00117

Full Text







The Star-Florida's fattest grow.
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St Joe.


THE


STAR


Port St. Joe-Site,of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill--Florald' fast.
eat growing little city. .. In
the heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center
r
VOLUME II PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 1938 NUMBER 13
J


Birthday Ball

"' f President To

Be Held Jan. 28

To Aid Infantile Paralysis Fund;
'March of, Dimes' Campaign
Also To Be Put On Here

President Roosevelt's birthday,
January 30, this year falls on Mon-
day, so Port St. Joe will observe
the affair on Saturday night, Jan-
"uary 28 with a grand ball to be
held in the new community build-
ing in Monument Park. Everyone,
is expected to buy tickets to this
affair, whether they attend 9Q.ot,
-and those who do attend th dance
will be assured of a good time, as
Bill Farmer's orchestra has been
-secured for the occasion. -
E. Clay Lewis, 'Jr., county chair-
man for rthe: "March of Dimes"
Scaminaign to raise funds for the
infantile paralysis foundation, is
making plans now. The plan is a
simple one that is to be siagetln
'Gulf county. Cans, mounted on
attractive placards will be'placed
at strategic points and with them
will be a bowl of small badges.
Everyone making A contribution
td the "MlA.~t*rimes' cam-
paign wllksdropb their money into
one ..t~iese cans and take one of
th'e~tadges, which are to be worn
Id the coat lappl.
ssistnhg Mr. :ewis- il Port St.
Joe is George, Tipper, who has
-been named local chairman.
Today there are 600,000 victims
of infantile paralysis in the United
'States,. and'this. campaign through-
nout the nation is' carried on in an
effort to care for. them and at the
same time. to find new scientific.
ways and means of fighting the
disease. ,
---------- *
Motor Parts

Store to Open

Will Serve Garages and Filling
Stations In This Territory

Another new business will open
in Port St. Joe within, the next
two weeks. It will be known as
Motor Parts and' will be operated
by Louis Emrich, formerly con-
-nected with a nationally-known
piston ring manufacturing com-
pany and well versed in his line.
:Mr. Emrich, who has leased the
store room in the new Costin
building on Monument avenue, for-
merly occupied', by the Bargain'
'Furniture store, states that he ex-
pects, to have an almost complete
'line of parts in his store by Feb-
eiary 1, and that he will have a.
small stock on hand before that
latee, .
The new concern will cater to
-garages and filling stations in this
,area from Blountstown on the
,north, Panama City on the west
and Carrabelle to the east.

WALLS OF NEW POSTOFFICE
BUILDING GOING/ UP FAST
Work is progressing rapidly on
the ,new postoffice building and
Masonic hall on Reid. avenue, the
concrete blocks for the side and
rear-walls and brick for the front
being laid at a rapid rate.
Cost of the building, which is
being erected by the Port St. Joe
Masonic lodge, is $7500.
---- --
SISEMORE TO CONVENTION
Rev. J; W. Sisemore will leave
Monday for, West Pal& Beach to
attend the Baptist convention to
.be held in that city next week.


City To Get New

-.Water Service

Coa.t Transportation Co. Expects
To Begin Service Soon

The Coast Transportation com-
pany, which at present operates
from New Orleans to Apalachicola,
will inaugurate coastwise freight
service into Port St. Joe when
the bridge on the coastal highway
west of the city is completed to
allow passage of boats down the
canal link connecting St. Joseph's
Bay with the inland water route.
The 'firm, of which Theodore
Brent is president, operates the
motorship Seminole,- and expects
to begin service into this city by
the middle of February.


County Fight Op

Tuberculosis To

Start Monday

State Board of Health Will Work
In Conjunction With Local
HealPh Units

According to an announcement
yesterday by the Port St. Joe
health office, an anti-tuberculosis
program will b conducted in Gulf
county from January 16 through
January 27, jn co-operation with
the bureau of tuberculosis os f tie-
state board of ,health. The state
board will furnish to. the 'county
without cost the. following serv-
ices:
Printed matter, such.as circu-
lars for thq :information of the
parents and printed form for con-
sent slips, and a, circular explain-
ing the, tuberculin test.
Speakers to address medical
meetings, Parent-Teacher associa-
tions, public health associations,
luncheon clubs and other groups.
P. P. D. tuberculin, first: and sec-
ond strength, for tuberculin test-
ing.
X-rays of the chests of those
with a 'positive recation to the tu-
berculin testing.
Reports to the family physician
of the reaction of the tuberculin,
test and interpretation of the X-
ray pictures.
Requirements of the program
are that it will be confined to all
high school children in the entire
county, both white and colored,
from the ,tenth, eleventh and
twelfth grades, inclulsve;
All these children in the tenth,
eleventh and twelfth grades must


Taxpayers' Group

Planning Fight On

Transaction Tax

Will Seek To Organize 300,000
Consumers Against levying of
Any New Forms of Taxation

The opening gun in a statewide
battle to defeat the proposedtrans-
'action tax at the coming session
of the legislature was fired in
Tampa this week with an an-
nouncement by R. L. Newman, ex-
ecutive secretary of the Florida
Taxpayers association, that his
group pl4ns to organize more than
300,000 consumers and heads of
families against the levying of
.any new forms of taxation.
The taxpayers' association, New-
man said, will Immediately form
units in each of the 67 counties
and 350 cities and towns. DeMf-
nitel plans for the campaign, he
added, will be \worked out at a
meeting of the association direct;
torate which will be held, shorty.
SThe' announcement came on the
heels of the adoption of resolu-
tions by delegates attending the
mid-winter conference of the Vet-
erans of Foreign Wars, Depart-
ment of Florida, held:'in Tampa
last Saturday tnd Sunday, in
which the veteransewent on record
against 'the transaction, tax and
pledged support .to the associa-
tion's >progranm'i '-.TI'he -resolution
was offered by ,Arch McIntyre, de-
partment commander. i
. In his address to-the conference,
Commander McIntyre 'denounced
the proposed -transaction levy as
an "attempt by the special Inter-
ests of Florida to shift the :burden
of taxation from the shoulders of
those best able to pay. to the backs
of those, least able to bear it."

Call Meeting to

FormnPortSt. Joe

Basket League

Those Interested In Playing Or In
,"Promoting a Team Asked
To Be Present

A meeting has been called for
8 o'clock Monday night at the new
school auditorium for the purpose
of organizing a city basketball
league.
Anyone interested in playing or'
backing a team is urged to be
present .at this meeting.
A city league of this character
was organized last year and cre-


be tuberculin tested, in t w o dated considerable local competi-
strengths of tuberculin, if neces- tion, and it is felt that more teams
sary, before the X-ray program will be in the field this year and
can begin. that a greater Interest in the or-'
Consent sliBos must be com- ganization will be taken by the
(Continued on Page 4) general public.

LOAN WILL ALLOW WOOD NAMED MEMBER OF
COMPLETION OF CHURCH JACKSON DAY COMMITTEE
The Southern Baptist Conven-
tion -oan Board this wee- granted G. Pierce Wood of Port St. Joe
a $6500 loan to the First Baptist has been named by Herbert E.
church of Port St. Joe and accord- Wolfe of St Augustine, state
ing to the pastor, J. W. Sisemore, chairman of the Jackson Day cele-
present plans are to start work im- brations, as a member of .the state
mediately on finishing the Interior committee for the affair.
of the bui ding. Florida will hold its state-wide
S "(' celebration on February 18.
SAND PLAYS AT CHURCH -----
The high school band played a GAS COMPANY GRANTED
number of hymns at the Presby. PERMISSION TO CROSS ROAD
terian church services last Sun- At a recent meeting of the city
day'at the request of Rev. H. F. commissioners, the St. Joe Gas
Beaty, pastor.' The band, which company was granted permission
was under the direction of Dan to lay a line across- Second-street
Farmer, received much praise efo(- in order to serve the First Bapt)st
their playing. I -- church. ..


Grocery Holding

Friday 13th Sale

Owens & Murdock Offering Many
13-Cent Specials Today

Today, Friday the 13th, may be
considered unlucky by many peo-
ple, but the Owens & Murdock
grocery is offering a lucky oppor-
tunity to householders of Port St.
Joe and the surrounding trade
territory with a special "Friday,
,the 13th" grocery sale.
They are offering many bargains
and it will pay anyone to read
their ad on page six of this issue
of The Star, and then go to their
store and' take advantage of these
low prices on staple and fancy
;groceries. Incidentally, these same
prices apply for Saturday, too.
e l.----X-- l---l

Beauty Pageant to

Be Stated Here By


Unique Bridge

Feature of Mill

Railroad Line

St. Joe Lumber & Export Company
Will Begin Operations Monday
With $40,000 Monthly Payroll

What Is anticipated will add
greatly to the economic stability
of Port St. Joe is the beginning of
operations next Monday by the St.
Joe Lumber and Export company
sawmill, which, according to Basil
E. Kenney, Sr, will employ about
300 men at the mill and in the
woods with an estimated monthly
payroll of between $35,000 and
$40,000.
Much work is yet to be done be-
fore the mill Is completed, but
construction has advanced to the
Point *here operations inmay begin.
In addition to as model village to'
-.-. the employes, he mill build-'


S.. ---._ ad drying kili- two storage
t 1in A v lia rY sheds 72 by 400 feet, one shed 100
Leglio A iialJ -by 200 feet and a fotu't shed 60
S, ., by 200 feet are under construction.
Amateur Contest and Kiddle Par. The 20-mile logging railroad is
ade Are Also Features; Win. complete with the exception of the
ners Co To 8tte Meet 'bridge across the Intra-coastal
anal, and this will be in.place in
SNext Friday, January 20, the a short time. This bridge.-1 one of
'Gulf County American Legion Aux- the most unique of its tpe ever
iliary will present a beauty pa- constructed, and tnsofara's -is
geant and amateur contestt in the known, is the only bridge of its
new community center building in kind. in the United States-:
Monument Park, aad;b the direc- "The bridge, in al~e t, ~i# the
tfon of Mrs. Ross CoDurn. 'This .sWingstype, butt depairtls Trm t~
will be the first community event usual design In that it- swings on
to be held in the beautiful new a floating barge instead of a cen-
$75,000 auditorium. ter'pier; and its- swinging mecha-
The show will consist of three nism :consists of two marine mo-
contestsi--a beauty pageant, -an tors with propellers. When not in
amateur contest and a kiddie pa- use .the pontoon will be moored at
rade. All young. ladies in this sec- the side of the canal and-when it
tion between the ages of 15,and 25 is necessary to use the line it will
are eligible to enter the beauty be swung into place by the motors.
pageant. The winner-will go to a The design and method of oper-
state contest at some central, point (Continued on Pamp 5)
in thI' A4,te.- wher eshe will have ----


i.n tne DWzie- we a. ueeu "w i .m
.all expenses paid while. there. The
winner of the amateur contest will
also attend the state eliminations,
with all expenses paid while there.
The winners of the beauty pa-
geant an d amateur shows, com-
pete at the state contest for the
privilege 6f attending a national
contest, under the direction of the
United States Beauty and Ama-
teur Shows, with headquarters in
Daytona Beach.
The; amateur contest takes in all
types/of talent, any age. Anyone
interested) in entering either of
these contests are asked to get in
touch immediately with Mrs. Co-
burn.
The third, and what probably
will be by far the most popular
feature of next Friday's program,
will be the. kiddie parade. This
contest will take in all children
between the ages of two and eight
(Continued on Page 6)
PORT NEWS
The S.S. Henry M. Dawes, Sa-
bine Transportation Co. owners
and agents, docked late Thursday
afternoon of last week with a car-
go of fuel oil for the St. Joe Pa-
per company.
The SS. Jean of the Bull Line
docked Tuesday morning and sailed
that evening for eastern ports
with a cargo of 500 tons of kraft
paper from the St. Joe Paper com-
pany.

EXCAVATION STARTS ON
FOUNDATION FOR BANK
Excavation work is well under-
way for the foundation of the new
$75,000 bank building at the corner
of Fifth street .ad Long avenue.


REVIVAL TO
OPEN SUNDAY

Rev. J. W. Marshall To Preach At
New Presbyterian Churoh

Revival services will be held in
the new Presbyterian church be-
ginning Sunday, January 15, and
continuing through Sunday, Janu-
ary 22, according to announcement
made yesterday by Rev. H. F.
Beaty, pastor of the church.
Rev. Jas. W. Marshall will con-
duct the services which will be
at 9 a. m. and T:30 p. m. each day
during the week. The :children are
especially invited, as 'Rev. Mar-
shall, who is a very gifted Bible
story teller, will tell some Bible
story at each service..
"COME ONCE," then-

EXPECT TO OPEN NEW
BRIDGE BY APRIL 1
It is expected that the new
coastal highway bridge over the
,canal connecting link west of this
city will be open for traffic by
April 1, according to the engineers
in charge of' construction.
All the structural iron is in place
but the counterweights for the
draw span are yet to be poured
and the pavement on the ap-
proaches laid.

PARTY ENJOYS CRUISE
A most enjoyable day was spent
Sunday by T. W. Wilson and four
guests on a yacht cruise to Black'S
Island where a luncheon was ea-
joyed and the party indulged il
target shooting.


I








PA TT FRD J 13. 19..


MARIE JONES CIRCLE MEETS
WITH MRS. J. E. BOUNDS
The Marie Jones Circle of the
Methodist Missionary society met
Monday afternoon at the home of
Mrs. J. E.:Bounds with fourteen
members present and Mrs. J. L.
Temple, circle chairman, presid-
ing.
The roll was.called, after which
the business session was held.
Mrs.:Omar Branch and Mrs. J. C.
Bradberry were named on the
flower committee for January and
a report was given by the social
service chairman. The program
was then turned-over. to Mrs. R. A.
Swatts, who opened the program
with the Lord's Prayer. She also
led the ,review of .the. pamphlet,
"Urban Scene".... .
Following. the business meeting,
a delightful special hour was .en-
joyed' during which ice cream and
cake was ser.yed.;by:the hostess,

IlLE HOURI BRIDGE CLUB
IN MEETING YESTERDAY, ,.
Mrs. W. K. Brooks. was,. hostess
to the Idle Hpour Bridge club. yes-
terday, ,afternoon at her ,homre on
Long avenue. At the beginning .of
the play -hour-,, a delicious salad
pate was :served. following g :three
grogressions,,; prizes .were ;pre-
itepted tq M.ns.. ,W.. WJervis, high,
Mrs, W, A, Smitth, low, and Mrs.
Thomas Gragg, out, ,

Mr. :.and Mrs... H. I. Wooden
aid familyr--rtured to the city
Saturday after spending the past
ten :days. in Mos Point, Miss.

SMr.. and Mrs. H. P. Sapp of Pan-
ama. City :were visiting in this
City .$ day .. "':;. ::

-Mrs. Heleni Allen and daughter,
Peggy, were' week-endl guests of
relatives- in Gordon, Ala.

: Miss Clara Maddbx tf Apalachi-
cola':moved tdo'this city Saturday
to make herhibome here with her
parents,' Mi. anid Mrs; John' Mad!
'dx, Si-., who moved to the city
recently.
'- -. 'r'

;.. .*,-::- .. .... .. .
."oni6 Once." ,

Mr. arid Mrs. J, W. Carmouchd
bf Clewiston thoved. to Port. St.
Joe last Thiirsday.

Mayor J. L. Sharit and Robert
Bellow.s left Tuesday or Wash-
ington, D. C., on business "They
are expected to return Saturday.





TUAT YOU -CAN
DEPEND ON
a ,..'" a


QU'ALIT-Y,

,WQRK

You Will Like
Creech Brothers, offer you
the .kipd of service.. you
want .- fast and at the
same time, *give you work
of the highest quality! Send.
us you clothes today-we'll.
return them the same day
fresh, clean and new
In appearance.


CreechBrothers.
TAILORS and CLEANERS
-We Call for and Deliver-
PHONE 102 Monument Ave.


Society Personals iChurches

LANETA DAVIS, Editor


HEALTH NURSE SPEAKS
BEFORE WOMAN'S CLUB,
The Port St. Joe Woman's Club
held their meeting this week at
the Methodist church yesterday af-
ternoon wi'th- Mrs. George Pat-ton
presiding. Purpose of the meeting
was to present Miss. Cleo Mc-
. Laughlin, tuberculosis nurse of the
state board of health, Jackson,
ville, who gave to the club the
"Causes and Effects." in keeping
with the survey which is being
made by the state board of health.
Dr. Derric Parmenter, who came
. to Florida from the state, board of
-health of. Kentucky to take over
the duties of Dr. Ball in the Frank-
lin-Gulf-health unit, showed a pic-
ture on the same subject and gave
Sa general survey during the show-
ing, following which the meeting
adjourned.

SMRS: J. H. TALLEY HOSTESS
MONDAY TO MARY CIRCLE
Mrs. J. H. Talley.was hostess to
the Mary. Circle oi the Baptist
Missionary society at the home of
Mrs. :T. Ansley at Beacon Hill
Monday afternoon. The meeting
oepe.ned withthhe devotional and
was followed with prayer by Mrs.
J. 0. Baggett. The' regular busi-
ness session was held, after which
a committee was' appointed for the,
coming, associational meeting to, be
held here January 2%, '
Following the meeting, the hos-
tess served .cake. and, coffee .to
members, present. The .next M.eet-
ing of. -the Mary Circle will be at
the home ofMrs. Joe Morrow and
-Mrs. George Hudson ..

MRA. J. M. SMITH HOSTESS TO'
THURSDAY BRIDGE CLUB:
Mrs. J. M. Smith! entertained
members of' the Thursday Bridge
club yesterday at' her "home 'on
Reid "'avenue. 'Two tables were
Laced for play in the living room.
'whiki was decorated with ciut
floweri' andi potted plants. Several
progressions were enjoyed' after
which 'score were tallied arid
prizes presented.' '. "
'1he' ho-tes_ served -pie topped
with 'whilied cretni, aind coffee"
to'Mes'dam'es' T. OwmIh, B. Owems,
E.' Ramis6ey, J.: Gl'oeklr, E.' C .
Lewis,B;'B A." Pridgebn, M. Tomlin-
son and 'C. Edwards.

EPI SCOPAL AUXILIARY
ELECTS OFFICERS
'Th'e Auxiliary of the St. Jamn-s
Mission of the Epi;''.-,al church
met Tuesday afternoon at the
home of Mrs. W. A. Smith on Gar-
riso'n avenue with Mrs. Smith,,
president, -presiding. This was the
first 'meeting of the new year and
tl f' .li-.in:? officers were chosen:
Pr.-;enr.r, Mrs. W. A. Smith; vice-
presidient,. Mrs. R. Fuller; secre-
tary, Mrs. F. Curtis,, 'treasurer,
Mrs. N. Comforter. Rev. Glion
Benson of Apalachicola led the
study for the meeting.
The next meeting of the auxili-
ary will be'held January 24 at the
home of Mrs. T. Owens.
'f
BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS
Mr. and Mrs, L. S. Singletary
announce the birth of a 7-pbund
baby girl Saturday morning, Janu-
ary 7, 1938.

Mr. and Mrs. G. Manasco are an-
nouneing the arrival of 'twins, a
boy and' a girl, born January 12,
1939.

Mr. and Mrs. Archie Smith and
family of Hartford, Ala., moved to
this city last Friday.

Mr. anid Mrs. 'J. E. Summers of
Lexington, Tenn., are the guests
this week of Mr. and Mrs. W. M.
Upshaw and Mr. and Mrs. S. C.
Prid.eon.

Read the ads-it pays!


At the Churches

METHODIST CHURCH
D. E. Marietta, Minister
.Services Every Sunday
10:00 a. m.-Churcn School.
11:00 a. m.-Morning worship.
7:30 p. m.-Evening worship.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
10:00 a. m.--unday School.
11:00 a. m.-Preaching service.
7:.30.p. m.-Preaching service.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. J. W. Sisemore, Minister
10:00 a. m.-Sunday School.'
11;00 a. m.-Morning. Worship.
6:30 p. im.-B.,T. .U.., ;. ,
7:30 .p. ma-Evering Worship..
SW. M.. U., Monday, 3:00 p. m.
Prayermeeting Wedndsday, 7:30 p.
:m. Teachers ,meeting, Thursday,
7:30 p, m. ,- .. .

ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Rev. H. P., Money, Pastor.
FuUL-tme services,.,.
10:15" a.: m.- Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.--Preachiug Service.
7:30 p. m.-Evangel;tic service.
Pnrayermeeting every Wednesday
night ., ::

IMARTH. CIRCLE MEETS
WITH MRS. E. A. McCASKEY
,Mrs. E.: A.:McCaskey was hos-
tess to "the .Martha Circle of thd
:Baptist Missionary society. at her
home on Fourth street Monday af-
*terfioon.. Mrs. McCaskey: presided.
Topic for the.. meeting .,was
*'Strength, for the New Year." De-
votional was taken from: Psalms,
27th, chapter followed with:jprayer
by 'Mrs;'W. '0, Prid eon, Roll w-as
CaTled? and ten memberss a1se'red;
Reports were heard fromFn various
committees and a building' fund
offering taken. The circle agreed
to clean the church for the Sun-
dayl services. The meeting 'Was
then turned over to Mrsi De!dyi
Bible study leader, and' the study
was from Exodis, '26th chapter
Mr-'. John, White dismissed t'he
meeting, after which the hostess
served a salad course, fruit cake
arid coffee.

WEDNESDAY BFFIDGE CLUB
MEET- WITH MRSf HOWEt.'L
The Wednesday Bridge clib met
thbi- weekk a the, homebof Mrs. W.
M. Ho'"wei 'on Long avenue. Fol-i
lowing the hour of play during
whichh 'three' tables were::in prog-
ress, scores' were tallied'; and'
prizes were .presented, Mrs. T.
Hull, high, and Miss Tommy LeeT
'King of Vilas, cut.
SRefreshments of salad, crackers
and chocolate were served' to Mes-
'dafies: D: C.' Smith, Shannon, W.
S. Smith, C. Trammel, T. Hull, T.
V. Westbrook, E. Hickey and M.
'Lrkin and guests, 'Miss Helen
Curry and Miss. Tommy Lee King
of Vilas.

LYDIA: CIRCLE OF BAPTIST
W. M. S. MEETS MONDAY:
The Lydia Circle of the Baptist
Mi'ssibnary society held its regu-
lai meeting.at the home of :Mrs.
Curtis Palmer at "Oak Grove"
Monday afternoon, wilt h Mrs.
Parmer presiding. The Book' of.
Nuiib'ers was used' at the study
.course for the meeting, followed
by the regular business.. An open
discussion was held in regard to
the circle Joining the Baptist
Debt Clubl. The meeting adjourned
with sentence prayers.
Following the business session,
the hostess served cake and cof-
fee to nine member and one visi-
tor.

Mr. and Mrs.' E. 'L. Wright and
family of Winter Haven moved to
the city Wednesday.

'Mrs. G. T. Boswell return'B
Wednesday from Bonifay, where
she spent a week.

"Come Once."


James Martin of Tuscaloosa,
Ala., has accepted a position with
LeHardy's Pharmacy. He expects
to bring his family to the city in
the near future.

"Come Once."


MRS. JOHN SOWERS f f ft
ENTERTAINS AT BRIDGE Al 'Reyer and Charles Suttle
Mrs. John Sowers entertained returned to the city Saturday af-
with two tables of bridge Saturday ter spending the week, in Hodge,
afternoon at her home on Garri- La.
son avenue. Cut flowers and pot f ft
plants were used for decorating Miss Tommy Lee King of Vilas
the living room where the guests is the guest of Mr. and Mrs.
were -entertained. Dishes of candy Monty Larkin.
were placed on each table..
Following several progressions, LEGAL ADVERTISING
scores were tallied and prizes pre- "
sented to Mrs. Bert Hull, high. NOTICE SALE OF BON'DS .-
Mrs.. George McLawhon, honor Sealed bids for the purchase of
prize, and Mrs. Tom Gregg, low. $175,000;00 of diedaing bonds1
licious refreshments of straw- 1937, of .the City of PorL SLt. Joe
Delicious refreshments of straw- obe
I_ .- I F.. Florida, wiU.ll b xe ived by
,irry jello topped, with fresh Cir dy Conjinis.sin, o f rh Ciy.
-trawberries and whipped ,:re.tam., Polt St'. Joe, Florida, ar the Cty
cookies and "'so drinlc, were Hall. in'saidCGity until l ten o'clock
served 'to M edames B eit Hull..A.M. '(E.S. T)Friday, February
:3,199,. 9 t which time,,andj place
George McLawhon. Tom qregg, Oc-1 i] bid-i iv ll b.I. public ly openedd and
den JServis, W. A. Woods, E. IfH., 'read aloud.
Horton, C Suttle and T. Frary.. The bonds w'Will 'be &td't January
S. ." '' -1937, in the denomination of
A M,(ua.ii.i each. .numbered in. order
SUSANNAH WESLEY 'o "their maurity fro ..1 to -75,
CIRCLE .IN MEETING both inclusive, bear intrdest at the
Th- Susanna'h Wesleyv Circle of. *rate 'of four Pe.rcentum pertannum;
' .td, t. ,l i ir" e t payable semi-annually on' January.
the Methodist Missionar society and July in eah year fromthe
met Monday afternoon at the home 'date thereof until maturity, pay-
of Mrs. loy, Gibson on Long ave. lbe as to both prJncipal and 'in-
nue Ia mission Mrs. Gib-./t 't the office bf the City
nuefr ,msson s.:.d rs d'ea-'IClerk. in the City. of -'Port St. Joe,
son, mission and 'Bible study -lead Florida, or, at the' option .o. _the
er, gave an interesting outline of holder, at the Florida National
tli mission study book. Bank ir Jacksonville, Jacksonville,
After the program, the hostess, Florida, in uch coin or currency
er,ed delicious rerebments a on' he respective dates of
.er' 0'lf-ous retre.ments of paymi.nt of principal thiere-of and,
cookies, coffee- and mints. interest thereon, legal tender -for
The next meeting will be the 'the, payment of public and private
regular program rumeting at the debt: ha11b e ine coupon form,
church. shall be registerable ,as to 'princi-
chpural only at the'oiption'of:the 'hold-
.... 0 er; iaa'd.,shall mature, serially on
HAPROLD PHILIPS AND 'MISS January 1 in the years and amounts
FLORENCE WYNN MARRY '" a- s'ollow.; .,.
', Mil Florence G~r4rtd Wyn Yea.r : Amount
and Harol1d "ope Philps wre 1,940, 1941r Il.4;! 19"44,
quietly married at nqon, yesterday 1945, 194, -1 194.
at the home of Dr, and Mrs. R S. 5, 1957 1955, each. .$9,000.00
Carver on' Eighth street. Rev. J. 1943,"''1947, 1951, 1955,
W. Sisemore officiated. .1959, :ech :v.'.; .... ,000.0
-; ,. The Cit& Commisi-:on reserves
Mr. and M1rs. T. M. Schneider ihbe right to 'aive 'any informali-
attended the spring tas'bion show t'ie in, or 'refuse any or all bids.
in footwear at Dothan Tuesday. CITY OF PORT ST."'JOE, Florida.

M. Michell was bsineBy M P. Tomlinson,
V'isitdr M.ind'a'in 'Pengaor'6n' 1-6113120127 ,City A ,tr


Would Yowu,


Send news of a death 'in a circular letter?



Put news of your wife's party- on a moving

picture screen?



Use a hqtel register to tell that you had en-

larged your store?



Tack the, news, of. your daughter's wedding

on a telephone pole?

. a ,'" ) .. ". '

THEN WHY T"IE .HEC` DI.0T,YOIU PUT YOUR
ADVERTISING IN THE NEWSPAPER, TOO?

PHONE 51 NOW -: and a representative will call on
you and help lay out your ad


TYo HSTAo

"Your. Home-town Newspaper"


PORT ST. JOE


FLORIDA


i.


PAGE TWO ::


FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 1939


v


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA







A.f.l.. 5. S 4 A4 1A


THE STAR. PORT ST. JOE. FLORIDA


PAGE THREE


School Textbooks

Are Being Revised


226 Gulf Families

Get Commodities


To Keep Classroom Activities In Estimated Value Would Total Ap-
Touch With the Times proximately $10,332 Annually


Florida's public school textbooks
are being streamlined to meet the
needs of children who are growing
.ip in a swiftly changing world.
State -Supperintendent Colin English
has announced a call for bids on
more than 200,000 volumes of new
books as an initial step in keep-
B --'clarrQ-r activities in touch
^ff-'the tines.
. There are 2,500,000 textbooks
supplied iree to Florida children
today -At least 6000 are being
*ed by the 1.224 children enrolled
*-Gulf ,..,:i nty schools.
Social science textbooks will be
replaced by new publications
which provide a better understand-
ing of world conditions as they
are today. New textbooks in the
field of science will acquaint high
school pupils with recent dis-
coveries, inventions and methods
Iof production of recently created
materials.
A r.ew series of remedial read-
ers will be supplied to primary
grades as a result o0 a recent
study by the state department' of
public instruction in which it was
revealed that 30 per cent of iall'
pupils in Florida requiree two or:
more years to complete the' first,
grade. ''
Courses in home .economics will
b? enriched by the adoption of ad-
ditional books so that a variety
of texts may be used in one class.
More than 40 publishing com-
panies are expected to submitbids
and sample books to the state
board of education by February 1.


Why Not YOU,. Too?
Enjoy a day's Fishing and
Picnic Dinner at

MIDWAY PARK
On Gulf County's Wonld-'
Famous DEAD LAKES
Our BOATS are New, Dry
and Kept Clean. ... jOur
CABINS are New, with :New
Beds and Furnishings.
This FRIENDLY CAMP is
Midway of the Lakes, at the
County Line, where your
Visit is Appreciated
B. F. CROCKER, Owner
Postoffice Address
WEWAHITCHKA, FLA.


Reviewing the past year, the
state welfare board yesterday an-
nounced that surplus commodities
were distributed in Gulf county
during November, the last figures
-available, to 226 families, or an es-
timated 949 persons. These com-
modities would total $10,332.72 an-
nually on the same basis of dis-
tribution.
The welfare board reported a
substantial increase in the number
of beneficiaries throughout the
state, due to the broadening of
the eligible list to include receipi-
ents whose incomes were less
than 100 per cent of their budget-
ary needs.
State distribution for the calen-
dar year of 1938, the board said,
totaled as follows: Foodstuffs,
21,279,900 pounds of a fair value
of $945,711.97; clothing fromWPA
sewing rooms, 1,089,113 pieces of a
fair value of $576,003.97.
The case load increased during
the year from 29,189 families, or
an estimated 122,631 persons, to
46,599 families, or an estimated
195,715 persons. So rapidly did the
program expand that commodities
distributed during the last five
months of last year exceeded in
quantity and value those dis
tribute during the preceding year.

FIVE IN COUNTY

GET BLIND AID

Number of Beneficiaries and Dis.
bursements Increase Steadily

Gulf county, like every other
county in the state, profited by the
Florida aid to the blind program
during the calendar year of 1938.
December checks were mailed to
five. recipients in Gulf county for
an aggregate sum of $91, ac-
cording to official announcement
of the state 'welfare board yester-
day.
January of last year marked the
inauguration of the program, with
checks for the month being mailed
to 47 recipients. Each succeeding
month found the number of bene-
ficiaries and the amount disbursed
increased. December checks were
mailed to 2,214 persons for an ag-
gregate total of $32,333. The av-
erage grant was $14.60.


Do you "fly all to pieces" when the children are noisy, or
when the vegetables burn, or when the jelly won't "jell?"
Some mothers are just naturally cranky. Some mothers are
cross and impatient because they are nervous.
If you are a natural crank, DR. MILES NERVINE won't
do much for you. If you are irritable because your nerves
are overtaxed, DR. MILES NERVINE will do a lot for you.
Do you suffer from Sleeplessness, Restlessness, Nervous
Irritability, Nervous Headache, or Nervous Indigestion? Do
you worry over trifles, start at sudden noises? Overtaxed
nerves will cause all these troubles, and DR. MILES NERV-
INE will help you to relax those overtaxed nerves.
Why don't you give it a trial on our guarantee of satisfac-
tion, or your money back? Your druggist can tell you about
DR. MILES NERVINE. He has been selling it ever since he
started clerking in a drug store. Dr. Miles Nervine comes
in two forms-Liquid and Effervescent Tablets.
Liquld Nervine, Large Bottle $lA-Small Bottle 25*
Effervescent Tablets, Large Package 75-Small Package 350


A.


Barber Issues

Prediction For

1940 State Race

Gives Pierce Wood Ninth Place for
Governor, Basing Chances On
Forthcoming Speakership

Frank Tracy, a barber of Jack-
sonville, who labels himself a "na-
tionally known political prognosti-
cator," and avers that in the last
general election his prognostica-
ting was 99.9999 per cent correct
24 days before election, on Janu-
ary 1 issued his prediction on gu-
bernatorial and senatorial chances
for the 1940 election.
Thirty-three possibilities for the
governorship are listed, in the or-
der of their present apparent
strength, and 10 aspirants for the
full-term in the United States sen-
ate.. Themythical odds are given,
together with remarks concerning
them by the barber prognostica-
tor, as follows:
Governor-
1. W. McL. Christie, 3-1. Excel-
lent record, clean campaigner.
2. Bill Hodges, 3-1. Was nosed
out last time.
3. Dan Chappell,3-1. Mighthave
won. last time with more funds.
4. Raleigh Petteway, 5-1. Led
race for governor last time out.
5. Turner Butler, 5-1. Will not
run if Christie does. Good man.
6. Claude Lee, 5-1. Dark horse,
good record.
7. Burton H. ;Schoepf, 5-1. Five-
cent citrus juice advocation is
making him friends.
8. Nathan Mayo, 5-1. Would
make a good race.
9. Pierce Wood, 5-1. Speaker-
ship will decided, his chances.
10. Pat Whitaker, 5-1. Has
ability. Good man.
11. D. Stuart Gillls, 8-1. One of
the best men in' Florida.
12. Grady Burton; 8-1. Ran a
good race last time out.
13. Charles F. Coe, 8-1., Has
made a lot of friends.
14. Jerry W. Carter, 8-1. A good
railroad 'commissioner in a good
spot now.
15. Lex Green, 8-1. Out of this
race; will go for the senate.
16. John T. Alsop, 10-1. Would
give them all hell if he starts.
'17. Wendell C. Heaton, 10-1;
Labor candidate with support of
employes.
18. J. J. Parrish, 10-1. Is well
liked in Florida.
19. Harold Colee, 10-1. One of
the best-liked men in Florida.
20. John R. Beacham, 10-1. His
friends are trying to make him
run.
21. Jim Lee, '10-1. Okeh where
he is; Fine man.
22. B. F. Paty, 10-1. Good old
Paty! Would like to see him run.
23. W. W. Rose, 10-1. Has some
possibilities.
S24. 'Chas. A. Mitchell, 10-1. With
funds, C. A. could beat a lot of
them.
25. R. L. Black, 20-1. You may
hear from R. L.
26. Walter 'Clark, 20-1. Has
plenty friends in South Florida.
27. Fuller Warren, 20-1. My old
pal. One of the best in the U. S. A.
28. Pete Tomasello,. 20-1. No-
body's fool. Needs funds.
29. W. B. Fraser, 30-1. Well-
likd in North Florida.
30. L. F. Chapman, 30-1. His
friends want him to run.
31. D. C. Coleman, 30-1. Well-
known in Florida.
32. Fred L. Touchton, 30-1. Not
a dead one. Old Senator has lots
of friends.
33. Dr. R. A. Williams, 30-1.
Might change his mind.
Senators-
1. Charles O. Andrews, 3-1.
May and could repeat. The man to
beat.
2. W. McL. Christie, 3-1. Strong
possibility.
3. Doyle Carlton, 3-1. Will run
much better race this time.


tively a leader.
4. Charles A. Mitchell, 5-1. Is
well-liked.
6.r Spessard Holland, 5-1. Would
be a very strong man.
7. Lex Green, 10-1. Is a sea.
soned campaigner.
8. Jerry Carter, 10-1. A good
railroad commission leader,
9. John T. Alsop, 10-1. Has ex-
cellent record,
10, Pat Whitaker, 10-1. Would
make good U. S. senator.
-----+-- -
It pays to advertise-try it!


DR. J C. COE
DENTIST--
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe



EYES EXAMINED
LI Lv I ITH


Glasses fitted when: needed
Made In Our Own Laboratory
Office Hours; 9 a, m, to- 6 p. m.

Dr. Newberry
OPTOMETRIST
PANAMA CITY, -FLA.


The meeting of the World Poul-
try Congress at Cleveland Ohio,
July 28-Aiigust 7, 1939, will be the
first the organization has ever
held in the United States.

Best...for.P ..rit.y. Qs


Beat for Purity, Qu
and Taste

PURITY

ASSURE


ality


IS

D!



.


I I i Even the
Cows Are
|U. Tested

Use Only

SOLOMON'S

Pasteurized

MILK


Pasteurized for Your
Protection


4-------r-----T'---------

WE HAUL ANYTHING--

CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING
WE HAVE GOOD CLEAN BUILDING SAND FOR SALE
Prompt and Efficient Service Always


C. W.HORTON


PHONE 70


PORT ST. JOE, FLA,


. =



NATURAL GAS SERVICE

Now Ready for Every House In

Port St. Joe

CO OK I N G WATER HEATING
REFRIGERATION HOUSE HEATING
o
NO EQUIPMENT TO BUY
NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED
JUST PAY FOR YOUR GAS

--f A full line of gas appliances in stock fl.-
RITZ THEATER BUILDING
Phone 168
PANAMA CITY


SOUTHERN LIQUID GAS CO.
YOUR GAS COMPANY SINCE 1932.


What more could
you ask for?

S.... A GULP IFEPE oyps
RXPIL.-SNTATIVE I. h i 'IOr Io BON&
Pm" Vtal OOMPLETB a M* &. 'P.Moia
05a0pWo P=OGORAHM .r 1TOM.


4. J. Turner Butler, 5-1, Posi-i


FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, IMi


I I






PAGE FOUR



THE STAR
W. S. SMITH, Editor and Publisher
Issued every Friday at Port St. Joe, Florida,
from The Star Building
Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance-
One Year ......$2.00 Six Months ....$1.25
Three Months ......65c

-~f Telephone 51 j-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

WHY IS IT?
We have often wondered why it is that
business and professional men continue to
fall for various and sundry advertising
schemes, such as thermometers and clocks
with the various ads placed about them, when
they tell their local newspaper that they have
no money for advertising when the solicitor
calls on them?
This type of advertising, unlike newspaper
advertising which.is an invited guest into the
homes of the people of a community, is seen
by few, and those who do read it once pass
it by: on future occasions. The money spent
for this type of advertising goes out0 of the
community and is gone forever, while money
spent for advertising in the local newspaper
immediately goes back into circulation-apnd
the continual circulation of dollars is the life-
blood of any community.
Florida is now being invaded by promoters
of these advertising schemes who are coming
here to get away from the cold weather tip
north. Undoubtedly many of these schemes
will be operated in Port St. Joe unless the
business men get together and do something
about it,
And they can do something about it.
IMany cities have organiized against such
practices, saving the business men;of the city
hundreds of. dollars. The only really practical
protection against these "snow birds" is to
appoint a committee of three or four business
men-preferably hard-boiled ones-and when
one of these promoters comes into town, in-
form him that he will be required to place
his proposition before this committee, and if
they approve it, he may go ahead and start
.selling. This discourages most of them right
at the beginning, and generally they leave the
city uttering maledictions against such a
practice.
This would be a good move to be under-
taken by the Port St. Joe Chamber of Con-
merce, as most of the business iien of the
city belong to this organization.

S". HISTORY REPEATS
The present is not unprecedented. The
world his known physical violence on a scale
comparable with our own wars and oppres-
sionis 'ind has survived. The world has known
brutalitarian regime. with their insanlely con-
sistent ideologies-G. K. Chesterton said that,
the only absolutely perfect logicians are'in
the .lunatic asylums-and has lived them'
down.
The world has seen 'chaos and vast human
suffering, and in the midst of such things the
greatest victories of the human mind were
quietly taking shape. After the horrorsof the
thirty years' war in the seventeenth century
came the splendid sunrise of modern science.
Beethoven wrote his symphonies within the
sound of Napoleon's gunfire.
Faith in the long-time triumph of these
higher things is justified by the historical
record, and the lesson 'for the day'is Forti-
tude.-New York Times.

It's beginning to look as if historians of.
the future will probably, be referring to 'this
era as the breaking-off-of-negotiations age.
-Boston Transcript'.


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


DEVELOP SMALL INDUSTRIES
Port Sti:oe has two large assets in the St.
Joe Paper company mill and the St. Joe Lum-
ber & Ekport company mill, but the city
should not continue to depend upon these two
large plants for continued existence. More
attention should be given to the development
of a wide variety of small enterprises which
would add much-needed strength to the com0-
munity's economic structure.
True, large industries employing hundreds
of workers are great assets, but the city
that has a large number of small plants manu-
facturing a variety of articles is much less
likely to suffer serious setbacks by far-reach-
ing economic upsets than one depending upon
two or three enterprises devoted to one par-
ticular line.
There are a number of opportunities here
for this sort of development, and the way to
get it is to see that local' men of recognized
ability, capable of proceeding with small in-
dustrial enterprises, are given financial aid
and local support to undertake the operation
of plants. The community should stand by
such' industries until they are able to stand
alone. Encourage new small industries by
giving them all the business to the exclusion
of~outside interests. Selfish? Perhaps it is,
but it is a selfishness that would aid the en-
tire community by keeping our dollars at
home.
By a development program of this sort the
profits accruing from the processing of.avail-
able 'local raw materials would be retained
in the community, :Benefiting the owners and
pr ocessors. Thus'the community become's the
sole beneficiary. Profits are turned back into
local trade channels;, strengthening the eco-
nomic setup all along the line.,'

A FATHER SPEAKS
Testifying at a coroner's inquest into a
traffic crash, which claimed the lives of his
daughter and .two other young people, a
Tampa father last week absdlved the death
car driver of all blame, and added:
"Our children are not to blame for these
things. Iti goes farther back than that.
Gentlemen, it goes right back'to us. We are
to blame. It is our fault in allowing yoting
people,' 16, 17 and' 18 years of ake; to. drive
high-powered aiitomobiles."
Where can one find a more potent sermon
on the subject of safety than in the Words of
this anguished parent? Three youig lives
were snuffed but all because nbe driver mis-
judged the speed of his car iii that split sec-
ond that so often means the difference be-
tween life and death. '
The modern motor vehicle is a mechanica
masterpiece. It is powered by an engine
capable of developing the energy of one hun- c
dred horses. It can be stopped in an instant
by highly perfected and efficient brakes. But
the mind of man has not adid cannot devise
an attachment that will respond fiiechanically
to the emergencies of traffic. There can be no
substitute for the human element. Hence the
ever-increasing need for tests for those who
drive-tests that will determine fitness to sit
behind the wheel of a machine that was built
for convenience but too often becomes a le-
thal weapon.
Perhaps' the words of this Tampa father
may bring about the enactment of a state-
wide standard drivers' license law in Florida
that will take from our highways persons un-
fit to operate motor vehicles and, through
this intelligent legislation, reduce the awful
toll taken annually in the name of progress.;

SHitler ought to wear his hat on his ego,
says Avery Powell in the Times-Union. But
consider, Avery, that if he did, every time he'
sat doirn he'd need a new hat.-Port St. Joe
Star. My, my, these foreign languages. We*
never did know before what the German word:
"ego" stood for.-Washinigton Cotunty News.

Is the world advancing? Fifty thousand
years ago meen lived in caves to avoid vicious
animals. Today they have to take to holes in
the ground to avoid vicious airplane bombers.
-Florida Times-Union.


FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 1938


A Claimaits Fl County Fight On

'Jbless Insurance' Tuberculosis To
TIo Register Here Start January 1(6

Local Office Will Be Open in the (Continued from Page 1)
City Hall On Wenesday l o
Of Each Week lately killed out and returned to
the local health officers.
Claimants for "jobless Insur- ..he. program must be carried
ance" are advised by H. W. Sperry, ?ut under the auspices of the loI
senidr interviewer ti charge, of cai health .oficer.
the Florida state employment serv- Cases requiring an X-ray of the
ice for this area, to register at the chbst, such' as adult suspects
nearest state 'employment office contacts, known cases requiring a
or to contact an itinerant inter- checkup, or any other individual
viewer. Under the Foria unem- nht included in the school grout
ployment compensation law eh- and for whom the local community
acted by the Florida legislature in is .unable to 'alite suitable ar
193T and under the terms of the rangeients, may be listed for X
social -security act, unemployed ray providing a request slip has
workers who 'have 'worked for em- been received ifom the local phy-
pldyers having 'in their employ sician. These individuals must be
eight or more workers, with.-the grouped for X-ray separately at a
reception of agricultural labor, specified time. Ea, e reqtfest for A
domestic service in' private homes, picture must have the name of the
service performed, as n- officer r family physrciaan.
member of the crew of a vessel on A campaign for finding cases of
the inavigable waters of the United tuberculosis -s apt to reveal more
States', family employment, govern- 'cases if the search is made among
mental service, 'employes of non- susceptible, groups.,
profit organizations' operated ex- The stresses and strains which
elusively ftr religious, charitable, accompany the change, from, child,
or other purposes, who have lost hood to maturity when added to
their' jobs through no- fault of their those of student liYt, render the
own, are eligible for benefits, pro- adolescent p' iP 1 o d, particularly
vided they have earned the nece- from'-the seventh grade up, especi-
sary wages during the year 1938. ally susceptible to tuberculosis.
Those unemployed workers who Contact with tuber'eulosis iatl-
are out of work and who have the ents" '8i' also a ery important
past year been working for a. means of finding cases of the dis-
employer employing eight or more ease. A much higher percentage bt
people, are advised to call at lthe eases may be found among oon-
Panama City office or to meet the tacts than, among any other grbap
itinerant interviewer at the city of people. Contacts of all ages
hall, Port St. Joe, on Wednesday should be examined for the pres-
of each week, and they will be ence of tuberculosis. This can be
given complete information re- done by the tuberculin testing aid
guarding. unemployment insurance X-ray procedure.
and whether'or inot they are en- It is considered of special lin
titled, to benefits. portance to ascertain whether or
+- not teachers have tuberculosis, be-
DR. BALL GOES TO BAY cause of their contact with chil-
COUNTY HEALTH UNIT dren..
Very young children who have
Dr. W. H. Ball, for the past been in contact with tuberculosis
eight months director of the patients, or who have used milk
Franklin-Gulf \county health unit, from tubercular cows, may have
Monday went to Panama City to become infected. Owing 'to the
become director of the Bay Coun- general tendency toward spontan-
ty-Panama City health unit. eous recovery As the children
grow older, the prop6rtibn of ac-
CRYING BIRD AT FAIR tive cases is 'apt to be higher
The limpkin, the cryingg bird" among infected children of pre-
of Florida, whose call of unitter- school infected children of pre
able sadness often startles visi- schoolchildren.
tors, will be among the birds in Any additional information re,
the wild life spectorama in Flor- garding the anti-tuberculosis pro-
ida's exhibit at the New York gram in Gulf county will be gladly
World's Fair. given anyone at the local health
---office.
We have heard some women ---- ---~ .-
brag of their voice range when in Underground rivers of perpetual
reality they ought to be bragging ice are found in the Modoc, Calif.,
of their cooking range. I lava beds.












STHE TATTLER


Judicious advertising, il-


lustrated with time cuts


and properly laid out to


present an attractive ap-


pearance will bring that


gold o your till, Mr.


Business Man.


PHONE 51


and a representative of


The Star, your hometown


newspaper, ille glad


-to call d help you with


yo


advertising.


:'' 'ri~. : -- `: :;'~ .'. ,<'~


SEES ALL-
KNOWS ALL-
TELLS ALL-

ABOUT HAPPENINGS
IN PORT ST. JOE HIGH


Moore."


The first motion picture with
sound was shown in 1926.

UNIQUE BRIDGE FEATURE
OF MILL RAILROAD LINE

(Continued from Page 1)
action were developed by the J. B
Converse Engineering company of
Mobile. The 90-foot steel girder
which rests on the barge and .car-
ries. the. rails,' was fabricated by
the Ingalls Iron Works company
in their .Birmingham plant and
shipped to Mobile. The barge was
built by the Ingals company at
their Chickasaw plant and towed
to the Mobile docks,, where the
90,000-pound t win girder was
placed on the barge.
'The completed structure was
towed to its final position across
the canal about ten days ago and
will soon be placed in operation.
Mr. Kenney stated yesterday
that the mill will produce about
67,000 feet of lumber hourly or
approximately. 1,500,000 feet per
month with a 67 to 70-hour week
on a shift-anda-half basis. Pro-
duction and hours may go above
or below these figures, depending
on the demand, but the yearly
output will be in the neighborhood
of eighteen to twenty million feet.
The mill is well situated for both
export and import trade, having
water shipping facilities over the
Port St. Joe docks and the intra-
coastal canal, a branch of which
leads to the mill site, and the
Apalachicola Northern railroad,
which connects with all the'main
railroads.


BASKETBALL SEASON
TO OPEN JANUARY 17

Team Looking Forward to a Most
Successful Season

Basketball practice started De-
cember 18, with great hopes for a
successful season. The ones re-
inrting for practice are. Al Schnei-
dri, 'Dick Stepp. William Trawick,
Bobby Coburn, John Lane, Wins-
tbn Jones, Ed Hufrt, dharles Gas-
kin, R. H. Smith, Arthur Forehand
and'dClye Capps.
The schedule. for the coming
season is as follows:
Jan. 17-Altha, in St. Joe.
Jan. 20--Vernon, in St. Joe.
*,Jan. 24-Blountstown, in St. Joe.
,an., 271-Carrabelle, in Carra-
belle..
J an. l1-B~lountstown, n Blounts-
tow~ :
Feb. 3-Vernon, in Vernon.
Feb. 7-Panama City, in Panama.
Feb. 1b-Apalachicola, in St. Joe.
Feb. 14-Wewahitchka, in We-.
wahitchka.
Feb. 17-Al(ba, in Altha.
Feb, 21-Carrabelle, in St. Joe.
.beb, 24-,Apalachicola, in Apa-
lachicola. -
Feb. 28- Wewahitchka, in St.
Joe.

BRIEF BIOGRAPHIES
Name: Bobby Coburn.
Born: Nov. 29, 1921.
Place: Apalachicola, Fla.
Color Eyes: Blue.
Antipathy: Study hall.
.Ambitoln: Doctor.
Weakness: Football.
.Name: Martha Hinson.
Born: June 19,. 1922.
Place: Samson,. .,a.
Color Eyes:: Blue.
Antipathy: Ed Hufft.
Weakness: Brady.
Ambition: Nurse.
--- --
'Why does a tree petrify?"
"Because the wind .makes it
rock."


w THE STAFF &
Editoi-ln-Chief.........Dick Stepp
Assistant Editor... .Bobby Coburn
Sports Editor........Al Schneider
Society Editors............ Opal
Greene a nd Dorothy Crockett
Joke Editor.........Paul Johnson


EDITORIAL
By the time this article is read,
everyone in Port St. Joe high
school will have had his or her
mid-term examinations. This test
climaxes a period of four long,
some happy and some sad, months
of mental training. It is a time
when those, if any, who have not
studied !during, the first semester
really bear down and put the
shoulder and brain to the .wheel
so, as to pass. It is also a. time
when .those who have studied
ritroughout the first four months.
tighten.j p, and study harder: and
con.:entrate .;more thoroughly on.
the printed page...
iThis mid-term test .is like a
tije that comes in a,huiman's life
when. he, (or she) is tested to .find
out what has .been learned through
experience, the great teacher, and
opportunity, the :great .door-knock-
er After this test..one .looks for-
ward to correcting mistakes made
in the first half of-,, lifetime-or
a, school year-andi trying with.
utmost ability to improve one's
record. .
.We feel, sure that thq students
accept this. mid-term, test with aun
aimi. to make the highest grades
possible for each individual, and
also to show the, rest of the world
that it can be done.

NEW STAFF

The Tattler starts off the new
year with a iew staff. Dick:Stepp'
steps into the shoes of Edward.
Hifft as editor-in chief:; Bobby Co-
burn replaces 'Al Schneider as as-
sis'tant editor, while Al retains his
desk as sports editor. The society
news 'wil 'now 'be taken care of
by Dorothy: 'Crockett nd Opal
Greene, taking over for Martha
Hinson and Dorothy Trawick. Paul
Johnson remains as joke. editor.

We have a new s.,tudion in school
this week. His name is Billy Car-
mouche, He hails from Clewiston,
Fla., and is a sophomore.


FM'DAY, JANUARY 13, 1938,


THE STARI PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


,PAGE FIVE







A XS O O E .u'-L FL, lnANU rY io 1, 1930


I


WASHINGTON, D. C., Jan. 12- months over similar periods in
To affect a thorough houseclean- past years bodes well for the fu-
ing and overhauling of the house ture of the forest phase of Florida
patronage situation, Speaker Wil- agriculture.
liam B. Bankhead has designated Instead of looking on the trees
Representative Millard Caldwell as on their farms as "just woods,"
chairman of the patronage corn- farmers are now considering their
mittee' with full authority, woodlands with a much keener in-
'For -several years there have terest and are paying more attend.
been rumblings of discord over tion to their management, propa-
the 'manner in which the many gation and conservation. They are
jobs on Capitol Hill have been al- learning that trees are a fine
lotted to the membership, and source of income, that trees will
there was an insistent clamor for conserve their land, and that the
a' change. Congressman Caldwell's federal government is willing in.
appointment came as a surprise to deed to co-operate with them in
many, as he was not even a mem- their farm forest work.
ber of the committee and had They have come to realize that
served notice on the speaker and seedlings planted now will not
those who had proposed his name only conserve their land-particu-
that he was not a candidate for larly land that might tend toward
the place, Also the fa6t that in the submarginal, but they will
the scramble for the place were grow into fine trees that will
several strong members, with bring them a tidy income in the
much longer service than Caldwell years to come.
and supported by the New York From county agents in many
and other large delegations, made sections of the state, from the
the appointment an unusual one. farm forester with the state agri-
The' chairman of the patronage cultural extension service, and
committee is the czar of the capi- from workers of the state forest
tdl when it comes to the distribi- and park service come reports that
tion of the asought-after places on Florida farmers are rapidly wak-
the house payroll. The authority ing up to the importance of trees
to'supply the men to do the work on their farms.
of the capitol police, clerks, mes- 'Besides the benefits' they will
sengers, doorkeepers and many derive from the conservation and
other joba is to be divided between improvement of their land and the
the majority membership, and each income their woodlots will bring
looks zealously for every inch of them in the future, farmers who
advantage for his district, plant seedlings as a part of their
The custom is for each of; the work in connection with the agri-
older members to have one of the cultural conservation program will
better jobs and the new members receive' govdrninent payment for
to take,: the ,more insignificant doing so.
ones-if they get one.at all. Often With the march of the paper In-
there are not enough places to go dustry into the Southland and Flor.
around. Congressman Caldwell has ida, there were some who feared
only one place, which is now filled that the forest lands of this and
by a Third District young man who, other states were going to suffer
Is using the Job as a means of heavily, too heavily, from the axe.
completing his .edcation, going to but the way in which agricultural
night school and working on the and forestry leaders and farmers
police force during tme day. have come forward with a sound
band beneficial program of keeping
-Educat rs Meet our forests a bit ahead of the axe
Educ s e t and even increasing them, has
i Marin r r somewhat dispelled .these fears. It
In M an a FOr is hoped that this program' will
Revision of Cod grow ever stronger in the future
RevIS1 On o Code and that our forests will never
suffer from exploitation as forests
Propose To Change Laws That in other sectionsi of the nation
Overlap and Cause Conflict In have suffered.
Duties of School Officials He is a wise farmer Who plants
Duties of School Officials
trees' and fosters their growth and
The organized educational fac- development.
tions of Northwest Florida met in
convention at Marianna Monday to Friends of Mrs. J. W. Sisemore
conventar various at Marianna Monday the pro- will be pleased to learn that, she
hear various reports on the pro-
posed revision of the educational greatly improved after a s-
code for the stt of Florida eral days' illness, and all wish for
code for the state of Florida.
B. G. McPherson, principal of hera speedy recovery.
the Port St. Joe schools, stated Rev. J.A.Marshal of Chattahoo-
that the convemtionl proposed to
hangthe convenlaws that cause the offices chee will arrive in the city tomor-
change laws that cause the offices I r
,and duties of various persons to row to oerian church being
conflict and overlap s the code the Presbyterian church beginning
conflict and o.verlap.- s the code
1. -v .4vPt Sunday.


S now exists, the auperinten uLuen
trustees, clErks, principals and
others of the various county choo
systems do not definitely or ex
actly know their various duties
At times they find their function
entangled. Mr. McPherson said
that a committee was appointed to
define and rewrite those sections
of 'the code and submit them fo:
confirmation at a later date.
The convention was attended b:
county' school 'superintendents
teachers, trustees, members o
Parent-Teacher associations and
interested. citizens. Colin English
state superintpd4ednt of public in
struction, issued the call for the
open session.
Mr. McPherson stated that con
ventions of a like nature will bt
called from time to time in the
future.


DI

SIF ANYBODY HAS-
a Eloped
W Married
s Divorced
r Had a Fire
Sold a Farm
)y Been Arriested
S Been Your Guest
f Started in Business
d Left You, a Fortune
h, Bought a New Home
- Swiped Your Chickens
S Met With An Accident
Had a Visi-e From the Stork
S THAT'S NEWS
s TELL THE EDITOR#
Phone 51-The Star


Absolutely pure alcoholthas no
odor.


Caldwell Is Named

As Head of Strong

House Committee

Appointed By Bankhead as Chair-
man of Patronage Committee
With Full Authority


ference at the conservation de-
partment in Tallahassee in which


Wise to FosterTrees
For Future Income

Farmers Are Now Considering
Their Woodlands With Interest

A marked increase in the num-
ber of pine. seedlings set out by
farmers during the n as t few


ways and means of curbing unau- for all entrants.
thorized and uninspected sales of It should be well worth while
Florida's delicious sea foods were for the young ladies of this sec-
discussed. tion to take part in this program,
Floria oyster dealers were com- and the amateur contest should
mended by Catlett for their uni- appeal to a great many, for it not
form willingness to co-operate only offers the opportunity for
with authorities in improving sani- entrants to show what they can
tary conditions under which oys- do, but holds forth the lure of a
ters and shellfish a re being free, expenses-paid trip to the
handled. He stated that he doubts state and national showdowns.
seriously if any other state has ef- Anyone desiring any additional
fected better surroundings and information in regard to these
conditions for handling seafoods, three contests are asked to call on
and he said that Florida's oyster Mrs. Ross Coburn, Long avenue,
and shucking plants and canning Port St. Joe.
plants not only are as good as can ___ __
be found, but that he believed they
are better and more up-to-date Mrs. Coy Reddi and little daugh-
than those found in other states. ter, Joyce, of Panama City, were
No one should buy an oyster in guests last Friday of Mr. and Mrs.
Florida until he has satisfied him- Jim Perritt and Mr. and Mrs. Le-
self that the product comes from roy Gaineous.
a certified dealer, Dowling said af- *
ter the conference. The oyster Mr. and Mrs. H. IL. McKinnon
bootlegger is a dangerous fellow were visiting relatives last week
who operates a dangerous racket, in Chattahoochee.
Oyster bootlegging has always r
been a thorn in the side of those Mrs. Sarah McCloud of Mobile,
engaged in health work, as well Ala., is the guest this week of Mr.
as those enped fni n nnservatitunr a.,r Mr, w Pn~n ., fa~ n mfl


IF YOU have a room for rent,
why not place a classified adver-
tisement in The Star. The cost is
low and'returns are ratify~lg. .
Try it tody. tt

Services .Offered
ELECTRIC WIRING-In ail Its
branches, reasonable. Fixtures ;
and Fans. Repair.
HENDERSON ELECTRIC:
COMPANY Port St.Joe:
Home Office, Apalachicol. Box 313


of Staple andRFancy

GROCERIES

SThese Prices are
for CASH ONLY


THESE PRICES GOOD FRI. AND SAT., JAN. 13 and 14


LARD IPound 13c

OCTAGON POWDER-6 Small FL U R
OCTAGON SOAP-6 small 123 J UNE BRI DE

RS Early June Peas" 13c 2437b 1
CROSS 24'b 9 12' b3
BUTTER BEANS-Per can 1*
TOMATOES-3 small cans 13*

BRAN FLAKES Box 13c

ALL BRAN or RICE KRISPIES-Bo ..........13 S A R


Honeymoon COFFEE 13c
BULK
DEL MONTE DRIED PEACHES-Box .........BLK -
MACARONI or SPAGHETTI-4 Boxes............13 23 lbs. $1.13


PEANUT BUTTER 16"' 13c


TOMATO SOUP-2 No. 1 Cans 13

TOMATO CATSUP BOTLE 13c ,OO

MILK-4 Small Cans ,13 POTATO S

MAYONNAISE P 13c 5 13c

GRAPEFRUIT JUICE-4 Small Cans ......-......13 LBS. 13

SALtON Can 13 SWEET
SALM 0N Can 13c ,


Owens & Mu-'ock


PORT ST. JOE


n


FLORIDA


a-


Issue Warning

Against Oyster

Bootleggers

No One Should Buy Oysters Unless
Satisfied The Product Comes
From a Certified Dealer

A warning against dealing with
oyster boottleggers was issued this.
week by G. W. Catlett, chief engi-
neer of 'the state board of health,
and R. L. Dowling, state super-
visor of conservation, after a bon-


work. A few oyster bootleggers
continue to operate because they
are not easily apprehended, Super-
visor Dowling said.
In this section, J. 0: Bragdon is
the only certified dealer.
------->~c-----_-
LEGION AUXILIARY TO
STAGE BEAUTY PAGEANT

(Continued from Page 1)
years. A silver loving cup will be
awarded the .child adjudged the
most attractive.
Judges in all three contests will
be .disinterested parties, in order
that the contests be entirely fair


CLASSIFIED ADS

FOR. RENT
FOR RENT-5-room house with
bath and sleeping porch; Four.'
room cottage with, bath, Three-i
room cottage with bath. See
Karl Knodel, Oak Grove Subdii-
visoh. 1*
UNFURNISHED 9 by 18-toot cab-
ina; ceied overhead and side;
good water; $6 .month. Apply S~.\
Joe lumber Co. 12t2|tI
ROOMS FOR RENT


ADDRESS BY COLEE MAY BE.
INDICATION OF ENTRY INTO
.RACE FOR GOVERNORSHIP;
Ft. Lauderdale, Jan. 12 (FNSi--,,
At the Jackson Day dinner here,
Harold Colee made a speech
which many observers thought
was his first step toward a cam-
paign for the state governorship
in 1940. His address was mainly
on the life of Andrew Jackson, but
he digressed to touch upon his
knowledge of the statewide prob-
Iems of Florida.

Wasting other folks' time is a
fine art with some people.


b ` ~


-


~ I r iC I'


~


PAGE SIX


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOEj FLORIDAA


FRIDAY JA UA Y 8


3


--~-~~-.. --~--t &U-L IVIKS. Ja0 ~ 2 Vu lalILU OI y.,


'* 4"


A