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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00111
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: December 2, 1938
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00111

Table of Contents
    Main: Section One
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
    Section Two
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Section Three
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
Full Text
SECTION ONE
FLORIDA CONSTITUTION
CENTENNIAL EDITION


THE


STA


Published on the 100th
Anniversary, of the Signing of
.Florida's First Constitution
At Old St. Joseph In 1838


VOLUME II PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1938 NUMBER 7


CENTENNIAL


CELEBRATION


EDITION


1
8
3
8


1
9
3
8


~ ..






*. I


J R. Edd C.
Hunter I Pridgeon


CLERK OF THE
SACIRCUIT COURT TAX COLLECTOR
Gulf County
Gulf County

BYRD PARKER C. L. COSTING
Sheriff of Gulf County Supt. of Public Instruction




Samuel A. R. Alton C. G.
Patrick Dendy Rish


SUPERVISOR OF
TAX ASSESSOR COUNTY JUDGE REGISTRATION
Gulf County Gulf County Gulf County







TO OUR PREDECESSORS


W E present officials of Gulf County feel that the One
Hundredth Anniversary of the drawing up of the
State's First Constitution is an appropriate occasion to
pay our respect and commemorate in revived memory
those officials who have gone before us and done their
best in their official capacity to promote the interests of
this section during their tenure of office.

We have endeavored to let the actions and precedents
established by them guide us in the administration of
present-day problems which confront us as we go about
our duties.


I I


Rl D'XY, DbECEMBEiR 2,10Y38


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE,--FLQRRIDk';


PAGE TWO,








PorPtSt. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000 1
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast.
eed growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


STAR.;


The Star-Florlda's fastest grow.
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St. Joe.


JOIN US IN CELEBRATING THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE SIGNING OF THE STATE CONSTITUTION, DECEMBER 7-10, 1938

VOLUME II PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1938 NUMBER 7





STAGE SET FOR CENTENNIAL


for the purpose of organizing a
state government, which specified
that an election be held in the
various counties of the territory
on the second. Monday of October,
1838, to elect delegates to a con-
stitutional convention, and stating
that the convention be held on


the first Mvonday in Diecember at
But with its entrance into the +.,+. T.l
tfl L~y VS OS. vaph


Union as a territory attention was
drawn to it, and settlers began to
cdme in. With the consequent in-
crease in population, the matter
of' statehood began to be talked,
and in 1837 the legislative coun-
cil passed an act "To Take the
Sense of the People of This Terri-
tory on the Policy and Propriety
of Becoming a State."
Opinion Divided
It seems that public opinion was
divided on the matter. The wide
open spaces of eastern and west-
era Florida were against state-
hood, but the more heavily settled
middle section was in favor'of it.
Therefore in 1838 the council, con-
sidering that the "sense of the
people" was favorable, In- 1838
passed an act to call a convention


ne c it.y or L. osepuu.
A storm of protest arose over
the selection of St. Joseph as the
site for the convention, and po-
litical strings were manipulated to
secure it for Pensacola, Tallahas-
see and the Mineral Springs on
the Suwannee river. But appar-
ently the politicians and banking
interests backing the new city of
St. Joesph had the greater influ-
ence, and the lot finally fell to St.
Joseph.
Build Hotels
St. Joseph was but a few years
old and ill-equipped to care for
(Continued on Page 9)
----------S---
-K
Florida has an area of 58,666
square miles, of which 3,805 square
miles are water.


United States Senator Claude
Pepper, who will be the main
speaker on the opening day of
the Centennial Celebration.


Expect Locomotive

Will Arrive Today

.Replica of Locomotive Used On
St. Joseph Railroad Will Be
Feature of Centennial

A replica of one of the three
Baldwin locomotives used on the
St. Joseph & lola railroad back in
1831-38, which was the first rail-
road in Florida and one of the few
in operation in the United States
at that time, is expected to arrive
in Port St. Joe today from Archer,
Fla., where it was constructed in
the shops of the Maddox Foundry
& Machine Works under the per-
sonal supervision of H. Maddox,
who is the possessor of a drawing
of one of the old engines.
The locomotive will be a feature
at the Centennial building, where
it will be placed on display, and it
is also contemplated using it on
one of the floats for the parades.
Following the celebration the
locomotive will ,be placed in the
building as a permanent exhibit.
-K
WORKERS WANTED

Anyone desiring to work at the
Centennial grounds are requested
to leave their names with T. W.
Wilson, secretary of the Port St.
Joe Chamber of Commerce.

Florida'leads all other states of
the Union in the production of
Fuller's earth.


Florida Constitution Centennial Committee


FRED P. CONE R. A. GRAY
,Governor of the State of Florida Secretary of State


Plans Complete For Observance

Of One of Most Momentous Events

In History of the State of Florida


Four-Day Celebration Will See Elaborate Fireworks Displays,
Spectacular Parade of Illuminated Historical and Allegorical
Floats, Band Concerts, Addresses By Speakers of Nation-
wide Renown, Big Free Circus, Carnival and Other Events.


Last-minute activities keep members of the Centennial conm
mission and their aides as busy as the proverbial one-armed
paper hanger with the hives, and Centennial headquarters in
the city hall,,as well as at the grounds, are kept at fever heat.
for 12 to 16 hours each day of the week, Sundays included.
This goes, tob, for the Gasthoff studio, where'the floats are
being constructed.
SThe Centennial building, the race track .and stables, the huts
on the trap shooting field, several of the booths from which
food will be dispensed and the open-air stage on the Centennial
grounds are practically completed and ready for service, thus
-confusing the pessimists who,
WILL BE HERE all along, have been predicting
that nothing would be in readi-
r-' w*. ~~ ess for the big, colorful cele-
j* ~T-' bration when the opening
,'., 4 1.date arrived.
Noted Marksmen To Be Here
Horace Soule and his fellow
SP |l committeemen having the trap and
skeet shoot in charge, in addition
to having the grounds ready, are
-. provTiing ample parking space for'
the crowds of participants ex-
a. pected for the matches. Among the
visiting shooters will be a num-
f ber of the crack shots of America
S and many runners-up, insuring
keen competition, according to
Mr. Soule.
S' Del Mahon and those associated
With him in the promotion of the
horse racing program are busy
'with last-minute preparations for
Sthe big meet. The track is. being
carefully) gone over in order to
have it in the best possible con-
to shelter the 100 or more horses



ment with their money in the way
Congressman Millard Caldwell, of friendly bets.
who has accepted an invitation Mr. Mahon is authority for thib
to deliver an address on Satur. statement that no bookmaking
day, the closing day of the Cen. will be permitted, nor will betting
tennial Celebration, be encouraged, "but," he says, "it
two friendly horse owners want
EXTRA COPIES OF THIS to make small side wagers, and
EDITION ARE AVAILABLE do it quietly, we will not stop
About 200 copies of this Cen. them."
tennial Edition of The Star are Southern States Shows
still on hand and will be mailed T S
to any a-dress for ten cents per The Southern States Shows,
copy ten cents per which will occupy the amusement
copy.- -- ---- --+


zouu uue 'ing Le four uays of t.e
celebration, are expected to arrive
in Port St. Joe early in the week in
order to have their tents, as well
as their mechanical devices, in
readiness for the opening next
Wednesday morning.
The Peerless Potters and their
paraphernalia will be here Tues-
day to set up the necessary
swings and nets for their thrilling
acts which will be among the free
features of the four-day celebra-
tion.
Several local organization have
asked for space as close to the
center of activity as possible on
which to erect food dispensaries
for the benefit of the big crowds
of sightseers expected.
Bands and Orchestras
During the first two days of the
celebration, music for parades and
Jances, as well as for incidental
music for luncheons and during
oratorical exercises on the great
outdoor stage erected at the en-
trance to the main building on the
Centennial grounds, will-be fur-
nished by the Port St. Joe high
qrhool band, the band from the
Florida State Hospital at Chatta-
hoochee and the Farmer orchestra
from Dothan, A:a.
Music for Friday and Saturday
will be furnished by the Port St.
(Continued on Page 6)


9 ,.- -A r "-. _
J. L. SHARIT JAMES H. KELLY
.Mayor of, Port St. Joe Wewahitchka, Fla.


Beautiful marble monument, erected' in 1922, which marks the site
where Convention Hall stood in which Florida's first constitution
was drawn up.. This monument stands in a beautifully landscaped
park directly in front of the Centennial building, an architect's
sketch of which will be found on page six.


The St. Joseph Convention


One hundred and seven years
ago Florida was ceded to the
United States by Spain, and' at
that time had a white population
of about 5000. There were but two
towns of any size in the territory
and they were almost 400 miles
apart. .


li +1 ;,. A 9







FRIDAY, DECEMPER2, 1938


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


THE STAR
:W. S. SMITH, Editor and Publisher
Issued every Friday at.Port St. Joe, Florida,
from The Star Building

.Entered as Second-olass matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St..Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year ......$2.00 Six Months ....$1.25
Three Months ...... 65c

-f Telephone 51 -

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
Thi spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

A CITY IS REBORN
We of modern Port St. Joe can look with
pride upon'the fact that we are living in a:
locality that is rich in lore of the early days
of our state. It was here, at old St. Joseph,
that the state's first organic law was written
in 1838-39, which event will be commemor-
ated next week with an all-Florida celebra-
tion of no mean proportions.
While old St. Joseph, dead and gone these
90 years and more, is but a memory and the
only tangible evidence we have of its actual
existence is the ancient burying ground with
its tombstones and vaults, the modern indus-
trial city of Port St. Joe is concrete proof
that a city may be reborn, rising, as it were
from the ashes of the ancient city even as the
fabled Phoenix was reborn fiom its self-made
funeral pyre.
Port St. Joe has already received nation-
wide publicity as the site of the South's
largest paper mill for the manufacture od
kraft paper from slash pine, and the Centen-.
nial Celebration next week will give us fur-
ther beneficial publicity and bring thousands
of visitors here who will be able to see at
first hand the many advantages we have,,
both natural and artificial, for future develop-
nent as an industrial center.
, Let us welcome these visitors with open
arms and extend to them every courtesy, for
among them there will undoubtedly be many
looking for business or residential. locations
and, as we all know, than Port. St. Joe there
is no finer spot on God's green earth.
A city is reborn and we want all the world
to.become cognizant of the fact!

CONSTITUTION 100 YEARS OLD)
Saint Joseph has gone with time, but in
its place we have a virile, hustling seaport
and industrial center making its first nation-
wide bid for recognition, that we Floridians
know as Port St. Joe, a healthy youngster
that is going places among Florida' municipali-
ties.
It is entirely fitting that Port-St. Joe, suc-
cessor to old Saint Joseph, scene of the mak-
ing and adoption of a constitution for this
great state one hundred years ago,' should be
selected to play the role of host to the multi-
tude of persons who are expected to witness
or take part in the elaborate celebration ex-
ercises which are to be held in this live young
city December 7, 8, 9 and 10. Its splendid
chamber of commerce will see to it that the
city acquits itself with credit upon this oc-
casion.
"There will be plenty of surprises when you
check up the advantages, natural and artifi-
cial, of Port St. Joe. To begin with it is most
admirably located on the Gulf of Mexico and
has one of the best land-locked harbors on
tidewater in St. Joseph's Bay.
Jutting well out into the Gulf, Port St.
Joe is an easy port of call for steamers from
Europe en route to New 'Orleans or other
Gulf seaports, and the same applies in regard
to all Atlantic coastwise, Carribean and Flor-
ida shipping, as well as traffic from the West
Coast through the Panama Canal.
Already in Port St. Joe there is a great
paper mill in operation and a huge lumber
mill about ready to. begin sawing pine, cy-


pres's and hardwood lumber, with hundreds of
millions of feet in standing timber nearby.
These industries spell a big export business
and big payrolls and their benefits to the city
Will be added to by others that will be quick
to see the'great value of Port St. Joe's fa-
vored location.
We salute Port St. Joe, already a worthy
Florida:seaport and industrial center, It has
a great future. Attend the' celebration: and
see for yourself.-Florida Public Works:

A CITY CAN DIE!
The climax did come that put an end to the
drama that was old St. Joseph, Florida, where
the state's constitution was written 100 years
ago. The story is ably, told by. George H.
Clements in this issue of the Florida Munici-
pal Record. It is not strange that a city should
die, yet somehow we shudder at the thought.
What it was that took the soul out of Flor-
ida's constitutional city is legendary, but we
know that yellow fever, a foreign importa-
tion, laid siege to its inhabitants; that the de-
cline of its feederrailway was its first major
disaster, and :that in some inexplicable way
spiritual and civic leadership was' abseit in
this veritable land of milk 'and honey. *
Florida was sparsely settled when St.
Joseph,was a city of, perhaps 10,000 persons.
The community had not the companionship
of a sizable sister municipality, nor. was it
sired by a strong state. The nation itself .was
weak, and political disintegration was threat-
ened. Still, here was a superabundance of vir-
gin timber, fair agricultural lands, an area
capable of fine stock raising, a port render-
ing St. Joseph at once open to world com-
merce, a climate peculiarly synchronized to
the requirements of mankind, and it is be-
cause these good things existed when St.
Joseph was in its heyday that we may well
ponder'its fate, for surely here, is evidence
that cities' are not unlike men in that they
find isolation stifling to the body politic.
6t. Joseph could not live alone. As long as
its contacts remained virile the community
grew and prospered until at last it became
the largest city in a frontier state-and, sad
to relate,.a satisfied one,
Communication-which is but another word
for co-operation-makes for a healthy secur-
ity, whether upon the part of an individual or
a community. Where this spirit is lacking,
vulnerability to disease and decay is apparent.
Florida urban-dwellers may be, as Gover-
nor Cone succinctly puts it, "eating high on
the hog"-and we believe that most of them
are, all situations being considered-yet you
will find that this happy condition is accen-
tuated where there is close co-ordination be-
tween state, county, city and national forces
working toward the advancement of a more
satisfactory arrangement of spiritual, civic
and economic forces.
Neither do satisfied persons build a city,
nor contented cities contribute greatly to the
commonwealth. Complacency weakens ties
which should bind a people. Government is
man's highest form of communal expression,
be you anarchist or merely bolshevism's wa-
ter boy, and the thought and energy respon-
sible for an improved government comes from
imaginative and vigorous persons and com-
munities.
A city can dieI
A Florida city did-and that city, ironically
enough, was host to givers of the state's first
organic law !-Florida Municipal Record.

"q Hitler ought to 'wear his hat on his ego,
says Avery Powell in the Florida Times-
Union. But consider, Avery, that if he did
every time he sat down he'd need a new hat.

The new "cocktail hat" for the pretty dears
looks as though the person who designed it
had- been mixing themin.-Macon Telegraph.

4Anyway, tin cans have been the making
of the can-opener industry.-Florida Times-
Union. And the tin-can tourist industry.

Send The Star to a friend-only $2 a year.


.Fiyst Ice Machine


m

wi
is
18

in
A]
th

te
tie

at
*de


Perhaps it Is not known to the S Joe J, Ice company ieever-
any Floridlans that the original theless t proved to be the tore-
achie for manufacturing' ice runner of a vast industry embrac-
SIng the entire world and one of
as invented right here n North, th greatest boons to cilllation.
est -Florida where t .was suc Dr. Gorrie died without. being
ssfPully operated aa early o. able to Interest capital in his re.
50. I+ ; markable invention. His native
The device, Ilctured above, was city. Apalachicola, erected a imonu-
vented by.Dr. John F. Gorrie of meat in his meioory there in
palachicola not in the Interest of 1900, and the state of Florida pre-
le manufacture of ice for cor- sented a marble statue of the
ercial purposes, but to lower the noted physician tto Statuary Hall,
mperature in the rooms of pa- Washington, D. C., in 1914.
cents suffering from yellow fever. It is interesting to know that
It was a queer cookingg appair- the first commercial ice factory
tus compared with the perfected in Florida ..began operation at
devices of'today 'like that'used by /Jacksonville in December, 1878.


EDITORS TELL OF VISITS

TO OLD CITY OF ST. JOSEPH


Practically every newspaperman
who visited the old city of St.
Joseph in its heyday, wrote inter-
esting descriptions of the town for
publication in their papers.
In June, 1838, Benjamin I.
Wright, of the Pensacola Gazette,
visited the city and published the
following account in the issue of
June 30:
A hasty visit to this rising city,
enabled us the other day, to take
a bird's-eye view of its growing
importance. The enterprise of its
citizens has certainly forced it for-
ward with a rapidity which. could
scarcely have been looked for. We
say "forced it forward" because
everything which has hitherto
been done at St. Joseph has re-
quirgd an actua' outlay of capital,
and as yet they can hardly be'said
to have received the slightest re-
turn.
The present railroad is six miles
long and does not seem to have
been constructed with great skill
or accuracy. Its inequalities are in
some places considerable, though
nowhere so great as to prevent the
locomotive to surmount them with
facility.
The town has an air and aspect'
of -newness -that s.s.acarcely, to be
seen anywhere 'else." The space
which is covered (or rather scat-
teied .over) "by thie ton is, large,
the streets are wide, .the -quares
numerous, and many of 'the lots,
especially those owned by persons
:abroad, are unoccupiedd, so that
'most '6f"ihe'buildings' have:'an -ap-
pearance :Which cannot be other-
wise so 'well desettbed ;as by say-
ing that they all seem to be stand-
ing out-of-doors. Nevertheless there
are some very pretty residences,
and not a few large and commodi-
ous houses for business.
Among the latter IL the Mansion
House, kept by the public's dili-
gent 'and worthy servant, Arm-
strong. In some of the onomies
he may be less au fait than those
who have consumed their lives in
tolling up "the hill when (sic)
Fame's proud temples shine afar,"
but in the science of gastronomy,
he is hard to beat. Others may
eat to live; but that is not in the
philosophy of mine host. He not
only lives to eat, but he very soon
puts everybody about him upon do-
ing the same thing. In short, all


the comforts that can be reason-
ably desired await the wayfarer
at the Mansion House.
St. Joseph was visited in 1839
by another prominent Florida jour-
nalist, Samuel S. Sibley, of The
Tallahassee Floridian. .His paper
carried the following story:
We made a trip a week or two
since to the cities of Apalachicola
and St. Joseph. Embarking at St.
Marks on board a steamboat, we
first visited the city of "Granite
pillars" going through St. George's
Sound. South Cape, which we
passed, is a dangerous place for ves-
sels coasting between St. Marks
and New Orleans or the other
ports westwardly. Apa-
lachicola is a proud specimen of
American enterprise. It, is,--
think, if it has good luck; destined '
to be one of the finest cities on
the Gulf. The merchants are busl-
ness men. -
We went the inland passage,
from Apalachico0a to St. Josephli;
This 'is a beautiful place. If thea
canal is dug to it contemplated be-
fore Apalachicola gets the start
too much, it may outstrip its ri-
val. With its two railroads, bne to .'
Lake Wimico, the oier to lola.a
there may, however, be some
doubt.
:But it Is a pleasant city. The.
best place, we think,' to establishh.
the Florida University.we have yet:
seen. We maybee 'partial--but we'
were brought up near salt water,
and, we like fish and : oysters
mightily. We can't speak too highly
of the citizSf s of that place. Their
"cify is:the seat of hospitality, kiM--
ness and liberality. We would not'
say less of the citizens' of Apa-
lachicola so far as our short visit
would permit us to form an 'opi-,';
ion. :

If a man's voice wasas a power-
tul for his size as that of the tree.
frog, he could be heard from east-,
ern Washington state to New
York City. A
------------ '^
With rare exceptions, Egyptian
sculptors followed the rule, of por-,
traying all men and women a
healthy and youthful.

Send The Star to a friei. "


PAGE FOUR









FIDADCME ,13 H TR OTS.JE LRD AEFV


St. Joe Lumber & Export

Co. Is Assured of Long Life


Another big manufacturing con-
cern, .in'addition to the St. Joe Pa-r
per company, will be in operation
shortly, after the first of the year-
wheln he St. Joe Lumber & Export
Company, a lumber firm with
merchantable timber resources of
more than 400,000,000 feet of pine,
cypress and" hardwoods, mostly
long leaf pine, blows the. Whistle
for the beginning of operation.
The owners of this gigantic lum-
ber concern are M. L. Fleishel of
Shamrock, Fla., Basil E. Kenney,
Sr., and.Basil E. Kenney, Jr., for-
merly of: Bountstown, and C. L.
Effinger and and J. E. Crosby of
Shamrock. Mr. Fleishel is. presi-
dent, Mr. Kenney, Sr., first vice-
presidentf and ,general manager,
Mr. Effinger, second vice-presi-
dent, Mr. Crosby, secretary, and
Basil E. Kenney, Jr., treasurer
and assistant to the general man-
ager.
The huge mill is now almost
completed, fifteen neat bungalows
for white workers and about fifty
cabins for negro workers have
been erected, in addition to a large
commissary a nd administration
building,' dining hall and other
necessary structures.
The plant is located just outside
the 'city limits, adjoining the new
inland waterway canal connecting
St. -Joseph's Bay, with the inter-
'coastal canal, and a branch has
been dug to the mill, giving wa-
ter facilities for the delivery of
logs; It is' also but a short dis-
tance from the new dock adjoin-
ing the paper mill, thus having, in
addition to a spur track from the
'A. N. railroad, practically direct
connection from mill to ship for
export business.
Band Mill Will Resaw
The mill is a single band and re-,
saw, constructed to 'take timbers,
up to 45 feet long, with brick dry
kilns, rough .sheds, planing mill
and' dress sheds. It will have a ca-
pacity of about 60,000 feet per
eight-hour day and will operate on
a double shift hbsis of 88 hours prr
week.
The owners of this new concern
are. well known in the lumber in-
dustry. Mr. Fluishel is president
and general manager of the Put-
nam Lumber' company of Sham-,
rock and is kno+ for the organi-I
zation work he Tas done for the
lumber industry.
.The Kenneys, who are now resi-
dents of Port St. Joe, until re-
cently operated' the Basil E. Ken-'
ney Lumber company at Blounts-
town. Mr. Kenney, Sr., has been
well known in southern pine and
hardwood circles for many years.
Bs- "J_.r., has been associated
with his father at Blountstown
Sand -has developed into an effici-'
:ent operator and capable execu-
ive. He is serving in the capacity
of treasurer of the new company
and is assistant general manager'
of operations.
J. S. Crosby, secretary, is gen-
ieral manager of the Putnam Lum-
ber company at Shamrock. He
started as a youth witr. Flei-
shel some 20 years ba and for
years has been recognized as one
.of the ablest,sales managers inthe
long leaf pine and. cypress indus-
tries, being intimately acquainted
with domestic and foreign markets.
Long Life of Mill Assured
The timber owned by the St.
-Joe Lumber and Export company
..onsists'of all the sawmill size
timber on the lands of .the late Al-
fred I. duPont, consisting of ap-
.,proxiiately 500,000 acres in Gulf,
Bay, Pranklin and Liberty coun-
ties, .the bulk of the timber being
in Gulf county. There is about
300,000,000 feet of long leaf pine,
some cypress' and hardwoods in
this tract, all under forest man-
agement.
The company also owns the Lis-
ter tract, containing approximately
130,000,000 feet of long leaf yellow/


pine, located in Gulf county, and
the Texas Oil company tract con-
sisting of 17,000 acres of virgin
yellow pine and cypress, with
some hardwood,, all in Gulf county
and totaling some 80,000,000 feet.
All the cypress on these three
tracts is Tidewater Red.
Total figures by, species are
325,000,000 feet of long leaf pine,
around 35,000,000 feet of hard-
woods mostly genuine tupelo, and
50,000,000 feet of cypress, making
a grand total of 410,000,000 feet-
the largest holding of virgin tim-
ber under one ownership any-
where in the South at the present
time.
This vast resource of timber as-
sures the company of a life of
production far beyond that of
other large southern operators and
assures, a. large payroll for years
to: come for the rapidly growing
city of Port St. Joe.
Most of the timber will be
'irJzd.l b: railroad and a 25-m.ile:
logging road, with three locomo-
tives, is being built into the heavi-'
est timber. Tractors will be used'
to a considerable extent, and some


OFFICIALS OF ST. JOE LUMBER & EXPORT COMPANY


of the timber will be brought to
the mill by water through the in-
tracoastal canal.
The company is most favorably
located with respect to freight
rates. Port St. Joe.has one of the'
finest natural deep water harbors
on the Gulf and is rapidly becom-
ifng the calling point for 'many


ships, giving the ,St. Joe Lumber
and Export company favorable
rates to Atlantic coast points and
to foreign ports. Also, by way of
the intracoastal canal to Panama
City, Pensacola, Mobile and New,
Orleans,' exceedingly favorable
rates will prevail for shipment
from other Gulf ports.


Automobile accidents caused 4,.
252 deaths in 125 major cities of
the United States during the first
six months of 1937, compared with
3,592 auto .deaths in the same
cities durifig the corresponding
period of 1936.
*'. = --.-- "/ -
The nicotine content of cigaret
smokes varies inversely with the
moisture gf the tobacco..


DR. J, C. COE
-DENTIST --
.Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe



EYES EXAMINED


Glasses fitted when needed
Made In Our Own Laboratory
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 6 p. m.

Dr. Newberry
OPTOMETRIST
PANAMA CITY, FLA.


December 11, 1938, Marks the 100th



Anniversary of Florida's Constitution


-. .. ; --, "


October 16, 1938

1. -
Marked the



22nd Anniversary



Sof Our Store





D URING this entire period Owens & Murdock has operated continu-
ously under the same management, endeavoring at all times to make
its service a constructive factor in the development of our rapidly-
growing Community.

We whose business lives have been spent in Port St. Joe during the good
years and the lean years appreciate that nothing contributes to the growth
of a business so much as the helpful co-operation of friends. To
each of these friends whose patronage and good-will have contributed to
our success and progress, we are deeply grateful.



As the years go on it is our aim to continue -
wvorking with our host of friends, both old ''
and new, and to reciprocate their co-ope.ration
to the end that we may all grow and prosper.










OOwens & MFurdock


PORT ST. JOE FLORIDA


I


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1938


PAGE FIVE








PAGESIXTHESTAR POT S. JO, FORIA FRDAY DEEMBE 2,193


Beautiful Building Is Center of Centennial Celebration Activities


-, ^


Above is the architect's drawing of the Centennial building erected at -a cost of $73,000, around which main activities of the four-day cele.
bration, December 7 to 10, will revolve. It is situated in Monument Park, at the' eastern.city limits of Port St. Joe, on ground? formerly
occupied by the now long-dead city of St. Joseph where Florida's first constitutional convention met in 1838. The structure is prac-
tically complete today and will be in readiness next Wedheeday for the'opening ceremonies.


General Program


Centennial Exposition and Festival

Port St. Joe, December 7, 8, 9 and 10, 1938


All-Florida Day
Wednesday, December 7, 1938
Guests of Honor:
Officers of the United States Army and Navy, the
Adjutant General and other officers of the Florida Na-
tional Guard, and the American Legion, and city and
county officials of Florida.
10:00 A. M.-Concert by Port St. Joe High School Band at Cen-
tennial grounds.
10:30 A. M,-Parade from downtown district to Centennial
grounds made up of visiting military organizations, and
civic bodies. Music by bands.
11:00 A. M.-Official opening of the Centennial with a raising
of the national and state flags on the Centennial Build-
ing under':the auspices of the American Legion, followed
by an address of welcome by Hon. J. L. Sharit, General
Chairman of the Centennial Committee. Other addresses
will be made from the outdoor stage in front of Centen-
nial building by United States Senator Claude Pepper,
and R. J. Dill, State Administrator WPA, on the im-
portance of the occasion in the light of history.
1:00 P. M.-Luncheon tendered visiting dignitaries by the Cen-
tennial Committee, Hon. W. T. Edwards presiding.
2:00 P. M.-Band concert on Centennial grounds.
2:30 P. M.-Centennial free circus; on grounds.
3:00 P. M.-Horse racing, race track east of Centennial grounds.
4:00 P. M.-Personally conducted tour through St. Joe Paper
Mill.
7:00 P. M.-Band concert on Centennial grounds.
7:30 P. M.-Centennial free circus.
8:00 P. M.-Fireworks. display in front of grandstand on race
track near Centennial grounds.
9:30 P. M.-Dancing in Centennial building. Tickets $1.10 per
couple.
Amusement Zone Will Be Open All Day From 10:00 A. M. Until
Midnight. Splendid Exhibits In Main Building.

Governor's Day
Thursday, December 8, 1938
Guests of Honor:
His Excellency, the Governor of Florida, Members of his
Cabinet and Staff, and officers and members of Lion's
Clubs from all over Florida.
9:00 A. M.-Trap and Skeet shooting near Centennial grounds.
10:00 A. M.-Band concerts in downtown area and at Centennial
grounds. /
11:00 A. M.-Visitors will be welcomed by the Hon. J. L. Sharit,
General Chairman. Addresses will be made by Hon. R.
H,. Chapman, Justice of the Florida Supreme Court
Hon. D. Stuart Gillis, President of the Florida State
Senate; Hon. W. McL. Christie, Speaker of the Florida
House of Representatives; Hon. Nathan Mayo, Commis-
sioner of Arriculture; Hon. Arthur Hale, Chairman State
Road Department, and former Governor Doyle E. Carlton.
1:45 P. M.-Luncheon for guests of honor, Hon. B. W. Eells,
Vice-Chairman, Centennial Commission, presiding.
1:45 P. M.-Luncheon for visiting Lions at High School eco-
nomics room, D. G. McPherson, President local club, pre-
siding. Principal address made by Joe, Tarrantino,
Governor of the Florida District.
2:00 P. M.-Band concerts at Centennial grounds.
2:30 P. M.-Centennial free circus.
3:00 P. M.-Horse racing at track east of Monument Park.
4:00 P. M.-Personally conducted tour through St. Joe Paper
Mill.
7:30 P. M.-Centennial free circus.
8:00 P. M.-Fireworks display in front of grandstand on race
track east of Monument Park, closing with special set
piece, the Florida State Flag.
9:30 P. M.-Dancing in Centennial building. Tickets $1.10 per
couple.
Amusement Zone Will Be Open All Day From 10:00 A. M. Until
Midnight. Splendid Exhibits In Main Building.

Education Day
Friday, December 9, 1938
Guests of Honor:
State Superintendent Public Instruction, County Superin-
tendents of Public Instruction, Boards of Education,
President of the Florida Education Association, President
of the mid-West Florida Education Association, and
teachers and pupils from all Florida's schools.
9:00 A. M.-Trap and Skeet shooting near Centennial grounds.
10:00 A. M.-Concert by High School Bands at Centennial grounds,
11:00 A. M.-Exercises at Centennial grounds on open air stage,
Hon. E. Clay Lewis, Jr., presiding. Addresses by Hon.


Turner Butler, Hon.-G. Pierce Wood, and Hon. John T.
Alsop, former Mayor of Jacksonville, on the subject of
"Patriotism." Following the address of Mr. Alsop, the
meeting will be turned over to the mid-West Florida
Education Association, under the direction of President
George Atkins, who will introduce President T. D. Bailey
of the Florida Education Association, who in turn will
introduce Hon. Colin English, State Superintendent of
Public Instruction, who will address the audience, includ-
ing- visiting teachers. In view of the fact that the day is
being celebrated as EDUCATION DAY with many educa-
tors and students in attendance, Mr. English will discuss
the progress made by the public school system of the
state and of the nation during the past 100 years.
Noon-Parade of decorated historical, allegorical and industrial
floats through'business and residential areas of the city,
thence to Centennial grounds, where it will be reviewed.
1:00 P. M.-Luncheon for visiting teachers..and school officials
in home economics room, Port St. Joe High School,
followed by a business session of the mid-West Florida
Education Association in the High School auditorium.
1:00 P. M.-Luncheon for visiting dignitaries, Hon. G. Pierce
Wood, presiding.
2:00 P. M.-Band concert Centennial grounds with bands from
Chipley, Panama City, Port St. Joe, and other Florida
points participating.
2:30 P. M.-Centennial Free Circus.
3:00 P. M.-Concert from open air stage by Glee Clubs from
Chipley and Panama City, with 200 voices.
3:00 P. M.-Horse racing at track near Centennial grounds.
4:00 P. M.-Personally conducted tour of St. Joe Paper Mill.
7:30 P. M.-Centennial free circus.
8:15 P. M.-Fireworks. in front of grandstand at race track.
10:00 P. M.-Dancing in Centennial building. Admission $1.10
per couple.
'Amusement Zone Will Be Open All Day from 10:00 A. M. Until
Midnight. Splendid Exhibits In Main Building.,

Constitution Day
Saturday, December 10, 1938
Guests-of Honor:
Officials of the Daughters of the American Revolution,
and all other patriotic organizations and historical so-
cieties and associations.
10 A. M.-Band concerts in downtown district and at Centennial
grounds.
11:00 A. M.-Constitution Day exercises on outdoor stage on
Centennial grounds. Addresses by Hon. George Couper
Gibbs, Attorney General of Florida, reviewing the history
of Florida's state constitution during the past 100 years;
Hon. Spessard L. Holland, State Senator, discussing the
historical significance of the Centennial celebration, and
Mrs. E. M. Brevard, State Regent D. A. R., on the de-
velopment of Patriotic organizations during the past
century. Hon. Millard Caldwell, Hon. J. Hardin Peter-
son, Hon. Mark Wilcox, Hon. R. A. Green, and Hon. Joe
Hendricks, members of the Florida delegation in the na-
tional congress; Hon. Earl W. Brown, Vice-President
aid General Manager of Florida National Exhibits; Hon.
F. W. Hoskins, Historian; Hon. J. C. Yonge, of the State
Historical Society; Senator Homer Lee Oliver, Apalachi-
cola, and others will be presented and respond briefly.
1:45 P. M.-Luncheon tendered guests of honor and other dig-
nitaries by city government of Port St. Joe, Hon. J. L.
Sharit, Mayor of Port St. Joe, presiding. The famous
Orange Blossom Quartet will sing at this luncheon.
2:00 P. M.-Centennial free circus.
2:30 P. M.-Concert on Centennial grounds with Florida A. and
M. Band and Glee Club participating.
3:00 P. M.-Football on gridiron in front of grandstand at race
tradk with bands to aid cheer leaders.
4:00 P; M.--Massed band concert with bands from DeFuniak
Springs, Tallahassee, and Port St. Joe participating.
4:00 P. M.-Personally conducted tour of St. Joe Paper Mill
for guests of honor."
7:30 P. M.--Centennial free circus.
8:00 P. M.-Presentation of a brilliantly illuminated pageant on
wheels made up of twenty beautifully decorated floats,
depicting episodes in the history of Florida and the In-
dustrial development of the state during the past 100
years.
9:30 P. M.-Fireworks display featuring special set pieces as a
grand finale in front of grandstand at race track.
1000 P. M.-Grand ball in Centennial building with spectacular
floor show during intermissions. Admission $2.20 per
couple.
Amusement Zone Will Be Open All Day from 10:00 A. M. Until
Midnight. Splendid Exhibits In Main Building.


STAGE SET FOR CENTENNIAL

(Continued from Page 1)
Joe, Chipley, Panama City, De-
Funiak Springs and possibly Pen-
sacolA high school bands, and the
famous band from the Florida Ag-
ricultural and Mechanical College
at Tallahassee
In addition to the instrumental
music, there will be concerts by
tue giee clubs trom the Chiplr'
and Panama City high schools,
with 100 voices each, and by Le
famous Orange Blossom Quaftet
from Florida A. & M. at Tallfas-
see.
Dance Committeed
A committee composed of H. D.
Marks, L. E. Robertson and H. H.
Saunters will have charge of the
dance program each of the four
nights of the celebration. They
will be assisted in the reception of
guests and the management of the
affair by the committee of spon-
sors for each evening. The ladies
named were selected by the Port
St. Joe Woman's club as follows:
Wednesday Evening. December
7-Mrs. B. W. Eells, Mrs. E. Clayj
Lewis, Jr., Mrs. A. J. Navarre, Mrs.
C. E. Boyer, Mrs. J. B. Gloekler,
Mrs. H. A. Kidd, Mrs. A. L. Ward.
Thursday Evening, December 8
-Mrs. N. Comforter, Mrs. W. E.
Bragg, Mrs. Ira Best, Mrs. Chester-
Edwards, Mrs. Jesse Smith, Mrs.
Joe Mira,.Mrs. Richard Miller.
Friday Evening, December 9-
Mrs. A. D. Lawson, Mrs. C. A. Le-
Hardy, Mrs. B. D. Smith, Mrs. H.
A. Drake, Mrs. H. S. Lillius, Mrs.
Horace Soule.
Saturday Evening December 10
-Mrs. D. C. Mahon, Mrs. L. E.
Robertson, Mrs. R. E. Bellows,
Mrs. D. L. Owens, Mrs. Ross Wat-
son, Mrs. C. P. VanHorn, Mrs.
Richard Porter.
Striking Floor Show
A striking feature of the Satur-
day night dance will be a series
of floor shows by a double quartet
of young ladies from the -Florida
State College for Women at Talla-
hassee, who will present in period
costume the dances of a century
ago, such as the minuet, the
lancers and the Virginia reel. The
costumes will) be elaborate and.
will come from a famous costumer
in Philadelphia, the Van Horn's.
These dances will be conducted
under the direction of Miss Kath-
erine Montgomery, physical direc-
tor of F. S. C. W.
Really one of the biggest, fea-
tures of the entire festival will be
the parade of lighted allegorical
and historical floats Saturday eve-
ning through the streets of the
city. These floats are similar to
those used at the Gasparilla Fete
in Tampa and the Mardi Gras cele-
bration in New Orleans and will
be well worth coming hundreds of
miles to see. They will depict the
history of St. Joseph and Port St.
Joe from early Indian days up to
the present time.
Fireworks Every Night
The fireworks displays for 'the
four nights of the celebration will
be surpassed in splendor only by
those at the Florida State Fair in
Tampa and the, Florida Orange
Festival at Winter Haven, accord-
ing to the fireworks men who will
arect the elaborate set pieces.
Each night's show will be culmi-
nated with a set piece of special
eair'e, all calculated to em-
phasize the glamour which legend
,,..icnes to old St. Joseph.
The city is on its toes, literacy
and figuratively speaking, invIpep-
aring for the Centennial, and it
will not be for lack of effort if
everything does not work out ac-
cording to schedule.
-4 --
E, C. PRIDGEON HOME
IS DAMAGED BY FIRE

The home of E. C. Pridgeon on
Long avenue was badly damaged
by fire Tuesday when an oil
heater exploded. Damage was es-
timated by Chief Troy Jones at
approximately $300.
The fire truck was called out
crier the same day to extinguish
a brush fire at the corner of Long
avenue and Sixteenth street.
___-K~------
Much Material Omitted

Many articles and any number
of pictures were omitted from this
special edition of The. Star due to
lack of space. They will be used
in the next and followTng issues.

Jane Lamar Bledsoe and Mildred
Maddox of Apalachicola were the
week-end guests of Tinka Marks.
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Ansley
and family of Calloway moved to
this city last Friday.
Mr. and Mrs. T. V. Westbrook
and two children, and Mr. and
Mrs. Shannon motored to Dothan
Thursday on business.
Mr. and Mrs. F. O. Allen spent
n,,ndav with Mr. and Mrs. Paul D.
.rMer.
Mrs. "W. M. Howell motored to
i-palachicola on business Monday.


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


PAGE SIX


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1938







FRIDAY,' DC B 2,9TH SR PR S. EFOI


GREETINGS FROM THE

Society Personals Churches
c.e rtil e
LANETA DAVIS, Editor

BAPTIST MISSIONARY ALLA MAE DARSEY IS E. D. RIVERS
SOCIETY IN MEETING HONORED WITH PARTY honored Committeemen
The Royal Service program was Alla Mae Darsey was honored Governor
rehearsed at the church Monday with a surprise party Tuesday
afternoon by the Martha Circle of evening at the home of her par- The following committee Novemb
the Baptist Missionary society in ents, Mr. and Mrs. J. i. Darsey, have been appointed to care for
joint meeting with all circles,Mrs. celebrating her seventeenth birth- the many activities during and Mr. W. Shelby Smith
A. E. McCaskey presiding and in day. Games were played and hot rior to the Centennial celebra-' Editor and Publisher The S
charge of the program for the af- chocolate and sandwiches served lion:
ternoon. ;- '" to the guests. Port St. Joe, Florida
Topic for the afternoon was Those enjoying the evening with Finance Committee
"China Sheaves With Rejoicing" Miss Darsey were the Misses Betty W. T. Edwards, Chairman My Dear Mr. Smith:
and the introduction was given by Marks, Kathleen Saunders, Doro- E. C. Lewis, Jr., Robert E. Be:- I am happy to notice that
Mrs. McCaskey. The devotional, thy Crockett, Elizabeth Bowman, lows, T. M. Schneider,, L. L. Mor- serving the signing of their
"The Sin of Not Praying," Psalms Myrt.e Whitaker, Marigene Smith, serving
99, 1st Samuel 12:19-23, was given Dorothy Bowman, Dorothy Tra- gan, B. W. Eells, R. R. Hodges, elaborate celebration in you
very impressively by Mrs. L. R. wick, Lillian Chancier, Betty Dar- B. A. Pridgeon, Dave Gaskin, J. R. It is quite well that in th
Holliday, followed with prayer by sey and Elaine Gore, and Ausley, r-Iunter, G. F. Kaser, C. G. Costin, other undesirable forms of
Mrs. McCaskey. The long view of Sioutemire, Dick Stepp, Winston N. Comforter, George Tapper, Sam t o to he rs
the study was given by Mrs. E. C. Jones and Jesse Darcey. mention to the stress which
Cason; the near view by Mrs. us.band. the government of our nat
Charles McClellan, and the view Reception Committee the government of our nat
beyond by Mrs. W. c. Pridgeon. H. D. Marks r., ChairmanConstitution is the safegua
W. Sisemore for a speedy end of The Tattler .C. Maomoho, T. H. .
he war in China. Dismissal was ew of Port St. Joe High SooMiller, W. W. Barrier, H. H. Saun- ou r government, both nation
thtew of Port St. Joe High School some for our people to takc
given by Mrs. J. O. Baggett. ders, W. T. Edwards, G. Pierce stitutions by which they are
This program led up to the open- Wood, T. W. Wilson, T. R. L. Car- tutons whch are
ing of the week of prayer for for- they delegate all powers to
eign missions, November 28-De- (Editor's Note-Due to lack of ter, R. A. Dendy, W. Mrdock, they e powers to
member 2, and the first'service was pace we were compelled to .1. O. Baggett, M. Ross Watson,
rendered biy th 'Mary Circle with omit a large amount of school eorg Tapper Roy Conne I etend toou and to all
Mrs. 0. F. Powell in charges news, or which we are sorry.) George Tapper, Roy Connel:. I extend to you and to all ]

Mrs. F. Powell in charge. ews, for which we are sorry.) Committee success ofthe celebration,
MARSHMALLOW ROAST SHARKS DEFEATED BY B. W. Eells, Chairman way.
ENJOYED ON BEACH CARABELLE MULLETS Horace Soule, W. O0 Anderson,
Honoring Roy Gibson, who was M. K. Hurlbut, R. O. Roberts, T.
home for the Thanksgiving holi- rk tum M. Schneider, I. C. Nedley, H. D.
days, a number of the high school The St.r J Sharksr, G. erna, D. C. Ma-
crowd entertained with a marsh- from a 14-13 fighting lead at the Marks, Jr., L. G. Berna, D. C. Ma-
mallow roast on the beach directly half to a 27-14 defeat at the end hon, W. L. Gatlin, Mercer Spear,
in front of Monument Park last of the game last Friday with the M. C. Edwards, Tom Owens.
Saturday night. Upon arriving at Carrabel:e Mullets. Invitations Committee METHODIST C1IURCH
the appointed place, a Iarge bon- Starting lineup for the local sex- G. P iere Wo C harmttee METHODIT
fire was, built and games played, tette was as follows: Al Schnei- G. Pierce Wood, Chairman WILL BE FULL TIME
after which marshmallow roasting der, right end; Ed Hufft, center; J. H. Kelly, C. L. Morgan, W. S.
was enjoyed. Dick Stepp, eft end; Howard Smith, J. L. Kerr, H, A. Drake, Rev. D. E. Marietta, pastor of
A M S E ulback; Winston Jones lefthalf. L. W. Owens, H. H. Saunders, G. the Port St. Joe Methodist church,
FTINKA MARKS EFinal game of the season will be A. Patton, T. G. Alsobrook, Joe announces that the church will be
Honoring Jane Lamar Bledsleplayedtoday at the local ball park Hauser, M. R. Watson, George a fuil-time station in the future.
Honoring Jane Lamar Bledsle plye d Deo toda at thelocalball pak At the recent session of the
and .Mildred Maddox of Apaachf with the WewahitchkaDemons, Gore, S. C. Pridgeon, C. A. Tovey, Alabama Conference Rev. Marl-
cola, who were her guests for the and everyone is urged to attend R. A. Dendy. etta was reappointed as minister
holidays, Tinka Marks entertained a ro Publicity Committee of the local church.
a number of the junior high boys ARGE W. S. Smith. Chrman All Methodists and friends of the
and girls at the home of her par- BAND TO BE IN CHARGE Y Methodist church are cordially in-
entts on Garrison avenue last Sat- OF PROGRAM TODAY C.tF. Hanlon, Thorne Lane, Sam tdby t minister to attend
fitted by thne minister to attend
urday night. Games were enjoyed There was no chapel program EiI:s, H. K. Johnson, Kenneth the Sunday: school and worship
for some time, after which all last week due to the fact that lnger, J. H. Perry and Henry services.
were invited to the kitchen to school was closed Thursday anderr, n enr ere.
make candy. Friday. Today the band will be in Wrenn. .. -
Sj^e. -.. .- t Mr. and Mrs. Wavne Coasdill


Icharge of the program.
BRADY NELL ENTERTAINS I 1 71 SCHOOL
HIGH SCHOOL FRIENDS BUTTWO DAYSOF SCHO
Brady Nell entertained a group SCHEDULED NEXT WEEK
of high school boys and girls at There will be but two days of
the home of his parents on Hunt- school next week because of the
her's Circle last Friday night with Centennial Celebration December
a "prom" party. Dancing and 7 to 10.
proms were enjoyed, after which,
the crowd went to LeHardy's foun- BAND WORKING UNDER
tain for refreshments. TREMENDOUS STRAIN
SAI The high school band nas been
REV. MARIETTA TO REMAIN under a tremendous strain the
Rev. D. E. Marietta returned to past few weeks preparing for the
this city Monday from Auburn, forthcoming Centennial. The new
Ala., where he attended the South- uniforms have not arrived as yet,
ern Methodist Conference. He was but everyone is in hopes that they
returned to the Port St. Joe Meth. will be here in time.
odist church for another year, for The band is going to do every-
which the people of the city are thing possible to make this cele-
grateful. bration a huge success.
~~ n A A ------------------


spor ts a
Football-W.
Horse Racing


S. Mcin. returned to the city Sunday after
D. C. Mending several days in Tennes-
-D. C. Mahon. ee.
see.


GOVERNOR OF GEORGIA


leparfutmt
lanfa


er 25, 1938


Star


the people of Florida are ob-
r first Constitution with an
ir city.
is time of dictatorships and
government that we give at-
is placed on constitutions in
ion and of our states. The
rd of citizens' rights. It is
It is the very foundation of
lal and state, and it is whole-
a great interest in the con-
governed and through which
those public officials whom

Floridians my best wishes for
which is so worthy in every .


Sincerely yours,
E. D. RIVERS
Governor.


Mrs. F. G. Sharit and Mrs. F.
0. Allen of Apalachicola were visi-
tors yesterday of Mr. and Mrs.
Paul D. Farmer.


you
Are Always Wanted and
WELCOME
at the

METHODIST

CHURCH
PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


Roselle "Mickey" Stone returned METHODIST CHURCH
Sunday to the University of Flor- D. E. Marietta, Minister
id. matter spending tue holidays Services Every Sunday
iere with his parents, Mr. and 10:00 a. m.-Churca School.
.Mrs. T. H. Stone. 11:00 a. m.-Morning worshi]
Roy Gibson, Jr., returned to 7:30 p.,m.-Evening worship
Barnesville, Ga., Sunday where he
is attending school, after spending W. M. Howell is attending
the Thanksgiving holiday in this Ford school in Jacksonville
city as the guest of his parents will be absent from the city
Mr. and Mrs. B. R. Gibson, Sr. several days.


ALL THAT REMAINS OF OLD CITY OF ST. JOSEPH "


FLORIDA AND PORT ST. JOE UPON THE 100TH
ANNIVERSARY OF THE FIRST CONSTITUTION


LET US PROVE TO YOU
Our Prices Are Lower!
e Our Terms Easier!
Our Assortments More Complete!
A Visit To Our Store Will PROVE These FACTS!
BEDROOM SUITES
LIVING ROOM SUITES
DINING ROOM SUITES
At All Prices To Suit Every Customer

COME IN TODAY
QUALITY CONSIDERED WE ARE NEVER


One of a number of tombs in the cemetery which is all that re-
mains of the ancient city of St. Joseph. These were built of brick
brought as ballast in the sailing ships that called at the old port
from Europe. All have been looted by vandals searching, for gold
and jewelry and the bones of the occupants scattered to the four
points of the compass. -Star Photo.


UNDERSOLD


DANLEY FURNITURE COMPANY

Gulf County's Oldest and Largest Home Furnishers


"Where Your Credit Is Good"


p.
P.


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


21;1 al "t om M-: =ldA.W~
)L A o y,, ('l~l~ C


Vo- 'elk


FRIDAY, DECEMBSER 2, 1938


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


PAGE SEVEN


GREETINGS





PAG HES. FO AEEME ,13


R. A. GRAY
Secretary of State


GOVERNOR FRED P. CONE


GEORGE COUPER GIBBS
State Attorney General


COLIN ENGLISH T. V. KNOTT
Superintendent of Public '
instruction State Treasurer
Instruction ;, **'


To


JERRY W. CARTER
NATHAN MAYO Chairman
Commissioner of Agriculture State Railroad Commission


Those Who Have Gone


Before


We present


officials feel that the time is appropriate and the occasion


fitting to commemorate in revived memory the deeds of those in our


who 100 years


ago and less, fought for and


achieved


things


which make the march of progress a little more definite a little
less wearisome.
Those who served Florida in official capacity or in the leadership of
citizenry, are as torches by which our feet are guided in the admin-
istration of the present-day problems which confront Florida and the
great united commonwealth of our nation.


We Look to the Past for Our


Lessons---to


the


Future for Our Objectives


State


'p sc r -~


THE STA*N, PORT-. ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1938


PAGE EIGHT








ffIflAV DEEBR2 98TE-TR OITS.JE LRD AENN


The St. Joseph

Convention

(Continued from Page 1)
such a gathering, but the people
began to make great preparations.
A number of new hotels and
.boarding houses were built, and a
large hall erected for use of the
convention.
The St. Joseph Times had this
to say of the hall:
Convention Hall, a building
well situated to the purpose for
which it is intended, is nearly
completed, and will be ready for



I GULF SEAFOODS
SFresh Shipments Daily
We Carry a Complete Line of
All Sea Foods
I4
OYSTERS MULLET
SCALLOPS SHRIMP
FLOUNDER
BLUE FISH FRESH ROE
TROiUT
So4
CLYDE JONES, Prp.


We Stock the Finest

LIQU RS
At Price* Ye Can Affwd

We Have JuHl t istatled A
NEW SNOOKER TABLE
S-come In and Enjoy a -Fe
m:... er of P.ol


LeHARDYBAR
and BILLIARD PARLOR
.FRANK LeHARDY, Prop.


--Why Not YOU, Too?
Enjoy a daya Fishing and
Picnic Dinner at

MIDWAY PARK
SOn Famous DEAD LAKES
Our BOATS are New, Dry
and Kept Clean, Our
CABINS are .New, with New
Beds and Furnslhings.
This FRIENDLY CAMP ils
Midway of the Lakes, at the
County Line, where your
Visit is Appreciated
B. F. CROCKER, Owner
Poetoffice Address
WEWAHITCHKA, LA.


Best for Purity, Quality
and Taste

PURITY IS

ASSURED!





4



Even the
-I
Cows Are
Tested

Use Only

,SOLOMON' S'

: Pasteurized

MILK


Pasteurized for Your
Protection
*-


occupancy at the appointed time.
Ample arrangements will be
made in the town for the ac-,
commodation of members and
strangers during the sitting of
the Convention.
Among the new hotels built
were the Byron, Pickwick, Fon,
taine, Mansion House, Shakespeare
and German Ocean House. These
were all high-sounding names, but
we have no record as to the lux-
uriousness of their accommoda-
tions.
In addition, transportation ar-
rangements were made by land
and water. Vessels were put into
service on the Gulf and on the
Apalachicola river andi a stage
line established to make two
trips a week from Apalachicola to
St. Joseph.
Great Day Arrives
The great day arrived, and on
December 3, 1838, Mr. Bartlett,
editor of the Apalachicola Ga-
zette, and a delegate to the con-
vention,. described the scene as
follows
The city of the Saints presented
quite a hustling appearance this
morning. Most at the members of
the constitutional convention have
come In and may be seen at dif-
fereni corners Of the streets, on
the plazaas of the boarding houses
or perhaps at the Pickwick,
Shakespeare, or Pyrom, earnestly
and solemnly engaged in elec-
tloneering for the important offl-
cea of president, clerk or door-
.keeper of the convention. Great
importance is attached to those
posts.of honor, and the fate of the
future State, the lustreothe new
star, mainly depends upon the jo-
dicious choosing of the different
occupants.
For President of -the convention,
I have heard of but two. candi-
dates announced-Gov. Duval of
Tallahassee, an4 Jiidge Reld, of
St. Augustine. It wou:d be prema-
ture, at this time, to- decide' lt
whose favor the .majorlty:;of the
convention will decide. As usual in
such cases, the friends of' both
parties are sanguine.
At 12 m.' the members assembled
in the new building, erected for
the use of the convention by that
enterprising citizen of the city,
Col. E. J. Wood, and proceeded to
the organization of their body by
calling. Col. Morton, of Escambla,
to the chair, and appointing Col.
Fitzpatrick secretary.
Following completion of the
temporary organization, the roll
was called from the proclamation
of Acting Governor John P. Du-
val, as follows:
MIDDLE DISTRICT
County o IT on
.,'Gebrge T. Ward, Samuel Park-
hill, Jaines D. Westcott, Jr., Leslie
A. ,Thompsdn, John. aylor, Leigh
Read, Thomas Brown, Wm. Wyatt.
County of Gadsden
Banks Meacham, John W. Ma-
lone, Samuel B. Stephens, John
M. G. Hunter.
County of Jefferson
Abraham Bellamy, Joseph.' M.
McCants, John M. Partridge, Ed-
ward', Carrington Cabell.
County of Madison
John C. McGehee, Richard J.
Mays.
County of Hamilton
Joseph, B. Watts, William Bi
Hooker.
EASTiRN DISTRICT
County of St. John
Robert Raymond Reid, Joseph
,S. Sanchez' David Levy, Edwin T.
Jenckes.
County of Daval
A.W. Crichton, 'SamUel T. Garey.
Oliver Wood. ,
County of. Columbia
George E. McClellan, WSilson
Brooks, John F. Webb.
County of Alachua
Isaac Garrison, E. Bird, E. K.
White.
County of Waspan
William Haddock, James 0.
Cooper.
County 'of Mosquito
Willllam H. Williams.
County of Hillsborough.
No returns.
SOUTHERN DISTRICT
County of Monroe
Joseph B. Brown, William Mar-
:vin.
County of Dade ,
Richard Fitzpatrick.
WESTERN DISTRICT
County of Jackson
Thomas Baltzell, Alfred L. Wood-
ward, Richard' H. Long, Samuel C.
Bellamy.
County of Escambia
Jackson Morton, Benjamin D.
Wright, Walker Anderson, Thomas
M. Blount.
County of Walton
John L. McKinnon, Daniel, G.
McLean. .i. :
(Continue- f.i_ Eg ) ....


i


Name of odges

Is Well Known In

Lumber Circles

R. R. Hodges, Owner of Mill Here,
Is Son of Lumberman And Is.
Well-Known In Florida

The name of Hodges in connec-
tion with the lumber industry is
well known throughout this sec-
tion of the South. R. R. Hodges,
owner of the Hodges Lumber Com-
pany in Port St. Joe, has been
connected, with the lumber indus-
try practically all his life, having
started in the business-in a lum-
ber company founded by his
father 50 years ago. Mr. Hodges
owns and operates the Hodges
Lumber Company in Marianna,
which' was established in 1929, in
addition to the mill in this city,
which was established in 1936.
The Hodges Lumber Company
is distinguished by their popular
slogan, "Better Lumber for Better
'Homes." They are wel-kinown
throughout our section as undis-
puted leaders in the lumber indus-
try..
This company is always eager
and willing to give advice to any,
one contemplating building. They.
hare aided materlaly in enhanc-
ing the value Of the propirtles of
their cUents who consult them be-
fore building. This service has e.-
phaisized itself in the satisfied
customers who point with pride to
the charm and' wram beauty of
their homes 'affordidb by consulta-
tioh with Mr. Hodges and his
staff.
The: officals~of, the-Hodges..Lum-j
ber Coimpany' are always 'iii
to confer with anyone on building
problems and make suggestions
relative to materials best suited
for the project under considera-
tion.

FIRST CONSTITUTION
WAS MORE ADVANCED
THAN LATER ONES

In some respects the constitu-
tion drawn up at old St. Joseph
was more advanced than some of
the later ones. Perpetuities and
monopolies :were disapproved; the
collection of. more revenue than
was required for necessary govern-
mental :xpenses was -expressly
forbidden;:the creation and opera-
tion of banking and other corpora-
tions. were limited and regulated.

O, CALM THOSEI BY USINGo
NERVES, .DOCTOR'
BE SWEET- MILES'
SErtENE NERVINE


PHONE 70


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


~- ---L------ ----*I- -10


NATURAL GAS SERVICE

INow Ready for Every House In

Port St. Joe

C OOK ING WATER iHEATiQG
REFRIGERATION HOUSE HEATING
Q.------------ *

NO EQUIPMENT TO BUY
NO DEPOSIT REQURkW
JUST PAY FOR YOUR CAS

-4 4 A full line of gas app iances in sai ck j~-e
RITZ THEATER BUILOLiNQ
'Phone 168
PANAMA CITY


SOUTHERN UQUID GAS':CO.
YOUR GAS COMPANY SINCE 1932


IfT not, make it certain.
r Provide security for your .. i
self and family. -See our
S. local agent ori rite
M41 .. -.


YOUR BANK


Can you afford to k
NERVO U S?
Perhaps you could afford
those attacks of Nerves if you
were the only one affected.
Tensb nerves make you a nui-
sance to everyone with whom
you -omi..t. contact, No am
ke when you are jumy
irritabe and nervous.
M DR MILES' 1
ERVINL
DR. MIES NERVINE as
been recognized as effective-for
more than 60 years by sufferers
from -ieeplessomi Nweous Ir-
rabilityd, Nervous Headache
.Nervous Indigestio, Travel
Sclkness.
LIQUID NERVINE
Large btl. 1.00, Small btl. 25
EFFERVESCENT TABLETS
'Large pkg. 75, Small pkg. 3W
At your drug store


Extends congratulations to Port St. Joe and
the great. Commonwealth of Florida upon
the 100th Anniversary of the drawing up of
the State's First Constitution at old St.
Joseph in 1838.
We Offer a. Complete

COUNTY-WIDE BANKING SERVICE
Accounts of Individuals and Firms
Respectfully Solicited
We Promise 'Faithful, Courteous and Com-
prehensive Service


Wewahitchka State Bank
"A County Landmark"
WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA

Member: Federal Deposit Insurance
Corporation .


In fact, in the 1838 convention, as 'Some :provisions were archaic.
it had 'been and was''later in the Ministers of the gospel were for-
territorial council, that was the bidden to hold an executive or
subject of the. sharpest .division of legislative office, nor was an offi-
opinion and the greatest contro- cer of a bank eligible; only male
versy. Legislative divorces, which freemen had a right to vote and
had often been granted by the to keep and bear arms for the
council heretofore, were forbidden. common defense.


4
WE HAUL ANYTHING-

CALL US FOR LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING
WE HAVE GOOD CLEAN BUILDING SAND FOR SALE
Prompt and Efficient Service Always

C. W. HORTON


I


"THE STAR, -PORT;ST. -JOE,, FLORIDA


PAGE NINE


FRIDAY.- DECEMBER -2, 1938








I E 1


The St. Joseph


Convention

(Continued from Page 9)
County of Washington
Stephen J. Roche, E. Robbins.
County of Franklin
A. G. Semmes, Cosam Emir
Bartlett.
County of Calhoun
William P. Duval, Richard C.
Allen. '
But 55 delegates are accounted
for in the proclamation, but on
December 17, William Bunce ap-
peared as a delegate from Hills-
borough county and was seated,
thus accounting for the full num-
ber of 56 delegates, as provided
for by the law.
At the first roll call all were
present except Wyatt, McGehee,
Mays, Cooper, Brown, Blount, An-
derson, Wright and Semmes.
On the second day (Tuesday,
December 4, 1838) a resolution
was made that the convention pro-
ceed with the election of a presi-.
dent and that a majority of the
votes of all the members be neces-
sary for a choice.
Gen. Parkhill of Leon nomi-
nated William P. Duval for presi-
dent. He was backed up by Gen.
Brown of Leon.
Gen. Read of Leon nominated
Raymond -Reid .of St.- Augustine
for the presidency,' i nd Mr. West-
cott of Leon also '.Adectared his
preference for Judge Reid.
Reid. Elected- President
Thereupon Mr. Bellamy' moved
that the convention proceed with
the election. The vote was taken,
viva voce, and on the first ballot
Robert Raymond, Reid received 27
votes and William P. Duval 26-
votes, whereupon Mr. Baltzell of.
Jackson county introduced the
following, resolution:
Resolved, That Robert Ray-
mond Reid is duly elected presi-
eit of this Convention..
Election of a secretary was
.next. in-.order,.,and a sergeant-at-
arms, -Joshuia Knowles of Talla-
aSsee received 33 votes, and J.
S. Robinson .-"2 votes .for secre-
itary, and ,Knowles was' declared
elected. Alexander Stewart of St.
Joseph was chosen for the -posi-
Stion of sergeant-at-arms.
The remainder of the first week,
following election of Mr. Reid, was
'devoted. to the passage of resolu-
tions, appointment of committees
and -waiting for reports.
On Thursday,. December 6, a
evolutionn was adopted appointing
a committee to rind a suitable
meeting .place. for the convention,
and .on December 7 a. resolution
allowing $1000 to the citizens of
St. Joseph for use of Convention
Hall was passed.
Reid Tenders Resignation
Between adjournment of the
convention on December 7 and the
following Monday, the question
arose as to who had been elected
as delegate from Hills-borough
county. The governor's proclama-
tion stated no returns had been
received. So, on Monday, when
the convention opened, President
Reid tendered, his resignation as
presiding officer, stating t hat
since he had been elected by a
majority of one vote, that of Mr.
Cooley from Hillsborough county,
whose vote was given by proxy
in his favor, he did not feel .that
he should continue to hold the of-
fice.
The chair was declared vacant
and Mr. Brown of Leon was called
to preside pro tem. A move was
made that a president be'elected,
and Mr. Duval nominated Reid.
Upon count of the vote, Reid was
declared unanimously elected.
The greatest hinderance to the
drawing up of a constitution was
the bank and anti-bank factions.
At this time this was the prevail-
ing issue in the territory. The
action of the convention was
looked to as determining the fate
of the banking houses, then in
full vigor and influence in Florida,
and deciding the question of as-


cendancy of the two parties.
The two interests were about
evenly balanced in the convention
and the culmination of the fight
was the adoption of Article XIII
on Banks' and Other Corporations,
Section 13, namely:
The General Assembly shall not
pledge the faith and credit of the
State to raise funds in aid of any
corporation whatsoever.
And also section 14:
The General Assembly shall, at
its first session, have power to
regulate, restrain and control, all
associations claiming to exercise
corporate privileges in the State,
so as to guard, .protect and secure
the interests of the people of the
State, not violating vested, rights
or impairing the obligation of con-
tracts.
At this time the members were
diminishing in. numbers and it
was feared the object for which
they had gathered might not be
accomplished.
The long drawn out convention
at last drew. to a close. Differ-
ences of opinion on the various
articles of the constitution were
adjusted and the completed docu-
ment was ready for submission.
Constitution Submitted to Vote
On Friday, January 11, 1839, af-
ter nearly,six weeks of heated de-
bate- and. many. changes, the con-
stitution was placed before"'the
convention for final passage.: A
vote.was called for and out o'f:the,
,6 delegates, but one, Riehard
FitpatriC'k voted against its' ac-
ceptance. -
Whereupon President Reid arose
and said:
"I solemnly proclaim and" de-
clare this to be the Constitiftion
of the State of Florida." '"
The gathering, then adjourned,
to meet in the evening for signing
of the historic document.
When the members recongned
on the evening of Friday, Jaruary
11, 1839, the constitution was pre-
sented to .Reid for his signature,
after which the delegates remain-
ing 1 affixed, their signatures, as
follows:
Rober.t Raymond. Reid,. President
Walker Anderson; John L; McKin-
non, Daniel G. McLean, Stephen
G. Roche, E. Robbins; Cosam Emir
Bartlett, Thomas Baltzell, Samuel
0-.. Bellamy, -Alfred L. Woodward,
Richard.- H." Long, R. C. Allen,
Banks Meacham, John W. Malone,
George T. Ward, W. Wyatt, James
D. Weetcott,-Jr., 'Leigh Read, E.
Cariflngton Cabell, J. M. McCants,
1John C. McGehee, Joseph B. Watts,
William B. Hooker, Wilsorf Brooks,
George E. McClellan, John F.
Webb, I. Garrison, E. K. White, A.
W. Crichton, Oliver Wood, Wm:
Haddock, Jose Simeon Sanchez,
Edwin T. Jenckes, David Levy, W.
H. Williams, A. Bellamy, John W.
Partridge, William Bunce, William
Marvin, J. B. Brown, Edmund
Bird.
Joshua. Knowles, Secretary.
Closing Scene
A writer in the Florida Watch-
man of January 19 following, de-
scribes the closing scenes of the
convention as follows:
It was one of deep and thrilling
interest-one well "' aldulated to
awaken .the sensibilities of all
present. Upon the final' passage
of the Constitution, though the
Convention Hall was crowded, a
'"Pn and perfect silence rested
upon the audience. The instru-
ment was first presented to the
president for his signature, after
which the members, one by one,
came forward in a solemn manner
and signed their names. It was
then presented to the president
or safekeeping. Mr. Marvin was
then called to the chair, and a
resolution approving of the impar-
tial and dignified course of the
presiding officer was introduced
by Mr. Anderson, of Escambia, fol-
lowed by a chaSte and compli-
mentary address, after which the
president -resumed his seat, and,
in his usual happy style, replied
to the sentiments contained in the
resolution. The Chaplain then
closed -the proceedings with
prayer.
The scene was one that we shall
never forget. It was one of moral
grandeur, well calculated to infuse
into ever person the mpst ar-
dent feelings of patriotism.
A vote of thanks was given to
Reid for the dignity, ability and
impartiality with which he had
presided over the deliberations of
the assembly, and upon resuming
the chair, Reid' expressed himself
as deeply gratified with the result
: = ;; ..


Chief of Police Troy Jones, who
with his aides, will keep order
in the city during the Centennal



CLASSIFIED ADS

FOR RENT

UN PURNISfIED 9 by 18-foot cab-
ins; ceiied overhead and sides;
good water; $6 month. Apply St.
SJoe Lumber Co. 12121tf
FOUR-ROOM house in Oak Grove
Subdivision; $20 month. Lights
and water included;. See W. L.
Bragg. ll-18tf


Services Offered
ELECTRIC WIdNG-In all Its
branches, reasonable. Fixtures
and Fans. Repairs
HENDERSON ELECTRIC
COMPANY Port St. Joe
'lome Office, Apalachicol. .ox 313


of the convention, stating, in part:
I congratulate 'you, and the
country, fellow -citizens, upon the
work you halve accomplished, and
when the obstacles and embarrass-
ments by which you have been op-
posed are remembered, your for-
titude, your .eal, your untiring
industry cannot be sufficiently ad-
mired.
We met here surrounded by dif-
ficulties; -. we were with-
out books for the models of con-
stitutional legislation; .. we
were dependent, almost entirely,
upon memory.
But nobly and faithfully have
you performed your duty; .
I am aware there is no one in the
convention who can say of that
instrument which lies before me,
that it contains no line which, dy-
ing, he could wish to blot. No,
the constitution is imperfect, but
was it ever otherwise with the
production of even the highest
genius, or the strongest intellect?
The true question is, do not its
perfections far outweigh its de-
fects? What some consider imper-
fect, others deem excellent. But
all will, I think, agree that the'
work is more to be commended
than- condemned. .
We part, never, perhaps, to
meet again. May you return in
safety tot your homes and expect-
ant friends, cheered by the con-
sciousness of having .performed
your duty, and greeted by the ap-
probation of your constituents,-
that highest reward of the Ameri-
can citizen.
Fellow citizens, I tender to you
an affectionate farewell. May the
temple you have 'thlis day -rected
to liberty; long remain--the honor,
the safety, the protection of the
people of Florida.
Thereupon; on motion of Mr.
Martin, the proceedings of the"
convention were concluded with
prayer by the chaplain.. ,

EXPECT-TO START NEW
P. 0. BUILDING MONDAY

It is announced by members of
the building committee of the
Port St. Joe Masonic lodge that
work of moving the present build-
ing occupied by the postoffice
will begin Monday morning' and
that at the same time material for
construction of the new postoffice
building and lodge hall will be. on
the ground.

Paul J. Farmer spent the week-
end -in 'Apalachicola visiting his.
grandmother,. Mrs. F. G. Sharit.

IN CHARGE OF POLICING


W. V.'KNOTT
State Treasurer and Insurance
commissioner

rate reduction of 17'% Ier cent,
saving -thousands of. dollars in
premiums for Florida industry.
As a member of the board of
administration, the clerical- work
of which is carried on solely in
his" office as a separate depart-
ment, he is custodian of funds and
investments of Florida's 67 coun-
ties, for the retirement of road and
bridge bonded indebtedness. Since
the board's organization February
15, 1930, nearly $100,000,000 has
been received and handled by the
treasurer..
Serving as chairman of the Flor-


We often hear of the state treas-
urer aptly described as the "watch
dog of the treasury," but what of
the countless other duties and de-
partments about which little is
said?
As insurance commissioner, W.
V. Knott supervises operations of
400-odd insurance companies, col-
lecting taxes approximating $1,-
000,000 annually. These are the
only direct collections made by
the state treasurer. Having final
jurisdiction over workmen's com-
pensation insurance, Treasurer
Knott last May affected an overall


D. Stuart Gilis,- president of the
Florlda' stale senate, who is
scheduled -to speak on next
,Thursday's' Centennial program.


100 Years Ago-


the residents of old St. Joseph did not have the services
pf registered optometrists that are available to you today


Have Your Eyes Examined.:


NOW!


Dark winter days, artificial light
and enforced lack of exercise .
all result in an increased eyestrain
on the eyes. Before the activities
of spring and summer get under
way, have your eyes tested and
fitted by registered opticians.


ALL. STYLES


Gojaranteed
: Work


Offices Opposite City Hall
PANAMA CITY


FLORIDA


State Treasurer Is Busy Man


DRS. NEWBERRY

OPTOMETRISTS and OPTICIANS


ida Securities Commission since
its inception July 1 1931, Knott
passes upon licenses of securities
dealers and the, propriety of per-
mitting sales in Florida of stocks
and bonds. All clerical worse
this department is handledIn the
treasurer's office.
Knott, as ex-officio treiaurer of
the teachers' salary fun, actually
pays out to Florida teachers the
state's apportionment for iistruc-
tion and transportation. An entire
department of Knott's office is de-
voted to this work.
Treasurer Knott is physical cus-
todian of 167 funds and. State Au-
ditor Wainwright recently com-
mended the state treasurer for his
"efficient manner" in handling
over $78,000,000 for the twelve-
months period ending June 30,
1938.
Treasurer. Knott is an active
member of the following boards:
Education, Pensions, Commission-
ers of State Institutions, Budget
Commission, Okeechobee. F o d
Control District, Conservation, and
Trustee of Internll Improvement
Fund.

PRESIDENT OF SENATE
S : ..* .:: '. s


THE STAR. POq-T.ST. JOE, FLORIDA


PAGE TEN


FRIDAY, DECEMnBER 2, 1938








-. YDto Mt e. -9 ut He SA P T F


Up.o-the-Minute Businss Concerns Qperate In New City of Port St. Joe

SUWANNEE STORE IS BUSIEST GROCERY CONCERN IN CITY ST. JOE BAR IS FINEST IN THE CITY


Above is an interior view of the Suwannee Store located in Port St. Joe. This c
ern grocery store is under the management of George Hudson and the meat dep
rated by I. C. Nedley. The store does a rushing business, offering the best for tl
BAYSHORE GROCERY SUPPLIES HIGHLAND VIEW
.............. .......-; :


The St. Joe Bar and Billiard Par'or, owned and operated by Ed. George,
is the most modern and up.to-date in Port St. Joe and stocks at all
times a complete line of liquors, wines, cordials and beer. The slogan
of thte St. Joe Bar, "'Where Friends Gather," is well taken, for it is the
most.popular meeting place in the city. This establishment, with its
expert mixologists, undoubtedly will be a favorite gathering place dur-
ing the Centennial Celebration, and Mr. George extends a cordial wel-
come to visitors to drop in during their stay here for the Celebration.
Mr. George and his ass.'stants are well-versed in the science of mixing
lean and mod- drinks, and regardless of the type of drink you pre'er all you have to
artment is op- do is ask for it. and in a few moments it is served to you in a well
he lowest price frosted glass, mixed to perfection with the finest of ingredients.

ST. JOE LUMBER & EXPORT CO. MILL MEANS MUCH TO ST. JOE


12.1T.1~

,Sn 4.
r'.it i ''


The Bayshore Grocery and Market, located in Highland View,
just west of Port St. Joe, is operated by Mr. and Mrs. Fritz Chris
tianisen and stocks a complete line of nationally advertised gro-.
ceries and canned goods, the finest meats and fresh fruits and
vegetables in season.
MODERN PLANT SUPPLIES ICE FOR PORT ST. JOE


New, mill of the St. Joe Lumber .& Export Company, now under construction, located just outside
the city limits of Port,.St. Joe'on the recently-completed connecting: link which gives this city
S water connections ith, the intracoaswateraterway, which expects to begin operations shortly af-
te.r the first of the year. This. mill will employ bout 400 men and the payroll will add greatly to
the business life of,the city, The St. Joe Lumber & Export Company is assured of a long life, as it
S".-, -ee ,-f the largest timber holdings in the South with approximately 500,000,000 feet of timber
to draw from, principally long leaf pine and tide water red cypress, besides tupelo and other woods.

THOMPSON'S BAKERIES MODERN IN EVERY RESPECT
r' .. -, ,


I&AK ED I IEl


The St. Joe Ice Company. owned ar'd operated by Max Kilbourn,
s one of the most modern and up-to-date in P'orthwest Florida
.and is caoable of caring for the needs of Port St. Joe.for many
years to come. Their ice is made from pure tested water and, as
.Mr. Kilbourn says, "There is no substitute for. real ice."
PORT ST. JOE'S NEW HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING


recently completed to care for greatly increased enrollment


Thlompson's Bakeries,with plants in Port St. Joe and Apalachicola, is one of the most modern
in Northwest Florida and supplies this section with the finest bread, caker, pies and other pas-
tries. Above is a view of, tht bakery located in this city. It is equipped with the latest equip-
ment 'and Js oceann and sanitary i all respects.
S;' 1 .' : .;', '/ ". .


" 1


TH9 STAR, PORT',ST. ',IOE; FL6RIlDA


FRID.AY, DE~CEMMA 2~, 1038


PAGE ELEVEN


r .







PAGETWEVE HE SAR,~OR ST.JOE FLRIDA~'AOAY DECMBE 2,193


Top-Notch Program At

Port For Centennial Week


MYSTERY THRILLER, COMEDY
FEATURE AND WESTERN
ON FOUR-DAY BILL
Manager Roy Williams of the
Port theater states that he has' a
nice array of. pictures booked for
the week of the Centennial Cele-
bration, December 4 to 10.
Starting the week off, playing
Sunday and Monday, December 4
and 5, is "Suez," a truly great pic-
ture with Tyrone Power, Loretta
Young and Annabella as the fea-
tured players. This is an epic of
the screen and should be seen by
everyone.
The height of this picture was
reached with the terrifying black
simoon. Twisting, torturing, all-
destroying, the devil-wind of the
desert roars across the screen
with a savage fury that makes it
one of the most unforgettable
spectaces ever seen on the screen.
This wonderful picture has a sup-
porting cast of thousands.
"Ho!d That Co-Ed"
The year's swellest football
game is to be seen in "'Hold That
Co-Ed," playing at the Port for one
day only, Tuesday, December 6.
For those that tage their football
seriously, "Hold That Co-Ed" also
reveals some of the most genu-
inely exciting gridiron play ever
screened.. Joali Dav.!s is known as
the 'bnnly female fullback in the
worl'd-and you will howl at the
way sh.~wins the game in the last
minute." The cast includes John
Barrymore, George Murphy, Joan
Davis, Jack Haley, George Bar-
bier and Donald Meek. Also on
this program .as an added. attrac-
tion will be Floyd Gibbons and 'one
of his true adventures, "Identi-
h


fied." *
Mystery Thriller
"Sharpshooters," with Gloria
Stuart, Michael Whalen and Brian
Donlevy,'plays Wednesday' only,
December 7. This is a highly
recommended mystery thriller and
is packed with plenty of action.
A big double wedding will be
seen at the Port on Thursday, De-
'ember 8, as Errol Flynn and
Olivia DeHaviland a n Patric
Knowles and Rosalind Russell get


hitched in "Foir's a Crowd." 1'
This picture has but one objec-
tive-to make tle audience laugh.
It is up-to-the-minute comedy of
the American family. Also in the
cast are Hugh 'Woo-Woo" Herbert,
Melvin Cooper,' Dennie Moore and
Gloria Blondell. Also on this pro-
gram is latest 'ews events and a
cartoon.
"Mad Miss Manton," featuring
Henry Fonda and Barbara Stan-
wyck is scheduled for Friday, De-
cember 9, and Saturday will see
our old friend Buck Jones on the
screen in "Boss of Lonely Valley."
The late show Saturday night
will be Paul Kelley in "Adventure
In Sahara."


PLAYING AT PORT SUNDAY AND MONDAY


,~j ... .. .
-A
Tyrone Power, Loretta Young and,-Annabella as they appear in
"Suez," which plays at the Port theaterSunday and Monday


MARTIN,

THEATRES
WELCOMES YOU TO THE

Port ThatreN
THEATRE OPENS 1:45 P. 'M.


ROY E. WILLIAMS, Manager


SUNDAY-MONDAY DECEMBER 4 and 5


AGAINST A.HR


LATEST NEWS EVENTS


CARTOON


TUESDAY ONLY DECEMBER 6
SEE THE ONLY FEMALE FOOTBALL PLAYER IN ACTION,!!
.. [f 1 : r ( .'''


PORT THEATER ONE OF FINEST IN WEST FLORIDA


Z.V-. .. .

This is the Martin & 'Martin playhouse recently completed in Port
St. Joe. o furnish amusement for theater-goers.: "!t.fimodern in
every respect and has a seating capacity of 1200..,,The theater is
Under the capable management of: Roy.Williams.

Pulp woods, amounting to 1,582,- 'The U.. S. Bureau of Forestry, a
2i0 cords,, valued at $1717,7,489, division of the department of agr.i-
Were imported into 'the' United culture, was fobnded in 1901.
States for making paper in 1930. ------ -
Gulf county invites the entire
The milk of mammals contains wordd to come and prosper with
4 to 7 ,per cent sugar.. 'e peple.. .

We Extend Hearty Congratulations to the,

SFlorida Centennial

Celebration


1- ----------


Port Theatre-

Always Comfortable

MAKE YOUR HEADQUARTERS HERE

PH'O NE 109

FRIDAY ONLY DECEMBER 9

MYSTERY AND LOTS OF COMEDY
HENRY FONDAand BARBARA STANWYCK in

"MAD MISS,

MANTON"

Plus I'MARCH OF TIME"

SATURDAY ONLY DECEMBER 10


RoaAng

Six Guns,


Thundering

: Horses





"The Boss Of lonely Valley"
Chapter 1 of 'TRIP TO. MARS"

LATE SHOW 10:30 P. M.
PAUL KELLEY In
"ADVENTURE IN SAHARA"
A.


$ $ $ WEDNESDAY ONLY-DEC. 7' $ $ $
ACTION WITH THRILLS
BRIAN DONLEVY and:LYNN BARI in


The Sharpshooters


ATSO SPECIAL EVENTS ON THE STAGE
Charlie Chase in "NIGHT SHIRT BANDIT"


5


THE .STAR, POR*i ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, DltdI9M~llk 2, 1038


PAGE TWELVE


r grq-'~
7

ti ~
r,


?j:










SECTION TWO F
FLORIDA CONSTITUTION
CENTENNIAL EDITION


STAR


Published on the 100th
Anniversary of the Signing of
Florida's First Constitution
At Old St. Joseph In 1838


/

VOLUME II PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA,,DECEMBER 2, 1938 NUMBER 7



"Florida's Agricultural and Other Advantages


h


Marvelous Land Of Opportunity

Extends Welcoming Hand To All

Here the Home-Seeker Can Find His Goal, the Tourist His
Playground, the Invalid His Restoration, the Sportsman
His Rendezvous, the Yachtsman His Silvery Race
Track and the Citizen His Horn of Plenty


average
000.
Pr
With th
crease in
per from
feed from
factories,
fruits, als
ing mater
.sugar mil]
and othei


.Florida, with its progress in agriculture, manufacturing, in sugar
health, wealth, education and recreation, is indeed blessed ing, as wf
with a very favorable environment. It is destined to become products,
manufacture
an area of tremendous economic activity, amount t(
Florida is a finger of land 536 miles long, running down next five
into tropical seas, fanned by the cool breeze of the Gulf Our fis
Stream along its eastern' and southern shores, and splashed with bettt
by the waters of the Gulf of Mexico along its western shore ter plant
line where is located the site of the ancient city of St Joseph and great
where Florida's first constitution was drawn up and where, us an incc
from December 7 to 11, will be celebrated in Port St. Joe, Our phi
the coming industrial center of Northwest Florida, the Cen- minerals
tennial of this momentous
-event. The area of the state is,
in round numbers, 38,000,000. -
acres-35,000,000 acres in land P A1 I S
and 3.000,000 acres in water.
Its agricultural and horticultulral Ill
operations are scattered from the
Pordido river on its western bor-' G ES S
der, to the lime groves of Monroe
county. a distance via Alabama
anf, Georgia line and Atlantic
Ocean of 900 miles. !
92,681 Farms In State
There are 92,681 farms, accord-
ing to the 1937 report of the state
department of agriculture, which
are .steadily increasing. There are
on these farms more than 100
kinds of productive soils, on which
are growing practically every crop
known to temperate, semi-tropical
and tropical zones.
The total agricultural invest-
ment in Florida is 'approximately
$800,000.000. Florica producers in-
vest annually in its growing, pack-
ing and marketing operations,' $80,-
000,000. The agricultural income
increases approximately 10 per
cent.per annum. This means that
10 years hence, our farms and
grovs will yield us products
valued at more than $300,000,000. C itie an d
At the present time the income
-'rmo our agriculture is a little bet-
ter.than $100 per capital for our
entire population.
We export more than $100,000,.
000 worth of food products per an- of
num, andi import about $55,000,000 mi
worth; so we have a balance of or.
some $45,000,000 Total sale of all of
agricultural products amounts to tir
$150,000,000. F
Vast Undeveloped Business ul) J Ill du
Since Florida has. approximately !i loc
.10,000,000 acres of land suitable to 'tw
various kinds of farming,and ag- N. ian
riculture is the basis of our wealth l r '' n
we have vast undeveloped business Th
ahead in connection with our agri- ,I id
culture. to
We have abundant moisture,, .~ r Y 001
more sunshine than any other sec- ti fIl .
t ion of our country, claims of Cali-
fornia, notwithstanding, and more ti''
growing days. We are accessible i
to. the great consuming centers -
,.and can move our products by
rail, boat or motor truck. In fact,
we are in the happiest latitude and
longitude agriculturally, exactly Menger. federall eserve crystem and
p~a,llel with the land-that the (feral iefto.0nil nuranceO orfiorailon
Lord said should flow with milk
and honey.
Duringk-the past 10 years our
manufactured, products have had a
range in annual value of from as
low as $116,000,000 to as high as T H E O L D E S T
$267,000,000, or an approximate ..


annual value of $191,000,- $25,000,000 if the demand is suffi- more than $1,000,000,000. There
.cient and the market good. are' other miscellaneous sources of
promise of Increase I Florida has $100,000,000 invested in-come of approximately $25,000,-
he promise of a great in- in wood manufacturing plants; all 000.
the manufacture Of pa- forest products, raw and manufac- This means that the annual
" our slash pine, cattle tured, amount in value 'to $125,- gross income in Florida is $1,896,-
I citrus waste of canning 000,000 a year. 000,000. Some government esti-
packing houses and cull Two Million Tourists mates have placed the annual gross
o celotex and other build- During the 1936-37 season there income of the people in the state
ial from the aste from at $1,930,000,000 and our net in-
ial from the waste from were approximately 2,000,000 vis- come per capital a t $ The to-
is, corn stalks, oat straw, iing tourist, in Florida, who left come per capital at $490. The to-
* materials, the-increase a gross revenue, in the state esti- tal wealth ,of the state, is esti-
and tobacco .manufactur- mated at: from $300,000,000 to $500,. mated at $3,300,000,000.
ell as all kinds of forest 000,000. Andl the 1937-38 season Big Population Increase
the total value of our should show a big increase in the The population of Florida has
hired products may easily tourist influx. In fact, prepara- increased 66% per cent in 15
S$300,000,000 within the tions are being made to entertain years, leading all the South and
years. 3,000,000 tourists during this win- all the states of the nation except
h and other seafoods,-ter season, who are expected to one in percentage of increase in
er distribution, PWA oys- spend one billion dollars, population, and all Southern states
:ng projects, advertising The more than 2,000 wholesale in per capital wealth except one.
ter demand, should give and 20,000 retail establishments Florida can supply the raw ma-
ome of $25,000,000 yearly. in Florida, and insurance com- trial for the folEowing manufac-
osphate, pebble, gravel, panies-fire, life and accident-- turned products: Glassware, china-
rock, kaolin and other professional men and government ware, insulating materials, canned
can yield us another employes, etc., have an income of (Continued on Page 6)


of the five mills in operation will be
more than 2,100 tons of pulp, most of
which will be used by the companies in
the manufacture of paper or sold on
contract to their subsidiaries. These
I n d u s tr y companies and the affiliates form a sub-
stantial unit in Florida's industrial
r structure. Thousands of workers will
I. JI find employment through the industry
and millions of dollars will be released
The black bulge of smoke, the hum annually for payrolls.


huge machines, great storage and
fixing tanks, imposing chemical lab-
atories, an army of trucks, hundreds
busy workers, and vast acres of pine
nber land these are all part of
orida's great new pulp and paper in-
istry. Five of these great plants are
:ated in Florida; one in Jacksonville,
o in our neighbor City of Fernandina,
d two in West Florida.
these huge concerns represent Flor-
a's newest industry and they have a
tal investment of more than $35,000,-
0 in the State. The daily production






NATIONAL


The Barnett- National Bank, Oldest Na-
tional Bank in Florida, has for years
been instrumental in building payrolls
for Jacksonville and for Florida. It is
proud of the part it played in encourag-
ing this great new industry, and today
-invites manufacturers and others to
take advantage of the opportunities the
State has to offer. To large and small
manufacturers and to commercial busi-
ness and to individuals, the Barnett Na-
tional Bank offers modern, complete
and efficient banking service, geared to
the tempo of todav's-business needs




BANTT
LBBwANK


AFFILIATED BANKS: The Barnett National-Bank of DeLand. The Barnett
National Bank of Cocoa, The Barnett Bank of Avon Park, The St. Augustine
National Bank of St Augustine, The Barnett National Bank of Fort Lauderdale


NA IOlN II DAN I I-N F L R Am


I -N


Nr A Tp 1 0 N A'L B A N K


F L 0R i







PAG TW H TR T OFLRD RDY EEBR2


"Eventide" On Beautiful St. Joseph's Bay


.. .-...;,,, .-. -.. "- -'.------------
., ,. ..; : . ,.J: "' 7 .- f: ..' .:., -- ,:.


mi:: ,'
.R.-
--I', ~c


-Florida has always been noted for its beautiful sunsets and, in the opinion of many, Port St. Joe outranks the rest of
the state-and the nation, for that matter-in the beauty of its sunsets. "Come where the sunshine lingers, to play a
tuneful lay of happiness, health, contentment and peace, on beautiful St. Joseph's Bay."


Now, that's what we call a fair string of fish.
The black bass were caught in Gulf county, whose
numerous lakes and streams, are teeming with
finned beauties like these.


STATE LOOKED

FOR FEDERAL

AIDIN 1842

Need of Money for Capital Roof
Provides Clo:e Parallel Toe
Present Situation

Public officials seeking .to. wea-
ther a financial crisis' in state af-
fairs by getting aid from Wash-
ington found a close parallel in
96-year-old records buried deep in
capitol vaults at Tallahassee.
When Florida was a territory, T.
Baltzell, Tallahassee commissioner,
wrote Governor Richard Keith
Call that there was not enough
money to complete a roof to the
first state capitol building.
In his fine penmanship, Baltzell
reported:
"The hope is indulged that con-
gress will 'make an appropriation,
, rather than allow the expenditure


PORT ST. JOE


already made -to be defeated."
On January 3, 1842, Baltzell
wrote the governor:
"The building is still unfinished,
the walls erected but without a
roof over the, greater 'portion of
them, and they are suffering from
exposure to the weather.
"The means of providing a roof
are not within the reach of the
commissioners, having no funds on
hand and no prospect of realizing
from the sale of land belonging to
the fund or of collecting debts, due
to it."
Baltzell said the "importance of'
again urging this matter upon the
delegate and congress is respect-
fully suggested. Attention -has ai-
ready been drawn to it by that in-
defati-gable public officer, and it
is to. be hoped that -his exertions
may be seconded by the local au-
thorities."
Already about $30,000 had been
paid to various contractors listed
in the now yellowed records. Balt-
zell said, however, he -had delayed
digging a weal in the public square
as directed, because he thought all
available money should be applied


FLORIDA


to the capitol construction, upstairs was left unfinished. It is left unsealed.
Present-day public officials have roofed, but quarters designed. forI- -
a new wing to the capitol, but the the house of representatives were Save by reading the ads!

I .-- -I-*-------- BMMIM


p ---- --


1838 1938


WE EXTEND CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR
NEIGHBORING CITY

PORT ST. JOE
UPON THE 100th ANNIVERSARY OF THE
SIGNING OF THE STATE'S

First Constitution
AT THE OLD CITY OF ST. JOSEPH IN 1838


The HumanBANKING
Side of

We have many accounts 'in Port St. Joe and neighboring cities, and we en-
deavor to handle them all fairly, and with the utmost consideration com-
mensurate with good business policy.

Because we deal in such cold and inflexibJe commodities as cash, facts and
credit, it is perhaps logical to think of banking as being also cold and un-
bending.

But banking has its human side. The problems of people-real people just
like you and your neighbors-enter' into almost every action we take and
every decision we make. In qr daily work we try never to lose sight of
this human side of our business.

We think you will like the aura of warmth and friendliness which you will
find at the Apalachicola State Bank.' We offer sound protection and friendly
co-operation in all financial matters, and cordially invite your patronage.

No account too small-none too large.


1897- 1938


Apalachicola


State Bank
Established 1897


APALACHICOLA


FLORIDA


Florida's Constitution
was drawn up at Old St. Joseph
in December, 1838
STEPHEN J. ROCHE was a signer of this
first Constitution, which marked the begin-
ning of Florida.
I am proud to say that I am the only direct
descendant of a signer of this historic docu-
ment who is in business in Port St. Joe today.

W. C. ROCHE



Roche's Appliance

Store


THE STAR, PCIRT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 19-39


J


PAGE TWO






FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1938 THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, PLORIDA PAGE THREE


Centennium of Agriculture
By NATHAN MAYO, Commissioner of Agriculture


Gulf County Is the Sportsman's Paradise


I wish to congratulate the city of
Port St. Joe, and the state of Flor-
ida as a whole; on celebrating
with a centennial fete the framing
and signing of the first state con-
stitution. We should show our
gratitude for our forbears and
thereby prove ourselves worthy of
the labor and sacrifice which they
gave for the benefit of posterity.
A centennium of agriculture in
'--Florida is a checkered history.
Most of the plans now under cul-
tivation were originally covered
with dense forests. Clearing those
lands required years of arduous
labor. Naturally timber with its
many uses and naval stores, hunt-
ing and fishing offered; the first
opportunity for a livelihood.
During the early days there
were plantations opened up for
growing staple crops cultivated
mostly by slave labor. When rail-
roads were built and the growing
of citrus fruits was introduced,
the agricultural area was vastly
increased.
State Holds Unique Place
Our diversified agriculture and
the production of fruits anid vege-
tables which were marketed in
the winter months, )rougiht Florida
to the front as a producer of food
crops furnished northern markets
when no other section of the coun-
try had fresh crops for sale. This
haq given us a unique place, in the
agriculture of the United States.
The Department of Agriculture
-was provided for in the constitu-
tion of 1885, which specifically
providess that the Commissioner of
Agriculture shall perform:
1. "Such duties in relation to
"agriculture as may be prescribed
by law."
2. "Shall have supervision over
all matters pertaining to public
lands."
3. "Shall keep. the Bureaui of
Immigration."
4. "Shall have supervision of


KINGS ROAD DATES BACK
TO ENGLISH OCCUPATION

The history of the old King's
Road dates from the time of the
English occupation of Florida
(1763-1783). They had not been in
Florida long before they started
building a road from New Smyrna
up to St. Augustine, thence to the
Cowford on the St. John's river,
now Jacksonville; from there to
the St. Mary's river at Colerain,
and on up into Georgia. That por-
tion from New Smyrna to St. Au-
gustine was neglected and soon


the State Prison."
5. "Shall perform such ot
duties as may be prescribed
law."
From the above it is quite cl
that the Commissioner of Agric
ture is not limited In his dut
to that of tire vocation of farmi
Any duty which the legislate


NATHAN MAYO


may impose upon him will be in
accord with the Constitution. He
is, already prison commissioner-
and this takes more of his. time
than any other one division. He
is Land Commissioner, Immigra-
tion Commissioner and Inslpection
Commissioner.
From time to time "other diu-
ties," have been prescribed by law
until today there are nine di-
visions of the department and- the
commissioner is' a member of
eight boards and commissions.
Lack of space will not permit
giving details of the duties in-
volved in all these branches of
public activities.,


fell into decay and disuse for sev-
eral years, but was later repaired
'and restored to a serviceable con-
dition.
All travel between eastern and
northern Florida passed over this
route and through Jacksonville.
Its route led northwestwardly
across, that city and in the center
of the town it divided into two
forks, one going toward Alligator
(Lake City) and eventually by dim
a #_DIevlous trails to West Flor-
ida and Pensacola, while the other
bore its original course to Cole-
rain, Ga.


other
by

ear
cul
ties
ng.
ure


I


ki


FLORIDA


PO ER


CORPORATION

J. P. COOMBS, Manager, Western Division


PORT ST. JOE. FLORIDA


EVERYTHING IN READY-TO-WEAR
PIECE GOODS, SHOES, MILLINERY



We are indeed happy to be in business in Port
St. Joe, Northwest Florida's coming industrial
center, upon this momentous occasion, the

100th Anniversary of the

Signing ofthe, State's


First Constitution
at Old St Joseph in 1838
/


Congratulations Florida!
.


ELECTRICITY



One of the Most Important Servants

Developed During the Past Century.


. .
.

..

: ".'
'' ', r. r' i ..

Deer in the Willis Swamp area of Gulf County, near Port St. Joe. Exceptionally good hunting is found
in the woods and swamps of Gulf county, and with the help of the citizens, the primordial magnifi-
cence of this section is being maintained in all its splendor.

The art of paper-making was' CLIMATE temperature is about 70 degrees,
known to the Chines'e and Japan- Port St. Joe has a uniform and and rainfall from 50 to 55 inches,
se in very early times. mild climate. The mean annual evenly distributed.


WHEN Florida's first Constitution was signed 100
years ago, Electricity as a servant was unheard of. Yet,
during the last fifty years, this modern servant has developed
into one of the most important factors affecting the con-
structive progress of the nation and state.

On the occasion of the 100th Anniversary of the
signing of Florida's first Constitution,. we join in the com-
memoration of this historic period. During the one hundred
years since the first Constitution was signed, Florida has
kept pace with national progress and today ranks as out-
standing for its tourist attraction, agricultural and industrial
development.,


Long live Florida!


PAGE THRES


THE STAR, P6RT ST. JOE, -FLORIDA


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1938







THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


DECEMBER 2, 1938


Sale of Lots Financed First

Construction of State Capitol
*- -4


WORK STARTED ON BUILDING
IN 1824; FIRST UNIT
COST $12,000

Revenue from sale of surround-
ing lots financed the first con-
struction of Florida's capitol.
Erection of the capitol, a $250,-
000 addition to which was finished
only last year, started in 1824,
more than 21 years before Florida
became one of the United States.
SLocation of the capitol in Talla-
hassee started the town, in fact
the formal proclamation by Terri-
torial Governor William Duval lo-
cated the. seat of government
"about a mile southwest from the
deserted fields of Tallahassee, at
a point where the old Spanish
Road is intersected by a trail run-
ning southwesterly."
Reserve Five City Blocks
Five city blocks were reserved
for the state government buildings
and other lots in the big tract ap-
proved by the National Congress
were sold to raise funds for erect-
ing the capitol. The squares were
named Capitol, Jackson, Washing-
ton, Wayne and Greene.
Capitol Square is occupied by
the capitol. Others are occupied
by the Leon county courthouse,
the state supreme court and the
road department building, and the
fifth, still owned by the state, is
a public park.
The territorial IegislativeB coun.
cil met in Tallahassee in Novem-
ber, 1824, occupying three log
buildings erected by Judge Rob-
inson and S. McCall, who were
among the first wnite persons to
"arrive on the site of Tallahassee.
Tallahassee Was Indian Chief
Indians living in the vicinity of-
fered no resistance and many of
them assisted workmen in the
building. The name Tallahassee
was that of an Indian chief who
farmed a nearby field.
Writers of the period reported
Indians loitered about the govern-
ment buildings and. watched the
proceedings of the legislative coun-
cil. White settlers were housed in
log cabins and tents nearby.


The council passed legislation
providing for laying out the town
of Tallahassee and constructing
and financing the first permanent
capitol. The town was incorpor-
ated in. 1825.
The first part of the capitol cost
$12,000. Through the years addi-
tions were made despite litigation
over their financing and agitation
for removing the capitol to some
other part of the state. Old St.
Joseph was one of the. sites taken
under consideration.
Ten-Year Controversy
In 1832 work on the capitol was
at a standstill because of a contro-
versy between state officials and
the contractor, Benjamin G. Thorn-
ton. Ten years passed before this
was settled, but in the meantime
the legislative council of 1832 pro-
vided $1200 to paint the building,
make repairs and,paint the capitol
square fence and gate.
The town limits were extended
several times in order that addi-
tional lots could be sold for cash.
Appeals were made to congress,
but there was no help from that
source. A. Patterson drilled a well
on the capitol grounds in 1842 and
received $350 payment.
A permanent capitol structure
had-been complete* and was ready
for the first .session of the state
legislature in June, 1845. It re-
mained without noticeable change
until 1902.
Defeat Proposal To Move Capitol
A white Democratic referendum
in 1900 resulted in defeat of pro-
posals to move the capitol else-
where, and in 1901' Governor W. S.
Jennings recommended appropria-
tion of $75,000 for erecting addi-
tions now known as the capitol's
north and south wings.
The, present east and west wings
were erected at a cost of $250,000
after appropriation sy the legisla-
ture in 1921 when Cary A. Hardee
was governor. Since. that time ap-
propriations have been made, for
repairs and some remodeling.
The 1935 legislature appropri-
ated $1,000,000 upon recommenda-
tion of Governor Dave Sholtz to


Congratulations Florida!

Upon the 100th Anniversary of the signing
of the State's first Constitution at old
St. Joseph in 1838.


J. L. Kerr, Jeweler


PORT ST. JOE



FLORIDA


Congratulations

We feel honored to be present in Port St. Joe
upon the 100th Anniversary of the signing of
Florida's first Constitution. .. Our hope
is that Florida will grow and prosper during
the next one hundred years as it has in the
past. .




HAUSER'S

Department Store
"We Clothe the Entire Farpily"


PORT ST. JOE


FLORIDA


'


^1
4'




4














1












I'
*I


PAGE FQUR


S T. JOE A R0 and BILLIARD

"Where Friends Gather" ED GEORGE,Proprieto
"Where Friends Gather" w- ED GEORGE, Proprietor


VE ST(
-


While our business life in Port St. Joe is comparatively short, we point
with pride to the fact that this city was the site selected for the drawing
up of Florida's first Constitution in December, 1838 one hundred years
ago and it is indeed with pleasure that we extend congratulations to
the great Commonwealth of Florida upon this auspicious occasion.
Like the ancient city of St. Joseph, which was one of the outstanding
cities of its day one hundred years ago, we feel that Port St. Joe will far
surpass the fame and glory achieved by the old town and will develop into
one of Florida's leading industrial centers.


BAYSHORE GROCERY

and MARKET

STAPLE GROCERIES and SELECT MEATS
Where Business Is Brisk You Always Find Fresh Groceries
HIGHLAND VIEW ------ We Appreciate Your Business


OCK THE MOST COMPLETE LINE OF LIQUORS, CORDIALS, WINES
AND BEER IN PORT ST. JOE


IWl~aMsrs~i~upi~sse~i"'- Z-~~Y""PYYLY~9sPrla~~ti~[~?i~~-lg~iY-


match grants and Idans from the TOWN OF TWO EGG
Federal Public 'Works Administra- NAMED BY CHILD
tion for a state building program.
Of this, the capitol .received the
recently-completed 4$250,000 wing "Two Egg," a small village in
which extends from east to west Jackson county, some 75 miles
on the same scale- as the central north of Port St. Joe, was named
east-west wing. by T. J. Boone, turpentine opera-
__ tor. The settlement was founded
1 in 1895 and customers at Boone's
He went through fire, water and commissary were scarce.
$20,000 of his father's money for One day a small child came to
her. the community commissary and


Visit Us During the Centennial Celebration






Congratulations Florida


asked Boone the price of eggs.
"Ten cents a dozen," he replied.
The youngster placed two fresh
hen eggs on the crude counter and
said: "Mummy says send her one
egg's worth of bladder snuff and
one egg's worth of ball potash."
BJone began calling tle' com-
munity "Two Egg," and the name
stuck.
---------
"Fine" is a nice word when it
isn't used by a judge.


W







1837 P.W.WILSON COMPANY 1938
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA
V',,


Service


S0 1m


IN 1837, when Tallahassee was a mere village and St. Joseph had been
founded but two years, Andrew Jackson was President of the United
States and Richard K. Call was Territorial Governor of Florida, D.
C. Wilson founded what is now the P. W. Wilson Company.
This business was built on integrity and service. These principles were
followed by his son, W. R. Wilson, and his son, P. W. Wilson, whose
name the store still bears. Today the fourth generation of this family
is caterirng to the people of Florida with the same ideas of service and


W=D.C.WILSVO


fidelity which have survived from the days of the covered wagon to
the present day with its modern modes of transportation, and which,
we hope, will survive for the next 100 years.
We are proud of being the oldest store in the South operated by the
same family, and we invite our friends from all parts of Florida to stop
at our store when in Tallahassee. It has been our privilege to have
served your forefathers and you for 101 years.


r'. TWLS(


3 -.-.-
A*


- 1938


S 1863.


P -907


The State's oldest business concern extends congratulations to the
entire commonwealth of Florida and to Port St. Joe upon this, the
100th anniversary of the signing of Florida's first Constitution at


old St. Joseph in 1838, and we
ing congratulations in 2038 to
bigger and better Port St. Joe.


101
4 4%Ed


HOW
j~0'a- ~


feel that we will again be extend-
a bigger and better Florida and a


'W5ILAHSONE,
TALLAHASSEEh~.~S~


FLORIDA


P. We


1938


- 4 se~IBB&S~n-rs~MP~-- '~iP~~glI~~~WP~B~~BJ~~.aJL ~spare~ q


Prossdress.


LAJMPANY


PIAO"'FIVE


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


DECEMBER 2, 1938


IL 0 '00"
'Tears


ot


t804t


ears


mwAM
01






P SI TH STAR, PORT -ST. O i FLORIZ


FRIDAv Y. DE CB 2. 19


General LaFayette Once Owned Land In Florida


ZAIAerE7g
7AILANAFE:~2A~~m
MEU~ VASTPLnORAP/A1
T2RACT ON/CE OiVA'E
BY GE4 MFAM YErrEl


Although' Lfayete, the famous French
general, owner an entire township ad-
jacent to Tallahas.s~e. andu planned an
elaborate French colonization project,
for Florida, he was destined never to
see his properi'.'es or even vi-it the state.
In 18:1, he act.a:.y sent over 50 or 60
Norman peasants to settle his lands, but
the project eventually failed.
The township had been given to La-
Fayette in 1824 by an act of congress as
a measure o' compensation for valued
service in helping to obtain American
independence, and a warrant\for it was
issued by Prelid-nt Moaroe July 4th,
1S25. Subse,-u'ently. Ger:era; Lafayette's
Flori'fa properties were placed on the
market and it is estimated that tney
brought the general and his heirs ap-
proximately $108,000.


Marvelous Land Of Opportunity

Extends Welcoming Hand To All

(Continued from Page 1) goal, the tourist his playground,
goods, creameries, cotton goods,! thp invalid his restoration and
phosphate mills, tile, fillers, pa-' refuge, the sportsman his rendez-
per roofing, cement, furniture,I vous. the yachtsman his silvery
porcelain, vegetable hair, buttons, race track, and the citizen his
fish products, leather, tents, awn-'horn of plenty. The dairyman, the
ings, dairy :products, fertilizers, stockman, fruitman, trucker, poul-
poultry products and all kinds of tryman, and general farmer, man-
soft and hard wood products. ufacturer and professional man
SFlorid'a is within 48 hours of 90 can find an abundant opportunity.
ner cent of the people of the It is the queen of American com-:
United States. Commodities ship- monwealths. There is no closed
ped to and from every quarter ofseason on straw hats andl palm
the globe enter and leave Florida beach suits and you can swim,
ports. The trade between North fish and eat strawberries in Janu-
ard South America now aggre- ary. And you are welcome as a


gates $2,250,000 a day. The ports
of Florid'a are the' logical places
for exchange of much of these
commodities.
Exceedingly Healthy
Health is an asset and means ef-
ficiency. 'Our health is excellent,
and our death rate low. Our cli-
mate is neither too hot nor too
cold-suitable to both pleasure and
work. Many of our visitors who
come here to play, invest here and
remain to live as citizens.
So it is very probable that, an-
other 10 years will increase our
population to 2,500,000 with an an-
nual income of $3,000,000,000, and
the value of Florida property from
the present estimate of $3,300,-
000,000 to more than $4,500,000,-
000.
Florida is larger than New York,
Massachusetts and Rhode Island
combined, and is greater in area
than Denmark, Belgium, Switzer-
land and the Netherlands. It has
an area of 58,666 square miles,
4,400 of which are water, consist-
ing of beautiful bays, crystal
springs, majestic rivers and thou-
sands of lakes, the largest of
which, Lake Okeechobee, has a
greater area than the state *tf
Rhode Island.
Land of Opportunity
It is our belief that Florida is
one of the most delectable lands
on God's footstool. It has fertile
lands capable of producing foods
for millions, It has an all-the-year-
round' climate. It has wonderful
roads, schools, churches, beaches,
and all kinds of recreational and
transportation facilities. It is ac-
cessible by land water and' air to
the population of the western
hemisphere 'and the markets of
the world.
Here in this marvelous land of
opportunity, progress and enchant-
ment the home-seeker can find his


visitor and invited to become a
citizen and enjoy its wonderful
material realities, and! become im-
bued with the spirit of eternal
spring.

365 GROWING DAYS

Port St. Joe has 365 growing
days in each year. Something can
be grown the year 'round. There
are no extremes of heat or cold
-temiperatures just low enough
in winter to give zest and enthu-
siasm, and' summers made pleas-
ant by cool Gulf breezes.


S0 0


TUPELO HONEY IS
SAID TO BE FINEST
You have, no doubt, often heard
of the sweetness and the extraor-
dinary qualities of Tupelo honey,
produced almost exclusively in the
Apalachicola valley, and the fact
that it wil not crystalize or be-
come rancid. It is said to be the
finest honey produced in the en-
tire world.
In a letter addressed to the
Apalachicola Times, H. S. Paine,
chemist in charge of the carbohy-
drate division of the. bureau of
chemistry and soils, Washington,
D. C., who recently made an an-
alysis of a sample of this honey,
gives its content as follows: Ash,
.09 per cent; sucrose, 2.52 per
cent; dextrose, 27.21 per cent; wa-
ter, 18.2 per cent; non-sugars, 18.2
per cent.
Mr. Paine stated in his letter
that perhaps the most unusual fact
relative to analysis of this honey
is the ratio of :evulose to dex-
trose, which is 1.70. The average
ratio of levulose to dextrose de-
termined in a large number of
honeys of different floral types,
ran around 1.19.
"It is apparent that tupelo honey
contains a much greater relative
amount of the non-crystalizing su-


gar levulose," he stated.
Send The Star to a friend.


Years


Old St. Joseph was the leading metropolis
the northwest section of Florida Territory.


TODAY---
Port St. Joe is the coming industrial center of
the Northwest section of the State of Florida.

BUILD NOW-,.
In this rapidly expanding city. Building costs to-
day are low compared with the normal "base
year" of 1926. It may be years before they are
again as low as they are right now. All indica-
tions point to higher' prices as soon as steps to
relieve the national building shortage get under
way.

Build In Port St. Joe



ST. JOE LUMBER CO.
See Us About a FHA Loan for Home Repair
PHONE 69 PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


In the Past 100 Years
Pharmaceutical knowledge arid practice has taken
great strides, until today you depend almost as
much ulpon vou' rldr-'iOst as ou crcc ,n r ortr


5
9
5











j

a
1


LtjVUI ) UIbgglbL yb Y OU p n yqcti
doctor. Carver's is an up-to-the-minute
drug store in every respect, and you can depend
upon your prescriptions being filled accurately by
registered pharmacists.


Carver Drug Co.
r .-"-: .: Part St. Joe, Fla.


BBB *.


r




i


-and in this modern age, Thompson's Bread will build
even greater history with its vitamins, nutrition and
greater food value than all the loaves of past centuries.



THOMPSON'S


BAKERIES

point with pride to years of progress and public service
in our modern and sanitary bakeries.





Thompson's Bakeries


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


APALACHICOLA, FLA.


L
















P


I


-. 4-------

We Join in Extending
CO .N ATULATION:jS
U cr tPhec 1 20'h Anniversary of the Signing of the
S3tae's GFit Constitution at Old St. Joseph


M ARS HA L L
Builder's Supply Company
Sashes,, Doora, Electrical and Plumbing Supplies
"With Quality and Service, We Earn and Keep
Your Confidence"
APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA

JOHN MARSHALL, Real Estate




bS S- ---% y----
Thgmpson s Bread


Is Building Hiatr}y,-

Just as the Constitutional Convention at old St. Joseph
in 1838 built history.


PAGE SIX


THE STAR, PORT ST. JO~E, 'FLORIDA.


May Be Older Than the

Centuries, Yet



Thompson's


Bread


is NEW!


GA90~-







RD D


YELLOW JACK WAS SERIOUS,

BUT NOT PROPOSED REMEDIES

SIXTY YEARS AGO IN FLORIDA

TAR BURNING, SPRINKLING OF however, that the carbolic acid
CARBOLIC ACID AND OTHER did it."
REMEDIES WERE URGED Freezing the Germ
When another doctor suggested
The story of a desperate, futile 'destruction of the germs by freez-
fight against an unknown enemy ling, Col. John Screvan of Jackson-
of an has o to ight ith th ille told of "a certain U. S. frigate
of man has come to light with the
discovery of two old Jacksonville that hadi yellow fever aboard. The
newspapers acted 60 years ago. vessel was carried north, stripped
Tt vwan a fight tlhat hlas bin of her rigging and filled with ice.


marked off as victory for nearly
40 years, and in the enlightenment
of modern civilization the vague
gropings of foremost medical men
in convention at Jacksonville dur-
ing February of.1878 seem slightly i
ludicrous.
There was no laughing matter
concerned at that convention, how-
ever. It was the nation's second
gathering of experts to find a wea-
pon with which to fight yellow
fever, the South's greatest scourge
of the 19th century and the one
that wiped out the population of
old St. Joseph.
Non-Existent Now
The average school child of to-
day recognizes yellow fever as
something that is non-existent in
the northern hemisphere. And he
knows that the germ of the fever
is carried by the stegomya mos-
quito.
But 60 years ago that informa-
tion was still to come. Suggestions
then made to cope with "yellow
jack" now appear fantastic. Each
doctor had his pet theory. He dis-
counted all others. None of them
were right.
They made no apparent effort to
determine the cause. What those
.:.en were interested, in was, the
prevention of the epidemics which
descended annually in some part
f the South with tragic effect on
he population.
S Strange Suggestions
Here are some of the strange
methods suggested: Quarantine of
ships' entering sountern ports-
keeping them out of the. city for
periods ranging ip to 120 days;
'disinfection of buildings and land
with, carbolic acid andi chloride of
lime;. fumgation by burning saw-
dust mixed with tar; killing the
germs by freezing.
The first speaker on the pro-
gram read a letter from the sur-
geon-general of the U. S. marine
hospital service saying that "sail-
ors are proverbially the propaga-
tors of disease," and that yellow
fever was, no exception.
A federal quarantine law was
proposed, but was attacked by Dr.
Same Holmes of Darien, Ga., who
.iU Jiad the state's rights issue in
bis mind'and declared he "did not
want the federal government to
dictate to us and did not want it
' have any control of our state
matterss."
Disinfection
Olher doctors countered that a
quarantine law could be enforced
only by the federal government.
$ Dr. Robert Lebby of Charleston
aid.bhe had "no doubt that the use
of. carbolic acid with chloride of
Iime would effectually prevent the
Jsease from spreading."
'There is no doubt that by thor-
ghly fumigating a vessel with
ois, she would be just as free
from disease as though she had
ever been in an affected port."
But Dr. McFarland of Savannah,
Ga.. said such disinfection had
done no good during a serious epi-
demlic in his home city two years
before. He advocated burning piles
f' sawdust saturated with tar, and
destroying all garbage by burning.
Mayor J. P. Jones of Pensacola
said he; too, had no faith in car-
Fblic acid. "In 1873 the yellow fe-
ver prevailed in Pensacola," said
the mayor. "Carbolic acid was
used freely. I put 10 gallons on my
,ce, and in a few days my whole
ily was, down. I will not say,


She was afterward reiftted and
pyt to sea, andi in four months
yellow fever again broke out on
board."
That's the way the quarantine
convention discussions went. Dele-
gates left for their homes with a
lot of new ideas about how to
check the disease when the hot
weather again arrived. But they
really accomplished nothing defi-
nite.
Yellow fever continued to take
its frightful toll until Doctors Car-
roll, Reed, Agramonte and Lazear
finished their conclusive and epic
experiments with mosquitoes in
Havana in 1898.

WHAT DO YOU KNOW
ABOUT CAMPHOR?

Tree Grows Freely In Florida and
Is Very Attractive

What db you know about cam-
phor?
The camphor tree is an ever-
green tree. from which the cam-
phor of commerce used to be
made. The tree is most attractive
for yard and street shade, has a
dense foliage with reddish tinged
dark green leaves. It is said to be
avoided by insects on account of
its odor not being agreeable to
them.
The camphor tree grows freely
in Florida andl is most desirable
for shade and ornamentation pur-
poses with its beautiful foliage.
The editor does not know whether
there are any in Port St. Joe, the
nearest, to his knowledge, being
in Sumatra, 72 mlies from this
city, where Jim Smith has a con-
siderable grove.
Some years ago there were
large camphor plantations in Put-
nam county which proaucedl cam-
phor in commercial quantities, but
it was put out of business by a
synthetically produced substitute,
as was the case with the old in-
digo industry, which at another
period was very' prominent in
Florida.

OLD MAP MAKERS LET
IMAGINATION RUN RIOT

An old map of America, issued
about 1550, showed only two
names that are familiar to us to-
day. Florida was featured as
"Terra Florida" and appeared to
apply to most of tne continent of
North America. "Cuba" appeared
as a large island jdst south of
Terra Floridla.
A narrow belt of water separ-
ated the continent from India Su-
perior. To the east of what is now
known as the Atlantic Ocean a
dark mass b*re the name of Af-
rica.
The makers of these and other
maps of that period didn't know
much about the various contin-
ents anudi oceans, so they let their
imaginations run wild. But they
had one advantage-no one else
'knew any better, so they couldn't
come right out and call the map-
makers liars.

A LAND SUPREME

The peop1el of Port St. Joe and
Gulf .county extend to all a hearty
welcome to "The Last Frontier," a
land supreme 'where the maker of
dreams causes 'them to c>me true.


1


1 00 YEARS


1 he women


1







9A




AGO


of Old St. Joseph


'wore clothes like this.


But


L these styles went out with. the
wooden Indian, and today

milady from Port St.

Joe comes to


Lillian Kilpatrick's Smart Shop
PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA

FOR THE LATEST STYLE CREATIONS





CONGRATULATIONS to FLORIDA

and to PORTT ST. JOE

UPON THE


100th 'Anniversary

OF THE SIGNING OF FLORIDA'S


First Constitution

AT OLD ST. JOSEPH IN


1838


YOUR

WIN'IER APPAREL
IS HERE IN ABUNDANCE

Curlee Suits $25; Ex. Pants $5


STETSON
and KNOX


Hats $5.00


Curlee Overcoats $17.50 to $22,50


MANHATTAN and JAYSON

Shirts $1.95
TOM SAWYER
Boys' Suits $5.95


Men's Suits


$16.50 and $18.50


Daffin & Cogburn

"THE TOGGERY"


Harrison Avenue


Panama City, Fla.


I-U- ~ ---- -- -- -~-----------..--~I~~


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1938


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


PAGE SEVEN









r )


History of Wilson's Is Integral Part of Florida's

Development From Territorial Times, Through Civil


War and Reconstruction Down


7


Talla-ha'see and Tallahassee's oldest store have the same son of the founder, is in active
history. The .founder of P. W. Wilson Company 101 years Icharge today.
ago was one o.f the founders of the capital. When St. Marks Store Was Burned
became an important cotton port, a Wilson was shipping cot- It is not known with certainty
ton from there for sale in New York. When Tallahassee be- where the Wilson store first was
came a mercantile center for middle Florida, Wilson's was a located. It is probable that it al-
factor. When the Floridians in this section were devoting ways has been on Monroe street
themselves to the cause that was to be lost in the War Be- and for many years it has been
teen the States, Wilson's blacksmith shop, then an integral located in the same place.
part of the business, manufactured bayonets for the Confed- In 1853 David C. Wilson leased
rate troops. two stores and a warehouse from
Was Bank Founder John Herr of Baltimore, located
In the establishment and operation of the Union Bank of at Monroe and Clinton streets for
Florida, one of Tallahassee's first financial institutions, a Wil- an annual rental of $800, plus
son was an important stockholder. taxes and insurance, with an op-
i In the establishment and continued service of the Presby- tion to purchase at $8,000. The
terian church a long line of Wil-, .sale apparently was consummated
:sons were active. f or in 1870 Curtis Hill contracted
In the development of Tallahas- m ts of a earlier etato rebuild the two stores, using
see from the first ax ring that of an earlier day. brick saved from the fire of 1869.
heralded the transformation of the But Wilson's survived. Under Between the fire and the rebuild-
Indian village into the present the management of the third Wil- ing, other quarters were used.
oderncity andcapital other son in direct line, Phelps Warden Old pictures and the memory of
state of Florida, the Wilsons have Wilson, the business continued to those who recall the store before
been leaders and the store has. '"n, with the city without inter- 'the turn of the century place It in
been an importantt cog in the com- eruption, met changing conditions, its present location several dec-
mercial machinery of Northwest and today is as much an integral ades ago.
Florida. part of the community's business
The long 'record of P. W. Wilson life as ever before. Who remembers when a blessed
Company is unusual in the busi- Phelps Wilson Long, grandson event was discussed only by the
ness world. No other store in the n .T. Wilson and great-grand- neighborhood women?
entire state can tlaim such a long'
and colorful history.
Began In 1837
It wa.s in 1937, just 101 years
ago, that David C. Wilson, first of
,of Tallahassee for some ten years, 9 1 5 H ai
'opened -a small .store. Under his
able management .the business A MODEST BEGINNING ON On
grew and prospered and hk was A SOLID FOUNDATION h A
active in real estate transactions 100t A
and other lines of commercial ac-,, Honest merchandise Truthful
'tivityT. Advertising Courtesy Pati- o
From that beginning, when n- ence-all have had a part in the
drew Jackson was presidenpf the building of this great institution
United Staetes and' Ri di Keith that has stood the acid test of Signing of
Call governor of e territory of time and rightfully given us our
Florida. Wils~l has kept pace slogan: "Where Home-Makers First Cso
with the r growth of the state. Are Satisfied."
Und -'e founder's son, W. R.
Wil, the store progressed. Be-
mFnning with a surprising purchase .. ,.. -
,, of high quality goods when he was '- ";
16 and buyer for his father, he
capitalized on the demand for the
better grades. '
Everything Was Stocked
Everything was carried in the
early Wilson's. Invoices show that
mantillas from Spain, .shawls from
Scotland, linens from Ireland, rum
from the West Indies, woolens .
from England. hardware, farm im-
plements and even blacksmith
service was obtainable in the same,
establishment.
Several of the Wilson slaves
were listed as blacksmiths and the
on was an important part of the
business. During the Civil War
bayonets. were made for the Con- New Sm em e
federacy.
Pt. l'arks was an important sea- -Three Striking Pieces
port for the movement of cotton Modern style, full dustproof construction,
from middle Florida and South large pieces of refreshing beauty. Ve- []
Georgia to the marts of the world needed in contrasting woods, giving a
and 'of foreign goods to plantation "different" appearance: Complete ..
owners and town dwel-ers for
many miles around. And. Wilson's
was a big factor in the trade. Cot- C
ton was delivered at Wilson's and Occasional Chair
shipped by the owner of the store.
A stream of commerce flowed
through Tallahassee to al? points, Well made and comfort-
and much of it through Wilson's ably upholstered.
establishment.
est sm gon Trains You Need One or Two
Wagon trains from Georgia were
driven through Tallahassee to de-
liver cotton at St. Marks, and on
thereturn trip they bought sup- $4 95 u
plies and loaded them for the re-
turn'journey to the interior plan-
tations.
The close of the. Civil War NA
brought an end to St. Marks'
prosperity and to ante-helium busi- AVERS-F W HAND
ness methods. Never since has cot-
ton brought such a high return PORT ST. JOE PANAMA CITY
in exchange values and the col-
lapse of southern farming carried


The man who does not advertise
because someone told him it does
not pay, if course believes that
the world is flat instead, of round
because some ancient once held
that belief.


Fo Present Day The United States Bureau of
Public Roads is working on stana-
Barley is apparently the oldest ards of design toward safety and
farm grain, utility.


We Join In Extending Congratulations to the
State of Florida Upon the

100th ANNIVERSARY
of the

Signing of the State's

FIRST CONSTI T'UTION





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DECEMBER 12, 1938


PAGE EIGHT


THE, STAR, -ORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA










SECTION THREE iT
FLORIDA CONSTITUTION
CENTENNIAL EDITION


STAR


Published on the 100th
Anniversary of the Signing of
Flbrida's First Constitution
At Old St. Joseph In 1838


VOLUME II PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1938 NUMBER 7



The Rise and Decline of the Old City of St. Joseph


Heroic Struggle Made By

Founders Against Terrific

Odds of Man and Nature


By JAMES OWEN KNAUSS.
Reproduced by Permission of the
Florida Historical Society
Florida has a number of places
within her borders that were once
the sites of flourishing settlements
of which nothing remains at the
present time except overgrown
ruins. None of the others that
flourished since the beginning of
the Amercdn occupation equal In
human interest and historical im-
portance the .town of St. Joseph,
located on the bay of the same
name, a short distance west of the
Apalacfiicola river. .
Here there occurred, one of the
most stirring fights. made by man
in a courageous but futile effort
to surmount overwhelming natural
and human obstacles. A study of
the struggle reveals many import-
ant events in the state's history.
Here the first steam- locomotive-iin
Florida- was operated; probably
the first (surely the secoid)'"rail-
road of the region led to the town;
the first and only constitutional
convention in territorial days was
held here: and the first important
reporterial work by Florida jour-
nisists was done in connection
with this meeting.
In addition' to these pioneer
events, a consideration of the
town's history sheds light on the
economic conditions of the Apa-
lachicola -region (extending into
Georgia and Alabama) in the late
thirties and early forties of the
nineteenth century, on the finan-
cial outlook of the territory dur-
ing this period, and on the politi-
cal problems engaging the atten-
tion of the inhabitants. It would,


in the contested district was Apa-
lachicola, of whose history prior
to 1835 very little is known. Its
location at the mouth of the'Apa-
lachicola river seemed to insure a
great future for the infant town,
since the stream appeared des-
tined to become the main commer-
cial outlet for the rich cotton dis-
trict of western. Georgia and east-


therefore, seem well worthwhile ern Alabama. The enthusiastic
to sketch 'the circumstances sur- settlers probably dreamed of a
rounding the growth and 'decline city that would rival New Orleans.
of St. Joseph. In May, 1833, a newspaper, "The
History of Town Began In 1835 Advertiser," sure sign of a boom
The real history of the town in those days, was started by R.
may be said to begin on March 17 nsmore Westcott. Commerce in-
may be said to begin on March 17, creased so rapidly that 40,000
1835, when the supreme court of so rapidly that 40,000
the United States gve an u bales of cotton were shipped, from
the United States gave an unani-
bhr bor in 1835 and numerous
mous decision in the case of Co-n 185 ad ume
lin Mitchell et al, v. the United steamers plied up and down the
States. This ease was concerned. river.
with the question of the ownership Sug t Founding wn
of 1,250,000 acres of land in Mid- The bustling, thriving and opti-
d:e Florida. mistic Apalachicollans were not in-
A commercial Panton clined to pay tribute to the people
too whom the United. States Snu-
Leslie and Co., starting activities
In Florida when England had p- preme Court had allotted the land.
in Florida when England had poe- They looked about, for a way to
session of the territory between escapee sporting the Apalachicola
1763 and 1784, had later obtained Lscape sporting the Apalahicola
permission of the Spanish govern- Land company, an organization
ment to purchase this. large tract started o L ese & ccessor ot alos
of land from the Indians ih order ton Les pro & Cot and yet nreiont
to indemnify the company for the potable trade the region.
losses .s~ffered... -This.i transaction- Somebody suggested the found-
wlth the natives was completed by ing of a rival town oan t. Joseph's,
.a, series of treaties between 1804 Bay, some 28 miles to the north-
.a:series of treaties .between 1804 west. Since Apalachicola was at
and 1811. When Florida became westSce Apaltchicola was at
territory of the United. States, the extreme western limit of the
territory of the UnitedStates, theForbes Purchase, the nw settle
question of the legality of these ment woul not be thin the jur
purchases arose. After litigation ent od e itn the
isdiction of the hated company. It
extending over a period of seven wsdicton of the hated company. It
years, first in the superior court -was, however, located in such close
of Middle. Florida and then in the proximity to the river that the en-
spremie Fcourt o the United thusiastic malcontents believed
supreme court of the United they could divert the stream's com-
States, a decision /was made, as they could divert the stream's com-
States, a decision was made, as merce and thus, ruin the .old town.
stated above, by the latter tribunal mere and thus ruin theold t wn.
in favor of the successors of Pan- The project as one that migh
have made reasonable men in more
ton, Leslie and Co.-
ton, LeslieandCo.normal times hesitate. It was not
In the 14 years, of American only a question of erecting a new
sovereignty over Florida before town, with wharves and other trad-
the case was finally adjudicated, ing facilities, but means of easy
immigrants had settled in the dis- and, cheap transportation had to
puted area, apparently without be devised between the river and
paying any attention to claims of the bay.


the company. The chief settlement


We Extend Congratulations,to

Florida and Port St. Joe

Upon the

100th Anniversary

of the Signing of the State's

First Constitution


Use Our
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for the coming Holiday Christmas
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LILIUS JEWELRY COMPANY


PORT ST. 1


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r FLORIDA


A bayou, called Lake Wimico,
extended from the river to within
a distance of eight miles from the
proposed, city. This lake, it was be-
lieved, would furnish an easy pass-
age for steamers, after some
dredging had been done. The in-
tervening land could be crossed
-ithler by canal or by railroad. In
addition to these obstacles there
also seemed some doubt whether
the bay was deep enough for ocean
steamers: However. the promoters
were undaunted, and began the
most remarkable undertaking that
Florida had seen up to that time,
or was destined to see for many
years to'. come.
Canal Company Formed
Even before the decision of the
supreme court was given, the Lake
Wimiico and St. Joseph Canal Co.
had been incorporated by the legis-
lative council of Florida to connect
the lake witi the bay. Now the
work was rapidly pushed. In May,
1835, parties, were dispatched to
explore the lake, andi naturally
their reports were very favorable.
Another party began sounding the
channel of the Bay. At about the
same time surveyors started to lay
out the new town, which was to
be called St. Joseph. The plan of
the place provided for wide
streets. "in order to give a free
circulation to' the sea .breezes,"
which would make it healthy and
salubrious. The streets were laid
out at right angles and had such
characteristic names .as Bay, Com-
merce, Palmetto, Magnolia, Wash-
ington and Columbus.
On June 13 the subscription


books of the canal company were
operied at Apalachicola, and in a
few minutes the entire stock was
taken. It is significant that the
Apalachicolians held three-eighths
of the stock, the merchants of Co-
lumbus, Ga., another three-eighths,
while remaining quarters was
bought by Tallahasseeans. This
shows clearly the chief interests
backing the project. In addition to
the discontented residents of the
old town the support of the com-
mercial powers or western Georgia
was a potent factor in the develop-
ment of St. Joseph. We can
readily imagine why they were in-
terestedL Their investments in
Apalachicola were threatened by
.the decision of the federal tribunal
and- hence their feelings were siml-
lar to those of the residents of
that city. The purchase of one-
quarter of the sto~K by-persons in
Tallahassee proves that the ven-
ture was also a child of the eco-
nomic conditions then prevailing
over the entire country.
Period of Speculation
This was one of the recurring
periods of intensive speculation
and overdevelopment, which econ-
omists now recognize as one of
the \phases of a 'business cycle.
Everywhere there was a wild orgy
of real estate development, aided
by cheap- paper money issued by
banks with enormous capitals. The
chief financial institution of'Flor-
ida was the Unlon Bank, with
headquarters at Tallahassee. With
its large apparent assets, any proJ-
ect which interested its stock-
holders. was bound to be a success,
even if temporary and fictitious.
The interest of the banks in St.
Joseph is often brought to light.
Thus in 1836 it was claimed that
the presidents of the Union Bank
of Florida, of the Bank of Colum-


bus, and of the Commercial Bank
of Apalachicola, and the ex-presi-
dent of the Bank of Marianna,
were financially interested in the
town. In the same year, Ben
Chaires, a banker and planter of
Tallahassee, was president of the
Lake Wimico and St. Joseph Canal
and Railroad company. This close
connection between the banks and
the town must always be remem-
bered by those who wish to un-
derstand its history.
Railroad Started
The next steps taken by the pro-
moters were the construction of a
railroad from Lake Wimico to the
bay, and the erection of terminal
facilities at both ends. Towards
the close of October, or at the
very beginning of November, 1835,
it was reported that 100 carpen-
ters and 200 laborers were em-
ployed on the railroad .and that
two or three hundred more were
daily expected from the north.
The exact-date of completion of
the railroad is not known, but in
an advertisement dated August 13,
.1836, it was announced that the
storage houses and wharf on Lake
Wimico were completed, that those
on the Hay were almost finished,
and that the railroad with passed.
ger and freight cars and two im-
proved Baldwin locomotives were
ready for work.
The formal opening of the new
road probably occurred on Mon-
,da, September 5, 183,6, for the
newspapers-of Florida and Georgia
give an count of the events of
that day thus:
LOCOMOTIVES IN FLORIDA
On Monday, the 5th inst., a Lo-
comotive drawing a train of 12
cars containing upwards of 300
passengers passed over :the rail-
road connecting tie flourishing
(,Continued on Page 2)


CONGRATULATIONS


to FLORIDA
On the 100th Anniversary of the Signing of the State's

First Constitution


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APALACHICOLA, FLA.--








PA9E TWO

Sn ln moving the county seat from Ap
Rise andDelne lachicola to St. Joseph. This, w,
undoubtedly a case of "cast-ir
Of Old St. Josepl nerve" on the part of the Saint
for the construction of their tow
had hardly begun at the time whe
(Continued from Page 1) the law was approved on Januar
'own of St. Joseph with the Apa- 17, 1836.
lachicola River. The trip, a dis But alas! sometimes fortune
tance of eight miles, was performed does not favor the bold; the n
in the short space of 25 minutes. tional congress annulled the 'la
The engineer, is confident, from Probably the chief cause of th
the superiority of the road and en- annulment was te activity
gine, that the route can be accom- Joseph M. White, the territory
polished in eight minutes. delegate to congress, who was i:
Settement incorporated terested in the Apalachicola Lan
While the railroad was being company, being one of the trustee
completed, the promoters were not appointed to sell its lands. Whit
idle in other directions. The shoals did everything in his power t
at the mouth of Lake Wimico were thwart the growth of St. Joseph
removed and the channel widened.
The attempt of IS36 was not th
The sale of the lots of the new
town was announced for Decem- last one to remove the seat
ber 14, 1835. The settlement was county government from Apalach
ber 14, 1835. The settlement was cola. The bill was reenacted i
incorporated by an act of the legi- wh he llwn as
1837 with the following causti
lative .council of 1836. This pro-prembe:"Whereas, the Legisi
vided for the establishment of a rea :e herea e ei
free school, for the support of the love Counch of the Territory
port, for the regulation of taverns, Floria tt the lt ssnhbitn
markets and quarantine, in addi- upon a petition of the inhabitant
tion to prescribing the form of of Franklin County e
government, acted and declared the city of S
('he Bank of St. Joseph, with a Joseph to be the public site o
capital of $1,000,000, and the St. said county, and whereas, the sai
Joseph Insurance company, with a Act has been annulled by the Co
capital of the same amount, were gress of the United States, cot
a!so incorporated by this session trary to usage and the local right
of the council. It must be added, of the people or Florida; an
however; that both of these enact- whereas, a large majority of th
ments were annulled in July, 1836. citizens of Franklin County at
by the United States Congress. recent election have expressed b
Firrt Issue of Newspaper *-'o their reference as to the lo
The necessity for advertising cation. of the 'county seat
for the successful development of The United States congress appal
the new enterprise was not forgot- ently remained obdurate, and Apa
ten. The home office of the pub- lachicola continued to be the sea
licity department was apparently of government for Franklin county
The Advertiser df Apalachicola, Gautier Elected Delegate
still in the hands of R. Dinsmore The next political move was th
Westcott; In November, 1835, he annual election of a delegate ti
issued the first number of the St the legislative council of the ter
Joseph Telegraph, although he ritory. St. Joseph proposed Pete
probably still had his publication W. Gautier, Jr., while the oppon
office in Apalachicola. Soon after- ents put up Hiram Manley. The
wards the two papers were merged, former, wellknown and popular
if indeed the old journal was not was elected, much to the conster
permanently suspended before the nation of the supporters of the old
new one appeared, town.
Sometime before March 10, 1836, However, during the next ses
The Telegraph was moved to St. sion of the council he displayed
Joseph. Westcott and his superiors as much wisdom as shrewdness
were extremely energetic in ad- The two important bills passed by
vertising the town and, it must the body which related to St
be admitted, their rival, the Apa- Joseph were in' all probability
lachicola Land, company, was just sponsored by him. The first one
as industrious in decrying it, with provided for the formation of a
the result that every Florida news- new county, to be known as Cal
paper of the period and many in houn, from portions of Franklin
adjacent states were filled with Washington and Jackson counties
material relating to the enterprise. St. Joseph was. chosen as the
So many communications poured county seat. :It was probably the
in on the editor of The Floridian wisest 'thing ;:that. could, be done
of Tallahassee that he gave notice under.:the. circumstances and was
that he would publish no articles so recognized' by te Apalachicol-
about Apalachicola and St. Joseph ians, whose public spokesman, the
except as paid advertisements. Be- Apalachicola Gazette, commented
fore the end of July, 1836, West- thus: "The. eg;-lati\- council will
cott was superseded by Peter W. '"'-s be free (if their powers
Gautier, Jr., a man whose name "boiind'prove equal to the task), to
was destined to become so closely legislate their etiy into something
alied with St. Joseph in the popu- like nominal importance, wifliout
lar mind, that whenever people running foul of our rights and in-
spoke of the one they also thought terests."
of the other. The Constitutional Convention
Gautier was the best stylist The o'"-er lawv mentioned above
pmoing the newspaper men of the designated St. Joseph as the meet-
territory; he was keen, shrewd i.g place of the conventionn that
and decidedly not over-scrupulous. was to draw up a constitution for
His paper, the name of which he Florida. This may be considered
changed to the St. Joseph Times the greatest political triumph ever
in November, 1836, became the won by the Saints. In passage of
most quoted .sheet in Florida, .the bill, Gautier's hand appeared
chiefly because of his wit and more than once. The opposing
cleverness. Gazette quoted a .ezter from him
Try To Secure County Seat in the issue of- February 7, saying
When men of prominence and that the bill was now up for the
influence engage in a costly un- third reading. On the 19th, after
,-'rtaking and enter into such bit- the law had passed, the same pa-
ter rivalries as did the Apalachi- -.- declared: "Sa--s Fizzy to Pe-
cola Land company and the pro- ter, Scratch my back and I'll tickle
motors of St. Joseph, the scene of your elbow." (Fizzy was probably
action will almost inevitably be at Richard Fitzpatrick, member of
times transferred to the political the council from Dade county.)
arena. Since the proposition suited, the
The "Saints," as they were popu- fancy of both parties, Peter
larly called, immediately attempted scratched the banr and Fizzy
to retard the development of the tickled the town. Honors did not
old town through legislative enact- come singly to Gautier, for almost
ment. With the representative, E. coincidently he was appointed by
J. Wood, of Franklin. county. the United States government,
which at that time included in its marshal of the Western District
boundaries, the two towns, taking of Florida.
the lead, a bill was rushed through After St. Joseph had been
Lu e~ .dti. cuuci 0-i .LOOU, IC-


. chosen as the convention town, the


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1938


a- promoters and inhabitants began Thompson and Albert G. Semmes. vention, but he was not a delegate.
as to make active preparations for! Not only were the future politi- All in all, it may be truthfully
on the reception of the notables. E. cal and judicial leaders of the said that never before nor since
ts, J. Wood had charge of the erection state at this gathering, but the have so many able meni been gath-
rn of a building in which it was two greatest newspaper editors of ered at one time in a Florida
en hoped, that the meetings would be, territorial Florida were delegates': town, and that town not four years
ry held, although the edifice of the Benjamin D. Wright, the able edi- old.
Methodist Episcopal church was tor and publisher of the Pensacola Allen Saver, the Day
e also available. Wood's place, which Gazette, and, Cosam Emir Bartlett, The convention continued in ses-
a, was called Convention Hall, had the clever and kindly leader of the sion to January. 11-a duration
w. fts interior walls'.hung with por- Apalachicola Gazette. Another able three times ,as. long as had been
is traits of famous statesmen-that editor, Joshua Knowles of the anticipated. Though the proceed-
of of Washington being placed above Florida Watchman of Tallahassee, ings ordinarily were of little in.
al the chair of the presiding officer, was chosen secretary of the con- (Continued on page 7)
na and those of contemporary living
id statesmen on the side walls.
es The energetic Gautier, sensing the We are Glad to Be In Business In
:e importance of the occasion and re- S T J E
o alizing the money value of com- Jj j JO E
h. plete reports of the convention, FLORIDA'S NEWEST INDUSTRIAL ENTR
ie made thorough preparations to se- NL CENTER
of aure full accounts or the proceed- Upon the Occasion of the
li- ings. He engaged another man to
n assist him in taking notes while 100TH' ANNIVERSARY
.c the convention was in session.
a- This was the first real reportorial of the Signing of
of work of any magnitude attempted F1 ida's First
in Florida. The portions of these Flo ida' F St
ts reports that are stlil in existence
n- form a valuable part of our knowl- Constitution
t. edge of the convention.
>f The voters of Calhoun county at Old St. Joseph in 1838
d also showed a wise interest in the
approachTng e~vefat by electing, as
1- delegates two men who in prestige B A- R R I E R S
s ..;dJ ability ranked among the fore-
d most in the gathering of the ter- 5 AND 10-CENT STORE
e ritory's representatives. One was W W. Barrier, Prop. Port St. Joe, Fla.
a William P. Duval, who had come
+-----------+--
y to the territory in 1821 as first
D- judge of East Florida, and had
"( been governor from 1822 to 1834.
r- The other was Richard 'C. Allen.
a- He had been. closely associated
t with St. Joseph almost from its
'. beginning, having been one of the
directors of the Lake Wimico and
e St. Joseph Canal and Railroad
o company as early as 1836.
r* Tense Excitement
S We can imagine, the tense ex-
I- citement of the Saints as Monday,
e December 3, the day set for the
r, opening of the convention ap-
proached. When the delegates
1 from East and Middle Florida ar-
rived on the steamer New Casttle
from St. Marks, either late on Sat- '4 '
1 urday or some time Sunday, the
residents of the town knew that WE EXTEND
y the long awaited day was at hand.
S When. the meeting was called to
order at 12 o'clock noon on De- C gT C l O S t
Scemrber 3, 46 members' were pres-
Sent out of a total of 56 After a f
-temporary organization had beenatlf L id
,perfected, one of the residents of
St. Joseph, the Rev. Peter W. Gau-. an to t St
tier, opened the .convention with L J
prayer. Little work was' done on
the first day, except to examine Upon the
credentials of the members. Then
'b convention adjourned until. 100th Anniversary of the
the next day, thus giving the dele-
gates and inhabitants a further op- Signing of the State's
portunity to get acquainted.
The Saints, learned to know Fi t Cit i
some of the most influential men FiTSt C onstitution
in the history' of. American Flor-
ida prior to 1870. There were pres-
ent at least two, probably three,
future governors of Forida: Rob-
ert Raymond Reid, within a year
destined to succeed Richard K.
Call as territorial governor; Wil-
liam Marvin of Key West, who
more than 25 years, later was .
chosen provisional governor at the
close of the Civil War, and, Thos. (Formerly Montgomery's)
Brown of Leon. county, probably
the same man who was governor PA AIL
of the state from 1849 to 1853.
The first three United States sen- APA LACHICOLA
tors, from Florida were mem-
",rs. of the convention: James D.
Westcott, Jr., David Levy Yulee
(his name at this time was David F L O
Sovv). and Jackson Morton. Five
of them sat in the Secession con-
vention which declared the state
no longer a member of the Union,
in January, 1861: John McGehee, L7dies' and M en'
who became president of the Se- Ladi S 'anc ii e S
Raession convention; George T.
Ward, Samuel B. Stephens. Jack- READY TO WEAR /1"
son Morton and James G. Cooper. J l .
R. Carrington Cabell became a
Florida representative in congress. /
At leats five members. of the fu- O
tnre supreme court of the state 9MAKE OUR STORE YOUR HEAD UARTERS
were members of the convention: WHILE IN APALACHICOL
Walker Anderson, Benamin D.
Wright, Thomas Balttzell, Leslie A.


the legislative councill of 1836, re-,







FRIDAY\ DECEMBER 2, 1938


THE STAR,'PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


PAGE THREE


Square Riggers Called at Old

St. Jbseph; Modern Freighters

Tie Up at Port St. Joe's Dock

One hundred years ago wooden habitants in the days when the old
ships and iron men plied the seas sailing ships had to go "around
when St. Joseph was a thriving I the Horn" to reach there from
port endeavoring to secure the the western coat of South Amer-
lion's share of water bourne cargo ica. Today the freighters calling
that formerly had been passing here from the same points come
over the docks and through the direct through the Panama Canal,
warehouses at Apalachicola. the voyage taking but days, where-
Today the new city of Port St. as in the old days it required
Joe is rapidly coming into her own months.
as a point of call and departure Baililr'; sips were still the main


for' modern ocean-going vessels,
and the contrast between the old
and the new is shown in the two
pictures accompanying this story.
St. Joseph was a hustling bustl-
ing city of approximately 4000 in-


tra'e carriers in the last century
w-en St. Joseph was gaining:fame
as the cradle of the Florida con-
stitution, though steam was com-
in- in, the first steam-sail ship,
t". Savannah, having crossed the


One hundred years ago, when old St. Joseph was at the peak of her
glory, wooden ships and iron men were the lifeblood of interna-
tional commerce. Today large steamships:tie up at Port St. Joe's
new steel-bulkheaded dock to take on and discharge their cargoes.
Compare this picture with that of the Tropic Star, the first vessel
to call at. the new port.


The Tropic Star, th first ocean-going vessel to tie up at P"-t St.
Joe's new dock. It brought a load of salt cake from Chili for use
in the St. Joe Paper Company mill. Vessels. coming into St.
Joseph's Bay require no tug, coming in under their own power.


Senator Andrews

Working Strong

For Centennial

Family of Solon Came To Florida
Before Convention Was Held
In Old St. Joseph

United States Senator Charles
0. Andrews. senior senator from
Florida, who has been making al-
most continuous trips to all parts
of the state during the past six
weeks, is a strong booster for the
success of the Centennial Celebra-
tion to be held in Port St. Joe and
has been talking it up not only in
Florida, but in Washington, D. C.
In a letter to the editor of The
Star, Senator Andrews has this to
say:
W. S. Smith, Publisher
The Star
Port St. Joe, Florida
Dear Mr. Smith-I believe that
the 100th anniversary of the sign-
ing of the state's first constitution
will be one of tue most glorious
celebrations ever held in our state
and I am doing what I can to pub-
licize it in my trips throughout
the state, in the hope that it will
be possible for literally thousands
of Florida people to attend and
enjoy the inspiration that they
will naturally receive.
It so 'happens that my family
came to the state of Florida over
one hundred years ago-before
the first Constitutional Conven-
tion-so this celebration, to me, is
one that I look forward to with
deep interest. I only wish it were
possible for our ancestors who
met in the first Constitutional
Convention to come back to Flor-
ida and see the development
which has occurred there in Port
St. Joe. Its growth from a tiny
fishing village on tne Gulf, through
adversity and hardship, to one of
the most beautiful and thriving
communities in our state should
be,. I believe, an inspiration, not
only to many otmnr communities
in Florida, but to .each individual
citizen.
Port St. Joe, in my opinion, is
on the threshold of a glorious
future. Its splendid deep water
harbor will welcome the ships of
the world as time goes by, and 1
believe that security, prosperity,
neace and happiness will be found
there during the years to come.
I congratulate you, as publisher
of The Star, and the public-
spirited men and women who com-
prise the Centennial commission
and who have devoted their time,
energy and ability in behalf ^of
this program, which I am certain
will be a most outstanding suc-
cess, and one which will be re-,
membered for many years to come
by all of ug who will be fortunate
enough to attend.
.With kind personal regards and
good wishes, I am,
Sincerely yours,
Charles O. Andrews.

tlantic in 1819, and the Great
Western vwas put into regular serv-
ice' between the United States and
England in 1838, making the cross-
ing in 16 days.
With the dawn of 1938, Port St.
Jo.e started probably the greatest
comeback any city in the South
has ever seen. The site of the
largest city in Florida is now a
flourishing city and is attracting
more nationwide interest than
any city in-the South and bids fair
to outrival the fame and glory of
her ancient .ancestor-St. Joseph.
The modern docking facilities
now available, both at the St. Joe
Paper company dock and the pub-
lic dock, where a new warehouse
is rapidly nearing completion, are
said by masters of vessels putting
in here to equal anything they
have seen in their travels around
the globe.


PORT ST. JOE


FLORIDA


,We Extend Congratulations to


Florida and Port St. Joe

Upon the


100th Anniversary

of the Signing of the State's


First Constitution


0

AND

Griffin's Grocery MARKET

H. L. SAULSBURY, Mgr. PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


LEWIS STATE BANK
TALLAHASSEE

FLORIDA'S OLDEST BANK



Statement of Condition
September 28, 1938
RESOURCES
Loans and Discounts ..........$ 759,418.84
Overdrafts .................... 1,030.91
,United States Bonds and Notes- 909,375.00
Other Bonds ................... 668;506.67
Premium on Bonds ............. 9,128.11
Banking House and Fixtures ., 53,844.52
Other Real Estate ............. 109,6.54.99/
Cash and Due from Banks...... 1,378,880.07

Total Resources ........... $3,889,839.11
LIABILITIES
Capital Stock .................$ 100,000.00
Surplus Fund ................. 100,000.00
Stockholders Reserve Fund .... 100,000.00
Reserve for Depreciation....... 34,260.21
Special Reserve ........... ..... 2,500.00
Reserve for Contingencies...... 5,000.00
Undivided Profits' ............. 3'1,538.20
Reserve for Overdrafts ........ 1,000.00
Due to Depositors ............ 3,515,540.70

Total Liabilities ............. $3,889,839.11


WE WILL BE PLEASED TO BE OF SERVICE TO, YOU
Member 'Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation


C


Come to Port St. Joe, where you The idea of making paper-pulp
will find that good old. Southern of wood was first entertained in
hospitality. the early part of the 19th century.



Congratulations Florida!
Upon the

100th Anniversary
of the Signing of
Florida's First
Constitution In 1838



Hinson Fruit Store
Next Costin's Department Store



WE EXTEND

SINCERE GREETINGS
To the State of Florida
and the City of Port St. Joe





Costing's Dept. Store






PAGE FOUR


Attorney Gem

Wide I

Attorney General George Conpe
Gibbs heads the legal department
or the state of Florida. During thi
;wo-year period included in the
last attorney general's report
11.J civil cases and 388 criminal
cases were hand-lea by this office
Attorney General Gibbs, ap
pointed by Gov. Fred P. Cone ti
fill the vacancy created by thi
ath of Attorney General Cary D
Landis, was elected to this office
Lie peop'.e in the general elec
tion last November to serve unti
January, 1941. This method of se
election of the attorney general dif
.s from that prescribed in the
first Florida constitution drawn up
at old St. Joseph just 100 years
a'o this month. Under that con
stitution the attorney general was
selected by the joint vote of bott
houses of the legislature.
Has Wide Range of Duties
*', '~-~ cnlet law enforcement of
ficelr of the state, t.e attorney
general has a wide range of du-
ties. He is a member of many of


THE STAR, fORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


eral Has Conserving State's

lange of Duties Seafoods Has Been

A Major Problem
r has power and responsibility con- ,
t ferred upon him, not by the con-
e stitution or by statute, but by the Requires Patrolling of 4400 Miles
e common or unwritten law. He is of Shoreline In Which 8,000
t, authorized, to take whatever legal Fishing Boats Operate
L action is deemed necessary to
. protect the interests of the gen- The immense importance of col-
- eral public, to prevent nuisances, serving and, replenishing Florida's
o and, to oust officials usurping a wide variety of seafoods, has been
e public office. one of the major problems faced
. The attorney general and those by Governor Cone's administration.
e working under his supervision and For 400 years white men have
- control, look after the legal inter- been fishing commercially in Flor-
l ests of the state of Florida, and in ida. Through these centuries Na-
" that way guard and protect the in- ture has been able to provide man
' terests of the people of Florida. with an, abundant supply of sea-
e----- foods and to renew this supply un-
P FLORIDA IS GARDEN aided, until in recent years de-
s SPOT OF THE NATION structive .machines and methods'
used by reckless men have threat-
' Vegetables and Fruit Can Be ended to deplete and to destroy the
h Grown Every Month of Year state's once vast resources.
When he was a member of the
That Florlda is the garden spot legislature, Governor Cone realized
of the nation is evidenced by the the danger faced by Florida's great
fact that vegetables and fruits can fishing industry and introduced the
be grown in the state every month act creating the shellfish comanis-
of the year, and their. value as a sion, which was the forerunner of
.Qhealth food is greater than .thosethepresent conservation depart-
grown elsewhere. Scientists~ 'e- ment.
clare that Florida receives more of When hebecame governor, he
the effective ultra-violet rays of appointed Robert L. Dowling, one
the sun than another part of thetading business
of the state's outstanding business
country, which produces th en, as supervisor of the conser-
health-giving minerals and vita- mn a departm ent and instructed
vation department and instructed
mins in abundant variety of For- him to make a thorough study of
The extent and variety of Flor-
ida-grown vegetables and, fruits is the situation and not only to en-
set forth in a book recently issued force the conservation laws, but
by the Florida Department of Ag- to devise means of rebuilding the
ric r entitd Forida Fru state's seafood resources.
riculture entitled "Florida Fruits Thia it seafood r ., r, .
This is a rmn dous task re.


and Vegetables in the Family
Menu," which says that from Janu-
ary to January, throughout the
entire length and breadth of the
state, from Pensacola to Key
WNest, fruits and vegetables of
some type, or of many types, are
n in season, and not only in season,
but in sunshine.
I -____r-
DEFINITION
GEORGE COUPER GIBBS One definition of the word for-
Attorney General of Florida 'estry is: "The economic manage-
ument of trees as communities." It
:he 'l.'tis and commissions thrui is distinct f r'o m -aboriculture,
a-hich the various functions of the which is more strictly concerned
state government are carried out. with the individual tree.
kmong those of which he is a" --
nember are the board of commis-' There are many opportunities
,ioners of state institutions, the for paying investments in the de-
:ta'e board of education, the state velopment of Port St. Joe.


quiring the patrolling of about
4409 miles of shoreline, much of
which extends into fresh water
lakes and up tidal rivers. Florida
waters produce commercially ap-
proximately 60 of the 120 or more
edible fish found in the United
States and yield annually more
than 137,000,000 pounds. The state's
total land area is estimated at
35,000,000 acres, of which about
2,841,000 acres are inland waters.
The great belt of coastal waters
extend from 10 to 40 miles in width
and almost surround the state.
About 8000 fishing boats are used
in the industry.
It is estimated that Florida's
commercial fishing industry repre-
sents, an annual turnover of $20,-


PORT ST. JOE


FRIDAY. DECEMBER 2. 938


000,000, that about $10,000,000 is
invested in equipment and that
fully 75,000 Floridians depend up-
on this industry for their daily
bread.
As a lure for tourists, Florida
fishingg is second only to her cli-
mate, and nowhere else In the
state can such fine fresh water
fishing be found as in Gulf county


It is conservatively estimated that
tourists. spend annually upwards Send The Star to a friend.

While Attending the

'CENTENNIAL

CELEBRATION


1


8


3


8


1








8


STOP AT LqHARDY'S
THE BUSIEST CORNER IN TOWN
for-


ICE CREAM
MAGAZINES


FOUNTAIN DRINKS
DRUGS and SUNDRIES


FLORIDA


- 'S


1


3


-1


pardon board, the Florida securi-
ies commission and the state bud-
A.t commission. He is also attor-
iey for these boards and for
otherss of which he is not a mem-
aer.
Located in the recently con-
;tructed addition to the. state
capitol building, the attorney gen-
?ral an1 his staff occupy offices
'specially designed for the use of !
Th'e law department of the state.
The attorney general's law li-
brary, containing more than 5000
volumes, is one of the most com-
plete in the state. An aid to the
assistants in conducting the law
work of the state, this library is
also used by lawyers and others
in their search for answers to le-
gal problems.
Much of the litigation carried on
by this office is in the supreme
court, and hardly a day passes
without a representative of the of-
fice arguing some case 'before the
court.
Legal Adviser To Governor
The attorney general is the le-
gal adviser to the governor and
the various members of the ex-
ecutive department of the state
government. His office is called
nn rndiv to render written opin-
ions interpreting the meaning of
the legislative enactments and to
advise state officials as to their
duties under the laws, applicable
to them. These opinions constitute
a substantial part of the work of'
the office. The latest attorney gen-
eral's report contains 840 printed
pages of opinions rendered to
state officials.
In addition, the attorney general


EAT HERE

During the

CENTENNIAL

Good Food Served
Promptly and Courteously


BEER AND WINES OF ALL KINDS


I0 10 ears

Is a mighty long time-and
you can't :f ford to let your
car go even a hundredth
part of that time without
giving it a complete over-
hauling. And that's our businiess-overhauling
and repairing automobiles. Bring your car in to-
day and let us give you an estimate.


City Service arage
1. H. WIMBERLY, Prop. PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


WELCOME


'Centennial Visitors!
'Upon the

100th ANNIVERSARY"
of 'ie Signing of Florida's /

FIRST CONSTITUTION

We feel that this is a fitting occasion to commemor-
ate in revived memory the deeds of the early pio-
heers who fought for and achieved the th ngs which
made this great and prosperous State! of Florida
what it is today. To them we d onor, and
trust that we of 4oday will bear ever nward the
heritage they have bestowed upon u~s.

o


GULF HARDWARE & SUPPLY CO.
PHONE 2 PORT ST. OE, FLA.


i


S-ee Our Gorgeous Display of

CHRISTMAS QIFTS
YOU WILL FIND HERE SUITABLE GIFTS
FOR EVERY MEMBER OF THE FAMILY





"Where Friends Meet"
"Where Friends Meet"


of $75,000,000 to enjoy this won-
derful sport in Florida's waters.
-----*----
The annual death toll from tu-
berculosis in the United States
would be 250,000 if the death rate
of the early 1900's still prevailed.
Under present mortality condi-
tions the annual death toll is about
70,000.


TRIANG~LE CA~FE


-_Li
1






FRIAY, DECEMBER 2, 1938


THEl STR POR ST.- JE FLOID PAC F i-


Dr. Herty Is Man Indirectly

Responsible for the Industrial

Rehabilitation of Port St. Joe


Port St. Joe owes its present in- I


Dr. Herty had made paper suc-


dustrial development and place in cessfully from black gums and tu-
he sun to a man who saw dimly, pelo gums and last spring had be-
thegun Side experiments with soft
a great many years ago, a vision maple.
in the whispering piney woods of While working with slash pines,
the South; a vision that later be- he discovered animal-type fats
came the dream of something be- which he held out as a likely
side and beyond tme lumber and profitable by-product of the paper
turpentine which, through a dozen industry. The fats, necessarily ex-
generations, had aeen the indus- tracted from -the pine pulp in the
trial reason for the piney woods- paper-making process, would be
a dream that lately came true, as useful in making, soaps and in
dreams so often do in the story certain) mine flotation processes,
books, and so seldom come true he said.
in this, our toilsome and baffled With the death y r Dr.. Herty last
life. 'zi July,' the entire nation suffered a
This man, Dr. Charles H. Herty, serious loss. Millions of people
came to see in the southern pine have benefited economically by the
tree a thing more stately than results of his research work. His
timber, and a use more valuable death left a vacancy that prob-
than its traditional bleeding for ably never will be filled.
sap. He could see, dimly at first The opportunity comes to but
and then more and more clearly, few men to render as great a serv-
the rush and swirl of a giant rib- ice as Dr. Herty rendered to the
bon of paper over the rolls of a social, and economic development
vast machine similar to that in of the nation. He was a prophet


Dr. Charles H. Herty, distin-
guished Geoorgia scientist, who
developed the process of making
paper from pine trees_ a nd
worked tirelessly in behalf of
,scientific utilization of the vast
forests of the SDouth. He .died
'ast July in' Savannah, Ga.,


use at. the St 'oeb Paper company.
A i a;ive .Georgian,. the slight,
soft-:wo!iken rceintsi spent the last
y'ar :Iof bhs lie with the project
in which he tok the greatest
,prde annd in which be won inter-
narional renewri-tbe development
of paper pil~i from the trees qf
the .ouibern tate-s-and we, as
trepidenti oftPott St. Joe and Flor-
qda, should. pay our respect to the
"niemory of this man. who gave us
pour great opportunity.
SDr. Herty envisioned the pine
pulp industry as the lever which
hli believed\would tart the South
on the road\to economic improve-
,ent. At orltime he stated -his
vi.ws on thilubject as follows:
:"In order t ive our people a
living and g~ them out of one-
rdom shacks, t may be desirable
in the next years to eat into
'our forest capital. But we've got
900,000,00 3 .s o forest land in
the Sou i. itf properly pro-
tected, a n; -.ied. can yield one
tord an acre ar."


where he had realized the dream
of- his lifetime-erection of a
pine-to-paper mill. This picture
was. made when he was cam-
pigning for this experiment, and
is available for use in The Star's
"cn'ennial Edition through the
courtesy of the Atlanta J6urnal.


of a new day and while he was
honored during ~t TIfetime, the
full measure of his work will never
be appreciated until its fruition
several years hence.
All honor to this man whose
contribution to the industrial, and
consequently economic and socio-
logical advance of the South, can-
not be measured.


HOUSES SCARCE

IN ST JOSEPH

Dwelling Made To Order In South
Carolina Finally Cost $4000
After Erection

A housing shortage apparently
existed in the old city of St. Joseph
similar to that existing today in
the new city of Port St. Joe. This
is shown in an account written by
R. J. Moses, secretary of the St.
Joseph & Iola railroad, when he
tried to. secure living accommoda-
tions in 1837.
After Moses had unsuccessfully
attempted to rent a house for $600
a year, he ha one made to order
at Charleston, S. C., for $300. How-
ever, wages were so high in St.
Joseph that the final cost of the
house after erection was $4000.
Following collapse of the city
in 1841, Mr. Moses bought the
house for $37.50 that he unsuccess-
fully attempted to rent four or five
years previously for $600 per an-
num. He later sold this house,
with the dwelling that had cost
him $4000,-and his father's resi-
den, valued at $2000, for $75.

STATE HAS BELONGED
TO U. S. FOR 119 YEARS

Treaty of Purchase From Spain
Signed On February 22, 1819

Florida has belonged to the
United States for 119 years.- The
treaty of purchase was signed at
Washington on February 22, 1819,
by John Quincy Adams, secretary
of state, and Louis de Onis, the
Spanish minister. It was signed
in Madrid, Spain, by Fernando,
king of Spain, and Evaristo Perez
'1e Castro, secretary, some months
later.
Florida became a territory by
act of congress on March 30, 1822,
and the act is recorded on page
654 of volume 3 of the United
States Statutes. It became a state
on March 3, 1845, and this act is
recorded on page 742 of volume 5
of the U. S. Statutes.
.Th'e treaty of ,purchase is printed
in the Code of Florida. There was
a period of delay between the
date of the actual signing of the
treaty and the turning -over of the
territory to United. States authori-
ties, caused by slow communica-
tion and transportation of those
days.

Something can be and is grown
all the year round in Gulf county.


M. G. Lewis & Sons


GARAGE
Extends Congratulations To

Florida and Port St. Joe
Upon the 100th Anniversary of tie Signing of
THE STATE'S FIRST CONSTITUTION

SEE US FOR YOUR
CAR REPAIRING



WRECKER SERVICE
PHONE 6,

PORT ST. JOE, FLA
ya


100 YEARS AGO---
When Florida's First Constitution was drawn up at
Old St. Joseph, all shoe repairing was done tediously
by hand.
TODAY We care for the shoes of all the residents
of. Pert St. Joe with the most modern equipment and
S do the finest work in a minimum of time.



Leader Shoe Shop
AUSTIN HUGGINS, Mgr. PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
-cJ

CONGRATULATIONS TO FLORIDA AND PORT ST. JOE!
WELCOME CENTENNIAL VISITORS!
Stop At Cooper's For Your Tonsorial Needs While Attending
The Centennial Celebration


Cooper's Barber Shop
PORT ST. JOE -- FLORIDA
w..... rg1l, '~d~r~P"CUrFm~


GOING

FORWARD

INTO THE SECOND
HUNDRED YEARS


Port St. Joe's

Newest Store


Joins with the rest of the
city and the great Common-
w\ealth of Florida in the
celebration of the

One Hundredth

Anniversary
/-
of the signing of the

State's, First

Constitution
at Old St. Joseph in

1838

SMay the next hun-
dred years see as great, or
greater, progress made in
development of this great
and glorious state as the
past hundred years.


GEtRGE HUDSIN, Mgr.


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


r


t -


THE STAR, POR~T ST9. JOE, FLORIDA:


PAGE FIVE


Suwannee Stores






..-. -- TIIH STAR PORT -ST.- JOE, FLORI-DA


PAGE 81X. ,,


Dead Lakes 0

Finest Fish


Gulf county's Dead Lakes are between the lakes: and the Gulf,
conceded by anglers to constitute the waters of the Dead Lakes are
about the finest fresh water fish- continually being lowered and at
ing grounds in the tteg, Th i name o
is derived, from the fact that a oude f te hnnels, are
great forest of millions of dea ,-
aad living treoa aft. CDress knees
'siand 6are and ghostly in the wa-
ters of the lakes.
No one knows exactly how these
lakes were formed. A number of B .
theories have been put forward. jq '-
One is that the Indians who lived
in this section built a crude dam
where the Chipola river empties -aB- -
into the Apalachicola river about- -! .
a half mile from Wewahitchka,
causing the waters to back up in
the Chipola rivei bed and sub-
merging the trees that lined; its
banks. Another is that a tug boat
-was sunk in the Apalachicola dur-
ing the 'Civil War by the Federals
in an attempt to blockade ship-
ments from the Confederate's salt
works'on the Gulf of Mexico.'Still
another is that plantation owners
put hundreds, of their slaves to.
work -to 'dam the OChipola at.. its
work to i the Chipola at. its Scene on the Dead Lakes, 25 mi
conflux with the Apalachicola. provides 85 square miles of the
Be that as .it may, a man-made the state of Florida. Boats and
('am or one formed by nature from a number of fishing camps that
drifting logs and other debris
blocked the Chipola and formed. a
great body of water covering some
85 square miles making the finest
fresh water fishing ground in t heC O
The federal government has de- C O N G I
dared the Chipola river a navi-
gable stream from the Apalaohi-
cola to Marianna, and apprbpria-
tion' are furnished by congress F lo ridc
for.. dredging work. As a result of
this, and construction of canals
THE SC


600 VARIETIES OF
FISH IN FLORIDA
Visitor To State In 1564 Tells of
Odd Fish Observed

According to a statement of the
Unite 'States Fish Commission
there are no less than 600 varie-
ties of.fish in Florida's salt and
fresh waters and, its'. .ore than
2000 miles, of seacoast, innumer-
able lakes and many rivers.
Sparke, in his record of a visit
to Florida bv an Englishman, Cap-
tain John Hawkins, in 1564, said: I
"Of fish they have in the rivers
pike, roch, salmon, trout and divers
other fishes, and of great fishes,
some of them the length of a man
and longer, being of a bigness ac-
cordingly, have a snout much like
a sword a yard "long. There are!
also sea fish, which we saw com-
ing down the coast flying, which
are of the bigness of a smelt, the
biggest sort have four wings, but
others ,have but two."
Apparently we of this modern
Florida are not the originators of
fish stories about the state.

CURRENCY WAS FREELY
COUNTERFEITED DURING
EARLY DAYS OF FLORIDA
In the early days of Florida
residents of St. Joseph were in the
same fix as everybody else in the
matter of a safe currency. Florida
at that time had not progressed
far enough to have'a safe banking
law, but laws did exist in other
and aasioliing states that gave
banks the right of issuing notes.
These were freely counterfeited so
much so that when a business man
went away from home and took a
package of notes with him, he did
not know whether they would
prove to be good' or not.
Up to'the time of the war of
1861-65, bank note detectors were
issued, giving descriptions of hun-
dreds. of spurious notes with which
the country was flooded.
The present city of'Port St. Joe
vas incorporated in 1910.


federal. aid for construction of a
dam and locks on the Jaken to
,.maintain a constant water level,
but nothing had ever come of
these attempts.


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1938,


er practical dry. ..
ffer S m e Unless' something is done, about
SF l ri a :this condition, these lakes and the
inT g In.S q T aia fine.fine singg will soon. be but a.
memory, and efforts have been,
made from time.to time to secure


Tom OWENS' Buster


BLACK

CAT

CAFE


iles north of Port St. Joe, which
finest Bass and Bream fishing in
guides may be secured, at any of
line the shore of the lakes.
-Star Photo


THE BEST PLACE TO EAT
WHILE ATTENDING THE

Centennial Celebration

Prompt and Courteous Service

S food PDinners
;aroad A SPECIALTY


RATULATIONS


Sand Port St. Joe i-

)UTH'S NEWEST INDUSTRIAL CENTER --


ST. OE LUM BE AND




EXPORT COMPANY

PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


* I


- S


Manufacturers and Exporters of


Long Leaf Yellow Pine

Tidewater Red Cypri


j


CLIMATE UNSURPASSED Gulf county isi the birthplace
Sard home of Tupelo honey, that
One of the chief assets of,Gulf far-famed table delicacy and medi-
county is its climate, which for cinal prodnut, that never granu-
uniformity and mildness is scarce-ates and never ments.
ly .surpassed. The mean annual
temperature ranges from 68 to 70 With its vast virgin territory
degrees, and the rainfall from 50 of little known opportunity, Gulf
to 55 inches, evenly distributed county is ,in reality Florida's "last
throughout the year. frontier."


--~-


* f








FRIDAY, DvCEMBER 2, 1938


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


PAGF SFVEN


Rise anhl decline

Of Old St. Josepn

(Continued from Page 2)
.erest to the populace, there were
occasions when the attention of
almost everybody was aroused.
heir delegate, Duval, lost the
:hairmanship of the convention by
>ne vote to Judge Reid, but' as a
partiall compensation for this dis-
ippointment he was made chair-
nan of there committee on the ex-
cutive department, and Allen of
,he committee on the judicial de-
)artment. Through all the sessions
Sense two men played very promi-
ent parts.
During the final days, when the
outlook for the successful comple-
on of the constitution was very
ark, when. the convention had
me to an apparent. stalemate
.ver the adoption of the Important
article XIII on "Banks and, Other
corporations, after long, tedious
mnd acrimonious debates, then Al-
en saved the day by proposing'
n January 5 the 14th section of
he article, which was immediately
Adopted by an, overwhelming' vote.
Vith the signing of the completed
document on the afternoon .of
anuary 11, 1839, St.' Joseph was'
assured of a prominent place in
he annals of Florida.

PART II
We" nimst now retrace our steps
nd. consider the rivalry 'between
he towns of St. Joseph and. Apa-
achicola after the Lake Wimico &
;t. Joseph Railroad began business
n September, 1836.
While the preliminary work for
he development of -St. Joseph as
rival o the parent city was be-
ng so successfully carried out, the
ip'porters of the latter place were
lot idle. At the beginning, of 1836
Se Apalachicola Land company
nat'ed 20,000 to.be.used to deep-
the western channel and the
rbor, thus permitting all vessels
o come within seven miles of the
ity and those of a maximum
.raught of 12 feet, to the wharves.
,t the same time the company
:ave $1000 to the city for purposes
if general improvement, and $5000
o defray the expenses of filling 1
.p the hollows and grading the 0
trees. In order to counteract the s
afluence of the energetic St. I
oseph Telegraph, the officers of e
he company financed the estab- t
[shment of a new paper, the Apa- 1
ichicola Gazette, and engaged as
editor and ostensible proprietor, c
ne of the ablest veterans of Geor- J
ia journalism, Cosam Emir Bart- c
stt.
3e-'d for Commercial War 1
Consequently the fall of 1836 "
und Ithe rivals ready for a bitter p
Uinercial war. The records for d
he years 1836 to 1841 are too i
leagre to be entirely satisfactory. fi
'he outcome of the rivalry in the r
inter of 1836-37 seems to have w
ten a decided victory for the a
ider town, although St. Joseph I
lay have fared better than is ap- k
aren't. b
.Our only source of information 'i
s, the partisan Gazette. According e
Sthe Apalachicola paper, 18 e
teamers' were plying between
hat town and. Georgia, an increase c
'three or more over the preced- n
I year. The total number of ves- b
sls that arrived between Novem- s
;er 1, 1836, and January 31, 1837, ag
mounted to 115, while during the p
ame time in the preceding year 5
ae number had, been only 48. The 24
malicious Gazette announced with cc
reat glee in its issue of Deceip- 1,
31, 1836, that two steamers p,
re, aground in the Lake Wimico
|annel. ci
Decide On Second Railroad .J
The promoters of St. Joseph re- cc
li~ied the disadvantages under tl
ich they were laboring. With a th
pinit that is not surpassed by any UT
modern business firm who is will- fo
ig to scrap costly machines for A'
"gre modern ones, they decided to so
struckt a new railroad from the bs


town to the Apalachicola river a
Tennessee Bluff, where the towi
of Iola was soon to develop. Thi
new road would have two advani
ages over the old one, the treach
erous Lake Wimico would b
avoided, and the transportation:
distance between St. Joseph an
Georgia would be considerable:
less than between Apalachicol;
Ind Georgia-Iola being 28 mile:
from the new town and 70 fron
the old one-while the Lake Wim
ico route made St. Joseph mor
distant from the cotton fields.that
Apalachicola.
The Saints. never, wasted mucl
time translating their plans intc
deeds. By the end of August, 1837
The Times annoticed that $50,00(
had been paid, to Mr. Chaires, the
contractor, and that 10 miles ol
the railroad had been graded and
the requisite timbers prepared
However, there was no possibility
of completion of the work for the
season of 1837-38.
The Apalachicolans, not to be
outdone by their rivals, had
planned an ambitious building
program. The Gazette announced
in March that there were now
completed or in process of con-
struction, 2000 feet of continuous
brick stores on Water street-
each, three stories high, and 80
feet deep.
The second season of commer-
cial competition between the cities,
the winter of 1837-38, found Apa-
lachicola retaining her supremacy,
although her rival's efforts to di-
vert trade were much-more suC-
cessful now than in the preceding
year.
While the Saints were exporting
more than 30,000 bales of cotton,
the total shipped by the older
town exceeded 50,000. St .Joseph
was undoubtedly making inroads
upon Apalachicola's prosperity, but
In doing so the railroad company
was c-'-pelled to lower its freight
rates to such an extent that the
income was 'barely .sufficient,. to
meet operating expenses, .and no
dividends could' be declared on the
original investment. The question
seemed to be which town would be.
willing to endure the, cutthroat
competition the longer.
Highway Completed
During this season and the, fol-
owing summer, the construction
of the railroad to ola progressed,
so that there was hope of its 'com-
iletion by September. This, how-
ever, could not be realized, and the
town was compelled to wait a year
onger.
The inhabitants succeeded in
obtaining a new outlet in May or
June, 1838, when a highway was
completedd from Georgia through
Marianna and St. Joselh to Apa-
achicola. As The Times said:
One of the great obstacles to the
prosperity of our place was its
difficulty of access by land. This
s now removed, and we already
ind the advantages from it in. the
market carts and pleasure.parties
rhich impart substantial comfort
nd gaiety to our city." The town
lad the additional saitsfaction of
knowingg that Apalachicola had
een outwitted, for the road. as at
first projected by the national gov-
rnment, was to run to that city
without touching St. Joseph.
The town was undoubtedly In-
reasing in population, but one
lust not imagine that it was very
ig. The results of an official cen-
us held in the spring of 1838
'owed that Calhoun county had a
population of only 1,645, of which
32 were colored, There were only
60 voters in the county. Franklin
county had, in the same census,
,890 white inhabitants, 176 colored
people and 262 voters.
Thus supposing a more rapid in-
-ease in the population of St.
o'ep:h we may believe,that the
,wms were about equal in, size as
ie third season of competition,
ce winter of 1838-39-arprgyaced.
unfortunately, comp-ete statistics -
r this season are not available.
palachicola's. exports decreased
.that only three-fourths as many
.les of cotton were shipped as


R.


Lt the year before. It is believed that
n St. Joseph's trade decreased pro
s portionately, for there is no sug-
- gestion anywhere that the city
1- scored a great commercial victory.
e Decide To Build Canal
n During this winter the work on
d the St.. Joseph and Iola railroad
Y was pushed steadily on. It was
a completed sometime during 1839.
s Although the exact date of the
1 opening cannot be ascertained it
- was probably as late as October,
e for the advertisement appearing
a in The Times, announcing its
opening is dated October 28, 1839.
S Even before completion of the
Railroad, the restless Saints were
, turning to a new project, or rather
0 to an old one of 1835, the con-
e struction of a canal from Lake
f Wimico to the bay. The vigilant
SGazette of February 2 announced
the project in these terms: "Our
friends of St. Joseph have already
Become convinced that the new
railroad to lola will not answer
their purpose. It is about to share
the fate of the old road to the De-
pot-'being thrown by in disgust.
They now talk of beginning anew,
and digging a canal from their
bay to the Apalachicola river."
This canal was presumably never
begun.
.The population seems to have
been increasing fairly rapidly at
this time. The namoer of voters
who expressed their preference at
the constitutional election of May,
1839, amounted to 283; twenty-
three more than were enumerated
.in the census of the preceding
year, and about 70 more than went
S'o the polls in the same election
in Apalachicola.
Death Blow
During the fourth season of com-
petition, the winter of 1839-40, a
new locomotive was put into oper-1
ation on the Iola railroad. This
was the last big investment made
by the Saints, so far as we know.
The lion's share of the bumper!
cotton crop of the season was
shipped from Apalachicola. Of the'
almost 105,000 bales exported from
this. region, 72,232 bales were sent
fromt'the Wharves of the older city.
The results of this year's rivalry
were the death blow to St.
Joseph's aspirations for commer-
cial supremacy. Much wealth had
been lavishly spent by the pro-
i others' in laying out the city, in
erecting warehouses and wharves
on the bay, on Lake Wimico and
on the river at Iola, in construct-'
:g 36 miles of railroad, in pur-
chasing at least three locomotives


PORT ST, JOE


FLORIDA


HODGES


Lumber Company

EXTENDS CONGRATULATIONS TO


Florida and Port St. Joe
UPON THE

100th ANNIVERSARY

OF THE SIGNING OF


Our First State Constitution


Manufacturers of
High Grade


Long Leaf


Yellow Pine

Lumber


To keep pace with the growth and develop nt of Port St. Joe, we have gradually ex-
ded our operations, enlarged our facility es, added new departments and service fea-
tures. We are prepared to supply present and prospective Home Owners with-
EVERYTHING IN BUILDING MATERIAL FROM FOUNDATION TO CHIMNEY TOP


-I -- orvrilv


and in dredging, the bay and the had been attempted. Inducements
lake. A long continued and able to settlers and, busmess men had
campaign of publicity had been been made with unusual far-sight-
conducted. All political wire-pull- edness. Churches, schools, well-
ing that was humanly possible (Continued on page S)







8
s R 9

3B 3

8 8





WELCOME


Centennial Visitors!
Upon the


100th ANNIVERSARY

of the Signing of Florida's


FIRST CONSTITUTION


We receive our fish just a few hours
after they've been caught .. .. so
they reach your table when they taste
best!

OYSTERS OUR SPECIALTY!






GULF SEA FOODS

CLYDE W. JONES, Prop.


R.


I







PAEEGTTESAPR T OFOIAFIADCME ,13


cl


The financial resources of the
Saints were about exhausted; and
the heyday of their strongest al-
lies, the banks, had long since
passed. New causes of worry were
beginning to disturb both cities.
The western Georgia cotton belt
was about to be connected with
the Atlantic coast by rail, and the
river above the Florida boundary
was no longer as. navigable as it
'had formerly been.
St. Joseph approached its fifth
and last commercial season in an
almost hopeless frame of mind.
There was one little item of cheer-
ing news. .The opening of a new
passenger route from Charleston,
S. C., to Mobile and New Orleans
by way of the town was an-
nounced for October, 1840. This
would bring transient visitors to
the place every second day from
the populous, Atlantic seacoast and
might be the forerunner of better
thingsJ
However, the hope was vain.
Before- long rumors began circu-
lating that the residents of the
older city were going to buy out
'the chief promoters of the town.
In fact, The Apalachicolian, the
only \paper of this locality of
which a fairly complete file for
the winter of 1840-41 is preserved,
definitely 'announced the purchase.
Try To Make City Watering Place
What hope could the future now
hold for tha settlers and property
owners of the town? Many had in-
-vested in real estate, and numbers
of people had built their homes
!here. The commerce of the place
-wolftf t be sufficient to support
the 'inha'itan.ts. Apparently a de-
,cision was reached to encourage
Summer visitors and thus make
tthe city an. early Pablo Beach for
Middle Florida. This seemed to be
' an aasy task, since the bay had
alwayss been noted for its beauty
and its. cooling sea breezes, and its
climate was reputed to be the
healthiest in th'e South. Hence we
find gathered here in the summer'
of 1841 some of the leading people
of the territory. St. Joseph had
laid aside its role as a commercial
metropolis and appeared as an at-
tractive pleasure resort.
Death Angel Strikes,
However, all hopes were doon to
b'e utterly crushed.'
'For the angel of death spread
his wings on the blast;
And the eyes of the sleepers
wax'd deadly and chill."
'This summer will always be re-
r.-embered in the traditions of
Florida, as the time when. the
dr e a d scourge, c yellow fever,
reached its most malignant form
in the annals of the territory. 'St.
Joseph was hard hit.
Other places, liotably Apalachi-
cola, had as high a mortality, but
in no other town were so many
eminent inhabitants stricken.
The wife of former Governor Du-
val succumbed on July 14. The
fever seemed to single out for its
victims the representatives to.the
St. Joseph Constitutional ConVen-
tion of 1838. The other Calhoun
county delegate, Richard C. Allen,
adil the wife and sister of George
T. Ward, Leon county delegate,
passed away. The publishers and
their 'relatives were also targets
of the deadly epidemic. Joseph B.
Webb, proprietor of the Florida
Journal, which 'had succeeded'the
Apalach'icola Gazette, caught the
'disease in St.'Joseph and died be-
fore he reached home. "Dr. E. R.
Gibson, who, had been -associate
editor of the T.rited States Tele-


There newspapers of both Apa-
lachicola and St. Joseph suspended
publication-the former temporar-
ily and the latter permanently. As
if nature wanted to emphasize her
abhorrence of the place, a severe
gale swept down upon it in Sep-
t'dmuer. Details of its violence and
the damage wrought are entirely
lacking, although the storm is
mentionedd by some of the Florida
papers.
Glory Gone Forever
When the cooler weather of the
autumn months at last checked the
devastation of the plague, life and
business in the older town as-
sumed its normal aspect, but the
glory and prosperity of St. Joseph
were gone forever., The most re
markable result of the calamity,
besides the complete rufn of the'
town, was the tradition that gradu-
ally developed that the gallant
"ity had been a place of utter
wickedness.
One can guess 4ow the legend
ard"e.NHe therehad been a flour-
ishing place, which had 't'eii
crushed in a most striking man-
aer, as if' by divine wrath. The
3uperfclal analogy of Sodom ad
'omorrah, and other wicked Bibli-
'cal cities, was so apparent that the
temptation to use St. Joseph as an
object lesson to worldly-minded,
amusement-loving persons, could
not be resisted. However, the town
did not deserve the appellation of
"the wickedest place in the United
States" any mo'e than other cities
along the Gulf coast.
It had its race track and its
public houses where alcohollic
liquors were imbibed in quanti-
ies; ,the sailors. coming from all
quarters gave it a rough element;
but there is absolutely no evidence
that it was in any way abnormal
in this respect. In. fact, all con-
temporary accounts praise the in-
dustry and liberality of its inhabit-
ants. Some of the most cultured
people of the lower South lived
here," and ,long afterwards one of
them, the mother of R. J. Moses,
wrote the followingg in an almost
mystical strain:
"St. Joseplh i ruins is moredear
to n:.v heart than any spotof more
*orldly grandeur, so peaceful, so
healthful, it seems as if its very
repose led'me nearer to my God,
so free from conventionalities and
restraints, so gloriously stamped
by the Finger of God."
Town Deserted By All
SAfter the final tragedy, real es-
tate values naturally collapsed.
The inhabitants could not meet
*pir financial obligations, and the
banks were compelled to foreclose
the. mortgages. But the mortgages
were practically worthless, since
real estate had depreciated so
much in value, with the result
that the struggling Union Bank
alone lost $150,000. The banks at-
tached all slaves belonging to the
unfortunates, as well as their land.
Some of the inhabitants, seeing
complete poverty staring them in
the face, took their movable prop-
erty, including the colored people,
and attempted to escape to Texas,
which did not as yet belong to the
United States.
'Hardly any records of St. Joseph
for the year 1842 have survived.
The Florida Journal 'of Apalachi-
cola in its issue of May 21, 1N42,
says: "St: Joseph with her arti-
ficiai resources and beautiful Bay,
has sunk'into an everlasting com-
mercial sleep." Of course the rail-
roads went bankrupt, and some


e a d D clie graph of Washington, D. C., also
fell before the onslaughts of the
destroyer. Samuel S. Sibley the
Of O d St Josepb n former editor of The Fioridian,
Old St. Jo 'p who had just moved to St. Joseph,
lost his wife in the great epidemic.
(Continued from Page 7) With high and low, free and
i r P 7 slave, thus relentlessly mowed
kept public houses with ice-cold down, it asins no surprise to
drinks, and a good race track had learn t onions no surprise to
been established. It may be safety learn that people fled froew ships
.augerous vicinity. Very few ships
said that the founders of St. entered or left the beautiful bay.
Joseph had done practically every- entered or left the beautiful bay.
Joseph had done practically every- The town was practically isolated
thing possible to make their ven- ad amo depopulated, so that
ture a success, but all in vain. The only 500 people were left on Au-
! aricaps. of nature proved too gat 25. According to one report,
great. i cian remained in the place


IT IS fine to pay tribute tb man's inge-
nuity, to the many wonderful things he
has made and accomplished through sci-
ence and invention.

BUT it is well, also, to pay tribute to
Mother Nature and to the many things
which she still does better than man can
do.

,.ONE of Nature's great achievements is
.the efficient,, economical refrigeration
.which is made possible through the use
of ICE.

NO METHOD of refrigeration yet found
can compare with ICE in the effective
and economical preservation of foods.


1838 1938


dence to make vats for evaporat- enterprise defied nature and man
ing salt. in unequal competition.
Thus, at last, practically nothing
except the cemetery was left of The hardest !thing right now :i
the little city whose inhabitants to keep down expenses while try
had so bravely and with such bold ing to keep up appearances.


cime during this year, or the one
immediately following, the rails
were removed to be used'to build
a road in Georgia.
Apalaqhicolians Buy Houses
The dismantling of the town oc-
curred in 1843. The residents of
Apalachicola bought the deserted
houses, tore them down, shipped
them by water to their city and
erected them there. Issue after is-
ma_ o 'T'he Commercial Advertiser
announces the arrival of vessels
laden with building material from
the dying town. The most inter-
t,;ung item is found in the issue
of August 12, 1843:
The schodher Phrenologist ar-
rived at our port from St. Joseph.
on Tuesday last, bringing part
or a large house, about to be
erected on the corner of Com-
merce and Center streets by our
enterprising citizen, Capt. H. F.
Simmons. This building was for-
merly used as a hotel in St.
Joseph, in her palmy days, -but
will soon be helping swell the
tide of prosperity for Apalachi-
cola. This bringing homes from
St. Joseph and erecting them
here seems to be the work of
"magic "Adzakly."
Nobody knows when St. Joseph
became a real "Deserted Village,"
when. only "yon widowed solitary
thing" was left, as "the sad his-
torian of the pensive plain." It is
certain that everything of value
was gradually removed. Even the
chimneys were torn down during
the War for Southern Indepen-


gratulations Florida!

and

Port St. Joe.
Upon the 100th
Anniversary of the
Signing of the State's
First


Constitution




enwood Products


I


Con

















Ore


Peanut Shellers

GREENWOOD FLORID


A


No other method maintains correct hu-
midity in the food chamber of the re-
frigerator-a condition necessary to,
food preservation.
NO OTHER method provides the essen-
tial condition of AIR CIRCULATION-
which in the ICE refrigerator is constant
in its work, keeping the air clean and
pure, removing food odors and maintain-
ing proper distribution of air moisture.
NpO OTHER method without great ex-
pense, can produce sufficient ice for
every purpose at all times. And no other
method produces the taste-free ice,
purer than drinking water, which is
produced in a modern ICE manufactur-
Sing' plant.


We Extend
BiE ST WISHES TO FLORID A
and to


PORT ST. JOE
UPON THE 100th ANNIVERSARY OF THE
SIGNING OF THE STATE'S


First Constitution

AT THE OLD CITY OF ST. JOSEPH IN 1838


ST. JOE ICE COMPANY
"Pure Ice From Tested Water"


MAX KILBOURNEpo.


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


oNature's Most Efficient,


Most Economical Refrigeration-.-


* For Real Purity

* For Real Economy

* For Real Service

* For Real -Protection


Company

A. D. "Pgp" Harkins, Manage


1,--* .--- -------


, &I ~au ---' y I, ~sL I L


FRIDAY, DECLtMBER 2, 19390


PAGE EIGHT


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


O