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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00104
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: October 4, 1940
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00104

Full Text





The Star-Flbrida's fastest grow.
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St Joe.


Port St. Joe-Site of'the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
est growing little city. ... .I
the heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY., FLORIDA, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1940


Machinery Set


For Registration

On October 16th

Circuit Clerk J. R. Hunter Is
Designated As Chairman
For Gulf County

H. P. Baya, state director of
selective service, opened sTate
headquarters at St. Augustine in
the. state arsenal on Monday oT
this week and at oice began the
._etting up of machinery for the
; one-day registration for selective
Silitary service on October 16 of
6l1 Florida men between the ages
of 21.and' 35.
Appointed as state director only
last' week by 'Govornor Fred P.
Cone, as the first step in the per-
fection 'of the necessary organiza-
tion,; Baya named a chairman in
charge of registration in e a c h
county. Circuit Clerk J. R. Hunter
was designated as Gulf county's
chairman.
In his initial letter of instructions
to countyty chairmen necessarily
general in nature, Baya pointed
out that the county chairman is
,the sole contact with state head-
quarters and is responsible for the
adaptation of the plan for registra-
tion, to his particular county and
for' the efficient and successful
registration of that county.
*'t. is the governor's plan," he
-wrote, "to declare a schooTf-T'Iday
on October 1t, and to use the pub-
lic schools or other public build-
ings as places of registration. The
public.school is one of -the best sym-
bols of our democracy. The sc~oil
system has patrioticaly tendered
their full cooperation in thecarry-
ing out of the registration, and the
school .teachers along with other
patriotic citizens will make idea!
registrars. This work, is of course
all on a patriotic, volunteer and no
(Continued on Page 4)

Kenneymen Win

League Pennant

Take Fifth Game from Apalachi-
cola, in Gulf Coast League
S Playoff Series

The St. Joe Exporters from Ken-
ney's Mill last Sunday copped the
mythical G u 1f Coast Baseball
League penchant when they downed
the Apalachicola Oystermen 7 to 5
on the local ball field in the fifth
game of the playoff series. The
tilt had been postponed for two
weeks due to the recent infantile
paralysis quarantine.
The Exporters chalked up two
runs in the second inning and five
in the "lucky seventh." The Oys-
termen's rally was started by Al
Adams in the seventh and he also
finished the rally in the last of
the ninth when he was the third
man out.
,Much enthusiasm was shown by
rooters from this city and Apa-
lachicola, who packed the grand-
stand to give one of the largest
crowds to titurn" out for any game
during the season.

BEN DICKENS NAMED 2ND
LIEUTENANT IN R, 0. T. C.
Ben H. Dickens of Port St. Joe,
a student at the 'University of
Florida; Gainesvllle, has been ap-
pointed as a second lieutenant in
the university's artillery Reserve
Officers Training Corps regiment.
Ben is a senior.
-.:': 4.-,'.: .


46 SAVED FROM BENARES AFTER EIGHT DAYS AT SEA


This photo, cabled from London to New York, shows children who were among the 46 additional persons
rescued from the City of Benares after they had landed at a port in England. The newly rescued
group included 40 adults and six children who were picked up by a British warship after drifting eight
days in an open boat 600 miles from land. They were first sighted by a British flying boat. The
new rescues brought the death toll from the torpedoing of the City of Benares down to 260.


Woman's Club

Starts Drive for

Beautification

Urges Cleanup Be Started and
Trees, Shrubs and Flowers
Be Planted -

The Port St. Joe Woman's club
this week is inaugurating a drive
tobeatiiiffy our city by cleanlinT uip
vacant lots and yards, planting
trees and shrubbery along our
streets and by developing flower
gardens, according to an announce-
ment yesterday by Mrs. Edna A.
Patton, chairman of the conserva-
tion and beautification committee
of the club.
"We are asking the citizens of
Port St. Joe to co-operate with us
in making our city a thing of
beauty and a joy to those who live
here," said Mrs. Patton, "and to
those who want to live here be-
cause of th-e cleanliness and the
beauty of our city.
,"Do we want the first impres-
sion that people have as they en-
ter our city to be a lasting impres-
sion of how lovely, how clean,
what an air of progress, or do we
want them to pass through or
come here to live with the impres-
sion of our unkempt streets, our
weed-groivn vacant lots, our di-
lapdiated fences and out buildings,
as well as badly needed coats of
paint on homes and business
houses-and the most lasting im-
pression of all is the utter barren-
ness of our city-the lack of trees
and shrubbery?,
"The citizens of Port St. Joe ar-e
responsible for this drab picture,
and particularly those of us who
are property owners.' It is up to
the citizens of our city to change
this picture, and the Woman's
club is asking everyone to do their
part in cleaning up all unsightly
surroundings, planting trees, mak-
ing yards more beautiful by the
planting of flowers and shrubs.
"Let's be ready to co-operate 100
per cent when our planning board,
which will consist of representa-
tives from each civic organization
headed by the Lions club, calls oh
us for our time, talents andrmoney.
"Our committee, with the back-
ing of the Woman's club," con-
cluded Mrs. Patton, "stands ready
to do all that is in our power to
make Port St Joe so attractive that
those who come here will want to
stay, and those who are forced by'


Work Expected to st. Joe May Have


Start Next Week


On City Hospital


Sharit States That Project
Has Received Final Ap-
proval of WPA

Mayor J. L. Sharit, who returned
Wednesday from a business trip
to the nation's capital, states that
Port St. Joe's $50,000 municipal
hospital project has received final
approval of the Washington WPA
office and instructions have been
issued to the Jacksonville office to
proceed with the work. He stated
that he is reasonably sure that
work will begin next week.
The hospital will be located on
Twentieth street, near the Cen-
tennial building, and will be of
brick construction with fireproof
shingles and asphalt -tile flooring
throughout, making it fireproof
and one of the most modern insti-
tutions of its kind in Northwest
Florida.
Fifty rooms will be provided,
with white and colored wards and
a number of private rooms, and an
isolation ward for communicable
diseases. Initial plans call for in-
stallation of 26 beds to begin with.

WATERWAY BRIDGE DISPUTE
ON WAY TO BEING SETTLED

Senator Pepper declared in the


Automatic 'Phone

System Shortly

Would Do Away With Hand-Crank-
ing' Now Necessary When
Calling Central

J. L. Sharit, general manager of
the St. Joseph Telephone & Tele-
graph company, yesterday was cirp
culating a petition ainong patrons
of the telephone company request-
ing that the present antiquated
switchboard be replaced with mod-
ern automatic equipment.
Installation of an automatic sys-
tem would do away with the pres-
ent method of twisting the tail of
the phone when calling central
and would result in a considerable
saving of time when calling a num-
ber.
Installation of such equipment
would represent a considerable in-
vestment on the part of the tele-
phone company, and the petition
states that in order to provide the
new service an increase in rates
of 50 cents per phone over the
present charge would be neces-
sary. Considering the number or
signatures on the petition when it
reached The Star office, the busi-
ness men of the city apparently
believe the small extra monthly
charge will be worthwhile.
------7--4--
NEW BOWLING ALLEY IS
DOING GOOD BUSINESS


nation's capital this week that The St. Joe Bowling Alley which
there is a good prospect that an was opened last week in the Ned-
agreeament may be reached for the ley building on Reid avenue by L.
elimination of a bridge of the P. Davis of Quincy, is doing an
Georgia-Florida & Alabama Rail- exceptionally good business. Mr.
road on the Apalachicola-St. Marks Davis, who has moved his family
link of the intracoastal waterway to the city, reports that more than
system from Texas to Florida. 2000 games were bowled during
Failure to eliminate this bridge the first week.
has held up the expenditure of" Thre alleys are modern and up-
$400,000 authorized for extension to-date and offer a pleasant recre-
of the Intracoastal waterway from nation to young and old, both men
Apalachicola to St. Marks. Much anl women.
pulpwoodi could be brought to the Mr. Davis extends a cordial in-
paper mill in Port St. Joe from vitation to everyone in the city to
that section If the waterway ex- drop in at the alley, whether they
tension could be made. contemplate playing or merely de-
-r sire to watch the games.
PORT NEWS ---
The Isle of June of Nassau BAND BOOSTER'S CLUB
sailed Saturday with a cargo of WILL SPONSOR PICTURE
lumber from the St. Joe Lumber &
SThe Band Booster's club will
Export company.
sponsor a picture, "Yesterday's
Heroes," at the Port theater Wed-
circumstances to move will go with nesday, Octbber 23.1 The film is a
'the feeling that 'I wish I cOni football story featuring Bob Ster.
have stayed'." ling and Gene Rogers.


Appeal Is Made

For Improving


Local Harbor

Mayor Sharit and Attorney E.
C. Lewis Tell War Depart-
ment Board of Needs

Mayor J. L. Sharit and City At-
torney E. Clay Lewis, Jr., of Port
St. Joe appeared before a war de-
partment board of engineers in
Washington last Monday to pre
sent an appeal for improvement of
T'le south channel and the turning.
basin in St. Joseph's Bay.
Mayor Sharit and' Mr. Lewis told
the board that a iiavigation depth
of 30 feet was required by the har-
bor's rapidly increasing traffic
and that at the present :time large
vessels with deep draft are pro*
hibited from coming into our port.
The necessity for federal aid in
doing the necessary work, they
stated, is due .to the fact that the.
'city of Port St.. Joe and Gulf
county are at ;present bonded to
the limit allowed by law.
The division engineer, partly ap-
proving the project, recommended
that the government take over the
maintenance of the south channel,
but rejected the request for deep-
ening and widening the channel.
It was pointed out by Messrs.
Sharit and Lewis that the increas-
ing water-borne 'traffic from the
St. Joe Paper coniaL,.. the St. Joe
Lumber and Export company and
other concerns and the probability
of early completion of the gasoline
pipe line from this city to Chat-
tanooga, Tenn., will of necessity
require deepening of the channel
and turning basin to care for the
vessels that will be calling here.
A hearing on ,this matter was
held by war department engineers
here last December, but no action
was taken by the department.

Mrs. Collinsworth

Is Taken By Death

Passed Away Saturday At High-
land View Home After
Long Illness

Mrs. Mary Collinsworth, 44, wife
of Wiley Collinsworth, passed
away Saturday at her home in
Highland View aiter an illness of
more than a year.
Mr. and Mrs. Collinsworth came
to Port St. Joe 17 years ago from
Calhoun county and have made
this city their home since that
time.
Mrs. Collinsworth is survived by
her husband and four daughters,
Alma, Edna, Carl and Eta, all of
this city.
Funeral services were held Sun-
day afternoon at Jehu cemetery,
near Wewahitchka, with Rev. D. E.
Marietta, Methodist minister of
this city, conducting the last rites.
--. -c-------
CONKLIN NEW HEAD OF
BAND BOOSTER'S CLUB

At the regular meeting of the
Band Booster's club held at the
high school auditorium Tuesday
evening, B. B. Conklin was elected
president of the organization for
the ensuing year.
Plans were made to sell car tags
and to sponsor a picture at the
Port theater soon .to raise funds
to carry on the work of the club.
Bandmaster Howell Hampton out-
lined a number of plans for the


band.


'VOLUME III


NUMBER 52


I


' '


- .-...


. ,


0""STAR








PAG TW H TR OTS.JE UFCUNY LRD RDY COE ,1


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla.,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year........$2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months..........65c

.-* Telephone 51 )3-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
Is lost; the printed word remains.


A WORTHWHILE MOVEMENT
The Port St. Joe Woman's club this week
is starting a campaign of beautification for
our city, and the co-operation of every prop-
erty owner and every citizen is required if
this movement is to be the success it should
be.
When we come to look around we find that
Port St. Joe-as far as beauty is concerned-
is really a rather barren and desolate place.
Outside of a few residential streets there are
no trees to offer shade and beauty on our
thoroughfares. The greater part of the va-
cant lots are waist-high with weeds and
grass, and in many places we find discarded
automobile bodies and other junk in unsightly
heaps.
It is true that some of our .homeowners are
beautifying their property with trees, shrubs
and flowers, but they are so few that their
efforts go practically unnoticed when the city
as a whole is considered.
-If we all pitch in and work co-operatively
in a planned scheme of beautification we will
soon get gratifying results. The proper type
of trees for this section of the state may be
secured from the state forestry department,
we understand, and if each citizen would
sponsor the planting of but one tree on our
streets and avenues, which would have to be
cared for by the city until they were well de-
veloped, we soon would have a city that
we could all be proud of and which tourists
passing through would remark about.
Let's give the ladies our fullest co-opera-
tion in their drive to make this "A City Beau-
tiful."

FIRE PREVENTION WEEK
Next week-October 6 to 12-is Fire Pre-
vention Week. And that week isn't something
to idly notice and then forget.
Fire Prevention Week is carried on for the
people of Port St. Joe and for all the other
people in this great country. It is carried orn
for our business, and for every other man's
business. It marks an intensive effort to
awaken the American people to the terrible
waste fire leaves behind it-and to show how
fire may be conquered.
Fire Prevention Week should be observed
by all of us-by every man and woman. This
is one place where all, old and young, can be
of great aid to the nation as a whole. Do
your part!

Keep smiling!


The Low Down
from
Willis Swamp
-
Editor The Star:
I just .been reading' some about
Uncle Samuel and his ventures
into business, and .boy, he takes
the cake.
The latest I been reading' is
about a deal up there near Boston
where the government .wanted to..
stant at their housing' project. So
they bought out the Bohemia club.
there for 18 thousand dollars. But


THE HOME GUARD
There has been some talk among members
of the local American Legion post about for-
mation of a home guard unit in Port St. Joe,
and this is as it should be, for it is only na-
tural that ex-service men should sponsor such
an organization, and that they should be of-
ficered by men who have actually seen ser-
vice.
We all know that military drill is good for
both body and mind because it builds physique
and teaches discipline. But that applies more
to younger men than to the ex-soldiers, who
are now in the 40-plus class, and military drill
would do little for them other than to remove
some of the fat from their paunchs and lim-
ber up their creaking .joints.
However a home guard unit should be com-
posed almost wholly of older men, as young
men can enlist in the National Guard unit at

Apalachicola, while men between the ages of
21 and 36 are subject to conscription. Of
course these younger men who are rejected
by the conscription board or the regular army
could be enrolled in the home guard to swell
its numbers.
It is altogether possible that a home guard
might be needed at some time, and it is well
that men in the higher age brackets enlist in
such units and get into better physical shape.
More power to the Legion, and may it go
forward with its plans for a home guard unit
in Port St. Joe.

IT WON'T BE SO BAD
From what we hear, life in America's new
conscript army isn't going to be so hard af-
ter all. With beautiful hostesses in canteens
to arrange social events. and generally make
the boys feel at home, and with screen and
stage stars falling over themselves to volun-
teer their services for free entertainment, it
looks to us like the draftees are going to get
a swell break.
And in addition to this night club atmos-
phere, it seems likely that new recruits may
not suffer the financial losses they have been
expecting as a result of their conscription.
For Washington, we understand, is working
on a plan to give additional pay to men taken
from-industry to make up the difference be-
tween their army pay and former salaries.
And if this doesn't work out, they are also
developing a scheme where a moratorium
will be declared on all installment payments
already contracted, such'as on homes, furni-
ture, cars, and so on.
Just think of it-all this, with a uniform to
swell around in and three meals a day! The
line forms to the right, boys, and don't crowd.

POOR ADVERTISING FOR FLORIDA
One need but look at Florida, where bill-
boards are unrestricted, to realize what an
asset some form of control is. In that south-
ern resort state, where the tourist trade is
such an important item, billboards and roai-
side signs are increasing constantly even
along some of the most scenic highways.
On the Jacksonville-to-Miami highway, for
example, there are more than 23 signs to a
mile-double the number found there in 1934. t
On a two-mile stretch approaching St. Au-
gustine, 90 signs were counted recently, and
in less than two miles on a' road approaching
Orlando 77 signs were noted.-Christian Sci-
ence Monitor (Boston, Mass.).


in order to, git goin' on the project ihvite a large bird to nest in a
they had to git rid of the club- small goperd.
I musts looked kinda dubious,
house, so ,they sold the building'
or something, because Henry says.
back to the Bohemians for 10S Alright, read it yourself-here ii
dollars. The club moved it across is in this Jacksonville paper.
the street to a vacant lot. Brother, Yours with the lowdown,
that is financing a la Samuel. JO SERRA.
But mvn neighhnr sa.v To dAon' ---t


git too exicted-calm yourself. The
government gourd,.research makes
your clubhouse financing' look sick,
he says. The paper says the gov-
ernment looked into the idea of
usi'...gourds for bird houses. And
they finally deducted and decided
that -the size of the gourd should
be in proportion to-the size of ame
bird, for it was found useless to


J. R. Hunter of Wewahitchka
was a business visitor in this city
Tuesday.

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Carter were
week-end visitors 'in New Orleans.

Bert Hull spent the week-end in:
Fairhope, Ala., -the guest, of Mr.
and Mrs. T. W. Richardson.


Pr


*aise Is Given FLORIDA LEADS NATION
Florida leads the entire natibno
George Clements for population gain during the last
ere le en decade, with an increase of 27.7
Mecson Niet hTile an.i Nei


Publicity Director of Port St. Joe's
Centennial Celebration Gets
Deserved Credit

George Clements, veteran news-
paper and publicity man, well and
favorably known in Port St. Joe
where he handled the publicity for
our Centennial Celebration in 1938.
in a recent issue of the Florida
Times-Union was handed a well-
des'erved bouquet of orchids for
his efforts in behalf of the Florida
exhibit at the New York World's
Fair. Said the Times-Union:
"Florida's products and attrac-
tions are receiving incomparable
publicity atfNew York's World
Fair-through the displays as-
sembled under direction of Earl
Brown and his staff. During this
current summer season alone,
thousands of columns have ap-
peared in the nation's newspapers
and .magazines concerning Flor-
ida's great display-as George
Clements, director of publicity for
the state's exhibit, can easily
verify.
"Incidentally, Manager Brown,
and the state as a whole, have
been fortunate in retaining the
services of Mr. Clements in the
publicity position which he has
held since our -participation in Chi-
cago's great Century of Progress
Exposition. One of 'the nation's
oldest active newspapermen a
veteran of Pershing's operations
"south of the border" back before
the World War, and prior to that
a war correspondent during Uncle
Sam's spat with Spain, back in
1898-Publicist Clements is ex-
ceptionally qualified for his pres-
ent task. The energy he displays.
and the results he secures, corm-
pare with anything which might
be .presented by "younger genera-
tions" of working newspapermen.
"The Florida exhibit is a mas-
terpiece-well worthy of all the
attention it has received, and is
receiving-but few masterpieces
actually get "the play they de-
serve" in anything approaching
the proportion accorded this 1940
presentation. Congratulations to
Earl Brown and' every member of
his staff and congratulations,
most of all, to Florida!"
Praise indeed for our old friend,
George Clements. The editor of
The Star, who came into close
contact with Mr. Clements while
he was in our midst, has suggested
that Mr. Clements be secured to
act in the capacity of secretary of
our chamber of commerce, know-
ing that he had expressed a de-
sire to setle in this community.
and we still feel that his acquisi-
tion would be of untold benefit to
our city.


239,000 SUBJECT TO DRAFT
The number of men in Florida.
estimated to be, subject to the
Iraft, between the ages of 21 and
35, is 239,000, according to war
department figures. Estimates fo'
:he nation is 16,404,000.

Mrs. Rush Chism and baby were
week-end visitors in Mobile.
-----
P~nrl The Star to a friend.


Lodge Notices


Order of Eastern Star
Meets on second and fourth
Fuesdays of each month in the
i\asonin hall. over postoffice. Visit
tors who are members are cor,
dially invited to be present.
American Legion
Gulf County Post 116 meets the
first and third Mondays of each
month at the Legion Hut.
American Legion Auxiliary meets
fourth Friday of month, 8 o'clock,
at Legion Hut.
Masonic Lodge
St. Joe Lodge 111 meets second
r",, fourth Friday nights at 8 30.
o'clock in Masonic hall.


Mexico with 24.9, while California
*was third with 21.1 per cent.



Purity Assured,


The Gulf County Dairy's
quest for perfection empha-
sizes purity. In every detail
of production our milk re-
ceives the benefit of scientific j
methods and discoveries


GulfCounty-Dairy
H. M. McCLAMMA, Manager
Leave or Phone Your Orders
to J. Lamar Miller's Standard
Station, Phone 98, ro Bu0
Station Cafe, Phone 12




ART

PROJECT

MAKES COLOR

PORTRAITS

OF CHILD PICTURES
FREE
This offer is one of the most remark-
able ever made. We'll send you a
beautifully hand-colored-in-oil-paint
enlargemnent of anyP picture you want
enlarged. Yes, any snapshot, any fa-
vorite picture you'd like enlarged and
hand-colored. These enlargements will
be size 5x7. They will be mounted on
high quality, double-white mat mount-
ings size 7x9. To duplicate such an
enlargement, hand-colored-in-oil'.
paint, would cost you from $1.25 to
$3.00 in any photographic store. To
get this enlargement you pay only 50c
for the enlargement and the hand-
painting will be done without charge.
Simply send a print or negative of
ycur favorite picture and fifty cent
in coin. That's all you do, and promptly
by mail you'll receive your hand-col-
ored-It-oil enlargement.'Send today to
ART EDITOR
COOPERATIVE FEATURES, INC.
360 N. Michigan Aye., Chicago, Ill.


TWO A. AND NOT-
A NERVINE TABLfT
IN TTHE HOUSE
c~9.


Do You Lie Awake Nights?
M ILLIONS do. The worst of
it is, you never know when
a sleepless night is coming.
Why not be prepared?
DR. MILES
Effervescent Nervine Tablets
help to quiet the nerves and
permit refreshing sleep.
Stop in at the drug store to-
day and get a package.
Try Dr. Miles Nervine T -b-
lets for Nervousness, Sleep-
lessness due to Nervousvess,
Nervous Headache, Exwta-
bility, Nervous Irritability.
Small Package 35
Large Package 750
Rad full directions
in package.


PAGE TWO


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1940


o








FRI4J


Society Personals Churches

LANETA DAVIS, Editor


Daffodils in Plenty

And All American Grown


LEGION AUXILIARY INVITED
TO. APALACHICOLA LUNCH
Members of the American Legion
Auxiliary have been invited to be
the guests of the Apalachicola
Auxiliary unit on Saturday, Octo-
ber 12, according to announcement
yesterday by Mrs. M. L. Fuller,
president of the local unit.
The luncheon will be in honor
of Mrs. Zoe Buzzell, department
president, and Mrs. C. E. Swank,
president of the Third district.
All members who can attend the
luncheon are asked to contactMlIrs.
Fuller before Monday next.

J. A, M. CLUB MEETS
Mrs. W. C. Pridgeon entertainedd
the members of the J. A. M. club
Monday evening at her home on
Monument, avenue. Sewing and
Cfiatting were enjoyed, after whict
;refremhments were served to the
members present.


DR. J.C. COE
DENTIST -
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe



WHEN YOU NEED A

TAXI




4E 123



DIME TAXI CO.


FALL IS HERE!
October heralds opening of the
fall social season. We are pre-
pared to complete your.fall en-
semble with a new hairdress
that will give you that chic
appearance so necessary for
social success.
For Appointment 55
PHONE 55

PRINCESS
BEAUTY SHOPPE



I BAYSHORE
GROCERY AND MARKET
S-Highland View
We Handle Nothing But
WESTERN MEATS-All Cuts
STAPLE and FANCY
GROCERIES and MEATS

SWe Keep Open Until Noon
Every Sunday -


NO SUBSTITUTIONS
Substitutions for specified in-
gredients don't make a pre-
scription. That's why we never
substitute ingredients in your
physician's prescription. Ac-
curacy is our constant watch-
word, You can depend- on us.

LeHARDY

PHARMACY



QUALITY

GROCERY
and MARKET
Make Us YOUR Food
Supply House
:"Prices Right-Clerks Polite"
Clarence Pridgeon, Mgr.
': WE DELIVER


WOMAN'S CLUB INSTALLS METHODIST WOMEN
OFFICERS FOR NEW YEAR IN MEETING MONDAY
Installation services for the Port The Woman's Society for Chris-
St. Joe Woman's club were held tian Service of the Methodist
at the club room in the Centennial church met at the church Monday
building Wednesday afternoon in afternoon with Mrs. A. M. Jones
the first meeting of the new year presiding.
for the organization. The session During the business session a
was -opened by Mrs. Basil E. Ken- letter of thanks from Miss Enid
ney, vice-president of the club for Mathison was read, after which it
1939-40, who introduced Mrs. H..L. was announced by Rev. D. E. Mari-
Oliver of Apalachicola, who con- etta that world-wide communion
ducted the installation ceremonies, services would be held next Sun-


carried out by candle light. Mrs.
R. W. Smith, the new president,
was presented the gavel, after
which Mrs. Oliver brought official
greetings from th e Federation.
Other officers installed were Mrs.
R. R. Minus, vice-president; Mrs.
W. L. Bragg, recording secretary;
Mrs. F. A. LeHardy, corresponding
secretary; Mrs. B. B. Kenney, treas-
urer; Mrs. Robert Tapper, critic,
and Mrs. B. E. Kenney, parliamen-
tarian.
Mrs. S. E. Montgomery of Apa-
lachicola, district chairman ot
public health, gave an outline of
the department's plans for the club
year. This was followed by a brief
business session at which was dis-
cussed the club project for the
year, the heating of the club room
and the Centennial building.. Plans'
were also made for securing a
piano for the club room.
Mrs. Kenney, program, chair-
man, presented the chairmen of
the various committees, who out-
lined briefly their plans for the
year. Several new members wer6
voted on at this time.
After adjournment of the meet-
ing a reception was held, in the
Centennial auditorium in honor of
the teachers of our local schools.

W. F. Poehler returned to this
city Tuesday after a visit in the
southern part of the state.

Mrs. Ed George spent Saturday
in Panama City shopping.

Miss Kathleen Suanders visited
in Dothan, Ala., Saturday.


day.
The program for the afternoon
was in charge of Mrs. M. L. Ful-
ler. The call to worship was fol-
lowed with prayer by Mrs. A. M.
Jones, Jr., and a piano selection by
Mrs. M. P. Tomlinson. The scrip-
ture was presented by Mrs. Kirby;
Meditation by Mrs. H. C. Spence:
"Investing Our Heritage" by Mrs.
Roy Gibson, followed' with a vocal
solo by Mrs. Pauline Murdock.
After the program, installation
services were held by the Rev.
Marietta, the following officers be-
ing installed: Mrs. A. M. Jones.
president; Mrs. M. L. Fuller, vice-
president; Mrs. D. B. Lay, treas-
urer; Mrs. Franklin Jones, record-
ing secretary; Mrs. J. L. Temple,
secretary of mission education;
Mrs. G. A. Patton, secretary of
Christian social relations; Mrs. R.
W. Smith, secretary missionary
projects.

MRS. COBURN HOSTESS TO
THURSDAY BRIDGE CLUB
Mrs. R. V. Coburn was hostess
to the Thursday Bridige club yes-
terday at her home on Long ave-
nue. A colorful arrangement of
fall flowers decorated the living
room where the guests were enter-
tained. At the conclusion of play,
high and cut prizes were presented.
and the hostess served delicious
refreshments to members and in-
vited guests.

Mr. and Mrs. George Hudson and
daughter, Shirley, spent the week-
end in Pensacola visiting with rel-
atives.


Imperial Muffins for Week-End Guests


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SO YOU'RE worried what to serve
for breakfast when guests arrive
this week-end?
Starting with the fruit, why not
have sliced honeydew with sweet,
red cherries scattered over it and
over the plate-for appeal, you
know. Or serve chilled, fresh apri-
cots and seedless grapes on glass
plates (on grape leaves, if you have
them). Follow with eggs baked in
bacon rings. And for this, simply
ring muffin cups with bacon, drop
in the egg, bake until the egg is
set, and there you are, pretty and
easy. It's taken for granted you'll
make plenty of hot coffee.
To crown this summer breakfast-
in name and flavor-make imperial
muffins. They're easy as saying
."scat" to mix up if you use the
new, self-rising flour. Baking pow-


a gsTas ..
der and salt are ready-mixed into
it, thus a double saving of (1) price
of these two ingredients, and (2)
time in sifting them with the flour.
You can use your favorite muffin
recipe with the new, self-rising flour,
omitting both baking powder and
salt. But for your aid, here is one
that's foolproof. Remember, as with
all muffins, to work fast and mix
ingredients only enough to blend
well.
Imperial Muffins.
Cream 4 tablespoons fat and 3 ta-
blespoons sugar together. Add 1 egg
and stir in thoroughly'' (do not
beat). Add 1 cup milk alternately
with 2 cups new self-rising flour
(sifted before measuring). Pour,into
well-greased muffin tins and bake. in
a hot oven (400 degrees' F.) about
2 minutest. :'- :


Since war has shut off all sup-
plies of bulbs from Holland, we are
limited this fall to those hardy bulbs
which can be grown in this country,
or imported from countries not
blockaded.
Of tulips and hyacinths, Holland
in the past has supplied us at least
95 percent, so these are the most
reduced by the blockade. But of daf-
fodils, second in popularity to tu-
lips, our entire supply has been
grown in this country for the last
ten years, and 'the supply this fall
is normal in both numbers .and
price.
Many gardeners are taking ad-
vantage of this situation to plant
daffodils in their garden borders
where other bulbs were formerly
used.
These plantings will endure for
years, in most gardens. There are
few locations where daffodils will
not live and multiply. They can be
left without lifting until they begin
to crowd, then may be taken up and
replanted to cover more space.
Daffodils are favorite material for
those so fortunate as to possess a
bit of woodland. They flourish in
shaded situations, coming into
bloom under early spring sun be-
fore the trees have leaved out, and
then the shade protecting them so
that they ripen their foliage and
mature their bulbs without being
prematurely ripened by hot sum-
mer sitn.
Another most effective practice is
to tuck in bulbs in vacant spots'all
over the garden between other per-
ennials and under the edges of
shrubbery so that in their season
the daffodils give character to the
Entire garden, and then their
leaves, which are unsightly and
floppy during their maturing period,
are concealed by the foliage of the
perennials which mount above them


BAPTIST MISSIONARY UNION
IN MEETING MONDAY
The regular meeting of the Bap-
tist Woman's Missionary Union
was held -at the church Monday
afternoon, the topic being "To the
Jew First."'
The meeting opened with the
year hymn, after which the watch-
word for the year was repeated in
unison. The Bible study, "Our
Great High Priest," taken from He-
brews 1:1-8; 2:1-6, was presented
by Mrs. L. E. Voss and followed
with prayer by Mrs. Charles Mc-
Clellan and a song.
The following interesting talks
were given: "A Calledi People," by
Mrs. E. C. Cason; "The Jew Today
In Palestine, Europe and Amer-
ica," Mrs. Curtis Palmer; "Israel's
Gifts to the World," Mrs. J. 0.
Baggett; "That Israel Might BeP
Saved," Mrs. Fred Maddox, and
"Encouraging Experiences," Mrs.
Voss. Mrs. E. B. Dendy led in
prayer and the meeting was dis-
missed by Mrs. J. W. Sisemore.
Following the program the first
program of the state mission week
of prayer was given.

MIrq MARTHA HINSON AND
FRED McLEAN ARE WED
Miss Martha Elizabeth Hinson.
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. H.
Hinson of this city, and Fredt S.
McLean of Apalachicola .were mar-
ried Saturday in Marianna, the
ceremony being performed by the
Baptist minister of that city.
The bride Is a graduate of the
local high school, class of '40, and
the groom, son of Mrs. Ela Mc-
Lean of Apalachicola, is a gradu-
ate of Chapman hign school in the
neighboring city. He. has been an
employee of the St. Joe Paper com-
pany for tfie past three years.
The newlyweds spent a brief
honeymoon in Alabama and are at
home to their friends at their resd-
dence on McClelland avenue.

Mr. and Mrs. Sammie Davis and
son, Carlyle, and Mrs. M. B. Smith
returned Monday from Dothan,
Ala., where Mrs. Davis was a pa-
tient in a hospital for two weeks.
Mrs. Smith was at the bedside of
her daughter.

Mrs. IT. Oliver 'and Mrs. S. B.
Montgomery of ApalachiPola at-
tended the Port St. Joe Woman's
club meeting 'here "Wednesday af-
ternoon.


and provide shade for the daffodils.
For this purpose the older and
cheaper daffodils and narcissi are
ideal and furnish as fine an effect
as can be obtained by the larger
flowered and much more expensive
modern hybrids.
The poeticus types are favored
for woodland planting in combina-
tion with the native bluebell or mer-
tensia, the wood phlox, phlox divari-
cata, and the white wood lily, tril-
lium grandiflorum. In the garden
they are in season with the early
tulips and the dwarf irises and
smaller spring bulbs.
Some of them are delightfully fra-
grant and are prized for this fea-
ture es well as their beauty. The
narcissus family offers the first
long-stemmed cutting material of
spring. They are ideal cut flowers,
as is shown by the quantities of
daffodils forced and sold by florists'
each winter. The trumpet varie-
ties are easily grown as house',
plants, provided only that the at-
mosphere is not too dry, in which
case buds often blast.


BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS
Mr. and Mrs. Milkes K. Hurlbut
are announcing the arrival of a
son on Monday, September 30.

Mr. and Mrs. J. Lamar Miller
announce the birth of a 7%-pound
son on Sunday, September 29.

Born, Saturday, September 28,
to Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Griffin of
Highland View, a daughter.

Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Tucker an-
nounce the birth of a son, Satur-
day, September 28.

Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Melvin of
Highland View are announcing the
arrival of a son at their home on
Sunday, September 29.

Born Monday, September 30. to
Mr. and -Mrs. P. Bass of Highland
View, a daughter.

Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Byrd and
baby spent the week-end in Pas-
cagoula, Miss.


CLASSIFIED ADS

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
FOR RENT, SALE OR TRADE-
Furnished cottage at Beacon
Hill; electric lights, ruining wa-
ter. See. H. A. Drake, Port St.
Joe. 9-27 2t
CANARIES

HARTZ MOUNTAIN CANARIES
FOR SALE-Singers, $4 and $5;
hens, $1. See Mrs. W. S. Smith,
Star Office, phone 51.


ROOM AND

BOARD
BY THE $7
WEEK Vm

Dining Room

Open to the Public
Club Breakfast, 6 to 9....260
Lunch, 12 to 2 ...........35c
Dinner, 6 to 8 ..........35c


MRS. M. O. FREEMAN
Corner Reid-'Ave. and 3rd St.
Griffin Grocery Building


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE THREE


.FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1940






J


OUR DEMOCRACY,---=byMat


JIgFAl lllllllllillllll~idi|IilllI






Opens Daily 2:45, Continuously
Saturday 1:35 Sunday 1:45
ROY WILLIAMS, Manager

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5
4 BIG SMASH
HITS
2 BIG
FEATURES

Roy ROgers

"The Ranger and

the Lady"

-AND ----
A N-D

LLOYD NOLAN

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2TH R IL L I N G 2
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SLast Chapter of"
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First Chapter of
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S TOM'S TOASTED
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SUNDAY MONDAY
OCTOBER 6 and 7
ROSALIND RUSSELL
VIRGINIA BRUCE
BRIAN AHERNE
-in -

"HIRED WIFE"


TODAY WE HAVE PAPER. AND METAL MONEY, BUT
MOST MONEY IS EXCHANGED BY CHECK..

GERMANY, ITALY AND JAPAN SIGN PACT
S.. ..


may be located in the same build-
ing if desired.
The county chairman was also
directed to appoint two or more
-citizens of the county to serve
with him on his committee. It was
suggested that the county super-
intendent of public instruction, be-
cause of his knowledge of schools,
and the county supervisor of regis-
tration, because of his knowledge
of county precincts and population
distribution, might well be chosen
as members of this committee. (If
Clerk Hunter follows these sug-
gestions h'e will name Chauncey
Costin and C. G. Rish to serve
with him on the committee.)
The number of men to be regis-
tered has been estimated at 15 per
cent of the population. It is also
estimated that one registrar, work-
ing full time, can register a maxi-
mum of 30 persons. A chief regis-
trar and sufficient assistants is to
be appointed for each registration
place. Registrars must be intelli-
gent, responsible citizens who can
write legibly.

Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Ro'ertson
are leaving today for New York,
Mr. Robertson having severed his
connections with the St. Joe Lana
and Development company.

'Mrs. J. E. Rollins and Mrs. I. H.
Woodson spent Monday in Panama
City


Mrs. Richard Miller and Mrs. A.
L. Ward were week-end visitors in
Pensacola.


. and

Keep HEALTHY
Don't let yourself be-
come soft during the,
winter months! Bowl
and be healthy!
FUN FOR LADIES
AS WELL AS MEN,
You'll ENJOY It!

ST.JOEBOWLING

ALLEYS -


WHITE TOP TAXI COMPANY


FOR PROMPT SERVICE

PHONE 100 m

DAY, OR NIGHT
TAXIS ALWAYS AVAILABLE IN FRONT '-
- OF ST. JOE TEXACO SERVICE STATION ;


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Advertisers Live in


Radiophoto from Berlin,taken last Friday, after Germany, Italy and
Japan signed a ten-year military and economic pact. Seated left to
right, Saburu Kurusu of Japan, Count Ciano of Italy and Hitler of
Germany. Standing, Von Ribbentrop reading' declaration.


NEW FORD ON DISPLAY BY ST.


HEALTH
'Mik is an energy food. It is
'eaejly digested and is grand
alone or with other foods.
Enjoy the benefits of the
valuable vitamin content of
Fresh Milk.

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SOLOMON'S

DAIRY
Dlstriblitors of Bruce's Juices

SHELBY STRINGFELLOW
Local Represtative


1941 Ford DeLuxe Coupe. Like the rest of the Ford line for 1941,
It is longer, wider, easier riding, with added beauty of line and finish.


MACHINERY SET FOR
REGISTRATION OCT. 16
(Continued from Page 1)
compensation basis. In charge of
each registration place there will
be a chief registrar, and serving
under him at each registration
place there will be sufficient regis-
trars to adequately handle the nuim-
ber of registrants who will pre-
sent themselves for registration.
The entire registration will be
completed Ootober 1, and the
chief -registrar will then deliver all


of his registration cards to the
chairman of the committee i n
charge of the registration for the
county."
The county chairman, the in-
structions continue, is to immedi-
ately formulate the organization
of his county for registration,
using the county precinct as the
unit for the formulation of regis-
,tration districts. Two or more vot-
ing precincts may be combined, the
instructions state, into a selective
service registration district, and
two or more registration places


W HAT they promise in their advertisements,
and what they deliver in their merchandise, are
right there for all to see.
If they deliver what they promise, they make
friends and steady customers. If not they make
enemies, lose patronage and finally go out of
business.
Those are the cold, hard reasons why honesty
is the best policy-especially in advertising.
But the real fact is that advertisers as a class
are humanly jealous of their good names. The
trade-marks of manufacturers and the published
recommendations of merchants are only ac-
corded to products which they can offer you
with confidence and pride.
You can trust the ads to lead you to sound
values.


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4,.,1940


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE FOUR


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