<%BANNER%>

UFPKY NEH LSTA



The star
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00103
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: September 27, 1940
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00103

Full Text






The Star-Florida's latest grow-
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and up)uliding of
the City of Port St Joe.


Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
est growing little city. In
S TR the heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY., FLORIDA, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1940


WHAT THE GOVERNMENT WANTS TO KNOW ABOUT
AMERICA'S YOUNG MEN TO BE DRAFTED


REGISTRATION CERTIFICATE
TSS a tfllIs IbM I, .,,,Jm~ .IA SMl
AesA cI. Vnda.A.,Mor~b. Pnsl.nI sl i V.and Ins

:n1w ..............................

Ink



Hp areSthe sele 1c0tiveservice
bsCjT(O. OP ESISm*TAN
RA*CE RUSS?~ W'ETOSS
---- SIPnaOL A*Dr.5 CASIPIXISSI



Bed uES
Q,*Ind,,IAIA R~s l4 US.......
ln......ui:-9,.



* *.AI5 a. .u., SO; "(',......-U S..A*

*~ I ~ -- -
f~ ~ UUPUa,


l~er4 ar the seective servc


0ESCSIPTIS.U? REGISTRANT
U.CU US', (*Ppn l~aU, IA
Ol~~~nAC IlU lr~
-~ nn' UA l .
.5!!L I PsSA
.abr. PAo~ ~r~l AhIM. U. SD I LIU......

AL~ Ol~s 5,1. ,n.nSM*5.54 IUISn- (II,..


forms which will have to be filed


gput by all men from 21 to 35 years (inclusive) giving the govern-
nment officials a wealth of information' on the personnel of United
States forces. The cards at top are front and: back of the registra-
tii certificates which will have to be carried on the person. Cards
at bottom are front and back of registration forms.
v


41FordsNowOn

Display By St. Joe

Motor Company

Show Rooms Thrown Open to the
Public This Morning for View-
ing of New Model's

Today is the annual "big day"
fo- .the St, Joe Motor company
as the new 1941 Fords were placed
on the display room floor for view-
ing by, the public.
The new cars give an entirely
new ride with their new, wider
bodies, greater vision all around,
longer wheelbase, longer spring-
:base, greater overall length, ney
eeat construction, faster accelera-
tion,' new body mounting, neVr
sock absorbers and: ride stabilizer
and many other, features.
"'We really have something new
this year," said W. 0. Andersoli.
"The cars have 56-inch front seats
-seven inches wider than.in any
previous Ford-and the width oft
the back seat is 57 inches. A num,
ber of upholstery stylings are
available in all models and there
Ais a wide choice of 'body colors.
"I've never seen a finer Frd
than this, and I don't believe al.y-
one can find another low.pric.ed
car to compare -with this big neew
Ford in comfort and styling.
"I ask everyone to come' to our
showrooms and view this new
line."

CITY LICENSES DUE SOON
City Clerk M. P. Tomlinson an-
nounces that all present city li-
censes expire September 30, and
urges all firms doing business in
thp city to secure 1940-41 licenses
at once.

FIRST GUARDSMEN GO NOV. 25
Secretary Stimson announced
this .,week that the first National.
Guardsmen from Florida would..be:
called for duty November 25, be-
Ing the 31st Division. -They will be
assigned -to Camp Blanding, .ey-
stone Hteihts.


Coast League

Championship

Game Sunday
4
Kenney Exporters to Meet Apa-
lachlcola Oystermen Here In
Fifth Game of Series.

The big thrill of the Gulf Coast
League baseball season is on the
pan for Sunday when the Kenney
Exporters, winners of the second
half of the season, tangle with the
Apalachicola Oystermen, tops for
the first half of the season, in the
fifth and final game of the playoff
series for the league pennant.
Each team has taken two games,
Apalachicola winning the first of
the playoff series 10 to 0, the Ex-
porters taking the second 9 to 5,
Apalachicola the third 12 to 1, and
the fourth going to the Kenney-
men 3 to 2 in an 11-inning tilt.
In each instance the winning
team played on its home grounds,
so it looks like the Exporters will
have a slight edge over the visi-
tors in Sunday's game.
The game is called for 3 o'clock
at the local .ball park, and if ad-
vance information is any criterion.
seats will be at a premium shortly
after the grandstand is opened.
So plan to come early and enjoy
what promises to be the best ball
game of the season.

PORT NEWS

Motorship Aztec, Houston, Texas,
made port Tuesday with cargo of
fuel oil for St. Joe Paper Co.
S.S. Jean of the Bull Line, sailed
Wednesday evening with cargo of
paper and lumber for eastern
ports.

RED CROSS CHAPTER TO MEET
The annual meeting of the Gulf
County Chapter, American Red
Cross, will e held in the Legion
Hut October 4. Election of officers
will be in order, and plans will be
discussed tfr the roll' cll.


Amazing Dinner

Held At Port Inn

Wednesday Night

Messrs. Fleischel and Ball Guests
Of Honor At Banquet of Busi-
ness Men's Association

On-e of the most amazing and
(to us) astounding dinners ever
recorded in the annals of modern
Port St. Joe was held Wednesday
evening at the Port Inn when the
Port St. Joe Business Men's as-
sociation met for a get-together
and had as their guests of honor
Edward Ball of Jacksonville and
Marc Fleischel of Shamrock.
The amazing part of the affair
was the fact 'that no speeches were"
made-not even by Richard Por-
ter-and after President Robert
Bellows had introduced the forty
men present to the guests of
honor, the delicious repast was
served.
When the meal was over and
the smoke of numerous, cigars and
cigarets drifted over the banquet
table, sotto voice remarks were
heard on all sides as to when the
speech-making wotld begin, and
many: an inquiring eye was cast
in the direction of President Bel-
lows. But he made no move 'to
rise up on his hind. legs and start
the usual flow of sugar-coated
platitudes so common to an affair
of this kind, and when at 9:15 the
honor guests arose to take their
departure, expressions of incred-
ulity and astonishment flitted over
the faces of most of those pres-
ent that they had not been sub-
jected to the usual barrage of
long-winded after dinner speeches.
The only outstanding event of
importance at the dinner was the
fear by Doc Carver, Otto Ander-
son and Basil Kenney that they
would be overlooked in the serv-
ing. However, after everyone had
almost finished, these three gen-
tlemen received their coveted
helpings and everyone was happy.
All in all, it was an enjoyable
affair and everyone expressed sat-
isfaction .for having had the op-
portunity of meeting Messrs. Ball
and Fleischel, the two men who
are doing much for the growth
and advancement of Port St. Joe.
.. -- ----

Three Days Left

To Get Licenses

Judge States That Approximately
1000 Motorists In St. Joe
Have Not Secured Cards

If you have not yet secured your
driver's license-that little card so
essential to have when a state mo-
tor patrolman stops you-you had
better start thinking seriously of
securing one, for'-the 1940 licenses
will expire at midnight next Mon-
day. And, not counting Sunday.
that leaves but three days to ge-t
your card.
County Judge Thos. R. L. Carter
stated yesterday that out of ap-
uroximately 1200 drivers in Port
St. Joe who secured licenses last
year, but 200 have taken them out
to date.
The licenses may be secured in
Port St. Joe at Lamar Miller's
Standard Station on Monument
avenue for 50 cents, plus 25 cents
notary fee. Or, if you prefer, or
happen to be in Wewahitchka, the
licenses can be secured for 50'
cents, Judge Carter doing the no-'
tary work without charge.


DE TRISTAN KIDNAPER


Wilhelm Jakob Muhlenbroich, the
kidnaper of 3-year-old Marc de
Tristan, Jr., of Hillsborough, Cal.
The kidnaper was apprehended by
two hunters in the mountains and
turned over to police operatives,
Federal men .questioned him to de-
termine if the apparent dull mind
was capable of writing the schol-
arly ransom note, or if some asso-
ciates were working with him.


St. Joe Sharks To

Meet Leon High In

Opening Grid Tilt


First Game Was Scheduled For
'oday With Crawfordville,
But Has Been Called Off

The Port St. Joe high school
football team will open its 1940
season next Friday afternoon in
a game with Leon High at Talla-
hassee. The Sharks originally had
been scheduled to play the Craw-
fordville high team here this af-
ternoon, but the tilt was called off
due to the fact that the Crawford-
ville team was afraid to come here
due to the recent infantile paraly-
sis scare.
Probable starting lineup for the
Sharks next, Friday will be: Gor-
don Farris, left end; R. H. Smith,
senter; Jimmie Taylor, right ena;
John Lane, quarterback; Buck
Walters, left half; Billy Hammock.
right half.
Coach Frank Hannon has been
working industriously with the
team, and while he is a bit skep-
tical of the boys winning from
the strong Leon High aggregation,
he believes they will put up a good
battle and might possibly bring
home the bacon.
C---

Name Committee

Members In Drive

To Raise Funds

County Democratic Executive Com-
mittees Preparing For
Campaign

As things begin to liven up for
the forthcoming November elec-
tion, the Gulf county Democratic
executive committee is formulating
plans whereby the quota set for
the county by the state organiza-
tion can be raised'.
Floyd Hunt, chairman of the
Gulf county committee has named
on his committee to raise funds
by public subscription J. W. Sea-
ley, A. H. Matthews and L. W.
Owens, Port St. Joe; T. J. Kinard,
Overstreet; T. P. Vani, Eugene
Kemp, and J. M. Cleckley, Wewa-
(Coatiael on Pang 4)


More Dwellings

Are Vital Need

In St. Joe Today

Wonderful Opportunity Here For
Independent Contractors and
Lumber Companies

While Port St. Joe has grown
in the past three years from a
sleepy-eyed village of 850 souls to
a bustling little city of 2500 souls,
our growth seems to be at a stand-
still, and the main reason for this
is the lack of housing facilities for
those who would like to make their
homes here, and would if they
could find a place to live.
Right now, according to figured
available, there are approximately
200 families who would' move into
the city tomorrow if they were
assured of housing. Apartments
and rooms are at a premium, and
as for residences-well,' they just
"ain't."
One of the big things holding
back construction here by inde-
pendent contractors and lumber
companies, as well- as individuals,
is the fear that the Florida Hous-
ing company, which during the
past two years constructed a con-
siderable number of residences,
will continue building.
The editor of The Star, in talk-
ing the matter over with Edward
Ball, learned that the Florida
Housing company, pas far as future
construction is concerned, is defi-
nitely out of the picture;
"The company was. organized,'
said Mr. Ball, "for the express
purpose of furnishing housing ac-
commodations for a number of
key men at the paper mill, and
now that that need has been filled
no further construction Will be:
done. Port St. Joe is going to in-
crease in population .enormously
in the next two years-the growth
attributable to establishment of
the paper mill here will be noth-
ing in comparison-and what we
will need to care for this growth
is more dwellings.
"In my opinion there is a golden
opportunity in Port St. Joe for In-
dependent contractors and lumber
companies, and I feel that when
they realize this fact we will see
a large numlrer of new residences
under construction by concerns
from all parts of Florida."
--------

Schools Reopened

After Quarantine

Children Troop Back to Classes
As City Resumes Normal
Activities

The Port St. Joe schools were
reopened yesterday following a
two-weeks' quarantine due to de-
velopment of a case of infantile
paralysis here, and once more the
children trooped back to their
classes after the unexpected vaca-
tion.
The city again resumed its nor-
mal activities after, two weeks of
watchfnl waiting during which all
public gatherings were banned.
The Port theater threw open its
doors Tuesday afternoon and an-
nouncements were made for regu-
lar church services at all houses
of worship; the fall social season
got' into stride and notices of
meetings .of lodges and civic
bodies are being made.
We were very fortunate in be-
ing able .to so quickly check the
spread of a pollomyeills outbrealt
,(Coflatin$ a Ppsp 0 .


VOLUME III


NUMBER 51


I


a
r


THE










STI


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla.,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
undel Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year........$2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months..........65c

-e{ Telephone 51 })-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

NO APPEASEMENT HERE
"Appeasement" has become a shameful
word during the last year or two-and justly
so. Today almost all of Europe is a tragic
monument to the futility of attempting to
appease the dictator powers. The appeasers
may have been sincere, but they were terribly
wrong. Dictators' ambitions know no limits.
And each fresh attempt at appeasing the dic-
tators simply gave them more confidence and
led to still greater demands.
In this country, the majority of the people
are opposed to any efforts to appease those
who may threaten the destruction of our way
of life-which is the democratic way of life.
But there is a minority whose thoughts turn
to the possibility of appeasement. "All over
the world," their argument runs, "liberty has
been abrogated, and government has been
made supreme. Civil rights have been dissi-
patted like leaves in a stoim. It is logical to
expect that we shall see a similar trend take
root at home. So we might as well make the
best of it. After -all, even total governments
must have the .services- of'men with, brains-
there will always be jobs. So let's see if we
can get on more friendly terms with our po-
tential enemies." ,
A child can see what that argument must
lead to, once accepted by the people. It would
lead to a dictatorship as brutal and as thor-
ough as any in Europe. For democracy is
one thing that can't go half-way. Weaken
it, and you are helping dig its grave. No na-
tion, said Abraham Lincoln, can exist half
slave and half free. And no nation can hope
to strike a balance between representative
government and total government. It must
choose between one or the other, with no "its,
ands or buts" involved.
A system worth having is a system worth
fighting for. The United States prays for
peace-but the United States was never a
country to give an inch to its possible ene-
mies. If the appeasers should have their way
we will go the way France went-and all that
America has stood for in the past will become
meaningless. Let's make up our minds that
this is one corner of the world where democ-
racy, social and economic, will be defended to
the last ditch.

A TIP TO YOUNG MEN OF DRAFT AGE
You young men of draft age, between 21
and 35, lend an ear and have a listen to the
editor, who knows what it's all about:
If you feel pretty sure that you will be
drafted, or if you merely have a yen to join
the army, why not sign up right now with
the National Guard for your year's training?
The Apalachicola unit-the Engineers-is a
pretty nifty outfit, and if you sign up with
them you will be with fellows you know,
you come from the same part of the country
and you probably will have mutual friends.
Believe it or not, but when you're put into
some outfit where everybody is a stranger to
you, you get doggone lonesome.
So our advice to Port St. Joe and Gulf
county youths is to contact Col. J. P. Coombs
at Apalachicola and see about joining up with
the Engineers. Incidentally, the Engineers
offer an opportunity' to learn things that no
other branch of the service teaches.


A DARK PAGE IN HISTORY
A year ago if someone had predicted the
death and destruction, waste and ruin, panm,
and desolation that has prevailed in some
parts of the world, we would have scoffed at
the idea and classed them as fantastic tales,
impossible of coming to pass. But one year
ago this month, Germany's mechanized le-
gions invaded Poland, laying waste not only
that country, but numerous other peace-lov-
ing nations of Europe.
Germany, as we will recall, on the eve ot
the Polish invasion, announced the ratifica-
tion of the German-Russian non-aggressiou
agreement, and on the same day made public
a sixteen-point proposal for the settlement ot
the Polish dispute, declaring that the War-
saw government had "refused" to send "au-
thorized representatives" to Berlin to negoti-
ate an agreement.
Since that date, in the short space of one
year, one of the blackest pages of history
has been written. Poland, Finland, Norway,
Holland, Belgium and France have fallen un-
der the tyrant's heel and today are paying
the price of non-preparedness.
In view of conditions and happenings
abroad-with England fighting grimly for its
very life and existence' to avoid the fate that
has befallen other democracies-it is time
that this nation forgot petty politics and
unite behind our great president in preparing
this nation against any such eventualities.
But our preparedness program and the build-
ing up of our national defenses is unlike that
of the totalitarian nations of the world. They
prepared for war; vwe-are preparing for peace.
Let us each and everyone do his part in
strengthening our national defenses that nu
nation or group of nations will dare attack
us. Then, and only .then, will this great coun-
try of ours be completely safe from the threat
of the totalitarian heel that leaves only mis-
ery, suffering and shame in its path.-South-
ern Star.

ARE WE SICK?
William R. Kuhns, editor of "Banking," re-
cently stepped hard on the defeatist doctrine.
which holds that democracies can't match the
efficiency of the totalitarian states, and can't
survive in a world which has largely been so-
cialized, sovetized or nazified.
"Where did this idea come from and why
should it have such popular acceptance, and
distinguished sponsorship among writers and
public leaders?" asks Kuhns. "Can it be that
we're not feeling well? Are we going to oe
sick ?
"Totalitarian layouts, particularly if they
are either ruthless or desperate, enjoy an ad-
vantage in war and foreign trade arrange-
ments. But after all, there is nothing to stop
us from meeting economic and military com-
petition without changing our creed or
our habits."
Unless the lessons of history are all wrong,
a system of free enterprise, other factors be-
ing equal, is always more than a match for
a system based on slave enterprise-and
"slave enterprise" is about as accurate a de-
scriptive term as can be devised for totali-
tarian methods. There isn't a nation in the
world with a tithe. of the potential economic
power of the United States. We have a bank-
ing structure adapted to both national and
international commerce which is the envy of
the earth. We have an economic system
based on gold-not a system based on the
frail sands of barter and financial blackmail.
Potentially we have unequaled military
power no less than economic power. The de-
featists in our midst would do well to. study
the history of what this country has achieved
in considerably less than two centuries.

We see the "people's friend," Bernarr Mc-
Fadden, who ran for U. S. Senator from Flor-
ida on the Democratic ticket, has reverted to
type and will support Willkie in the coming
presidential campaign.

Hitler's best year was really 1903, for in
that year America gave the 'airplane to the
world.-Punta Gorda Herald.


The Low Down
from
Willis Swamp

Editor The Star:
This idea that there is anybody
in this country or elsewhere who
is indispensable, don't check up
so good-and, is mostly talk.
You take it under' the Pharaohs
there in Egypt when they were
putting' up the .pyramids, it was
about like it is here now. They
grapevined 'the idea around that
they couldn't git along without old:
man Rameses. And some of the
'big dams we been building' all over
the country, an' the wide an' high
building's on our rollin' Potomac,
they'll ,be hard to explain 3000
years hence, like them there pyra-
mids are a problem today.
But the Pharaohs of Egypt and
our own Big Folks here at home,
they had to be doing' something big
-they figgered-and they did so.
And old man Rameses, he kept
his gold chariot-and he kept on
bein' Pharaoh-and he kept on the
payroll. But in the end- the pyra-
mids got him-he's buried there-
under.
,Clamin' to be indispensable Is
takin' in a lotta territory. A pinch-
hitter for the great Casey could
have done no worse than Casey
himself.
Yours with the low down,
JOE SERRA.


'Scatterbrain' At

Port Tomorrow

Will Be Shown On Screen Tonight
For Those Who Cannot See
Film Saturday

SFollowing .up the cycle inaugu-
rated by "Boy Meets Girl" and, la-
ter, "Once In a Lifetime," Repub-
lic Pictures offers its own contr-
bution to 'the list of motion pic-
tures that have been made about
motion pictures in "Scatterbrain,,"
starring Judy Canova, which will
play Saturday at the Port theater.
Manager Roy Williams announces
that the picture will also be shown
tonight at 10 o'clock for the bene-
fit of theater patrons who will be
unable to see it Saturday.
Eddie MacIntyre, 'breezy press
agent,' talent scout and right-hand
man to J. R. Russell, producer-
director of Perfection Pictures, ar-
ranges -to "plant" nis own girl
friend in the Ozarks and have her
"discovered" as an authentic hill-
billy to be starred in a new play.
Though an error, Miss Canova,
a real hillbilly, is brought to the
film capital instead of the phoney
hillbilly, and her adventures aftei-
she arrives there become really
enlightening.
Because there are no loopholes
in her contract, it appears that
she is stuck with Perfection--ot
they are stuck with her-but in
time Judy develops into one o!
their most valuable starring per-
sonalities instead of the back-
woods maiden they believed her
to be originally.
Alan Mowbray is cast as the
producer and Eddie Foy as the
press agent. Joe Cawthorn por-
trays a Sam Goldwynish film ex-
ecutive, and Ruth Donnelly con-
tributes one of her inimi-table com-
edy roles as secretary.
--~---------
Buck Spooner left Monday on a
vacation trip to be spent in Do-
.than, Ala., Tallahassee and Pan-
ama City.

Mr. and Mrs, W. A. Smith and
daughter, Miss Marigene, visi.teG
over the week-end in Tallahassee.

Red Anthony made a trip to Do-
than, Ala., over the week-end to
visit his sister.

Jesse S1tone. made a trip to
Qzark, Ala., over .the week-end.


TURKEY DAY TO BE NOV. 28
Ignoring the proclamation of
President Roosevelt in setting
Thanksgiving one week ahead,
Governor Fred P. Cone officially
set the date for Thursday, Novem-
ber 28, for the state of Florida.



Purity Assured











EVEN THE
COWS ARE
TESTED .


The Gulf County. Dairy's
quest for perfection empha-
sizes purity. In every detail
of production our milk: ret-7
celves the benefit of scientific
methods and djscover1ie. .


Gulf CountyDairyo
H. M. McCLAMMA, Manager 5
Leave or Phone Your Orders
to J. Lamar Miller's Standard
SStation, Phone 98, ro Bus
Station Cafe, Phone 12


ART

PROJECT
MAKES COLOR

PORTRAITS '

OF CIID PICTURES

FREE
This offer is oneof the most remark
able ever made. We'll send you a
beautifully hand-colored-in-oil-painh
enlargement of any picture you wan
enlarged.. Yes, any snapshot, any fa
vorite picture you'd like enlarged and
hand-colored. These enlargements wil
be size 5x7. They will be mounted or
high quality, double-white mat mount
ings size 7x9. To dilplicate such at
enlargement, hand-colored-in-oil
paint, would cost you from $1.25 t'
$3.00 in any photographic store. Te
get this enlargement you pay only 50c
for the enlargement and the hand
painting will be done without charge
Simply send a print or negative o
your favorite picture and fifty cent
in coin; That's all you do, and promptly:
by mail you'll receive your hand-col
ored-n-oil enlargement. Send today t
ART EDITOR
COOPERATIVE FEATURES, INC
360 N. Michigan Aye., Chicago, 111


a
t
t
1
id
a
I
a
S
C
d-
I
S


C.


Do You Lie Awake Nights?
M ILLIONS do. The worst of
it is, you never know when
a sleepless night is coming.
Why not be prepared?
DR. MILES
Effervescent Nervine Tablets
help to quiet the nerves and
permit refreshing sleep.
Stop in at the drug store to-
day and get a package.
Try Dr. Miles Nervine Tab-
lets for Nervousness, Sleep-
lessness due to Nervousness,
Nervous Headache, ExtLta-
bility, Nervous Irritability.
Small Package 35* .
Large Package 75*
ead .full diretlons
in package.


FRIDAY, SEPTEM13ER 27,- 1940


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE TWO









F Y P E IRII2,l,9E A O T EI
if*
3


AWARDED SCHOLARSHIP

Miss Frances Palmer, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Palmer of
this city, who is a student at the
Florida State College for Women,
Tallahassee, has been awarded a
scholarship given each year to
former 4-H Club girls by the State
Council of Senior Home Demon-
stration Work.


SDR. J C. COE
-D EN T IST -
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe


WHEN YOU NEED A

TAXI




E 123


,DIME TAXI CO.


FALL IS HERE!
October heralds opening of the
fall social season. We are pre-
pared to complete your fall en-
semble with a new hairdress
that will give you that chic
appearance so necessary 'for
social success.
For Appointment 55
PHONE 55

,PRINCESS
'BEAUTY SHOPPE



BAYSHORE
'GROCERY AND MARKET,
S -'Highland View
We Handle Nothing But
WESTERN MEATS-All Cuts
STAPLE and FANCY
GROCERIES and MEATS
We Keep Open Until Noon
.Every Sunday


-NO SUBSTITUTIONS
Substitutions for specified in-
gredients don't make a pre-
scription. That's why we never
substitute ingredients in your
physician's prescription. Ac-
curacy is our constant watch-
word, You can depend on us.

f LeHARDY

PHARMACY



QUALITY

GROCERY
and MARKET
Make Us YOUR Food
Supply House
"Prices Right-Clerks Polite"
Clarence Pridgeon, Mgr.
WE DELIVER


< SOCIETY


WOMAN'S CLUB WILL OPEN
YEAR NEXT WEDNESDAY
The 1940-41 year will be opened
by the Port St. Joe Woman's Club
next Wednesday at 3 o'clock at
the club rooms in the Centennial
.building with a reception for our
school teachers.
Mrs. R. W. Smith, newly-elected
president, will be in charge and
presentation of plans for the year
will be given by committee chair-
men. and Mrs. Oliver,. sectional
vice-president, will deliver official
greetings to ,the assemblage.
The president urges that all
members plan to be present at this
initial meeting of the new year.
The executive committee will
meet today at the home of the
president.


RONALD CHILDERS AND MISS
MYRTLE WHITAKER WED
Miss Myrtle Whitaker, daughter
of Mrs. Mary Whitaker, and Ron-
ald W. Childers, son of Mrs. L. H.
Bartee, were united in marriage
Wednesday evening at 6 o'clock in
Tallahassee, the ceremony being
performed in the presence of a
few close friends of the families.
The bride came to this city two
years ago and graduated from th,,
local high school. "Mr. Childers is
also a graduate of the St. Joe
schools and the University ot
Florida.
Immediately following the cere-
mony the young couple left for a
honeymoon in Miami and will be
at home to their friends at their
home on Monument avenue after
next Sunday.

LEGION AUXILIARY WILL
MEET THIS EVENING
The American Legion Auxiliary
will meet in regular session this
evening at 7:30 in the Hut and
the president, Mrs. M. L. Fuller,
requests that all members attend
and bring a new member.

HEALTH COUNCILS TO MEET
The quarterly joint meeting of
the Franklin-Gulf county health
councils will be held in Carrabelle
next Tuesday at 3 o'clock at the
city hall. An interesting program
is scheduled, and all members of
the councils are urged to attend.


Basil E. Kenney of the St. Joe
Lumber and Export company, at-
tended a meeting of the Southern
Pine association in New Orleans
during the week-end. Mr. Kenney
was named as a member of the
southern pine emergency defense
committee.

Sammie Patrick, county tax as-
sessor, of Wewahitchka, attended
the meeting of the Port St. Joe
Business Men's association Wed-
nesday night.

Mr. and Mrs. John Blount, Jr.,
have as their guests this week
Mr. Blount's parents, Mr. and Mrs.
John Blount of Geneva, Ala.

Mrs. J. E. Ray left Monday for
her home in Jacksonville after an
extended visit here with her sis-
ter, Mrs. A. G. Montgomery.


A great man stood before the
microphone 'the other day. in a city
scarred by bombs. Fires were rag-
ing at the docks of its historic
river and there was a threat of
greater bombing in the night to
come.
The man spoke calmly, coura-
geously to the people of an har-
rassed empire. He told them or
the situation as it stood, that aw-
ful day and, warned them of the
impending danger of an invasion.
There was no effort to minimize
the frightfulness of the ordeal be-
fore them. Yet there was no sign
of flinching.
He called upon them to remem-
ber 'the greatness of their past and
to. realize the significance of ths
battle they were waging. Then in
closing that magnificent speech,
Winston Churchill turned for a.
moment from the horror of the
present conflict and, looking to-
ward the future, spoke confidently
of "the long and better days that
are to come"!


If the prime minister of Great
Britain, in such an hour, could
speak with confidence of the fu-
ture, how much more hopeful
should we be, here In tne United
States and in Port St. Joe. Not
only because we are an ocean
away from the actual conflict, but
because this country of ours was
founded for the sake of those


of "hard times" during which, for
the first time in our history., we
have failed to advance our stan-
dard of living. But our'country is
still rich in natural resources .
still underpopulated and we
still have that genius for inven-
tion, 'production and organization
that has built up the greatest In-
dustrial system ever known!


u-eter uays as they wer v- --- --
ioned by our forefathers 200 years Joe Lilienfeld returned Tuesday
ago. .to the naval base at Norfolk, Va.,
With our representative democ- after a ten-day visit here with his
racy we have already come nearer parents, Mr. and, Mrs. J.Lilienfeld.
than any other nation to those Joe expects to be transferred to
"better days" of which great men the west coast shortly.
in every age have dreamed. The
highest standard of living the Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Hill visited
world has ever known edu- over the week-end with relatives
cation for a larger per cent of our in Donaldsonville and Bainbridge,
young and those precious privil- Ga.
eges of being able to say what we 4*
please, to write what we think, to Mr. and Mrs. B. B. Conklin, C.
go to the church we believe in, B. Conklin and Sammie Davis vis-
has made this land of ours the ited Sunday in Dothan with Mrs.
envy of the world. Sammie Davis, who is confined to
Yes, we have endured ten years a hospital in that city.


ROOM AND

BOARD
BY THE $7 00
WEEK Ag $7

Dining Room

Open to the Public
Club Breakfast, 6 to 9....26c
SLunch, 12 to 2 ............35c
Dinner, 6 to 8 .............35c


MRS. M. O. FREEMAN
SCornpr Reid Ave. and: 3rd -St.
Griffin. Grocery Building
,i----------------------


CLASSIFIED ADS

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
FOR RENT, SALE OR TRADE-
Furnished cottage at Beacon
Hill; electric lights, running wa-
ter. See H. A. Drake, Port St.
Joe. 9-27 2t
CANARIES

HARTZ MOUNTAIN CANARIES
FOR SALE-Singers, $4 and $5;
hens, $1. See Mrs. W. S. Smith,
Star Office, phone 51.
MISCELLANEOUS

IF YOU have a room for rent,
why, not place a classified adver-
tisement-in The Star. The cost is
low and returns are gratifying. .
Try it today. tt


"The Young and Better Days..."


\LU,


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1940


THE STAR, PO RT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE THREE








PAGE FOUR THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1940


Opens Daily 2:45, Continuously
Saturday 1:35 Sunday 1:45
ROY WILLIAMS, Manager


LAST TIMES TODAY
H HENRY FONDA
~ THE RETURN OF
FRANK JAMES"
In Technicolor


SATURDAY, SEPT. 28
BIGSMASH
-HITS-
GENE AUTREY
SMILEY BURNETTE
"Tumbling
Tumbleweeds"
HIT NO. 2
l YE A'G OTOAT


SCHOOLS REOPENED NAME COMMITTEE MEMBERS
AFTER QUARANTINE
(Continued from Page 1)
(Continued from Page 1) hitchka.
and to the action of our mayor Mrs. A. H. Cook, vice-chairman
and city officials, our doctors and of the Gulf county Democratic ex-
our health officials should go* the ecutive committee, has named, the
credit for this good work. Also to following ladies to work,with her
the people of Port St. Joe for co- in the fund drive for the women's
operating to the fullest in making division: Mrs. A. D. Lawson, Port
the undertaking a success. Pos- St. Joe; Mrs. Mack Miller,' High-
sibly some have thought that they land View; Mrs. M. L. Fuller,
have been imposed upon, but this Kenney's Mill; Mrs. R. B. Hardy,
was never intended, as the action Overstreet; Mrs. W. C. Whaley,
was taken for the good of the Dalkeith; Miss Della Ward, White
greatest number and particularly City, Miss Minnie Kemp, Wetappo,
for the health of our children, and and Mrs. Kate Lanier, Wewa-
soon we will all look back anid re- hitchka.
member that it is always betteD- Mrs. Cook asks that all loyal
to 'be safe than sorry. Democrats tune in tonight at 8:30
on Mrs.. Roosevelt's radio pro-
CARD OF THANKS gram for Democratic Women's
We desire to express our sincere Day.
thanks to all those who cast their
votes for our baby in the recent .Carlyle Matthews spent the
Port theater baby contest, week-end in Dothan, Ala., with his
Mr. and Mrs. Troy Jones. mother.


Mr. and Mrs. Robert Tapper and
George Tapper returned this week
from a visit to Brooklyn, N. Y.
z *^
Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Hunt and
Mr.' Hunt's mother, Mrs. B. F.
Hunt, were week-end visitors in
Bay Minette, Ala.


Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Fuller and
children were visitors Saturday IiI
Marianna.
Lamar Childs,'Glenn Grimsley,
Tommy Guertin and Tom Thomp-
son attended a football game last
Friday night in Dothan, Ala.


ZORRO'S LEGION NO. 11
.. e** *** ***s
SUNDAY MONDAY
SEPTEMBER 29 30
BING CROSBY
MARY MARTIN


NE!W





1941

In some years, some cars
take a big jump ahead. The
Ford does that for 1941.
It has jumped .ahead in
size. It's the biggest Ford
we've ever biilt, inside and
out. It's wider. It has a longer
wheelbase. Its seating room
is wider by as much as 7
inches. It has new wide
doors and semi-concealed
running boards.
You'll notice also a new
beauty, achieved by a skilful
blending of mass with longer
flowing lines. Larger wind-
shield and windows give bet-
ter vision all around.
One of its biggest advan-
tages is the new soft ride.


Latest 'MARCH OF TIME'
CURRENT NEWS
TUESDAY ONLeY, OCT.
TUESDAY ONLY, OCT. 1


FOR BETTER
HEALTH
Milk is an energy food. It is
easily digested and is grand
alone or with other foods.
Enjoy the benefits of the
valuable vitamin content of
Fresh Milk.

Pasteurized for Your Protection


SOLOMON'S

DAIRY
i~istrlbutors of Bruce's Juices
SHELBY STRINGFELLOW
Local Representative


New, -slower-action springs
give a slow, gentle, gliding
movement. A newly designed
stabilizer helps absorb road
shocks, and maintains bal-
ance on sharp curves and in
cross winds.
More rapid acceleration to
match its familiar speed and
power makes this new .Ford
an even livelier car to drive.
These are only a few of
this new car's outstanding
features. It represents all the
rich experience gained in
building more than 28 mil-
lion motor cars.
Any Ford dealer can give
you many good reasons for
making this your 1941 car.


Get the Facts and You'll Ge. a WordJ


WHITE TOP TAXI COMPANY


FOR PROMPT SERVICE

S PHONE 100.

DAY, OR NIGHT -
TAXIS ALWAYS AVAILABLE IN FRONT
OF ST. JOE TEXACO SERVICE STATION J


a


mmTIF~7~5m[immr~~


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE FOUR


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1940


,