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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00101
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: September 13, 1940
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00101

Full Text




The Star-Florida's fattest grow-
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and uptmuilding of
the City of Port St" Joe. T


ort St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
uPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast.
st growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


VOLUME III PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY., FLORIDA, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1940 NUMBER 49


Census Shows Gulf

County Leads State

In Population Gain

Rapid Growth Due to Industrial
Activities Centering In and
Around Port St. Joe

According to figures released by
the bureau of census at Washing-
ton, Florida gained 27.9 per cent
in population between 1930 and
1940, the increases being from
1,468,211 to 1,877,791.
Of the 51 counties in the state
showing an increase in population
Gulf county ranked first with a
population increase' of 117.7 per
r ent. In 1930 Gulf county had a
population of 3,182, and in 1940
this. figure had! jumped to 6,928.
This more than doubling of
population is due to the industrial
development centering in and
around this city-the St. Joe Paper
company and the St. Joe Lumber
& Export company-and the de-
velopment of our natural harbor
facilities.
The greater portion of the pop:
elation increase of the county is
in Port St. Joe and vicinity, al-
though an increase is noted in
the balance of the county as the
result of industrial activity here.
This city, according to the 1930
eensus,- .ad, a population of 851,
while the 1940 census gives us
3,182-and we're still experiencing
,growing pains.
This is just a start, for. it future


lapns mature, Port St. Joe
well up. toward the 10fO00O
tion mark. within the next
three years and will begin
its rightful place as one
large industrial centers of
west Florida.


will be
popula-
two or
to take
of the
North.


Insurance Plan

Is Beneficial'To

Mill Employees

Group Insurance Can Now Be Se-
cured At Fraction of Cost of-
Individual Insurance

- Several weeks ago officials of
the St. Joe Paper company made
arrangements for group insurance,
containing life, health and acci-
dent clauses, for those employees
of the mill who desired to take
out'this type of coverage. To date
41-0 of the men have taken ad-
vantage of the plan, this being ap-
proximately 80 per cent of those
employed at the mill. This is in
addition to the regular coverage
.carried by the.company on all em-
iployees.
The plan went into effect at
12:01 a. m. Sunday, September 1,
and about 7 o'clock' Sunday morn.
ing Clinton L. Brooks, an employee
of the mill, passed away at his
home at Beacon Hill of progressive
infantile paralysiS. Yesterday Mr.
Brooks' widow received a check
from the insurance company for
$280 and will receive $720 addi-
tional in 12 monthly installments.
The :employees of the milll are
wise to take out this type of in-
surance as it costs them but -
fraction what it would if taken out
individually.

TO_ SCOUT MEETING

Mr. and Mrs. M; P. Tomfhnson
fi.Gred.to: DeFuniak: Springs Mon-
day.night where Mr. Torllsbn ait-
tended a. district meeting of. the
Gulf coaat Council,; Boy Scouts o0
Ateia, .


UNITED STATES ACQUIRES DEFENSE BASTIONS


"*raca --- "" T#rINIDR

ANA'NA .rVENEZUELA
*\COLMA < RITISH
SSOU AMERICy > IANA.

Bases at the points- indicated by circled dots are being leased 'by
Great Britain to this country for 99 years. The leases Tor those in
Newfoundland and Bermuda are in effect outright gifts; the leases
for the-others: are iyn. exchange for 50 over-age U. S. destroyers. The T
bases in the daribbean area will supplement present American de-:
fenses (black diamonds) in guarding approaches to the Panama Canal


Gentry Baby Is

Contest Winner


Chosen As Most Popular In Con-
test Sponsored by Theater
And Poehler's Studio

In the most attractive baby con-
test sponsored -by the Port theater
and Poehler's Studio and which
came to a close Wednesday eve-
ning with presentation of prizes to
the winners on the stage of the
Port theater, Clyde Gentry, Jr.,
young son of Mr. and' Mrs. Clyde
Gentry, took first honors and the
silver loving cup with a total of
114,700 votes.
Runner-up was Francis Jones


with 91,400 votes. Others high in
the :voting, were Freddie ,Owens,
86,900; Frances Hauser, 82,300;
Virginia Lee Zimmerman, 59,000,
and Mina Dolores iChism, 49,200.
Other entries were Arthur Van-
landingham, Betty Jean Bell, Bar-
bara Mitchell, Charles Cooper, Pa-
tricia Ann Robertson,, James Cos-
tin, Tommie Bryant, Ernestino
Durant, Marietta Chafin, Billy
Durant, Alice Ruth Tucker, Jimmy
Howell, John Nunnery,. Gerald
Huggins, Lydia Wood, Dorothy
Singletary and Michael Roche.

PASTOR ON VACATION
Rev. W. A. Daniel, pastor of the
Presbyterian church, is leaving
this week on a two weeks' vaca-
tion. He will return to his pulpit


Schools Closed

Due to Infantile

Paralysis Case

Small Daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Brown Stricken; Be-
lieve Other Cases Here

The Port St. Joe schools have,
.been closed for two weeks, accord-
ing to an announcement yesterday
by Principal Jon Stapleton, due to
the appearance of infantile paraly-
sis in the city.
The small daughter of Mr. ana
Mrs. Charles Brown has been
stricken, and: in order to prevent
spread of the disease it has been
found advisable to close 'the
schools .and; as far as possible,
do away with public gatherings of
all types:
Several other children are under
"hsprvation at present in the be-
lief that they may develop polio-
myelitis.
Principal' Stapleton stated that
enrollment at the schools up to
Wednesday. had been 595, which
was 68 more pupils in attendance
-than at the same time last year
and 99 more than at the close of
school in June. He expects the
number to pass the 600 mark when
the schools are reopened.

PORT NEWS

S.S. Afoundria, Watterman Line,
sailed last Friday with cargo of
lumber for Puerto Rico.
Mdtoi'sithp' Aztecb Atec Shipping
corporation, but of Houston; Texas,
this week. dischaged a cargo of oil
for. the St. Joe Paper company.
S.S. Dorothy, Bull Line, sailed
Monday for Baltimore and Newark
with cargo of paper and lumber.
S;S. Cirisco, under British regis-
try, arrived yesterday morning.
for cargo of lumber.
---f------
LAWSONS ASK NEW TRIAL

The Gulf county circuit court In
session at Wewahitchka on Thurs-
day of last week, took a 15-day re-
cess in order that a new motion
for trial might be filed by attor-
neys of Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Law-
son of this city in their suit to re-
cover damages from the Sunny
State Oil company. In the case, af-
ter a day and a half of hearing, a
verdict was directed for the de-
fendants, with costs of the case
to be borne by the plaintiffs.


DESTINY ... FOR AMERICA


Reading history ... .hearing termined to go west, generation
the stories handed down in youi after generation, until there were
own family listening on no more frontiers? Have you ever
the radio to episodes from our wondered why women as well as


past have you ever won-
dered why we built this country
so fast?
Only a little more than a cen-
tury and' a half since we became
a nation! Only 300 years since all
there was of it were those few,
precarious settlements on the At-
lantic seaboard!
And now? We are the greatest
nation In the world, with power
to lead that world if we choose!
Have you ever felt that back of
the urge.which brought people to
this country wae.something more
than personal ambition? A great
plan, perhaps; that caught them
up in its unfolding so that they
were eager to cross- tlie- ocean
*when It was six weeks wide .and-
dingeroius; so tlist they; Were ded


mien were possessed with such a


The great role, for which we as
a nation have been unconsciously
preparing through all of the swift,
full years of our history, is not re-
vealed. The part calls for colossal


love for land of their own that strength, great wisdom, tolerance
nothing mattered' but gratifying it? and hard, persistent work if we
Not drudgery; not danger, not are to play it well and realize the
loneliness, destiny which our great past has
Have you ever wondered' why mnde possible.
even the climate of this new wor i We have the necessary re- f
is for the most part more stimu- sources. We have the propitious
lating than that of the old, so that geographical setting, the economic i
men are. necessarily active and in- genius and the material develop- t
tolerant of idleness? Have you ment. Those who have gone be- t
ever thought that we are set apart fore us have played their part t
between two great oceans or won- well .. b ut have we the will,
der why we have been so inven-r the unity and the vision to play
tive and skillful with machinery? this part, as it must be played: if
Today, as the old world seems to the world is to go forward in its p
be destroying itself, the need' for' own development? u
a strong; new world, equipped by. Each. one of-us in ,Port St. Joe l
nature and. her own self-elected t-reah dae. t'us alive. in America ;g
people for complete self-sufficiency today-is helping to give the mo- f
is apparent. mentous aqsswer! '."


This City Being

Considered for

Naval Station

Navy Department Has Eye on Port
St. Joe for Naval Base or
Auxiliary Air Base

In connection with the series of
articles published during the past
three weeks by The Star in regard
to securing a naval air base for
Port St. Joe as a part of the na-
tional defense program, Mayor J,
'L. Sharit, who has been in contact
with the navy department and
Senator Claude Pepper in regard
to the matter, and who has for-
warded maps and information on
this area, last week received the
following letter (copy) which was
sent to. Senator Pepper from the
office o'f the chief of naval opera-
tions in Washington:
S"My dear Senator' Pepper:
"Your letter of' August 23, ad-
dressed to the secretary of the
navy; with which you enclose a
letter you have received from
Hon. J. L. Sharit of Port St.
Joe relative to the establishment
of a naval air base at that city,
.has been referred to this office
-~Tr consideration and reply.
"At the present time the navy
department does plan to estab-
lish an additional naval air base
or auxiliary air base. at that lo-
cation. The department appreci-
ates' the data furnished by Mr.
,Sharit and will forxird it to the
,bureau of aeronaut;'c for infor-
mation and consideration in 'the .
event that future developments
indicate a need: for the estab-
lishment of naval aviation ac-
tivities in that vicinity. Mri
(Continued on- Page 3)
-'C-

Fourth Game In

League Playoff

Goes 11 Innings

Exporters- Take Tight Game 3 to
2 to Tie Series; Final Game
Will Be Played Here

In a tight game Wednesday at
the local ball park which de-
veloped into a pitchers' battle, the
Kenney Exporters of this city de-
feated the Apalachicola Oystermen
3 to 2 in an 11-inning game, the
fourth of the five-game playoff for
the pennant of the Gulf Coast
League. The series now stand's
two-all, and the decisive game will
be played here Sunday afternoon.
Both teams scored one run in
the first inning and then the
pitchers really warmed up to their
work. Apalachicola chalked up an-
other run in the lucky seventh,
and it looked like curtains for tne
Exporters. But the local boys up
and drove a run over the plate in
the last of the ninth to tie the
score and continue the game into
extra innings.
The tenth inning passed with
neither side scoring and in the
first of the eleventh the Oyster-
nen failed to put one over, but
the Exporters, with one out in
:he last of the eleventh, pushed
the winning run over home plate
.o take the game and tie the
series.
I A large and enthusiastic group


of Apalachicola rooters accom-
ranied their team and done their
utmost to win the game for Apa-
lchicola; It is expected that the
grandstand will beB. packed, Sunday
'or the final game aud:more than
(Continued on Page ) .'


STAR e s








PAGE TWO THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 194@


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla.,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-clase matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year........$2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months..........65c

-4{ Telephone 51 j)-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.


AN OPEN LETTER TO ADOLF HITLER
(Editor's Note-The Star has been receiving a
great deal of propaganda from" the German Li-
brary of Information, including :"Facts In Re-
view," and we had been intending to write an
editorial on the matter, but the following from
the Bradford County Telegraph covers the
ground completely, and we reprint it herewith
as expressing exactly our own views. The pat-
tern of Hitler's projected world revolution
steadily becomes more clear. It is apparent to
anyone that this is not a war in the traditional
sense, in which Germany, if she wins; will be
satisfied with reparations and' colonies and eco-
nomic power. What the Nazis obviously intend
-despite their protestations to the contrary-
is the complete and final destruction of the
British Empire. And following that if Hitler's
astoundingly frank "Mein Kampf" is to--e 'be-'
lieved, the rest of the democracies will receive
similar treatment. Nowadays, the only democ-
racies left, save England, are the American Re-
publics. And of these republics, only the United
States possesses sufficient wealth, resources
and potential armed strength to De a serious
obstacle to the aifs of national socialism. Con-
Sobstacle' to the aims of national socialism. Con-
sequently the war of propaganda is being car-
ried on in this country in an effort to convert
disciples to the principles of Naziism.)

Dear Adolf-If it's all the same to you, you
can remove the name of the Bradford County
Telegraph from your propaganda mailing list.
The sooner, the better.
For several months now we have been re-
ceiving your magazine, "Facts In Review,"
issued by the Germany Library of Informa-
tion, 17 Battery Place, New York. Confiden-
tially, Adolf, we think it stinks.
Not that there is anything wrong with the
grammatical style in which the articles are
written. To the contrary. They are the most
adroitly ,worded, most ingratiatingly ex-
pressed, most cleverly misleading pack of lies
we've ever read. But we still think it stinks.
For instance, this phoney little gem from
a recent address by Joachim von Ribbentrop,
German foreign minister.:
"On September 3 the rulers of Britain ana
France declared war on the German reich.
There were no rational grounds of any kind
for their action. The German people and their
fuehrer have since Jaunary, 1933, constantly
reaffirmed their intention and desire to live
in peace and friendship with the British and
French peoples. The German people, how-
ever, have accepted with solemn determina-
tion the war that has been thrust upon them.
The scheme of the Anglo-French rulers to
break up the German reich, to take away the
rights of the German people and ruin them
economically will be paired by the united
forces of the German nation and thus frus-
trated."
Well, anyway, Adolf, your propaganda has
taught us one thing. We know now why your
leaders have such grim, steely-eyed expres-
sions-it's from trying to keep a straight face
while telling such baldfaced lies! They do
deserve a certain amount of credit for their
ability as actors, Adolf. John Barrymore
couldn't do it any better himself.
But surely you underestimate the intelli-
gence of the American people, Adolf, if you
think they're going to swallow the sugar.
coated swill contained'in your' "Facts In.Re-
view" ahd think it is the truth: 'But the mere
fact that youi ate allowed' to send it out, with


the aid of Uncle Sam's postoffice depart-
ment, makes us think that this great land of
ours is, after all, perhaps, just a little TOO
free.
There should be some way to stop you
from mailing out your "Facts In Review,"
Adolf, for there is always the possibility that
a copy might fall into the hands of some poor
dumb cluck who cannot recognize a lie if it's
dressed up in top hat and tails. Why doesn't
the FBI or the Dies committee call at No.
17 Battery Place and ask a few questions?
It must be terribly expensive to publish
your little magazine, Adolf. It's printed on
nice slick paper and all dressed up with photo-
graphs showing \Nazis praying at the grave-
sides of German children who have been vic-
tims of British air raids. Who are they pray-
ing to, Adolf? Seems to us that we distinctly
remember your forbidding any other gods in
Germany but you.
So if you're finding your magazine pub-
lishing venture too much of a drain on your
purse, Adolf, you can discontinue our com-
plimentary copy immediately. Being in the
publishing business in a small way ourselves,
we can imagine what it must cost to send out
free copies of "Facts In Review" to every
editor in the country, to say nothing of the
large number sent to other "influential" citi-
zens. So if it's all the same to you, Adolf,
you may concel our subscription and use the
money to buy a bit of jam for some little
German girl who probably hasn't had any on
her morning toast since you began your pro-
gram of "guns instead of butter."

SOUND TALK FROM THE PAST
P. T. Barnum may have had some of the
weaknesses generally credited to showmetn,
but, he was highly successful and he ran a
good circus where you generally got youi
money's worth. A word of advice from the
man who operated, the "Greatest Show On
Earth" is therefore apropos at this time.
Here's a very pithy declaration from Bar-
num's own lips: "Advertise, or the chances
are that the sheriff will do it for you."
The great showman's estimate of the valuG
of advertising is surely worth the attention
of every merchant and business man in Port
St. Joe. Those who argue that advertising
is a waste of money forget that it sells goods
widely, helps to make mass production pos-
sible, and thus in the end leads to far lower
prices for the average consumer.
Barnum understood these matters. It was'
perhaps when he ran into folks with a con-
trary view that he made a second famous re-
mark: "There's one born every minute!"

The average reader, following the official
war communiques from belligerent powers,
goes around in something of a daze. They
simply don't make sense. The Germans, foi
instance, will claim the destruction of fifty
British planes with loss of but fifteen of their
own. while the British, on the same day, will
reverse the figures. And the dispatches of
the war correspondents are not a great deal
more helpful for the most part. These corre-
spondents are able and honest reporters, but
they are subjected to an -iron censorship and
must necessarily couch their comment in
vague terms. And the warring governments
make sure that the correspondents see only
what they want them to see. However, the
United States war and navy departments'
have channels of reliable information and
they state that the British reports of give-
and-take in their war now going op are far
more accurate than the German.

Well, at least the navy department plans
to establish an air base in Port St. Joe at
some indefinite future date. Now it's up to
all of us to convince them that NOW is the
logical time to act, not 'at some future time.
when the necessity for such a base becomes
apparent through threats of an invading
force and when there would be no time to,
establish such a'base. ..' ': .. .

Keep smiling! '


FOURTH GAME IN LEAGUE
PLAYOFF GOES 11 INNINGS

(Continued from Page 1)
likely spectators will be hanging
from the rafters.
Box score for Wednesday's tilt
follows:


BOX SCORE
Exporters- AB R H


Walters, 3b ....
P. Johnson, If ..
Crain, ct .......
Bilbray, c ......
Lynn, rf......
Whitmire, ss .
C. Johnson, lb..
Lane, 2b .......
Thomason, p ...


4 0 2
5 1 1
5 0 1
5 0 3
5 0 0
312
3 1 2
5 1 2
4 0 0
5 0 1


Totals ...... 41 3 12
Apalachicola- AB R H
Burke, 3b ...... 5. 2
Adams, If ....... 6 0 3
Russell, ss ..... 6' 0 3
F. Bloodworth, .p 4 0 0
W. Raudolph, c.. 3 0 1
Maxwell, c ..... 2 0 1
Gander, 2b ..... 5 0 1
C. Randolph, rf.. 4 0 0
K. Bloodworth cf 5 0 2
Counts, lb ...... 5 0 0


PO A E
1 2 1
0 0 1
1 0 0
18 0 0
0 0 0
0 3 1
9 0 1
4 3 0
0 2 0
33 10 4

PO A E
0 1 1
3 0 0
5 2 0
3 2 1
4 0 0
4 0 1
2 0 0
1 1 0
3 00
.35 1 0
510


Totals ...... 45 2 13 31 5 5
Summary
Two-baes Hits- Walters, Whit-
mire, Bilbray, C. Johnson, Thoma-
son. Runs Batted In-Bil-bray, C.
Johnson, Walters, F. Bloodworth,
'Russell. .Stolen Base-Whitmire.
Double Plays-Walters to Lane to
Johnson; Whitmire to Lane t<4
Johnson; Russell to Counts.
Struck Out-By Thomason, 16;
by Bloodworth, 4. Bases on Balls
-Off Thomason, 2; off Blood-
worth, 4. Earned Runs Ex-
porters, 3; Apalachicola, 1. Left
on Base-Exporters, 9; Apalachi-
cola, 8. Umpires-Tharpe and, Ma-
hon.
Scores of Games Played


First Game-
Apalachicola 005
Exporters .. 000
Second Game-
Apalachicola 013'
Exporters ... 500
Third Game-
Apalachicola 210
Exporters ... 100
Fourth Game-


RH E
005 OOx-10 12 1
000 000- 0 7 3
RHE
000 001- 5 12 3
200 20x- 9 12 3
RHE
090 00x-12 15 1
000 000- 1 4 2
RHE


Spalach. .. 100 000 100 00-2 13 5
Export. .. 100 000 001 01-3 12 4


The Low Down
from
Willis Swamp

Editor The .Star:
Susie and I, we're getting' ready
to build a house. We been livin
a long time in our little old log
cabin here in the Swamp and usin'
a backhouse a quarter mile away,
and we decided that in our ol'o
age we're entitled to some of the
comforts of life, such as a indoor
toilet with tissue paper 'stead of
a mail order catalog. Two people
in a big house rattle 'round like
in a barn, so we decided on one
that is kinda small-along simple
lines. But our idea of simple ar-
chitecture got us into difficulty.
You can't find, a simple design-
you only find them chrome-platea
ivory, trimmed.
But we wanted something with
less glare-so we had to skirmish.
And also we had to. scare up more
coin. And that is what I want to
tell you about.
Up there on the rollin' Potomac
they been saying' that a banker is
not such a hot citizen, but I
dropped in at the Wewa bank
anyway. And I 'sidled over and I
says to the feller there, I'm fig-
gerin' on building' a house and 1
need $1200. And Mr. OGaskin-he's
the banker-he says, Come right
in, and couldn't you use, he says,
$2400 verus $1200? It almost got
me down. And also,, he says, do
you. know anybody else wanting"
money?- .. ..
.This, tall., about bankers beinp.
hard citizens is baloney-and' not


so. Anyway it ain't so with Mr.
Gaskin at the Wewahitchka bank.-
Yours with the low down,
JO SERR_-.

Send The Star to a friend.



ART

PROJECT

MAKES COLOR

PORTRAITS -. -. ',

OF CHILD PICTURES

FREE
This offer is one of the mt remark-
able ever made. We'll send you a
beautifully hand-colored-in-oil-paint
enlargement of any picture you want
enlarged. Yes, any rpapho'., nny fa-
vorite picture you'd like enla:ged and
hand-colored. These enlargements will
be size 5x7. They will be mounted on
high quality, double-white mat mount-
ings size 7x9. To duplicate such an
enlargement, hand-colored-in-oii.
paint, would cost you from $1.25 to
$3.00 in any photographic store. To
get this enlargement you pay only S0c
for the enlargement and the hand-
painting will be done without charge.
Simply send a print or negative of
your favorite picture and fifty cents
in coin. That's all you do, and promptly
by mail you'll receive your hand-col-
ori-dn.-oil enlargement. Send today to.
ART EDITOR
COOPERATIVE FEATURES, INC.
S60 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, IlI.


ENJOY A DAY'S


FISHING!







at-


MIDWAY PARK
On Gulf County's Famed 4

DEAD LAKES
o
Our BOATS are Dry and
Clean. .. Our CABINS
are Clean and Completely
Furnished
-0
S--------o----
This Friendly Camp is Mid-
way of the Lakes, at the
County Line
4
o-----

J. L. KNOWLES
Postoffice Address
WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA
I................................


M OST people who use Dr. Miles
Anti-Pain Pills say that one
pill usually relieves their head-
aches. In the regular package,
Dr. Miles Anti-Pain Pills ,cost
one penny each. In the economy
packages, one penny buys 1:'
pills.
Why Don't You Try Dr. Miles
Anti-Pain Pills?
They taste good, act promptly,
do not upset the stomach, con-
tain no opiates or laxative medi-
cines.
You may be miles away from a
drug store when you are suffer-
ing from a Headache, Neuralgia,
or Muscular Aches and Pains.
Why not get a package of Dr.
Miles Anti-Pain Pills today and
be prepared for emergencies?.
Regular Package, 25 Pills, 25
1Eonomy Package, 125 Pils, $1.0
Fead funl di-
reettona In -
package.


NIs PLS


PAGE TWO


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1940








R


The Star is $2 per year-sub-
scribe now!


Let GARLIC Help Fight
HarmfulColon Bacteria
Dut of sorts ? Harmful bacteria in accumu-
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LeHardy's Pharmacy 12-13 sary Saturday evening, members
of the Junior Auxiliary to the
DR J C C American Legion gathered at the
DR. J C. COE Centennial building for a birthday
celebration. In addition to the
DE N T I S T young people, members of the se-
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5 nior auxiliary and the American
Sunday By Appointment Legion pos-t were present to the
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe number of fifty.
Rev. D. E. Marietta delivered an
interesting address on "National
WHEN YOU NEED A Defense." Other speakers were
Mrs. W. H. Wellington and Mrs.
TA X I M. L. Fuller.
Dancing and contests were en-
joyed and delicious refreshments
3 served during the course of the
evening.
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BAYSHORE
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Highland View
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WESTERN MEATS-All Cuts
STAPLE and FANCY
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We Keep Open Until Noon
.Every. Sunday


NO SUBSTITUTIONS
Substitutions for specified in-
gredients don't make a pre-
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word. You can depend on us.

- LeHARDY

PHARMACY



QUALITY

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and MARkET
Make Us YOUR Food
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WEEK 7 4


Dining Room

Open to the Public
Club Breakfast, 6 to 9:...2-5c
Lunch, 12 to 2 ...........35c.
Dinner, 6 to 8 ...........35c


MR. :M. .' FREEMAN
Corner Reid Ave. and 3rd St.
Griffin Grocery Building
^A ^ -. ^ A A t A -^^_A a A. ^


MRS. SOULE ENTERTAINS
EPISCOPAL AUXILIARY
Members of the Woman's Aux
iliary of the Episcopal church me
Monday afternoon with Mrs. H. W
Soule at her home on Tenti
street.
Following the opening prayer a
'thank offering" was taken and a
short 'business session held. After
the business was dispensed with
Mrs. Robert Bellows was pre
sented with a beautiful 'table lamp
by the members in appreciation oi
the work she has done as a mem-
her of the auxiliary.
The ten meplbers present were
served with iced drinks, sand'
wiches and cookies 'by the hostess.

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT
Born, Saturday,--eptember 7, to
Mr. and Mrs. G. L. Kennington, a
6-pound girl.

the frst Sunday In October..
Mrs. Hugh Howell of Chipley
arrived last Friday to take her
position as instructor on the local
school faculty.

Mrs. B. C. Burns of Tuscumbie,
Ala., is 'the guest of her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Jones.

Dave Maddox returned home
Sunday morning on the S..S. Doro-
thy and is temporarily through
with the sea.

Glenn Grimsley left Monday for
Troy, Ala., were he expects to
attend college.

Miss Kathryn and Albert Hickey
left Tuesday morning for their
home in Orlando after a visit of
several days here with relatives.

Mrs. Eirie Samford, Miss Mari-
gene Smith and Miss Martha Hin-
son spent Saturday afternoon in
Panama City.

Mrs. E; Clay Lewis, Jr., and two
,children, Joyce and E. Clay III,
are visiting with relatives in Tar-
pon Springs.

Mr. and Mrs. George Cooper and
Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Gentry and
son have returned from a visit in
Georgia.

Mr. and Mrs. Earl Rollins 'and
daughter Peggy spent the week-
end in Gordon, Ala.

Miss Louise Solomon and Miss
Juanita Gunn have returned' to the
city 'to resume their positions as
instructors in. the local schools.

Mrs. H. A. Drake left Saturday
for a visit in Atlanta, Ga..

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Maddox weru
business visitors Saturday in Pen-


Personals

LANETA DAVIS, Editor


NOTICE
Due to the illness of our so-
ciety editor, Mrs. Laneta Davis,
who was taken to a Panama City
hospital today for treatment,
we will appreciate it very much
if anyone having society items
or personals will phone or bring
them to The Star office.
-The Editor.

NEW METHODIST SOCIETY
HOLDS CHARTER MEETING
The Woman's Society of Chris-
tian Service, the new organization
of the Methodist church replacing
the Woman's Missionary Society,
:eld its organization meeting at
the church Monday afternoon.
The meeting opened with the
hymn, "Faith of Our Fathers,"and
was called to order *by the pastor,
Rev. D. E. Marietta, who was in
charge of election of officers and
the enrollment ceremony. Mrs.
Franklin Jones acted as temporary
secretary.
Mrs. R. W. 'Smith gave a read-
ing, "The New Day," and the Dox-
ology was sung by the group, fol-
lowed by prayer in unison. Rev.
Marietta spoke on "The Purpose
and Plan of the Organization'' and
the enrollment ceremony then
took place, with 60 members en-
rolling. Each member pledged to
take part in service activities to
strengthen the church and to im-
prove civic, community and world
conditions. The enrollment was
made in six groups and hymns
were sung during the signing of
each group.
Charfer members of the Wo-
man's Missionary society were ac-
corded' the honor of being the
first to sign as charter members
of the new organization. Eight
were present, being Mrs. T. S.
Gibson, Mrs. M. I. Lupton, Mrs. R.
A. Costin, Mrs. G. A. Patton, Mrs.
J. T. McNeill, Mrs. T. H. Stone
and Mrs. A. M. Jones.
Following signing of the char-
ter, election of officers was held
and the following elected to serve
for the first term of the new body:
President, Mrs. A. M. Jones; vice-
president, Mrs. M. L.. Fuller; re-
cording secretary, Mrs. Franklin
Jones; corresponding secretary,
Mrs. George Suber; treasurer, Mrs.
D. B. Lay; secretary of missionary
education, Mrs. J. L. Temple:
secretary of missionary projects.
Mrs. R. W. Smith; secretary of
Christian social relations, Mrs. G.
A. Patton and Mrs. J. T. McNeill:
secretary of literature and publi-
cations, Mrs.' J. L. Sharit; secre-
tary of supplies, Mrs. B. H. Smith;
secretary of student marks, Mrs
Roy Gibson.
Committee chairmen appointed
by the president were: Spiritual
life, Mrs. Boyd; program, Mrs.
Fuller;' finance, Mrs. A. M. Jones:
membership, Mrs. Edwin Ramsey;
fellowship, Mrs. Sharit and Mrs.
A. M. Jones, Jr.: publicity and
printing, Mrs. Patty Love'tt. Mu-
sicians, Mrs. M. P. Tomlinson,
Mrs. W. E. Murdock and Mrs. S.
C. Parker.
Following appointments by the
president the meeting was dis-
nissed with prayer by Mrs. W. E.
3oyd.
The next meeting of the society
vill be held at the church at 3:30
Monday afternoon with Mrs. Ful-
er in charge of the program.

.Miss Myrtle Whitaker and Roy
Gaskin, Jr., attended the McClel-
an-Bailey wedding in Blountstown


last week.

Glenn Kingry spent the week-
end in.'Dothah, Ala., with his par-
.eats.


sacola. *. *t
; .... Dick Grimsley of Washington, D..
i Mrs. D. B. Lewis, D. B. Lewis,. C., and' Try, 'Ala., spent several'
Jr., Marianne, Jewell and Gwendo- days here last week as the guest'
lyn Spencer made a business trip of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joe'
Mond y afternoon 'Panamad t'" rimsley." .. ...


for the regular monthly Bible
study. In the absence of Mrs. J.
F. Miller, Bible study leader, Mrs.
E. B. bendy taught the five books
of Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah and
Jonah. Following the study the
meeting was dismissed by repeat-
ing the Mizpah.
The circles will meet next Mon-
day as follows: Lydia Circle with
Mrs. Curtis M. Palmer; Martha
Circle with Mrs. W. H. Howell.
and the Mary Circle with Mrs. A.
E. McCaskey.

J. A. M. CLUB MEETS
WITH MRS. B. A. PRIDGEON
The J. A. M. club met last Fri-
day evening at the home of Mrs.
B. A. Pridgeon on Fouith street.
Zinnias were used in profusion to
add a colorful note to the home
for the occasion.
Present were Mesdames Leroy
Gainous, C. G. Costin, J. L. Per-
ritt, E. C. Pridgeon, Jr., W. C.
Pridgeon and S. C. Pridigeoh, Miss
Myrtice Coody and Miss Edna Da-
vis, sister of the hostess.


Two Great Stars

In Witty Comedy

Two Academy Award Nominees to
Be Seen At Port Theater In
"Pride and Prejudice"

Another famous romantic clas-
sic has been brought to the screen
in "Pride and Prcjudice," star-
ring Greer Garson and Laurence
Olivier, which comes to the Port
theater Sunday and Monday.
Teaming two Academy Award
nominees of last year, the amusing
story deals with the romance of
Elizabeth Bennet, eldest of five un-
wedded daughters living in a small
provincial English tewn, and Dar-
cey, handsome young aristocrat
who comes to town as a visitor.
Mrs. Benet has her cap set for any
eligible bachelor who comes with-
in her vision. Darcey falls in love
with Elizabeth, but can't stand
her family. But he finds that fam-
ily pride is not nearly so strong
as love, and in the end comes to
the rescue when Elizabeth's sister
rums away with an adventurer.
One of the season's most notable
supporting casts is featured in the
film, hea3'ed by Mary Boland, Ed-
mund Gwenn, Edna May Oliver,
Maureen O'Sullivan and Ann Ru-
therford.


CITY


--4---
BEING CONSIDERED
FOR NAVAL AIR BASE


(Continued from Page 1)
Sharit's letter will be returned
to you after it has been referred
to the bureau of aeronautics.
"Sincerely yours,
C. C. HARTIGAN,
Captain, U. S. Navy
By Direction."
The fact that Port St. Joe is be-
ing considered for a naval air
base is quite encouraging, but


of us to get behind the project.
and push for all we're worth. It
will mean a great deal to the fu-
ture of our city if such a base sl
established.
_____-
PARDON BOARD TO MEET

Dates for the semi-annual mreet-
ing of 'the state pardon board have
been set for November 18 to 21-
Persons who live in the First,
Fourth and Fifth congressional
districts will be heard on Novem-
ber 18 and 19, and those who live
in the Second and Third districts
will be heard November 20 and 2L


KIDNEY STAGNATION

"IS WORSE THAN

CONSTIPATION!
Because We Treat Constipation at
The Onset, While We Neglect
Our Kidneys Indefinately
No other organ in your body t ise
more importance than, your kidneys. For
hn your kidneys there are nine million
tubes which must work day and night to
filter the fluids and keep the system free
from wastes, acids, poisons which, i per-
mitted to remain, may cause serious kidney
md bladder troubles.
It is no wonder then that Nature
iftens calls for help to clean out the
kidneys. So if you are troubled withL
Getting-Up-Ni.hts, Leg Pains, Bactrche.
Nervous Headac!e. Diszines or Los.i of:
Energy, due to functional kidney disorders
try KIDANS, the famous kidney remedy.
which aids Nature to flush out the kid-.
aeys, to filter all wastes, to prevent kid-
pey stagnation.
KIDANS is Safe and Reliable. Thou-
lands report entire satisfaction. Takem.
iccarding to directions, KIDANS will give
iplndid results. Try KIDANS, Buy it at:
>ur Special Price OC-r on two boxes. Lse.
me box. If not satisfied, return unor- 1
box and GET YOUR MONEY BACK. 4
If your local druggist cannot su-
ply you, send $1.00 to The Kidans
Company, Atlanta, Ga., for two full-
size boxes on a money-back guar-
antee. sep. IS
a


FOR BETTER

HEALTH
Milk is an energy food. It is
easily, digested and is grand'
alone or with other foods.
Enjoy the benefits of the
valuable vitamin content of
Fresh Milk.

Pasteurized for Your Protection-


SOLOMON'S

DAIRY
Distributors of Bruce's Juices

SHELBY STRINGFELLOW
Local Representative



WHITE TOP TAXI COMPANY



FOR PROMPT SERVICE

PHONE100 *

-- DAY, OR NIGHT--

[ TAXIS ALWAYS AVAILABLE IN FRONT:,V
.s OF ST. JOE TEXACO SERVICE STATION .
.. . c.. :. ..' ;: "-^ -. .. ., .. ,:....


from indications this development
Swill not occur-if at all-until
Susome far-distant date. It is now-
hurch s up to the people of our city to
stress the natural advantages we
have as well as the strategic po-
sition of this area. in' order that
BAPTIST CIRCLES IN BIBLE the navy department can be con-
STUDY MONDAY AT CHURCH vinced of the necessity of a: base
The three circles of the Baptist here.
Woman's Missionary Society met One or two men cannot take
Monday afternoon at the church care of this matter-it's- up to all


-- -la -~b~-~CQCt~ ~LCPP6- -~~-~Errrlr


W7


(_ C~"'brr-~--~-LI1CC~~-WIIYIIIYIYld


I


r-


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1940


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE THREE


t


L


*0







PAGEFCU TH STA, PRT T. JE, ULFCOUNY, LORDA FID~y, EPTEBER13,194


BOY KING AGAIN RULES All Ablebodied


W Kuar--- IN- ,
Michael, son of King Carol of Ru-
mania, is shown here with his
mother, the Princess Helen of
Greece, to whom his father pre-
ferred Mme. Magda Lupescu. King
Carol abdicated and fled the coun-
try. Young Michael rules in name
only, for Rumania is now a dicta-
torship under Premier General
Ion Antonescu.

A relief map of the United
States 32 by 20 feet, completed by
WPA workers, is called the larg-
est accurate "three dimensional
map of the country.

ll[ lll lltlll llllll A llltlill"""r J







Opens Daily 2:45, Continuously
Saturday 1:35 Sunday 1:45
ROY WILLIAMS, Manager

SATURDAY, SEPT. 14
2BIGSM'ASH2
HITS--

-Pat

UR .DA


"Zorro's Fighting Legion"
* *60o o, g ** 9
SUNDAY MONDAY
SEPTEMBER 15 16

PRIDE AND
PREiJUDICE4I
I kN 1 G iC]TUPE ;
- Ge-a GAFSP.ON Lurarp IV0 R
.c F-4


Popeye


Latest News


* Y U *^< C *
TUESDAY ONLY
SEPTEMBER 17


"YOUR TOWN," a Story of
America!


WEDNESDAY ONLY
SEPTEMBER 18


II


Men In Florida

Are Militiamen

Article of State Constitution Pro-
vides Those Between 18 and
45 Shall Constitute Militia

Whether you know it or not.
and regardless of federal action in
the matter of conscription or com-
pulsory military training, every
abledbodied man in the state of
Florida between the ages of 18
and 45 are members of the state
militia and may be called for mili-
tary service in that organization
at the will of the governor, accord-
ing to an article of our state con-
stitution.
Article 14 of the state constitu-
tion reads: "All ablebodied male
inhabitants of the state between
the ages of 18 and 45 years that
are citizens of the United States.
or have declared their intention to
become citizens thereof, shall con-
stitute the, militia."
Another section of the article
-empowers the governor to "call
out the militia to preserve the
public peace, to execute the laws
of the state, to supress insurrec-
tion or to repel invasion." Thp
legislature is given authority to
provide by law "for organizing and
disciplining the militia."
The second amendment to the
Constitution of the United States
says: "A well regulated militia.
being necessary to the security of
a free state, the right of the peo-
ple to keep and bear arms shall
"'nt be infringed."
So technically every ablebodiedt
'--ai in Florida between the ages
specified is automatically made a
member of the militia or national
guard and' is subject to immediate
call should 'the law be invoked or
emergency arise.
---- -- ------

Drivers' Licenses

Now On Sale Here

May Be Obtained At Miller's Ser-
vice Station; Present Licenses
Void After October 1

County Judge Thos. R. L. Carter
states that drivers' licenses are
now on sale and can be obtained
in Port St. Joe at Miller's Standard
Service Station on Reid avenue
today and tomorrow, next Monday,
Wednesday and Friday and daily
during the balance of the month
beginning September 23, except
Sunday. Drivers' licenses will be
75 cents and chauffeurs' licenses
$1.25, which includes notary fees.
To avoid delay and tedious wait-
ing, applicants may drive in and
take the oath for applications and
secure their licenses the following
day.
Operator's and chauffeur's li-
censes and temporary instruction
permits are on sale at the county
judge's office in Wewahitchka
daily except Sa'turday afternoons
and Sundays. When the judge is
present to administer the oath the
prices will be the same as last
year-50 cents and $1.00. During
absence of the judge there charge
for notary fee will be added, mak-
ing the prices 75 cents and $1.25
Judge Carter points out that all
present licenses will be void after
September 30, and urges operators
of motor vehicles to secure their
licenses, now.

BUILDING PERMITS
A building permit has been Is-
sued to Arthur Lupton for con-
struction of a 5-room house in Bay
Ridge Subdivision, on.Palm ave-
nue, at a cost of $3000.
Permit for construction of a
duplex apartment on Eighth street
at a cost of $3500 has been issued
to A M. Jones,

Since 1918 over 200,000 products
entirely new to mankind hav.
come from American laboratories.


'SUFER-BGMES' A.RE DROPPED ON LONDON


Britons examining bomb container in which German planes over
London dropped clusters of explosives that break apart in the air.
On the table are exploded and unexploded bombs- Photo passed
by the British censor.


"EARTHBOUND" IS FULL
OF COMEDY AND DRAMA

The surprising adventures of a
ghost haunted by the living are
portrayed in "Earthbound," star-
ring Warner Baxter and Andrea
Leeds, playing Tuesday only at
the Port theater.
There is comedy, pathos, drama
and human interest in the moving
story of a lost soul who wants to
right the wrongs he unwittingly
caused on earth, but he is unable
to contact the right persons.
Through the medium of modern
camera magic, Baxter becomes a
spectre after his death early in
the film, but he doesn't realize it.
He walks through iron doors and
stone walls to be at the side of
his love, but she can neither see
nor hear him.
The. strong supporting .cast is
topped by Lynn Bari, Charley
Grapewin, Henry Wilcoxon and
Elizabeth Patterson.

Every ads carries a message-
a message that will save money.


Industrial research has made it
possible to turn salt into road sur-
facing materials and also into fer-
tilizer.
LEGAL ADVERTISING
NOTICE
This is to certify that on the
2nd day of September the Regis-
tration Books will be open in the
various districts for the purpose
of registering those who did not
register for the May Primaries.
The books will be open for three
days a 'week at the following
places and with the following peo-
ple in charge.
District 1, Wewahitchka-Regis-
trar's office; Claude G. Rish.
District 2, Ewing's Still-J. A.
Kemp hobane; Minnie Kemp.
District' 3,. White City-Ward's
home, Mts. Della Spotts.
District. 4. Kenny's Mill-Doc-
tor's office; Mrs. J. B. Traweek.
District 5, Dalkeith-Stripling's
store; ferman Stripling.
District 6, Overstreet-Kinard's
home; T. J. Kinard.
District 7, Port St. Job-Sentinel
office; Mrs, C. C. Taunton.
District 8, Highland View -
Brigman's store; Mrs. Paul Brig-
man.
C. G. RISH,
Supervisor of Registration.


CHECK UP
On Light Bulbs in
Every Room
SRemember that old blackened
bulbs waste current and rob
you of your light and sight.
Replace them now with Mazda Bulbs
and don't forget to fill all empty sockets
. nse:the-proper size bulbs to give you
BETTER LIGHT FOR BETTER SIGHT.


O CHECK UP


Adequate wiring gives Reddy Kilowatt an opportunity to beer serve
your appliances. It's easy and economical to have your wiring brought
up to date. Now is the time to install switches where you need them
and install adequate convenience outlets to provide for lamps, your
radio anda appliances.

Sight is PRICELESS-Light is CHEAP
Protect.ou irvreelese, possession, sight, with adequate lighting facilities.
Lthtinj bulbs and fixtures are., tdy better and hear. than ever
before--take advantage of this by igjht Conditioning-NOW!


FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION

f .


LOCAL BOYS JOIN NAVY
Charles R. Mahon, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Charles Mahon and
Charles K. Lewis, son of Mr. and
Mrs. D. B. Lewis 'this weak joined
the United States Navy through
the recruiting station at Marianna.
It is understood that both young
men will be stationed at the Nor-
folk, Va., 'base.

Joe Lilienfeld, who is in there U.
S. Navy, and stationed, at Norfolk,
Va., is expected home tomorrow
on a furlough.

A fish hook said to be strong,
rust-proof and resistant to. qorro-
sion has been produced from an
alloy that is 98 per cent nickel.


e e



Advertising

IS


Good News

Specially now, when the world
is so full of strife, misery and
anxiety, it's good to be able to:
get the pleasant news that comes;
in the ads.
About a light-hearted summer
turban... sportswear coolly stolen.
from the men a refreshing
hot weather beverage a
A pipe that promises a smoke.
treat...a light straw hat for the
steaming brow ..
The ads are reminders that life
can't all be woe.. reminders to
be as normal and comfortable a:
possible reminders to whih
you can sensibly respond. Fot
the ads lead you to sound values

rj- - vr"w.'


Wihen You




CLEAN




HOUSE



CHECK UP
On Your t vlgng
Fixtaz.-es
rDo our I.Wi~ FuPiaixawws
G ratmre, and gkv "&, Lm'd-
t..etos7 l U*i?'U IsWI.O W*PAe'
ance in x t .-ping with ,-ar e .r huarmir
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and 2t4uect the W ulght *'nd"itotou
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GENE K4t*REY in
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wo


4L! -W-,ktL !,4LV=IAW'MULL,!6&J I M I


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRJDAY,~1I SE.PTEM-P.ER 13, IP


I A, -1.6.1