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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00100
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: September 6, 1940
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00100

Full Text







..The Star-Florida's fastest grow-
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St Joe.


Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast.
est growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


VOLUME III PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY., FLORIDA, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1940 NUMBER 48
a


Vacation Days Are

Over; Local Schools

Will Open Monday

Increase In Enrollment Expected
By Jon L. Stapleton, New
Principa)


With the opening of the Port
St. Joe schools Monday morning
blissful, lazy vacation days for
the children of the city will come
to an end and the nine-month
trek on the road to knowledge
"will begin.
Principal Jon L. Stapleton ex-
-seets a healthy increase in the
number of pupils over last year,
and urges that all students be on
hand the first day, especially high
school students, as at that time
the schedule is still subject to
-change.
Elementary pupils will meet in
the auditorium at 9:30 Monday
morning to receive directions for
registration, and high school stu-
dents will gather at 9:45.
Opening day of school is sym-
bolical to the world of the frequent
appearance in the lives of young
folk of new horizons to i ary the
tedium of existence. While age re-
volves in its mind the' perplexing
question of when is the proper
time to turn over' a new leaf,
youth has this problem solved for
Itself in the normal course of
nts ;. -.-. ,- ? ? *'-2
Each fall brings to school chil-
dren the pleasant prospect of new
fields of learning, of new associa-
tions, and the hope of experience


heretofore unknown.
As the time approaches for the
opening of school, a strange feel-
ing grips the heart of every pupil,
still untouched by the blase, taun-
diced outlook that is the curse of
mankind in general beyond a cer-
tain -age.
The young folk are turning over
in their mind the question of how
they. will like the new teacher'.
Subjects which they have, not tried
before will come up for considera-
tion, as they peep behind the
overs of books that heretofore
-*tliey have seei the pupils in the
grades just ahead' of them carry
for the past several years.
In short, even the dullard who
barely manages to' ease by each
year gains some excitement from
the prospect of what is ahead ot
him at the beginning o- school..


Death Calls Mrs.

Lillie McDaniel

Highland View Woman Passes
Away Friday At Her Home;
Burial At Tifton, Ga.

Mrs. Lillie Mae McDaniel, 43,
passed away last Friday at her
home in Highland View following
an illness of several months. Fu-
neral services were held in Tit-
ton; Ga., Saturday afternoon, with
burial in the Tifton cemetery.
Mrs. McDaniel had been a resi-
dent of this section for three
years, coming here from Tifton.
She is survived by her husband,
Watson J. McDaniel of Highland
View; three daughters, Miss Ruth
McDaniel and Mrs. Richard Dow-
nun of this city, and Mrs. N. E.
Chambliss of Alapaha, Ga.; a son,
Roy E. McDaniel of this city; two
sister, Mrs. T. L. Mincey of'Port
St. Jee and Mrs. .G S. Walker of
Sylvester, Ga., and three brothers,
J. T., T. L. and! J. Jackson of
Council, Ga... ..


R. A. F. BOMBS CITY OF BERLIN


The damage to this apartment
house in Berlin by Royal Air
Force planes was in reprisal for
Nazi raids in London. With the
second World War in it's second
year, the ,main objectives of


Exporters Lose

First Game In

League Playoff

Apalachicola, Winner of the First
Half In Gulf Coast League,
Takes Kennymen 10-0

While the Kenny Exporters of
Port St. Joe went great guns to
win first honors in the second half
of the Gulf Coast League season,
and Apalachicola, winners of top
position in the first half, ranked
fourth in the second half, the
Oystermen from the neighboring
city shut out the Exporters 10 to
0 Wednesday at Apalachicola in
the first game of the playoff for
the league pennant.
The Exporters marked up seven
hits during the game but appar-
ently did not have the batting
power to bring 'em across the
home plate. Apalachicola chalked
up 12 hits, three of them homers,
making five runs each in the third
and sixth innings. Home runs were
made by Bloodrworth, Adams and
Counts.
The second game of the series,
to be the best three out of five,
will be played at the local ball
park this afternoon anid the third
game will be played Sunday at
Apalachicola.
The box score of Wedensday's


game follows:
Apalachicola- AB R


Burke, 3b ...... 5
Aidams, If ...... 4
Russell, ss ..... 4
Bloodworth, cf .. 4
W. Randolph, c.. 4
Gander, 2b ..... 4
C. Randolph, rf. 2
Myer, rf ....... 2
Counts, lb ..... 4
Hendles, p ..... 4


1
2
1


Totals .......37 10


Exporters-


H'PO A
1 1 1
1 0 0
1 3
1 3 0
1 7 1
1 2 4
11 0
1 00
2 12 0
2 0 3

12 27 12


AB R H PO A E


Democracy vs. Dictatorship is
still to be decided. War in the
air getting more vigorous day
by day, it is hard to tell what
turn the outcome might be if
the war lasts through the winter


Sinclair Service

Station In Formal

Opening Saturday

Free Prizes Being Offered Those
Who Register At New Sta-
tion Tomorrow.

SC. W. "Red" Horton will hold
the formal opening of the new
Sinclair service station at the cor-
ner of Monument avenue and
Fourth street tomorrow, and in
order to get people acquainted
with this modern and up-to-date
dispensary of gasoline and oils he
is giving away cash prizes to those
who register on the guest book
during the day. There are no
strings attached' to these prizes-
no one has to purchase a thing,
just stop in at the station and
register.
The new station will give 24-
hour service and will be in charge
of Wilbur Wells and J. R. Guilford.

TWO ARE BEING HELD IN
BLOUNTSTOWN SLAYING

Sheriff J. K. Musgrove of Cal-
houn county has arrested two men
on charges of killing George E.
Lambe, 45-year-old -bachelor school
principal whose partly decomposed
body was found near his home last
week.
He said one of the men, Coy
Lindsey, 55, is in jail at Bristol, in
Liberty county, and that the other,
Tom Chason, 48, is being held lU
the Gulf county jail at Wewa-
hitchka because feeling is running"
high in Blountstown.
Lambe was last seen alive aftel
he had left Blountstown with
Chalson several days before his
body was found. The sheriff said
Chason, brother-in-law of the death
man, had bden making his home
with Lambe.
Lambe's body was exhumed Sat-
urday and two doctors found in an 1
autopsy that his neck had been
broken.


.wnitmire, ss ... 4 0 02 1 1 ___
Lynn, If ....... 1 0 0 0 0 0 H. F. CHAPMAN TAKES


TONSIL CLINIC TO BE
HELD SEPTEMBER 19
A tonsil clinic will be held' Sep-
tember 19 at the Centennial build.
ing, sponsored by the Port St. Joe
Welfare League. Dr. McLane will
be in charge of the clinic, assisted
by Dr. A. L. Ward of this city.
-- 41-- -

C. L. Brooks Dies At

Beacon Hill Home

Young Man. Called By Death Af-
ter Siege of Progressive
Infantile Paralysis

Sunday morning death called
Clinton L. Brooks, 25, son of the
late Thomas C. Brooks, former
lighthouse keeper at Beacon Hill,
at his Beacon Hill home. Cause
of death was progressive infantile
paralysis contracted a week pre-
viously. He was found dead by
his wife early Sunday, having died
during the night.
Funeral services were held Mon-
day afternoon in Apalachicola with
Rev. L. E. Wright of the Apalachi-
cola Baptist church officiating, as-
sisted by Rev. J. W. Sisemore of
this city. Pallbearers were R. V.
Porter, T. S. Gibson, W. A. Rob-
erts and Peter Mahon.
Deceased is survived by his
widow; one sister, Mrs. R. V. Por-
ter of Apalachicola, and five
brothers, Fletcher of Apalachicola,
Willard! of Pensacola, Herbert of
-Miami, Felix of. Memphis, Teni.,
and A. H. Brooks of Gulfport,
Miss.

DRIVERS' LICENSES
ARE NOW ON SALE

Automobile drivers' licenses for
1941 are now on sale according to
information received from the of-
fice of D. W. Finley, state motor
vehicle commissioner. Application
blanks and license cards have been
mailed to all county judges in the
state and Gulf county residents
can secure their licenses by con-
'acting County Judge Thos. R. L.
Carter.
Walter F. Reid, director of the t
state highway .patrol, has written n
letters to all county judges urging n
them to refuse licenses to habitual
drunkards and to persons who are t.
too old or sick to operate automo- c
biles safely. He said similar pleas M
will be made to police chiefs and l
municipal judges. b
"It is our desire to do .every-
thing possible to prevent the issue.
dance of driver's licenses to incom-
petent persons in the effort to
protect our citizens and tourist
visitors while traveling on the
highways," Reid said. W
___ -(--- -
NEW TAXI SERVICE
NOW IN OPERATION

The White Top Taxi company,
i new concern, this week started a]
:)erations in the city and will
give day and night service. c
The taxi stand will be located a
at the St. Joe Texaco Service Sta. t
tion and the phone number will da
be 100. lc
4 is
CITY COMMISSIONERS a
CONSIDER GAS BIDS
The city commissioners at their B


P. Johnson, If .. 3 0 4 2 0 1 OVER CLEANING PLANT meeting Tuesday night opened
Crain, cf ....... 4 0 2 0 1 0 Bob's Dry Cleaners, located on bids for servicing the city's cars
Bilbray, c ...... 4 0 1 8 3 0 Third street, this week was pur- for the ensuing four months. No
Jones, rf ........-4 0 0 0 0 0 chased by T. F. Chapman of Da- action was taken on the matter at
Walters, 3b ..... 4 0 2 1 3 0 visboro, Ga., and will be known fa the time due to the absence ot
C. Johnson, lb .. 4 0 1 11 0 1 future as "Chapman's Cleaning Commissioner J. E. Bounds.
Lane, 2b ...... 3 0 0 00 2 0 Service." Mr. Chapman has had a Bids were submitted by the St.
Thomason, p ... 2 0 1 0 2 0 great deal of experience in the dry Joe Motor company, J. Lamar Mil-
Moore, p .......1 0 0 0 1 0 cleaning business and states that ler's Standard Station, Sunny State
- he is prepared to give tle best of Station, American Oil company
Totals .......84 0 7.24 13 3 service. and the Texas company.


Labor Day Fete

Draws Big Crowd

To City Monday

Miss Saunders Crowned As Queen
At Grand Ball Held In Cen-
tennial Auditorium

The third annual Labor Day
celebration staged in Port St. Joe
last Monday by organized labor
in co-operation with business men
and civic organizations, drew
what is said to be the largest
crowd ever to attend such an af-
fair in this city.
The day opened with a parade
through the main streets of the
city headed .by the school band
followed by marching units of the
Boy Scouts, labor unions, Ameri-
can Legion and Auxiliary, the city
fire truck, and decorated' cars.
The parade ended at Port Inn
Park where public addresses were
heard, with Mayor J. L. Sharit
acting as master of ceremonies,
Speakers of the day were Con-
gressman-elect Bob Sikes of Crest-
view, State Senator-elect Frank
Adams of Blountstown and T, M,
Schneider, commander of the Gulf
County American Legion Post. All
paid tribute to labor and the fine
work it is doing in the upbuilding
of our nation.
Following the speaking every-
one adjournpdct' o -Constitution
Park where more than 1500 pounds
of meat was consumed at a free
barbecue.
After a brief siesta period a free
baseball game was enjoyed at the
local ball park between the St,
Joe Exporters and the St. Joe Pa-
permakers, with the Papermakers
makingg the long end of a 9 to 4
score.
An old-time fiddler's convention
was held at the Centennial audi-
orium at 8 o'clock in the evening
with Pete Strange of this city
taking first honors, Mr. Stevens of
Milville, second', and W. A. Law-
on, third.
Concluding the gala day was
he grand ball held in the Centen.
nial auditorium with music fur-
lished by Curtis Davidson and his
orchestra from Quincy. At this
ime Miss Susan Saunders was
rowned as Labor Day queen,
liss Murnice Taunton was se-
ected as princess and Mrs. Eliza-
eth Pridgeon named as duchess.


Baby Contest to

SEnd Wednesday

Winners to Be Announced From
Stage of Port Theatre; "Gold
Rush Masie" Is Screen Show

Winners in the Port theatre's
Attractive Child Contest" will be
announced from the stage at 9:30
'clock Wednesday evening, ac-
ording to Manager Roy Williams,
nd he urges all attending the
Ieatre between now and, Wednes-
ay to be sure and cast their bal-
Its for their favorite. The affair
being sponsored by the theatre
nd Poehler's Studio.
Appropriate prizes will be pre-
ented the winners in the contest.
The picture for Wednesday is
Gold Rush Masie,' presenting a
ew romantic team that squabbles
ore than it romances.
Third in the popular series deal-
g with the adventures of the
randed showgirl, "Gold Rush
asie" presents Ann Sothern in
er familiar characterization, this
me adrift in the midst of the
(Contlnued on Page 3)


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PAGE TWO


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year........$2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months..........65c

-- .Telephone 51 ja-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.


WE AGAIN QUERY "WHY?",
Just prior to the recent election the editor
of The Star ran for a number of weeks an
editorial titled "Why?" and demanding to
know why all county printing and advertis-
ing should go to the county seat paper in-
stead of being divided between the two print-
ing plants of the county,
After several repetitions-and before elec-
tion day-the editorial brought results, but
since the election all the county work again
is staying in Wewahitchka, and again we
query. "Why?"
A number of other counties of the state
divide equally the printing and legal adver-
tising among the papers of the county and
do so without inconvenience to the clerk. We
see no reason why such a system can not be
inaugurated in Gulf county. If it can't, we
want to know the reason why.

ANOTHER LABOR DAY HAS PASSED
Another Labor Day has been celebrated,
and at a time wflen unemployment is high.
The nation knows that the percentage of:
the unemployed would be much higher were
it not for the programs of self-aid which have
been instituted by labor unions. They have
been contributing to funds for the relief of
the needy in the ranks and have been pro-
moting an industrial peace that conditions
might not be aggravated.
Labor has come through the year with
high honors. It still faces problems but has
reason to believe that the worst is over, that
the numbers of the unemployed will slowly
lessen and that upon the lessons which have
been learned will be built a plan which will
be of permanent service in another era in
which men who are anxious to work must
remain idle. In the defense programs which
are being advanced for the interest of the
nation, labor is playing and will continue to
play a leading part.

Neutrality and the code of international
morality are now one with-Nineveh, the 5c,
glass of beer, springbottom pants and inter-
national law.-Macon Telegraph.


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


LOYALTY COMES FIRST
Today the American people are in no mood
to countenance disloyalty of any kind-no
matter where it may be. Loyalty must be un-
qualified from those in high places and low.
A short time ago one of the nation's lead-
ing newspapers investigated the business ac-
tivities of a commercial agent of the German
government in this country. This agent had
rented a local home under an assumed name
to negotiate deals of all kinds with some
American business men. Great secrecy sur-
rounded the transactions. Much of what ac-
tually occurred is still shrouded in mystery,
but enough has been disclosed to shock the
country. A few business men apparently
worked on the principle that nothing counted
save profits.
One of the business men involved has been
discharged by his company. It is time for
both government and industry to work to-
gether to disclose any other machinations of
this kind that may exist. The overwhelming
majority of American business men are true
patriots, but there are a few who are for sale
-even as there are a small number of labor
leaders and government officials who are for
sale-and the country must be rid of them.

A SPLENDID OPPORTUNITY
Great enthusiasm has been shown by the
youngsters in the organization of the Sons of
the Legion baseball team, and we believe the
same enthusiastic response would be forth-
coming if an effort were made to give Port
St. Joe one of the most colorful of all musi-
cal units-a drum and bugle corps.
Different kinds of people like different
kinds of music, but we venture to say that it's
doggone hard to find a person who does not
thrill to the music of a drum and bugle corps.

The defense program is beginning to move
at last. Big airplane contracts have been let,
along with contracts for powder, tanks and
other necessities. No other country in the
world has anywhere near our industrial ma-
chine-and no other nation is so potentially
powerful, once it shakes off its lethargy and
gets down to the business of preparing
against aggression in dead earnest.

A Japanese spokesman, in telling of the
designs of Nippon for taking the Philippine
Islands and the Dutch East Indies, said.that
they had "no fear of the American people as
they were too weak and pacifistic." But boy,
we sure can raise hell when we gits started!

The Labor Day week-end death toll in the
United States came to 514. That is more than
the Germans and British kill in a week with
their aerial warfare.

Automobile drivers are urged to drive
carefully through the' streets of the city be-
ginning next Monday, as school opens and
the streets will be overrun with children.


JOHNSON WINS


Senator Hiram W. Johnson of Cal-
ifornia who won both the Repub.
lican and Democratic nomination
in last week's primary for re-elec-
tion for a fifth term.. His victory
increases Republican hopes ot
carrying the state because, Presi-
dent Roosevelt tried to purge the
veteran senator.
-- (----


The Low Down
from.
Willis Swamp

Editor The Star:
Up in Richmond, Va., for years
the firemen have 'been doin' a
good turn for the youngsters in
their neighborhood givin' 'em hair-
cuts-between fires. And every-
body had fun.
I know they had fun, because
when our boys were smaller-and
before they commenced to wash
their neck without bein' told-I
had a lot of fun myself. I maybe
clipped' an ear now an' then, but
I have had' an ear clipped myself
by some of 'the very best barbers
in this here section.
But in Virginia the firemen must
desist. No more free haircuts.
They are violation' some kind of
ordinance. Something to do with
sanitation-washin' their hands, or
maybe their own neck, I don't
know. It sounds fishy.
But for bein' sanitary, you could
cut a boy's hair in a glass-lined
and sterilized operation' room, and
a half hour later you would find
him stand-in' on his head in a mud
puddle full of pollywogs. No polly-
wog is more sanitary-maybe less
so-than any Richmond barber.
If I was a Richmond barber,
and my house got on fire, I sure
wouldn't expect much from the
fire department.
Yours with the low down,
JO SERRA.


with a hose could knock down a
diving plane with this gun," Hale
said.


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1940

HORSE ONCE HAD TOES
The horse had three toes on
each foot and; was only 27 inches
tall 3,000 years ago.
--Read the ads--it pays!
Read the ads-it pays!


PROJECT

MAKES COLOR

PORTRAITS ;

OF CHILD PICTURES

FREE
This offer is one of the most remark-
able ever made. We'll send you a
beautifully harid-colored-in-oil-paint
enlargement of any picture you want
enlarged. Yes, any snapshot, liny fa-
vorite picture you'd like enlarged and t
hand-colored. These enlargements will
be size 5x7. They will be mounted on
high quality, double-white mat mount-
ings size 7x9. To duplicate such an
enlargement, hand-colored-inroil-
paint, would cost you from $1.25 to
$3.00 in any photographic store. To
get this enlargement you pay only 50c .
for the enlargement and the hand-
painting will be done without charge.
Simply send a print or negative of:
your favorite picture and fifty cents
in coin. That's all youdo, and promptly
by mail you'll receive yoar.lwsad-col-
or- 4n-oil enlargement. Serd today te
ART EDITOR.
COOPERATIVE FA'LlTIEr.S, INC.
360IN. Michigan Ase.. Chicago, Ill.



ENJOY A DAY'S

FISHING!






at
--at -- '-


:'MIDWAY PARK
On Gulf County's Famed

DEAD LAKES
0-o-
Our BOATS are Dry and
Clean. Our CABINS :
are Clean and Completely,
Furnished
-o-
This Friendly Camp is' MId-
way of the Lakes, at the
County Line
-----o-

J. L. KNOWLES
Postoffice Address
WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA
^** *" *" ^ '*'- *'*'*" '*'*' ^


PLANT SLASH PINE ON
SORRY LAND, NIELAND
ADVISES FARM OWNERS'

Thousands of acres of worn-out
or unimproved parts of farms and
cut-over lands in Florida can be
used to grow the dual-purpose
slash pine, says L. T. Nieland, ex-
tension forester for the Univer-
sity of Florida College of Agricul-
ture. These acres, profitless for
other crops, are suitable for pro-
duction of timber and naval stores
from slash pine.
Quoting a recent publication of
the U. S. Forest Service, the ex-
tension forester reports ,that slash
pine on average land at ages ot
15 to 25 years produces wooa for
such uses as pulpwood, stave
blocks, and fuel at the rate of one-
half to one cord an acre annually.
On good quality land, well-stocked
stands are growing at the rate of
one to two cords an acre a year,
or 300 to 600 board feet.
By .proper cutting" and 'profee-
tion from fire, sia~i'-pine' wood-


lands and forests can be kept con-
tinuously productive and perpetu-
ally renewed.
Slash pine, the extension for-
ester says, is one of the most
profitable forest trees in the
United States because of its rapid
growth and its value in production
of naval stores. A too common
practice in the past has been to
work the trees when they are 'too
young, or when they -are under 9
inches in diameter.
Though many areas have suffi-
cient seed trees to reseed them-
salves and produce good stands of
timber if protected from fire, Mr.
Nieland says that replanting is
necessary in some cases. He urges
farmers interested in planting for-
'est trees to see their county
agents for reliable information on
the best forest practices.
---_X
"TICK" IS AN OLD WORD
"Tick" in the phrase "to obtain
goods on tick," meaning on credit,
is a word of considerable an-
tiquity.


GUN FIRES 10,000
SHOTS A MINUTE

A compressed air gun which the
inventors say will shoot 10,000
times a minute and' possibly
many more-was demonstrated at
Los Angeles, Calif., Saturday with
half-inch ball bearings as bullets.
At 100 feet the missiles pierced
airplane armor plate and cut a
three-inch oak plank in two.
The gun emitted only a gentle
hissing noise. The steel balls shot
out so quickly they struck brilliarl
sparks from each other at the
targets.
The gun muzzle was colder af-
ter the firing than before. Instru-
ment dials indicated the air pres-
sure was 150 pounds per square
inch. The inventors said 2000
pounds pressure would be feasible.
The inventors are William B.
Hale and Durand' Beam,- associ
ated with Roger J. Adams, Holly-
wood engineering research tech-
nician.
"Anyone who can spray plants


KIDNEY STAGNATION
-IS WORSE THA

CONSTIPATION!
Because We Treat Constipation at
;The Onset, While We Neglect
Our Kidneys indefinitely
No other organ in yeur body is of
nore importance than your kidneys. For
in your kidneys there are nine million
tubes which must work day and night to
filter the fluids and keep the system free
from wastes, acids, poisons which, if per-
mitted to remain, may cause serious kidney
md bladder troubles.
It is no wonder then that Nature
)ftens ,calls for help to clean out the
kidneys. So if you are troubled with
Getting-Up-Nights, Leg Pains, Backache,
Nervous Ileadache, Dizzines or Loss of
Energy, due to functional kidney disorders,
try IIDANS, the famous kidney remedy,
which aids Nature to flush out the kid-
neys, to filter all wastes, to prevent kid-
ney stagnation.
KIDANS is Safe and Reliable. Thou-
lands report entire satisfaction. Taken
according to directions, KIDANS will give
ilendid results. Try KIDANS, Buy it at
nr Special Price Offer on two boxes. Use
mne box. If not satisfied, return unopened
iox and GET YOUR MONEY BACK. 4
If your local druggist cannot sup-
ply you, send $1.00 to The Kidans
Company, Atlanta, Ga,, for two full.
size boxes on a money-back guar-
antee. setn.13


M OST people who use Dr. Miles
Anti-Pain Pills say that one
pill usually relieves their head-
aches. In the regular package,
Dr. Miles Anti-Pain Pills cost
one penny each. In the economy
packages, one penny buys IV'
pills.

Why Don't You Try Dr. Miles
Anti-Pain Pills?
They taste good, act promptly,
'do not upset the stomach, con-
tain no opiates or laxative medi-
cines
You may be miles away from a
drug store when you are suffer-
ing from a Headache, Neuralgia,
or Muscular Aches and Pains.
Why not get.,a package of Dr.
riles Anti-Pain Pills today and.
be prepared for emergencies?
Regular Package, 25 Pls,:25*
Economy Package, 125. Plls, $%,Q.
Read fll dl-*
rections in
"DR.MILES








PAGE THREE
q


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


The Star is $2 per year-sub-
scribe now!


Let GARLIC Help Fight
Harmful olon Bacteria
Dut of sorts ? Harmful bacteria in accumu-
lated waste matter in your colon may be
poisoning you and causing distressing
headaches and dizziness Tr- rZAniualR
--R-I odoriesd ,aric Tablets. Come in
and get a FREE trial package.
LeHardy's Pharmacy 12-13


DR. J.C. COE
-- DENTIST-
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe


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SHighland- View, ".,
SWe Handle Nothing But
WESTERN MEATS-All Cuts
STAPLE and FANCY
GROCERIES and MEATS
We Keep Open Until Noon
Every Sunday


'NO SUBSTITUTIONS
Substitutions for specified in-
gredients don't make a pre-
scription. That's why we never
substitute ingredients in your
physician's prescription. Ac-
curacy is our constant watch-
word. You can depend on us.

LeHARDY

PHARMACY



QUALITY

GROCERY
and MARKET
Make Us YOUR Food
Supply House
"Prices Right-Clerks Polite"
Clarence Pridgeon, Mgr.
-WE DELIVER



ROOM AND

BOARD
BY THE $7.00
WEEK 7

Dining Room

Open to the Public
Club Breakfast, 6 to 9....26c
Lunch, 12 to 2 ...........35c
Dinner, 6, to 8 ..........35c


MRS,. M. O. FREEMAN,
.Corner Reid Ave. and 3rd -St.
SGriffin Grocery Building
-.. .. .. -


Society


- Personals


LANETA DAVIS, Editor
I


LEGION AUXILIARY IN
THIRD BROADCAST
The third in a series of five
broadcasts sponsored by the Amer-
ican Legion Auxiliary was pre-
sented Wednesday over station
WDLP, Panama City.
The program chairman, Mrs.
Madeline Whitaker, gave an Inter-
esting talk on "Legion Auxiliary
Work," bringing out plans for the
Christmas work. Bandmaster r.
Hampton 'beautifully rendered a
cornet solo, "Schubert's Serenade,'
accompanied at the piano by Mrs.
M. P. Tomlinson, after which the
theme song, "America the Beauti-
ful," was played.
This series of broadcasts is in
connection with the Americanism
and membership drive of the Aux-
iliary and gives the people an op-
portunity to learn of the work be-
ing done by the American Legion
and Auxiliary.

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT
Born, Saturday, August. 31, to
Mr. and Mrs. Ivey Vanlandingham,
a 9%-pound son at their home on
Eighth street. The young man has
been named Johnnie Edward.

Mrs. J. M. Smith and daughter
Marigene, Mrs. D. C. Smith and
Miss Elaine Gore returned Thurs-
day of last week from a visit to
Orlando. While there they were
the guests of Mr. and Mrs. A. H.
Hickey. Albert and Miss Kath-
erine Hickey accompanied them
home for a visit.

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Pridigeon and
daughter Virginia, Gwendolyn and
Wanda Mae Spencer 'and Margie
Costin accompanied Cecil Costin,
Jr., to Mobile Sunday, from there
he will go to Gulfport, Miss., to
resume his studies for another
year at the Gulf Coast Military
Academy.

Mr. and Mrs. James Hawnins
were visitors last week of Mr. and
Mrs. Johnny Todid.


It's a far cry from the pomp
and ceremony of "Schonbrunn,"
the great castle outside of Vienna
where the Austrian emperor and
his family spent the summer, to
that simple white house on a New
England village street where Zita,
the last empress of that ill-fated
country, and seven of her eight
children have found refuge.
Even the .small, twelfth-century
castle in the Flemish village of
Steenockerzell, twelve miles from
Brussels where this family' of
royal exiles had been living since
1929, sacked of the elegance
which used to surround the Haps-
burgs wherever they went. There
was a moat surrounding the castle
and a drawbridge which was not
poweredd until a visitor's credentials
had satisfied the retainer who
stood guard at the medieval
bridge.
But up in Royalston, Mass., only
a low, white fence of wooden pal-
ings separates the last of the great
Hapsburg families from the world.
And the Empress Zita expects her
younger children to attend Ameri-
can universities.this fall: That willI
be better than private .tutors, she.
believes. It is important for them
to know the people of this coun-
try aid how they live..
And wha: will the young refu-
:gees, whlia.vde lived in preocariouba


ALTAR SOCIETY MEETS
WITH MRS. NAVARRE
The St. Joseph's Altar society
met Tuesday afternoon, at the
home of Mrs. A.. J. Navarre on
Eighth street. Mrs. Madeline
Whitaker presided and called the
meeting to order with prayer.
The regular business routine
was carried out and Mrs. J. J.
Darcey was appointed as finance
chairman for September. It was
decided that a ton of coal would
be purchased: for the church. Bills
were presented and, ordered paid,
after which the meeting adjourned.
The hostess served cake and iced
drinks to members present.

SOCIETY EDITOR ILL
Mrs. Laneta Davis,society editor
of The Star, has been confined to
her home on -account of illness for
the past two weeks, but hopes to
be back in harness next week.

Mrs. Helen Snellgrove and
daughter have returned to their
home in Ozark, Ala., after a week's
visit in the city as guests of Mr.
and Mrs. Bill Snellgrove.

Mr. and Mrs. G. M. Sheppard of
Tallaahssee spent the Labor Day
week-end ii Port St. Joe as the
guests of Mr. and Mrs. W. S.
Smith.

Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Graves and
Miss Melissa McCoy of Newville
spent Sunday and Monday in the
city as guests of Mrs. M. B. Smith
and family.

Mr. and Mrs. Hoke Larkin and
Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Larkin spent
from Saturday through Monday in
Bristol visiting relatives.

Miss Mary Lee Hayles returned
Monday after spending several
days in Pensacola.

Mr. and Mrs. J. N. Weatherly
and children have moved to 'Mo-
bile, Ala.


exile all their lives, think of a
country where people say what
they please, no matter if they are
disagreed with where news-
papers report BOTH sides of a
controversy where young
people follow their own inclina-
tions in choosing a career?
Had they been born 25 years
earlier, being Hapsburgs t he y
would have had unusual privil-
eges, honor, wealth. But never
would they have had such liberty
as will be theirs in America
where freedom rests on a tripod
of representative democracy, civil
and religious liberties and free en-
terprise-where the individual is
more important than the state.

BABY CONTEST TO
END WEDNESDAY

(Continued from Page 1)
Arizona desert when her old Ja-
loppy breaks down. Lee Bowman,
the other half of the battling duo,
appears as a handsome hermit
and ranch owner who is happier
the fewer people he sees. After he
has given Masie shelter for the
night, she returns, much to his
disgust, with a whole family of
itinerant crop followers who are
on the trail, o a gold'.btriko.F.m
there on the situation is filled:
with comical situations replete:
with' laughs.:


BAND REHEARSAL WILL
BE HELD THIS EVENING


Howell Hampton, new band in-
structor for the Port St. Joe
schools, announces that rehearsal
will be held in the high school au-
BAPTIST MISSIONARY UNION ditorium this evening at 8 o'clock
IN BUSINESS MEET TUESDAY and asks that all members of tire
A business meeting of the Bap- band be present. Regular rehear-
tist 'Missionary Union was held at sals will begin Monday.
the church Tuesday afternoon. The Parents desiring to have their
meeting opened by singing of the children join the band may meet
year hymn, "How Firm a Founda.. with Mr. Hampton this afternoon
tion." The devotioanl was given at the school building or next
by Mrs. J. W. Sisemore followed week after opening of school.
with prayer by Mrs. Fred .Maddox.
The regular routine of business
was carried out with excellent re-
ports received from all officers c

and chairmen. '
The nominating committee gave
a report of officers for the' ensu- .
inm year, which was accepted as
follows: For president, Mrs. W. H. B .
Howell; first vice-president, Mrs. /
J. O. Baggett; second vice-prest. //. ,
dent; Mrs. Nick Kelly; thlr vice- /
president, Mrs. Benny Grace; re- FOR BETTER
cording secretary, Mrs. W. C.
Pridgeon; treasurer, Mrs. Char'ls H E A LT H
McCeIllan. Following this report,
the meeting was dismissed by Milk is an energy food. It is
Mrs. Baggett. easily digested and is grand


Miss Corrine Davis left Tues-
day for her home in Orlando fol-
lowing a two weeks' visit wita
her brother .and sister-in-law, Mr.
and Mrs. Sammy Davis.

Miss Joan Walker left yesterday
for her home in Pascagoula, Miss.,
after spending several weeks here
as the guest of Miss Betty Jo
Temple.

Mrs. C. E. Boyer and baby were
dismissed from a Panama City
hospital Thursday of last week
and are now at home.


alone or with other foods.
Enjoy the benefits, of the
valuable vitamin content of
Fresh Milk.

Pasteurized for Your Protection


SOLOMON'S

DAIRY
Distributors of Bruce's Juices

Thomas Solomon
Local Representative


BEST VALUES


IN TOWN


ST. JOE SCHOOLS OPEN
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 9


BOYS $100BOYS
SCHOOL PANTS VV SPORT SOX

Shirts or Shorts DRESSES 59c and up
BOYS M GIRLS All Sizes
SCHOOL SHIRTS 4 SHOES $1.00 and up
BOYS GIRLS
SHOES $1.00 .up SOX, Sport and Dress 100

A COMPLETE LINE OF SCHOOL SWEATERS AND
SKIRTS. KAYNEE SPORTS WEAR


A Complete Line of RED GOOSE; SHOES from
Infants ;to. Grtwn-ups '. :-.....


WHrIE TOP TAXI COMPANY



FOR PROMPT SERVICE

PHONE 100 9

DAY OR NIGHT-
T TAXIS ALWAYS AVAILABLE IN FRONT
- OF ST. JOE TEXACO SERVICE STATION






BACK TO SCtOL


I


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1940








PAGEFOU TH STR, PRT T. OEGUL COUTYFLOIDAFRIAY, EPTMBE 6,194


HELD FOR BEATING WIFE
Coley Mattox of Highland View
is being held in the county jail at
Wewahitchka on a charge of beat-
ing his wife Saturday night. No
definite charge has been lodged
against Mattox pending outcome
of his wife's condition.
PORT NEWS
S.S. Maiden Creek of the Water-
man Line sailed Saturday for
Puerto Rico with cargo of lumber
and paper.
Miss Katherine DeCosmo of Ap-
alachicola spent Monday and Tues-
day here as the guest of Miss
Marigene Smith.

I)Ikai IIIIIIII~I! iiaa iiiMllllMI!ll Illlllllllllll !IIl






Opens Daily 2:45, Continuously
Saturday 1:35 Sunday 1:45
ROY WILLIAMS, Manager

SATURDAY, SEPT. 7

Double Feature


HIT NO. 2


"Zorro's Fighting Legion"

SUNDAY MONDAY
SEPTEMBER 8 9
ERROL FLYNN
BRENDA MARSHALL
ALAN HALE
CLAUDE RAINS


THE SEA HAWK


Donald Duck


News


v9* *w 0**004ro u w0
TUESDAY ONLY
SEPTEMBER 10
LORETTA YOUNG
MELVYN DOUGLAS
in

"HE STAYED for

BREAKFAST"

WEDNESDAY ONLY
SEPTEMBER 11
ON THE STAGE -


BABY CONTEST

- WINNERS
9:30 P. M.
SEE YOUR FAVORITE!


0 0TBRN -


Migratory Fowl

Season Is Longer

Hunting Period Increased From 45
To 60 Days Due to Increase
In Number of Birds

The federal restrictions on the
hunting of migratory waterfowl
will be less stringent this fall than
for several years because of a de-
cided increase in the number of
these birds, it is announced by
Secretary of the Interior Harold
L. Ickes.
Sixty days of hunting will be
permitted in place of the 45 of
last year and hunters may begin
hunting at sunrise instead o0
waiting until 7 o'clock. It was not
announced whether there would
be a change in the cease-firing
hour of 4 o'clock. The season in
Florida will open on November 2
and, close December i1.
The opening on November 2
will be 18 days before the open-
ing of the state hunting season
on November 20, but it is antici-
pated that the state will not in-
terfere with waterfowl hunters
during this period. Heretofore the
federal season has been opening a
few days ahead of the state sea-
son and in each of the years the
boards of county commissioners of
most counties have asked that the
state laws be disregarded on this
type of hunting.
Ickes said that five years of
regulation had so increased the
waterfowl population that it was
possible to liberalize the' laws. He
did not indicate, however, that
the day of stringent regulation
Was over.
The bag limit on doves has been
decreased from 15 to 12 because
the severe winter in the South
last year depleted the supply ot
these birds.

Racing Nets Neat

Sum To Counties

Over $31,000 Realized This Year
By Each of Florida's
67 Divisions

Gulf county, along with Florida's
66 other counties, received' nearly
twice as much money from the
state racing commission during
the past year of 1939-40 as com-
pared with the amount received
form the 1935-36 season, the year
before Governor Cone entered of-
fice and started his economy drive
in state expenditures, according to
the annual audit of the commis-
sion.
Each county received $16,794
from the 1935-36 season, the year
for the past year each county re-
ceived $31,562. The total amount
received from the racing commis-
sion by the 67 counties since le-
galized racing began in 1931 totals
$11.918,4755, or $117,887 to each
county.
The audit shows that the racing
commission received a total rev--
nue of $2,302,834 for the 1939-40
season and had a total expenses
of $200,705. This is an increase of
$865,877 over the revenue collected
in 1935-36, and at the same time
-expenses were decreased $114,656
below those of 1935-36. Collection
costs amounted to 21.95 per cent
of the revenue in 1935-36 and to
only 8.72 per cent in 1939-40-a
decrease of 13.25 per cent.
Mr. and Mrs. R. S. Carver and
son, R. S., Jr., have returned from
a week'.s visit in Live Oak and
Perry.
.* fr *
Miss Angeline Davis of Ozark,
Ala., spent Monday in this city.

Mr. and Mrs. C. P. VanHorn and
family left Monday for Pensacola
to make their home.

The Panama Canal Zone has a
population of 5i, $'1"' prelimi-
nary census report.


'Sea Hawk' Plays

Sunday-Monday

Action-Packed Picture Coming to
the Port Theater Is Replete
With Salty Dialogue

All the mouth-filling, ear-split-
ting 16th century oaths common to
both sailors and Knights of the
Bath during the raucous period
when Queen plizabeth ruled Eng-
land, had to be imitated' or para-
phrased for use in the dialogue of
"The Sea Hawk," which plays
Sunday and Monday at the Port
theatre.
Rough-sounding names to call
one's friends or foes in 1588 or
thereabouts include "sheep-biter,'"
a contemptuous expression; "clod
pole," meaning a blockhead; "fat
chuffs," a rich miser, and "knotty
pated," indicating stupidity. Other
good words for naughty purposes


are "clutch-fist,' "micher," "prig,'"
"hunk" and "snudge." These are
all hard-sounding words of 16th
century England and they fit in
the story of "The Sea Hawk," a
sto.y of sea adventure which
needed adventurous language with
a salty tang.
Starred in the picture are Errol
Flynn, Alan Hale, Brenda Mar-
shall and Claude Rains,, with a
supporting cast of thousands.
LIONS REORGANIZE
At a call meeting of the Port
St. Joe Lions club held Thursday
of last week, plans were made for
reorganization of the club. Meet-
ings will be held on Thursday
evening at the Port Inn.
--*% I
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Dearing and
sons, Pat and Mike, of Panama
City, visited in this city Sunday.
S*&
Mrs. J. O. Baggett and daughter
returned Saturday after spending a
week in Wedowee, Ala.


SINCLAIR---

H-C Gasoline
Oils and Greases


For performance


gasoline at reg


price is superior:


SINCLAIR H-


WE GIVE 24-HOUR SEi

PHONE 126 PQRT ST


Send The Star to a friend.

LEGAL ADVERTISING
NOTICE
This is to certify that on the
2nd day of September the Regis-
tration Books will b'e open in the
various districts-for the purpose
of registering those who did not
register for, the May Primaries.
The books will be open for three
days a week at the .following
places and with the following peo-
ple in charge.
District 1, Wewahitchka-Regis-
trar's office; Claude G. Rish.
District 2, Ewing's Still-J. A.
Kemp home; Minnie Kemp.
District 3, White City-Ward's
home, Mrs. Della Spotts.
District 4, Kenny's Mill-Doc-
tor's office; Mrs. J. B. Traweek.
District 5, Dalkeith-Stripling's
store; Herman Stripling.
District 6, Overstreet-Kinard's
home; T. J. Kinard.
District 7, Port St. Joe-Sentinel
-office; Mrs.-C. C. Taunton.
District 8. Highland View -
Brigman'.s store; Mrs. Paul Brig-
man.
C. G. RISH,
Supervisor of Registration.


U. S.-o-

Tires

and Tubes


S-- no


ular


r to


C



VICE

. JOE, FLA.


fl1129(92i'2


Formal Opening of


HORTON'S SINCLAIR


SERVICE STATION



SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 7


Complete Washing, Polishing

and Greasing Service





FREE PRIZES!


For Those Registering Saturday

You do not have to purchase a thing ..
just come in and register whether or not

you own or drive a car. All we want

is to get acquainted with you.


I ~- I I IB L L~ ~b~ ~


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1940


PAGE FOUR