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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00097
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: August 16, 1940
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00097

Full Text




The Star-Florida's fastest grow-
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upltuilding of
the City of Port St Joe.


ASXAR e


'ortlSt. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPorit Paper Mill-Florida's fast.
st growing little jty. In
the heart of the pine belt.
j


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


VOLUME III PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY., FLORIDA, FRIDAY, AUGUST 16, 1940. NUMBER 45


STORM BENDS STEEL Gives Advice On


IIi
'-'1





ji Ii~
1-'-.'i


10-STORM BENDS.........
The/steel tower of a radio station
at Port Arthur, Texas, was bent
double by the violent winds which
.accompanied the storm striking a
vast area of Texas and Louisiana
last week. The tower close by re-
nmained erect as the hurricane
ripped past.


Theater to Hold

Kiddie Contest

TNumber of Prizes to Be Awarded;
.AffalJ Co-Sponsored By
.phler's Studio

The Port theater, in conjunction
with Poehler's Studio of this city,
this week opens a "Most Attrac-
tive Child" contest at the theater.
Anyone living in Gulf or surrounq-
ing counties who has a child un-
der eight years of age may enter
the contest absolutely free. There
are no strings to the affair, the
winners being selected by popular
vote. Every ticket to the Port the-
ater will carry a certain number
of votes-lOc tickets will have 100
votes; 15c tickets 200 votes, and
25c tickets 400 votes.
Parents desiring to enter their
children in the contest are asked
to see Manager Roy Williams and
secure an entry blank, which will
entitle them to one picture of the
child free of charge at Poehler's
Studio.
The contest will end Wednes-
day, September 4, at which time-
the winners will be announced
from the stage of the theater and
beautiful gifts awarded.
C-------
CIVIL SERVICE EXAMS
The U. S. Civil Service commis-
Sion has announced open com-
petitive examinations for t.le po-
sitions listed below: Senior sten-
ographer, $1620 a year; Junior
stenographer, $1440 a year; senior
typist, $1440 a year; junior typist,
$1260 a year; for appointment in
Washington, D. C., only. Examina-
tion open to both men and womeh.
Civil engineer, four grades, with
salaries ranging from $1600 to
$4600 a year. Optional branches
are cadastral, construction, soi-
mechanics, safety, sanitary, gels-
,eral. Full information may be oh)-
tained at the Port St. Joe post-
office.

AUTO TAGS TO BE RED-WHITE
Florida's 1941 automobile tags
will be red and white-red figures
on a white background, the same
as were used in 1939. The plates
will be made at Raiford by state
prisoners.
t .. .,


Local Power Corporation Manager
Tells What To Do During
Electrical Storm

R. G. Porter, local manager for'
the Florida Power corporation,
offered the following comments
made recently by Dr. Karl
McEachron, head of General EleC-
tric's 'engineering laboratory, re-
garding lVghitning .dangers:
In answer to the old belief thai
lightning never strikes in' the
same place twice, Dt. McEachron
points out the studies being car-
ried out by General Electric's high-
voltage engineers. He reports that
the Empire State Building in New
York City is struck 40 and 50
times yearly.
He gives some advice to the
housewife and suggests the fol-
lowing:
"Stay away from the piano. Do
not take a bath or shower turning
a lightning storm. A needle will
not attract lightning, but do not
use an electric sewing machine
during a storm."
In explaining some of lightning's
pranks, Dr. McEachron said that
theie are two types of lightning,
one which travels very fast and
the other which is relatively slow.
The bolts which ignite fires are
of the latter variety, while the
fast strokes .splinter trees, teai
apart homes and do more damage?
.of t,4is:,ature.
IH' cited an instance where a
housewife had the materials for
a fire lying in a stove, andi light-
ning struck the home and started
a fire in the stove. This type, ac-
cording to the speaker, was of the
slow traveling variety.
To swimmers Dr. McEachron
says: "Stay out of water during
an electrical storm."
Mr. Porter also pointed out that
severe lightning storms in this
area occasionally coused service
interruptions oper which. there is
no control. The company's record
of outages, however, is excep-
tionally good, considering the dam-
age caused' to the lines by light-
ning.
-- -
BAND BOOSTERS URGE
ALL TO ATTEND MEETING
Mrs. J. T. McNei11 announced
this week that a meeting of the
Band Boosters club will be held
in the high school auditorium next
Tuesday in connectiioh with the
interview of the new band direc-
tor, Howell Hampton and his pros-
pective band members. All parents
with children in the band and pros-
pective students and parents are
urged to attend this meeting. Mr.
Hampton will interview band mem-
bers from 4:30 to 6:30 at the band
room and will meet with the pa-
rents, at 8 o'clock.
Band rehearsals will begin Mon-
day, September 2. With thle co-
operation of the Band Boosters
club and others interested the
prospects for the ensuing year are
for a bigger and better band for
Port St. Joe.

ST. AUGUSTINE FIESTA
"La Fiesta Grande," celebrating
the 375th anniversary of the
founding of, the city of St. Augus-
tine, will be held in the Ancient
City September 7, 8 and 9.
K


GRAND RIFLES GO INTO PRODUCTION


The Garand semi-automatic rifle is now being produced in quanti-
ties for the U. S. army at the Springfield Armory at Springfield,
Mass. Army officials believe that the Garand rifle will give the
American troops the greatest firing power of any armed force. This
photo shows Col. G. H. Stewart, comianeng officer of the Spring-
field Armory (left) and J. C. Garand, inventor of the rifle, holding
one of the new rifles.


Byrd Released


Gulf County FDA


After Inquest Committee Meets


In Connection With.ibeath of Sea-
man; Williams is Released
On $500 Bond

Following a 'coroner's inquest
and hearing at Wewahitchka last
Tuesday, W. D. Byrd, seaman of
Houston, Teyas, was released,


Discuss Plans for Aiding Farmers.
With Debt Problems Who
Apply for Assistance.

A meeting of 'the Gulf County
Farm Debt Adjustment committee
was held Tuesday morning in the
Masonic hall, with, the following
0


after being held in connection with members present: C. G. Costin, 'C.
the death of Claude G. Williams, F. Hanlon and W. G. Hardy.
Supervisor George E. Simmons
also of Houston, whose body was of the U. S. Farm Security Admin-
found on the highway near Port istration, with headquarters in
St. Joe. Marianna, met with the committee
State Attorney L. D. McRae and and explained various phases of
his assistant, conducted the hear- his organization's program for the
ing before Judge T. R. L. Carter rehabilitation of low-income far-
and Byrd wasi released! due to lack mers.
of evidence. George Williamson, Rolland O. Bell of Marianna,
charged with hit-and,-run driving district FDA supervisor of the
when he struck the deceased, was FSA and field man of the state
released on $500 bond. .Byrd was FDA commission, also was pres-
charged with assault prior to Wal- ent and spoke on the debt adjust-
ter's being struck by the car driven ment program as it has been con.
by Williamson, who was pursued ducted in Florida by the state and
to Boluntstown, arrested and held federal groups during the past
until bond was furnished, five and one-half years.
Claims were made that the de- Before adjourning the committee
ceased was assaulted before Wil- elected Mr. Costin as chairman
liamson's car struck him. for the ensuing year and dis-
Chief Troy Jones and Sheriff cussed plans for aiding any Gult
Byrd Parker: are continuing an in- county farmers with debt prob-
vestigatiion of the case. lems who apply for assistance. Mr.
--------- Simmons will serve as secretary
Ato the committee.
Andy Hardy To Also attending the meeting were
)- --- A 4. E-- E. R. Nelson, county agent; Mrs.


De neen At rort

"Andy Hardy Meets Debutante" Is
Said to Be Best Picture of
Hardy Series

"Andy Hardy Meets Debutante,"
playing Sunday and, Monday at
the Port theater, is said to be the
best yet of the Hardy Family se-
ries of pictures.
Mickey Rooney is teamed again
with Judy Garland and the usual
support of Lewis Stone, Cecilia
Parker, Fay Holden, Sara Haden,


Mrs. W. S. Smith left Wednesday and Ann Rutherford.
for Fort Myers, called by the ill- The story contains a preach-
ness of her sister, Mrs. Annie ment on American traditions and
Piggott. She was accompanied by heritage, interwoven in the story
her mother, Mrs. J. W. V mith of in such a manner as to make it a
Sumal :, component part of the plot.


Pearl Whitfield, home demonstra-
tion agent, an.di Mrs. Edith H.
Middle'brooks, home supervisor.
Mrs. Middlebrooks gave an inter-
esting discussion on the home
program of the FSA.
------
LIONS DISBAND
It was announced this week by
Secretary Roy Williams of the
Lions club that the organization
was temporarily disifanded, due to
lack of interest on the part of
members. The Lions have greatly
aided in securing glasses and
oher assistance for underprivi-
leged children and it is hoped that
the organization can be soon re-
organized. The charter will be
sent to headquarters of Lions In-
ternational until the club becomes
active again.


Lightning Perils


'W "VM-4



XL 'A..JL


112 Lose Drivers'

Licenses In July

Drunken Driving Accounts for 90
Per Cent of Revocations
Since October

W. F. Reid, of Tallahassee, di-
rector of the department of public
safety, reported this week that 112
drivers' licenses were revoked, dur-
ing July and 39 drivers' licenses
were suspended. The total num-
6er of licenses revoked and sius-
pended since the drivers' license
law became effective last October
amounts to 1,012, Director Reid
stated.
In the July list of revocations
Polk county was high with a total
of 14; Pinellas county was second
with 12; Dade .county was third
with 10; and Duval and Hillsbo-
rough counties were tied for fourth
place with 9 each. Gulf county hadi
nono.
In drivers' licenses suspended
during July, Palm Beach and Pdlk
counties were high with 7 each;
Pinellas was second with 6, Hills-.
borough was third with 5;;- Lake,
mnd St. Johns had 3 each; Brevard
2; Escambia, Highland and Semi-
nole 1 each. One license was sus-
pended ou-t-of-state.
Drunken driving was the offense
for which 105 licenses were re;
yoked in July and accounts for
abput 90 per cent of the total rtP
voked during the year. Recklesp
'rth-g was the offehse- cited In'"
July revocations, and incompetence
in one case.
Records of the department of
public safety show that the seri-
ousness of drunken driving cair-
not be overemphasized, Director
Reid -said. More than 675 drivers
have lost their privilege of operaZ-
ing their motor vehicles on OU0
public highways since last October
because they endangered the lives
of their fellow motorists by trying
to drive their cars when they were
under the influence of liquor and
couldn't even walk straight.
The department receives many
applications, supported by plea
of prominent politicians, lawyers
and business men, for the reit,
statement of drivers' licenses that
have been revoked, Reid stated.
Some of the cases presented show
that the offending drivers will lose
good jobs and their families will
suffer if the revocations are al-
lowed to stand. But, he pointed out,
the law maies license revocation
mandatory in the case of drunken
driving and does not make any
provision for reins-itement.

CRIPPLED CHILDREN'S
CLINIC TO BE THURSDAY
The crippled children's clinic
sponsored annually by the Ameri-
can LeTion, in co-operation with
the Florida Crippled Children's
commission, will be held next
Thursday. August 22, at the Cen-
tennial building from 9 a. m. to
5 p. m. Lunches will be served by
the ladies of the Auxiliary to chil-
dren and their parents.

NEW NYA CAMP
A new NYA camp, first of itS
kind in the nation, designed to
train youth in national defense
crafts, will be established at
Tampa. It will consist of twenty-
three buildings and will cost
$500,000.

COTTON CROP UP
Florida's cotton crop for 1940 t1
expected to be well above that of
1939. Production is forecast at
19,000 bales, as compared with 11,-
000 'bales in 1939.







PAGETWOTHESTA, PRT T. JE, ULFCOUTYFLOIDA RIDY, UGUT 1, 140I


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla.,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year........$2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months..........65c

-4 Telephone 51 j--

The spoken word is given scant attention:
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

WHO'S GOING TO SACRIFICE WHAT?
The American people, driven by the need
for military security, must build a military
establishment costly beyond all precedents.
An incredible proportion of the national in,
come must be taken from the pockets of the
people and diverted to government, and we
jn Port St. Joe, along with the rest of the
country, will feel the heavy hand of taxation.
All of us will have fewer luxuries. All of us
must conserve. All of us must sacrifice.
That is clear enough and reasonable
enough. But it has become tragically plain
-that a very substantial portion of the Amen-
can people have the idea that the other fel-
low should make most, if not all of the sacri-
fices. It's the other fellow's standard of living
which should suffer, not their own. It's the
other fellow who should, pay the bill and do
the work, while they go on much as they
did before.
Certain influential segments of labor, for
instance, "demand that industry must sacrifice
more of its profits in the interests of labor.
A certain segment of industry works to re-
duce the share that goes to labor, and it
works to get more bounty for itself out ot
government in one way or another. It too
believes in sacrifice-so long as the other fel-
low does it.
Those who have gone on government re-
lief as a career favor sacrifice, too-so long
as it doesn't touch relief appropriations.
Powerful influences demand that not one
nickel of this "relief" be eliminated, no mat-
.ter how much others sacrifice to pay it, or
how dire the menace the country faces.
The professional politicians talk much of
sacrifice, in noble words. But it's a rare poli-
tician who is willing to sacrifice one thin
dime of patronage that might cost a vote, to
support a principle. Money still goes out for
government credit schemes of all kinds, and
for a thousand and one purposes which are
in no way a true function of government, but
which are prolific sources of votes and power.
The self-seeking hand of politics handicaps a
real defense program which would get maxl-


The Low Down
from
Willis Swamp

Editor The Star:


mum results with a minimum of waste of
time and money.
Who is going to sacrifice what?
That is the question America faces today,
if national security is to be a reality, not a
mirage. The answer is plain. All must sacri-
fice, all must contribute their full share. The
other fellow isn't going to do it for us.
Selfish interests now at play in America,
whether they be in labor, industry or gov-
ernment, are among the fifth columnists
within our gates.

NEW TAXES COMING
For the sake of national defense, Wash-
ington is considering one of the knottiest
problems-where the money is coming from
to build the thousands of airplanes and guns
and tanks and ships which are needed to
make the nation invulnerable to attack.
In the first place, the government must
borrow the money to buy most of the equip-
ment because for years it has lived above its
head. In other words, even without national
defense it has been spending more than it
took in. And on national defense it hasn't
even been keeping up with the Joneses, not
to mention Hitler and Mussolini.
So, in addition to the just-enacted national
defense taxes, new taxes are being talked
of. They probably will not materialize until
after the November election, but they will
come soon.

WORLD ART COMES TO AMERICA
.This year the main cultural 'exhibit at the
New York World's Fair, as it was last year,
is the art exhibition. The current collec-
tion covers four centuries, and consists or
400 European and American paintings valued
at $30,000,000. Practically every great name
in art, from Titian and Rembrandt to Degas
and Renoir, is represented
, Millions of Americans will experience the
deepest of aesthetic pleasure .when attending
this magnificent exhibit. And, more than that,
it is a fitting thing that so many of the shin-
ing masterpieces of world art should be gath-
ered in this country at this time. Bombers
are not attacking our cities. It may be, tragic
as the thought is, that concentrating art mas-
terpieces in our land may save them from
destruction.

Spain is appealing to the United States for
money to rebuild the country. It seems logi-
cal that they should appeal to Hitler ant
Mussolini, as they're the guys who helped;
wreck the country.

We remember the time when folks tried to
keep up with the Jonses. Now, with speedy
motor cars, they want to go around the
Jonses.-Gove (Kan.) Republican-Gazette.

From the looks of the weeds on vacant lots
and in some yards, Port St. Joe ought to
have a general Clean-Up Week.


against 3 small Britishers down ment issued by the. Netherlands
there off South America. legation in Washington asserting
SWe been rushin' around, voting that 30,000 persons were killed
money hap-hazard, and halfway and 70,000 injured in a single 7/2-
Sbeside ourself. The only thing con- minute nazi air raid on Rotterdan:


gress asks is, how much-and the
bigger the amount, the quicker
th'e vote.
Sure. spend some money for


You know, this idea of doing the army and the navy, but take
something about getting prepared it away from the PWA and the
for war is okeh. But the idea of WPA and eliminate these alpha.
just doing something, and having betical branches altogether and
only a hazy idea about how it is put the unemployed in the army
gonna turn out, is a horse of a dif- and .the navy-they'd make mor,
ferent color, there anyway.
And you take those battleships Yours with the low down,
costing around 90 million each, JO SERRA.
which we think we gotta have- ____ ---
they will maybe not be what we NAZI WIRELESS DENIES
want, three or four years from ASSAULT IN HOLLAND
now, when they're finished. We _
need: Ssomething now as much as The German wireless, in a re-
four years hence. cent broadcast, denied that 30,000
For 90 million we could build 25 civilians were killed in Rotterdam
or 30 welter-weight boats. And 25 during the German invasion oP
or 30 such spitfires circling one the Netherlands, .declaring that
battleship would make things actually only 619 civilians had
pretty lively for the big boat. The been killed "during the whole
25 million dollar Graf Spee of the month of May."
Germans, she didn't last long The broadcast followed a state-


after the Dutch army nad capitu-
lated'.
The Netherlands legation called
it "the greatest mass destruction
the world has ever seen . a
deliberate, fiendish assault on un-
armed, undefended civilians."
Personally, we'll take the word
of the Dutch rather than thac, or
the nazis, for the lies that ara
sent out over the German broad-
casting system and through press
releases are made 'purely for the
purpose of trying 'tu Impress the
world that Germany has been at-
tacked by England and France ana
is only defending herself.
-------- ---
A study of tree rings in house
beams at Uralbi, Ariz., Hopi In-
dian village which is the oldest
continuously inhabited settlement
In the United States, shows they
were cut as early as 1260.
Send The Star to a friend.
Send The Star to a friend.


1917 DRAFT JAR was over, each number repres.ent-
ing a group of men. The jar may
be used again if the Burke-Wads-
S worth military service bill is
i passed by congress.


Ki IDNEY STAGNATION
IS WORSE THAN
CONSTIPATION
Because We Treat Constipation at
S The Onset, While We Neglect
s Our Kidneys Indefinately
S' No other organ in your body is bil
nore importance than your kidneys. For'
IS NIS In your kidneys there are nine million)
i tubes which must work day and night to
J ilter the fluids and keep the system free
6 i S 1 i I rom wastes, acids, poisons which, if per-
SSitted to remain. may cause serious kidney
I ; I e 15I 'S P I ind bladder troubles.
li It is no wonder then that Nature
Sftens calls for help to clean out the
kidneys. So if you are troubled with-
IU etting-Up-Nights, Leg Pains, Backache,
SNervous Headache, Dizzines or Loss of
Energy, due to fuinctional kidney disorders
,try KIDANS, the famous kidney remedy,
rhe original glass jar from which which aids Nature to flush out the kid-
Speys, to filter all wastes, to prevent kid-
Secretary of War Newton D. ,ey stagnation.
Baker drew the names of men to KIDANS is Safe and Reliable. Thou-
be drafted in 1917, shown at lands report entire satisfaction. Taken
be drafted in 1917, shown at Inde according to directions, KIDANS will give
pendence Hall, Philadelphia, where plendid results. Try KIDANS, Buy it at
u r Special Price Offer on two boxes. Use-
it has been on display. The draw- ne box. If not satisfied, return unopened
ing took place in Washington and kox and GET YOUR MONEY BACK.'.*
10,000000 mein were selected, of If your local druggist cannot sup-
whom 687,000 saw service abroad., ply you, send $1.00 to The Kidans
In all 10,500 numbers were drawn Company, Atlanta, Ga., for two full-
from the big jar before the draft size boxes on a money-back guar-
antee. sep. 13
. . . ..-- -. ,


ENJOY A DAY'S

FISHING!






at
--- at ---

MIDWAY PARK
On Gulf County's Famed

DEAD LAKES
0-
-------o---
Our BOATS are Dry and
Clean. Our CABINS
are Clean and Completely
Furnished
-------
This Friendly Camp is MVd-
way of the Lakes, at the
County Line
-o-

J. L. KNOWLES
Postoffice Address
WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA


DR. MILES


NERVINE




Hundreds Of Thousands Of Times
Each Year Dr. Miles Nervine
Makes Good
When you are wakeful, jumpy,
restless, when you suffer from Nerv-
ous Irritability, Nervous Headache,
Sleeplessness, or Excitability, give
DR. MILES NERVINE
a chance to make good for YOU.
Don't wait until nerves have kept
you awake two or three nights,
until you are restless, jumpy and
cranky. Get a bottle of Dr. Miles
Nervine the next time you pass a
drug store. Keep it handy. You
never know when you or some
member of your family will need it


At Your Drug Store:
Small Bottle 250
Large Bottle $1.00
Read ful dblecttu tn packae.


FOR BETTER

HEALTH
Milk is an energy food. It is
easily digested and is grind
alone or with other foods.
Enjoy the benefits of the
valuable vitamin content of
Fresh Milk.

Pasteurized for Your Protection


SOLOMON'S

DAIRY
Distributors of Bruce's Juices

Thomas Solomon
Local Representative


----------------------- :


PAGE TWO


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, AUGUST 16, 1940-.


r
r


5 i







THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


Society
i-


BIBLE STUDY HELD
BY BAPTIST CIRCLES
The regular Bible study of the
Baptist W. M. U. was held by the
three circles at the church Monday
afternoon, with Mrs. J. F. Millei-
in charge. Song, "Stand Up for
Jesus," opened the meeting and
was followed by the devotional,
Daniel I, and prayer by Mrs. L. R.
Holliday. The study for the meeting,
was the Book of Daniel, after
which announcement was made for
the next meeting: Martha Circle
will meet at the home of Mrs. Nick
Kelley, all members are asked to
meet at the church at 2:45 and
transportation ,will be furnished
them. The Lydia Circle will meet
at the home of Mrs. Curtis Palmer'
on Seventh street, and the Mary
Circle will meet at the home of
Mrs. L. E.' Voss on Woodward
avenue. :

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Townsend
and granddaughter of Gainesville
are the guests this week of Mr. and
Mrs. T. Owens and family.

Inliio inurl I Inrll HIiIi V oIlrlll Iiinll nJjIl i lmlniu ni inil


SATURDAY, AUGUST 17
2 BIG NE W
FEATURES
HIT NO. 1

BOB BAKER
FUZZY KNIGHT

41 John Mack Brown
#"* 0 -9p,


"Zorro's Fighting Legion"
. ** *** e 0 8 0 <>^v
SUNDAY MONDAY
AUGUST 18 19
The Best of All Andy
Hardy Pictures


Pete Smith Latest News
*** ** *I00^ *********
TUESDAY,AUGUST 20
HORROR OF MOTHER
AND SONS IN WAR!

FOUR SONS
-WITH--
DON AMECHE, EUGENIE
LEONTOVICH

"Wicky Wacky Romance"


Personals

LANETA DAVIS, Editor


**0~ 4s8 044* 4*4 AUXILIARY MEETS
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 21 The regular meeting of the
Presbyterian Auxiliary was held
He Was a Champ to at the church Mdncay afternoon,
Everyone But Cupid! with Mrs. T. R. L. Carter presid-
ing. Topic for the meeting was:
SM "The Home and Christian Influ-
ence," and an interesting program
'i W was presented by Mrs. P. D. Prows
RICHARD EAN and Mrs. M. Doan.
DENNING-CAGNEY *
D rma Mrs. Ralph Edwards has r e-
John Daye tn turned to her home in Blounts-
--"THE-SINGING IPUDE" town after spending, several days
llllin the city as the guest of :Mrs.
Lloyd Hughes. ,


FRIDAY, AUGUST 16, 1940.


MISS ELOISE COLLIER BRIDE
OF ANDREW PRESTON MARTIN-
An event of much interest to a
wide circle of friends was the
marriage of Miss Eloise Avaryee
Collier, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Edwards Collier of Crescent City
to Andrew Preston Martin, son or
Mrs. Willie Ola Upshaw of this
city, on Sunday, August 11, at 8
o'clock in the First Baptist church
of Crescent City. The ring cere-
mony was performed by the Rev.
P. C. Cason, of Laie City, who also
officiated at the wedding of the
bride's parents. The church was
beautifully decorated with a pro-
fusion of fern, coral vine and cut
flowers, and Miss Margarte Rinck
rendered appropriate selections
prior to the wedding march. Dur-
ing the ceremony Liebstraum
(Lisze) was softly played and the
couple entered the church together,
unattended. The bride, an attrac-
tive brunette wore a traveling en-
ensemble of burnt sugar wool with
matching accessories. Her corsage
was of talisman roses and valley
lilies.
Mrs. Martin graduated from the
Crescent City high school, later
attending Stetson University and
graduated from Florida State Col-
lege for Women. For the past
five years she has taught in the
local school. Following a short.
wedding trip to New Orleans, the
couple will be at home to their
friends in Port St. Joe, where'Mr.
Martin is connected with the
Appalachicola Northern Railroad
and Mrs. Martin will teach in the
school this year. They have a
host of friends who will join the
Star in wishing for them much
happiness.

METHODIST CIRCLE MEETS
WITH MRS. A. M. JONES
Mrs. A. M. Jones, Sr., was host-
ess to the members of circle No. 1
of the Methodist Missionary society
Monday afternoon at her home on
Eighth street. Mrs. J. L. Fuller,
chairman, presided and the pro-
gram for the afternoon was pre-
sented by Mrs. Fuller, Mrs. A. E.
Boyd and Mrs. B. W. Smith, afttr
which, discussions were held re-
garding aid to the refugees.
The meeting' was closed with a
missionary prayer. A social hour
followed with the hostess serving
delectable refreshments to ten ot
the members.

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS
Mr. and Mrs. Brooks Harrell are
announcing the arrival of a 6%-
pound boy on August 12 at their
home on Long Ave. The baby has
been named Michael Brooks.

Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Minus an-
nounce the arrival of a 7-pound son
at their home on seventh street on
August 13.

Mr. and Mrs.\ Buck Griffin ot
Kenney's Mill are announcing the
arrival of a 7%-pound son, born
August 14.'

Mr: and Mrs. Paul Sullivan or
'anama City announce the bir
f a daughter on Thursday, Aug-
Ist 8, at a Panama City hospital.
Irs.'Sullivan will be remembered
s Miss Adelaide Hardy.


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MRS. JOHNSON HOSTESS TO
M. E. CIRCLE THREE
Mrs. C. W. Johnson entertained
the members of Circle 3 of the
Methodist Missionary society in
her home, Monday afternoon. The
program was in charge of Mrs.
Jesse Bradbury, and opened with
the devotional, Revelations 3;4-5,
-followed by prayer. The topic for
discussion was "Can Men Afford
to Dare Anything Less Than the
Best?"
A discussion was also held on
the first and second chapters or
Jeremiah, after which the meeting
was closed with prayer. A social
hour followed, during which the
hostess served refreshments to
six guests,

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS IN
MEETING LAST WEEK
Flora Mae Cason was hostess to
the Intermediate Girls' Auxiliary of
the Baptist church Thursday aft-
ernoon of last week. The topic for
the afternoon was "The W. M. jU.
Training School." After the study,
plans were made for a social for
the next meeting, to be helt at
the beach. Those taking part on
the program were Mary Ann Lewis,
Virginia Pridgeon, Flo r a Mae
Cason, Betty Jo Lane and Carolyn
Bagget. The meeting was dismissed
with prayer and the hostess served
ice cream and cake for refresh-
ments.

MRS. SMITH HOSTESS TO
THhRSDAY BRrTGE CLUB
Mrs. J. M. Smith was hostess to
the Thursday Bridge club at her
home on Monument avenue yes-
terday. Two tables were mn pro-
gress and at the conclusion wor
play high and cut prizes were
awarded. -
The hostess served ice box cake
topped with whipped' cream and
iced drinks to Mesdames E. Clay
Lewis, J. B. Gloeckler, George
Gore, R. Coburn, members, and in-
vited guests: Mrs. J. L. Stapleton,
Mrs. J. Mira and Miss Martha,
Belin.

Wilbur (Wells' left Wednesday
For Lima, Ohio, to drive back the
new school bus recently pui-
chased by the county. This bus
is of the latest type and will total
four buses used for the Port St.
Joe schools.

Miss Emily Porter of Apalachi-
cola visited in this city Monday.


HISTORICAL SOCIETY WILL
HOLD BEACH PARTY'
The Historical Society of Gulf
county will meet with a beach
party next Thursday, Aug. 22. The
society is seeking new members
and all that are interested in be-
coming members are asked to con-
tact the president, Rev. D. E.
Marietta. The work of the society
in the county is to further the
interests of historic connections
of the past; to establish a museum,
to develop projects and to publi-
cize the advantages of the county
and to work in conjunction with
the state historic society an d
planning board. "The society can
do nothing more but good In the
community and county andi more
citizens should take an active part
in it. We welcome any and all
that are iTterested," says Rev.
Marietta.
*
METHODIST MISSIONARY
SOCIETY MEETS
Mrs. Roy Gibson entertained the
members of Circle 3 of the Metho-
dist Missionary society at her
home on Long avenue, Monday
afternoon. Mrs. Charles Brown,
circle chairman was in charge of
a short business session, afte-
which, Mrs. Ralph Swatts, program
chairman, presented the following
interesting program:
Song, "Living for Jesus," .scrip-
tures by Mrs. J. L. Sharit and Mrs.
George Suber; poem, "Spiritual
Hitch-hiker," by Mrs. R. Brinson;
reading, "Welfare Workers Inter-
view," by Mrs. Brown; so 1 o,
"Something for Jesus," by Mrs.
Roy Gibson, and a poem and
prayer of dismissal by Mrs. Swatts.
During the social hour that fol-
lowed the hostess served ice
cream and cake.
-cream and cake to a good repre-
sentation.

MISS ANGELINE DAVIS
HONORED WITH PARTY
Honoring Miss Angeline Davia,
of Ozark, Ala., who is the guest
of Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Stone and
family, Jessie .Stone entertained
a number of the younger set witV,
a beach party Wrdnesday evening,
The young people met at the Stone
beach and enjoyed dancing at
Van's.

S. C. Pridgeon returned to the
city after several days' business
trip to St. Louis, Mo.


DR. J C. COE
-DENTIST
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe


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MILLER'S DRUG STORE
Port St. Joe, Fla.


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Lunch, 12 to 2 ...........35c
Dinner, 6 to 8 ..........35c


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Corner Reid Ave. and 3rd St.
Griffin Grocery Building


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PAGE THREE


A








E FR TH S


MOVE UNDERWAY TO
PLACE STEPHEN FOSTER
IN THE HALL OF FAME

MAYO, Fla., Aug. 16 (FNS)-In
a communication received from
Senator Claude Pepper by the
Mayo Free Press, in regard to its
campaign to put Stephen Foster
in the Hill of Fame, Senator Pep-
per was enthusiastic.
"I know of no man whom the
American people," he wrote, "if
they had the choice to make,
would prefer to see in the Hall of
Fame than Stephen Foster who
has written the songs which have
touched, the hearts of the people
of the nation-even the world. We
of the South, particularly, would
feel if Stephen Foster were in tht
Hall of Fame, that he represented
the 'Spirit of the South'-the
deep, beautiful, moving sentiments
which the south from time imme-
morial has contributed to the na-
tion.,"
Interested Southerners may do
their share in electing Foster to
the Hall of Fame, by writing to
The Curator, Foster Hall Collection,
University of Pittsburgh, Pitts-
burgh, Pa., for a list of the electors
to the Hall of Fame.
They are then urged to write
all, or as many as they feel able,
and set forth their reasons for
wanting Foster in the Hall of
Fame.
-No greater tribute could be paid
to this beloved composer of Ameri-
t.an folk songs.
--------- It- --
PORT NEWS

S.,S. Dorothy of Bull Line sailed
yesterday for eastern ports with a
yesterday with a cargo of paper
from the St. Joe Paper company.
MVotorship Allocate from Roatan,
South America, sailed Saturday
with a cargo of lumber from St.
Joe Lumber and Export Company.

Miss Sue Yent of Weirsdiale and
Miss Ann Ashbrook of Louisville.
Ky. were the week-end guests of
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas McPhaul.
ft ft f


PERSONALS

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Samford re-
turned Saturday from a several
days' visit with relatives in Boga-
lusa, La. Mrs. W. E. Samford and
son, Lawson, accompanied them
home.

Mrs. D. B. Lay, Mrs. M. P. Tom-
linson and Mrs. A. M. Jones, Ji-.,
are spending this week in Tuscum-
bie, Ala., guests of Mr. and Mrs. B.
C. Burns.

Elgin Bayles returned to Talla
hass'ee Monday after spending the
we'ek-end in this city with his
family.

Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Jones are
visiting relatives in Birmingham,
Ala., this week.

Mrs. Junie Keene and daughter
of Thomasville, Ga., are the guests
this week of Mr. and Mrs. P. D.
Farmer.

Miss Jean Theobald of Apalachi-
cola was the week-end guest of
Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Gloeckler.

Mrs. S. C. Pridgeon and Mrs.
Willie Ola Upshaw spent Sunday
in Wewahitchka, guests of Mr. and
Mrs. Earl Pridgeon.

Mr. and Mrs. Vic Bernal and
children left Tuesday for their
home in Nashville, Tenn., follow-
ing a several days' visit in the city
with Mr. and Mrs. Pete Bernal.
Pete Bernal accompanied them
home.

Miss Angeline Davis of Ozark,
Ala., arrived Wednesday and is the
guest of Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Stone.
*r
Mr. and Mrs. Massey Ward and
Mrs. A. L. Ward returned Monday
from a ten days' visit to the Worlds
Fair at New York.

Mrs. Jesse Larkin and so n,


Mrs. J. F. Rollins has returned Bowen, returned Sunaay to tneir
home after spending the week in home in Bristol after spending
Gordon, Ala., the guest of Mr. and two weeks in the -city as guests of,
Mrs. J. Kennedy. Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Larkin and Mr.
I .. and Mrs. Hoke Larkin.
Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Graves of
Newville, Ala., and Mr. and Mrs, OH, YEAH?
D'. L. Helms of Enterprise, Ala., George P. Walker, Jr., of Attala,
were the guests Sunday of Mrs. Ala., has a well-trained 'possum
M. B. Smith. Mrs. W. D. Jones and hound. In fact, he is trained so
small son, Travis, accompanied well that Mr. Walker can show
them to their home in Headland, him a pelt stretching board and
Ala., following a week's visit in the. dog will immediately go out
the city. and catch a 'possum whose pelt
fits the board.
Nelson Haygood of Bogalusa, La,. A few days ago the dog saw the
was the week-end guest of Mr. and family ironing board, and Walker
Mrs. W. J. Belin. hasn't seen him since.




SALE OnAll



.ALE SUMMER GOODS


Your Big Chance for Big Savings

In order to make room for our new stock of Fall Mer-
chandise we are offering all Summer goods at drastic
reductions. Buy now and save!


Florsheim Shoes 5.95
Regular $8.95. Sale price


Fortune Shoes $2.65
Regular $4.25. Now

All Straw Hats at About Half Price




Costing's Dept. Store


TAMPA GIRL MAY BE
GOOD-WILL DELEGATE

TAMPA, Aug 15 -(FNS) Miss
Hortensia Vallina, reigning queen
of the gay and colorful Latin Car-
niival, left for Washington this
week where she and officials of
the Carnival will be the guests of
under Secretary Wells and mem-
bers of Florida's congressional
delegation.
Miss Vallina carries the title of
"Miss Latin-America VLII." She
is a very beautiful and charming
young lady who speaks Spanish as
fluently as English.
It is hoped that through the
state department, plans can be
worked out to send Miss Vallina
on a tour of Latin-American coun-
tries as a good-will emissary in
connection with the recent national
effort to cement relations with our
South American neighbors. Accom-
panying her on the trip to Wash-
ington are her sister, Miss Rose
Vallina, Peter S. Cemino, Norman
Kirkoonnell and Leon Cazin.
The group will be entertained
by members, of the Florida delega-
tion and a conference has been
arranged with under Secretary
Wells. It is also planned to have


Miss Vallina visit representatives
of Latin-American countries.
Upon her arrival in the Capital
she will present Tampa made cigars
to a number of officials and ex-
tend invitations to them to attend
the 1941 Latin Carnival in Tampe.
----'-f------
Roy Gi'bson, Jr., returned to the
city last Friday after spending the
summer vacation in Richmond, Va.

Mr. and Mrs.. C. Edwards and
daughters left for Jacksonville for
a several days' visit.


CLASSIFIED ADS

FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Ladies dinner ring,
3 diamonds-at a bargain. If in-
terested write Box 696, Port St.
Joe, Fla. 1*
FOR SALE-Skiffs and bateaus.
See Autha Soderberg, St. Joe
Lumber Co. 7-12tf
COTTAGES FOR RENT
Cottages at Beacon Hill by the
year; furnished or unfurnished.
See Mrs. Smith at cottages. Act
quick! L. N. Smith 9-6*


O. A. Gregory, of Pensaoola, dis-
trict scout executive, visited in the
city last Friday.

Mr. and Mrs. L. P. Sutton and
children visited in Tuscaloosa over
the week-end.

Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Allen or
Amite, La., were the guests last
week of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas
McPhaul.
LEGAL ADVERTISING
NOTICE
This is to .notify all who have
not registered with the County
Registrar, that the registration
books will be open on August 5th
in the office of the Supervisor of
Registration, in the Court House
at Wewahitchka for a period of 30
days.
This registration is open for
those who dtid not register for the
May primaries and who wish to
vote in the General Election. The
books will be open in the office
of the Supervisor of Registration
from Monday morning through.
Friday afternoon. Hours: 9 until
12, and from 2 until 5 p. m.
C. G. RISH,
Supervisor of
8-9 8-23 Registration.


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PORT ST. JOE
FLORIDA


-ia n I


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, AUGUST 16, 1940.