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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00088
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: June 14, 1940
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00088

Full Text






The Star-Florida's fastest grow-
: in little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St Joe. T


STAR


Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast.
est growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


VOLUME III PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, .FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JUNE 14, 1940 NUMBER 36


MAY GET WILD LIFE



PROPAGATION DEPOT



FOR GULF COUNTY


PLANES FOR ALLIES


I...


PAPER MILL CLOSED



PENDING SETTLING



OF LABOR PROBLEMS


Local Youths Will

Learn About Our


Station In Choctawhatchee
Forest To Be Moved to
New Location


State Government THIS SECTION SUITABLE


Two Port St. Joe Boys Will Tak
Part in "Boys' State" Gather-
ing .In Tallahassee

Jimmy Weatherly and Authi
Fowhand of Port St. Joe will mee'
with 200 other boys from all parts
of the state at Tallahassee on June
22 to, learn something about state
government.
The event, termed "Boys' State,'
is sponsored by the American Lo
glon. and Auxiliary, the clergy,
civic, fraternal and'educational or
ganizations. Boys selected by these
groups from all sections of the
state are being.sent to the capital
'where for a week they will be
given an apporlunity to iUR+
functions of state government and
set up their dow administration at
ReynoWI Hall on -the campus of
the Florida State CQege- for
Women. "
The boys. will be.. divided into
groups representing various gov-
ernmental departments. They will
elect a governor and members of
the cabinet, as well as supreme
court justices. Other -groups will
be composed of legislators, com-
missioners and other officials.
Appointments of department and
bureau heads will be made by the
boy governor and,,-following the
regular procedure, these boys will,
under -the guidance' of state of-
Picials,- be given an, insight into
the functions of each, department.

JUNIOR BAND TO BE
CONTINUED UNDER
WHITE'S DIRECTION

Preston R. I White, assistant
band director at the Port St. Joe
school, announces that the junior
band conducted by Dan Farmet
previous to the closing of the
school, will be continued under
his direction at the band school
premises -three days each weeks
Monday, Wednesdays and Fri-
days.
"The charge for this instruc-
ton has been $1.50 per month,"
stated Mr. White, "but henceforth
'the charge will be $1 per month.
I am asking parents of children
who have been taking this, in-
struction to urge them to continue,
in order that they will be in a
position to take their place in the
school band when the fall term
opens.
opens."

APPOINTMENT OF DRAKE
CONFIRMED BY SENATE

Appointment of H. A. Drake as
postmaster for Port St. Joe was
confirmed by the- U. S. senate
at Washington Wednesday.

.BUSINESS MEN ARE URGED
TO OBSERVE FLAG DAY

Today, June 14, is Flag Day, ane
all business houses of the city are
requested by the American Legion
post to display the American flag.
w.


e Sportsmen, County Commis
-sioners and Others Con-
tact State Officials
a
t Due to the fact that the federal:
I government is taking over the
6 Choctawhatchee Nat.inal Forest
e for an. army..bombing. range, the
United States Departxpnt of Ag
* culture wild life propagation de
Spot located in the tfoest will be
Sabandon0d of remove to a new
* location. ;
Sportsmen of Gulf county, the
Board of county commissioners and
I other interested parties have been
contacting state officials. in an .ef-
oirt, toihave the Florida Game and
Fresh Water Commisqion t ake
Over the plant and locate it in this
county, it being pointed out that
the people of .this spetfn are coin
servation-minded and that all will
render full co-operation in the suc-
cessful carrying on of the propa-
gation work.
Letters have been sent to Dr. I.
N. Kennedy, executive secretary
of the commission, by the board
of county commssioners, W.- -T.
Edwards, vice-president. of Gulf
Coast Properties, the,. St Joe local
of the Brotherhood of, Paper
Makers, .the -St. Joe Paper com-
pany and the publisher of The
Star. ..
The letter from the county com-
missioners pointed out that "we
are reliably informed that a
greater area of our county is un-
der state forest fire protection
than in any other county of the
state. There are approximately 600
miles of annually plowed fire lines
in which duPont companies advise
that they would be willing to sow
grass seed, peas and other forage
crop for birds. We are further ad-
vised that the duPont companies
would be willing to lease you a
site for propagation stations at $1
per year."
Mr. Edwards' letter to Dr. Ken-
nedy stated that "I am reliably in
formed that, the number of licenses
for hunting and fishing in Gulf
county are greater per capital than
any other county in the state. The
citizens of Gulf county are cer-
tainly conservation-minded. A
larger area of Gulf county is un-
der state forest fire protection
than any other county in the state.
On these fire protection areas
there are approximately 600 miles
of annually plowed fire lines in
which our companies would be
willing to sow grass seed, peas and'
other forage crops for birds. .
Furthermore, we would be willing
to lease you at $1 per year a loca-
tion for the propagation stations."
Quoting from the letter of the
Brotherhood of Paper Makers:
"Due to the fact that the local
sportsmen, with the co-operation
of members of this union, are al-
ready making considerable effort
toward propagating wild life in
Gulf county, this local union wishes
.to urge that our state conservation
(Continued on Page 4)


Three of nine Unted States Na-
I val Reserve scout' bomber air-
e planes which left'Floyd Bennett
t Airport in Brooklyn last week
8 for Buffalo, N. Y,~ where they
will be turned into the Curtise&
Wright corporation, are shown In
e flight. The planes will be camou-
flaged and sent overseas. Each
plane is worth abQot 50,000.
S------^--V-~-T-
Red Cross Quota

Here Is Doubled

Boosted from $200 o 40 With
.-: But--$4.-ertleeteot 3ate;
Drive to. Continue

eThe American Red Cross war re
1i4 fund has been raised from ten
to twenty million dollars, and Gulf
county's quota, according to Robert
Bellows, Gulf county chairman of
the drive, has been raised from
$200 to $400.
"So far $124.60 has been raised,'"
said Mr. Bellows, 'which leaves
us far short of our 'goal. Gult
County Chapter is hopeful that the
quota may eventually, be raised,
andi the drive will be continued in
an effort to accomplish this. We
urge that every person who has
not already contributed do so at
once."
Donations' received to date: Mr.
and Mrs. H. A. Kidd, $25; Paper
Makers Union, $25; Electrical
Workers Union, $25; merchants
(collected by T. M. Schneider and
Doc Carver), $16.75; employes of
paper company office, $11.25; em-
ployes of railroad company, $13.60;
collections by Mrs. Tapper, $8.00;
collected in Wewahitchka, $7.00;
Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Anderson, $2;
Florida Bank at Port St. Joe, $6.
----K----
WORK IS STARTED ON
SINCLAIR OIL STATION

Work was started this week by
the Albritton & Williams Construc-
tion company of Quincy on erec-
tion of a Sinclair Oil company ser-
vice station on the corner of Monu-
ment avenue and Fourth street,
opposite the St. Joe Motor com-
pany. Cost of the station will he
$3500.
----e----.
STRIKE EDITION

Due to the fact that closing
of the St. Joe Paper company
mill has caused a, large de-
crease in the volume of busi-
ness transacted by local mer-
chants, they feel that under
existing conditions newspaper
advertising would be of little
help to them, consequently-his
issue of The Star is but four
pages due to lack of necessary
advertising to make up the
usual six or eight pages.


Unions Present

Their Side Of

Mill Shut-Down

Statement Issued By Presidents
Of Three Laborers' Or.
ganizations

The following statement has
been issued to the press by the la-
bor unions in connection' with the
closing down of the St. Joe Paper
company mill. We publish it with-
out comment:
Since operations began in the
plant of the St. Joe Paper corn
pany there has been continual
strife and turmoil among the men
employed in this mill. Men mak-
ing good salaries have refused to
buy homes in Port St. Joe. and
have not taken :an interest in the
civic welfare of our city, all be-
'cause they. knew not whefi, with-
out notice, they would be released
without plausible reason.
In the past few months the labor
unions Ihdve been able to prevent
this to a certain'xtet' B"ut d1ts-
criminations in Vi'ying degrees
have been committed against the
union members. Some workers
havebeen subjected to continual
oppression 'from their foremen,
souie have been deprived of right-
fut promotions they had worked
for faithfully In *months past,
others have been promoted with
the threat that the first' mistake
they made would be their last, and
open attempts have been made to
create friction between the' local
labor organizations. These condi-
tions have caused many good men
to quit the employment of the
company because they -would
rather have the uncertainty of not
getting another job than to endure
the strife and discrimination com-
mitted against them.
The committees have in the past
been able to adjust some of these
grievances. That is when they has
the management in the position
that they could make no other de-
cision, and on occasion by threat
of strike.
SAll or most of our troubles have
been traced to one man, Mr. A. J.
Navarre, general superintendent of
the St. Joe Paper company. Last
week this man set about the busi-
ness of disposing of a member (or
subjecting this member to humili-
ation to the extent that he would
quit) of the machinists local. This
(Continued on Page 4)

FORMER LIGHTHOUSE
KEEPER PASSES AWAY

Thomas C. Brooks, 67, passed
away at his home in Crestview last
Wednesday following a heart at-
tack. A native of Alabama, he
came to Florida when quite young
and had, after leaving the sea as
schooner master, been keeper of
the lighthouses at Cape St. George
and Beacon Hill, retiring last year
and moving to Crestview.
Mr. Brooks is survived by fou. I
sons, Felix of Memphis, Tenn.,
Willard of Pensacola, Howard o0
Gulfport, Miss., Fletcher of Apa-
lachicola, and Clinton of Port St.
Joe; one daughter, Mrs. R. D. Por- t
ter of Apalachicola; four brothers,
Will of Fort Walton, J. P. of Texas, d
Richard and Blamie of River Junc- r
tion, and three sisters, Mrs. W. C. T
Proyor of Fort Walton, Mrs. Wil- r
liam Marler of Destin and Mrs. W. o
C. Forehand of Port St. Joe. e
Funeral services were held in
Crestview with interment .iii the c
Fort Walton cemetery. ., t


Shut-Down Throws 550 Men
Out of Employment; Causes
Decrease In Business


NEGOTIATIONS FAIL

Mill Owners, Men'and Rest
dents of City Hope Matter
Will Be Settled Soon

The St. Joe Paper company mill
closed down early last Saturday
morning when a strike was called
by the machinists' local after ne'
gotiations for the removal of A. J.
Navarre, general superintendent,
were unsuccessful.
The strike was called by A. L
Ezell, president of the machinists
local, an affiliate of the American
Federaton of Labor, and members
of. the paper makers union and the
'electrical workers. union also left
their stations in a sympathy walk.
out. The mill is "open shop." .but
employes ien belja'glng 'to the
unions also were thrown out of
jobs. Total number of'men em-
ployed by the mill is 550 with a
payroll of approximately $2200 per
shift.
The stand taken :by the union
men is given in detail in another
column of this issue.
In an interview Wednesday with
Edward Ball, president'of the pW
per company, and W. T. Edwards,
vice-president, these ,gentlemen in-
formed the publisher of The Star
that they could not dispense with
the services qf Mr. Navarre under
the circumstances unless the griev-
ances of the men were presented
to them in detail, in writing, and
the matter then threshed out to
find whether Mr. Navarre should
be removed.
"We cannot remove this matt
from the position he has occupied
since the mill opened without giv-
ing him a fair trial, and we cannot
do that until we have the evidence
in detail," said Mr. Ball. "We are
willing to open negotiations to
settle this matter when this evi-
dence is presented us."
Closing down of the mill takes
away from business houses of the
city one of their principal sources
of income and business men have
been doing their utmost to effect
a reconciliation betwee'b the union
men and the mill owners in order
that the mill can be reopened and
business of the city continue in a
normal way.

WPA PAY PERIOD IS
CHANGED TO BI-WEEKtC

WPA payrolls in Florida will
hereafter be paid upon a bi-weekly
period instead of the semi-monthly
basis 'that has been used in the
past, according .to an announce-
nent yesterday by State AdminiS-
rator Roy Schroeder.
The change in the payroll period
loes not have any effect upon the
rate of pay of project workers. It
means that workers will be paid
regularly every 14 days (regardless
If calendar date) instead of twice
ach month. Over the period of a
'ear workers will receive 26 pay
hecks instead of 24 checks, as in
he past. : ". '...;" '"' i


k








PAG TO HE TA, OR ST JEGUF CUNYFLRID FIDYJUN 1, 94


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla,
by The Star Publirhing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
undel- Act of March 3, 1879.


Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year.......$2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months..........65c

--f Telephone 51 )-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

GUNS-NOT BUTTER
Mussolini has finally quit walking the
fence and jumped down on what he: hopes will
be the' winning side, and we can shortly ex-
pect to see the remainder of Europe dragged
into the blazing .inferno o.f war.
And we personally are advising that great-
body up in Washington to stop quibbling and
do something drastic in the way of preparing
this country in a defensive way. We've been
operating for such a long period on a peace
economy program that to change military
economy will involve readjustmentsts which
apparently few as yet thoroughly understand
but .which are obvious to any who have
,studied the European situation over the past
ten years.
When the Nazis came to power in post-war
Germany the slogan was "Guns, not butter."
The result of the ruthless application of that
slogan was a steadily declining standard of
living' nd 'a serious decline in the general
standard of public health. More and more ot
the national -income went for state purposes
-less and less was left in the hands of the
people. To a lesser extent, all the European
nations, which have been on a war footing
for many years, have undergone the same ex-
perience. And now it loqks as if we are to
undergo it, too, although we will not feel it
as drastically as in European countries, foi
we are a far richer country, possessed of re-
sources which no European power can equal.
There is no question of devoting sixty per
cent of our national income (which is the pro-
portion being spent in Germany) for military
purposes. But it does mean that all factors in
our life here in Port St. Joe and all over the
notion will be called upon to.make serious sac-
rifices to the end that we be made as secure
as possible from successful invasion. It means
that we will have fewer luxuries, fewer dol-
lars to spend as individuals, in order that we
may have more airplanes, tanks, battleships
and the other implements of defense.
And we shouldn't kick over this, for it will
be far better than possibly being ground un-
der the iron heel of an invading army;,having
our young men shot down by the thousands
in defense of our land and possibly eventually
paying billions in tribute.
The government, industry and labor will
have to co-operate toward the end of produc-
tive efficiency. The American people must
be willing to make the necessary sacrifices
for a non-political defense program that will
achieve results with a minimum waste of time
Sand money.
There is less and less talk of Amercia go-
ing to war abroad-we have our hands full
in this hemisphere. We are at peace, but we
are moving toward a war footing. Almost
none doubt the necessity for this,' but rela-
tively few as yet know what it involves.
We aren't going to have to give up our
Butter to buy guns-but, symbolically speak-:
ing, it seems certain that we will have less
butter"on our bread:

Bisrmarck was known: as Germany's iron
.chancellor. Glancing over Hitler's birthday
presents, we see.,the' fuehrer is destined tot
become the "scrap .iron" chancellor.-Sara-.
sota Herald-Tribune.


SHUT-DOWN VITAL TO ALL
The shut-down of the St. Joe Paper' com-
pany mill is something that is vitally import.
ant to' every resident of Port St. Joe and
the surrounding district. Closing of the mill
cuts off the large payroll that is the back-
bone of trade in the city and it also throws
out of employment hundreds of men in the
woods who have been supplying logs to keep
the mill wheels turning.
The editor of The Star is in sympathy with
the mill workers for he has been out on strike
at times and has also seen the results ot
strikes in the"shipping,and automobile indus-
tries and the hardships worked not only on


the workers, but on plant owners and the
public generally.
We can also see the side of the owners of
the paper mill and can understand the stand
they are taking.
Both sides are suffering a loss as long as
the mill is closed down, and the residents of
.the- city are also suffering a loss. We trust
that 'the dispute will soon: be-settled to the
best interest of all concerned, and in an amic-
! able manner, and that the wheels of the huge
plant will again turn :and 'i.ictinue to turn
without interruption inthe future.

TIME TO LAUGH OUT
There is sweet momentary surcease from
the harrowing narrative of war in a perusal ol-
the "goofier" happenings of the week in our
own American scene. For instance,' furrowed
brows should smooth a trifle, and laugh lines
around eyes crinkle at reports of such recent
intriguing occurrences as these: Atlantic City,
N. J., has instituted hostesses on street cars
and some San Jose, Calif., co-eds formed a
brigade to bring down parachutists with bows
and arrows. "No Accident Week," in Finney
County, Kansas, started off with two auto
accidents and a Washington, Ga., paper
came out without a fifth column. 'The census
takers. disclosed that in Arizona the'"vanish-
ing American" has increased by 10, per cent in
the last 10 years and Postmaster General
Farley promised to get out a postage stamp
honoring spinsters. In New London, Conn., a
man ate at one sitting two bowls of soup,
three portions of spaghetti and meat balls, a
roast chicken and eight roast beef dinners.
And a Murry, Utah, justice of the peace dis-
covered that his job had been abolished 33
years ago-15 years before he took office.
Also, a Pueblo, Colo., editor snapped his jaw
over the war news so hard that he broke a
tooth. For the week just ended, that was all.
Now, after this brief time-out for mirthful,
blessed relaxation, we can go back to the
nerve-wracking, depressing business of wor-
rying about the war.-Miami Post.

PREPARE OUR YOUTH
The editor of The Star for the past twenty
years, has been a strong advocate of com-
pulsory military education for all young men
reaching the age of eighteen. We learned a
bitter lesson in 1918,when thousands of our
boys were needlessly killed because they were
unprepared for war. Many of those men would'
be alive today-had they had a year or two,
of military training and knew what it was all
about.
While it is rather'late now to begin, we
believe that such a law should be passed by;
our congress -now, otherwise we will again
be caught with our pants down and other'
thousands of our youth needlessly slaugi-i.
tered. We trust and hope that it will not bei,
necessary for these young men to take'up'
arms in defense of their country, but if they
should be called upon to do so, it would be
much better tif they knew how to handle
those arms when-they"did take them up.

'Aim at the stars and don'tt let the scars
bother you.too much-as long as you-know
you're on their up-grade.-Florida Times-Union.
And keep smiling.; .

Germany 'begins worrying about next win-
ter's coal s lbrtage, evidently firm "irt the be-
'lief jth-at- Etrdpe wili still, be ,on the map at
that time.-Sarasota Herald.


HEY! KEEP YOUR MIND ON OUR BUSINESS!


.Rai oad .Quns In Action


Nazi troops in the foreground the guns id just firing while the
watch the work of one of their nearer Weapon' is prepared to
giant railroad guns. during re- send its cargo toward the French
cent action at the front. One of lines. '
S- Photo passed by German Censor.
-'
Mr. and Mrs. L.' von Weller of Miss Enid Mathison and Miss
Tallahassee and Mrs. Huel Croce- Claudia Houstoun' attended tue
ett and daughter of Washington, District Association of Nurses
D. C., visited in the city Wednes- meeting in Panama City Monday
day. Mrs. Crockett and daughter evening.
will return to their home Sunday. -- --
Mr. and Mrs. Ted Frary will ac- In the pagt 20 years new dis-
company them for a week's visit coveries of petroleum have bal-
in the nation's capital. anced consumption.




Remember Dad
S -





FATHER'S

DAY



Sunday, June 6 /

At Costin's You Will Find/
aWijder, Variety of Gifts to
.-Please Dad- Than at Any
Other Port St. Joe Store!

SHIlRTS, TIES, ROBES,- SHOES -
AND OTHER MEN'S GOODS

ii DEFPT '

T, O STORE
PORT ST. JE FLORIPA
7-. .*. ? -- -
:*** a --r


PAGE TWO


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, JUNE 14, 1940








'FRIAYJUN 14,194 TK~-TAR POT ST JO, GLF CUNT, FORID.. AGEFIV


Lemon Juice Recipe Checks
Rheumatic Pain Quickly EASTERN STAR ENTERTAIN
If you suffer from rheumatic, arthritis WORTHY GRAND MATRON
or neuritis pain, try this simple inepen- Preceding the regular mee
sive home recipe that thousands are using.
Get a package of Ru-Ex Compound today. of the Eastern Star Tuesday
Mix it with a quart of water, add the
juiceof 4 lemons. It's easy. No trouble ning, a banquet honoring
at all and pleasant. You need only 2 worthy grand matron, Mrs. Mil
tablespoonfuls two times a day. Often
within 48 hours sometimes overnight Cogan of Tampa, was held in
splendid results are obtained. If the pains Port Inn dinin
do not quickly leave and if you do not ort Inn dining room. During
feel better, Ru-Ex will cost you nothing to dinner the following program
try as it is sold by your druggists under
an absolute money-back guarantee. Ru-Ex presented, with Rev. D. E. M
Compound is for sale and recommended by etta acting as master of c
MILLER'S DRUG STORE monies:
Port St. Joe, Fla. Address of welcome by I
Erin Kelly, worthy matron;
sponse by Mrs. Belle Harmon
R O O M A N D Panama City. Piano and accord
numbers were rendered by,
B 0 A R D Misses Alma and Carolyn Bagg
Y THE' Distinguished visitors were in
Y o7 00 d and gave impromptu ta
WEEK A f- adding, "Mrs. Joanna John
.,. : '* Returns from the Sanitarlu
SDining Rtoom was given by Mrs. W. S. Smit]
Following the dihner,'the ini
SOpen. to the Public tton of Mrs. A. E. McCaskey
Club Breakfast, 6 to 9....25e. held at the Masonic hall. An
SLunch, 12 to 2 .........35c teresting talk was given by 1
SDinner, 6 to 8 ...........5 Cogan and the meeting was clo
with a so'ng, "Evening Prayer,'
the honoree.
".MRS. M. O. FREEMAN Out-of-town guests were "
Corner' Rid e. and St. Cogan of Tampa; Mrs. Elizal
Corner' Reid andrd S Penn, past grad' organist, Tam
Griffiri. ,Grocery Building Mrs. Emmalu Brown. :grand
..............structor of District 6, Tallahass
Charles Rimes, Mrs. Belle Harnm
: Mrs. Club anl Mrs. Minnie Post
ART of Panama City; Mrs. M. Mor
Miss Florence Morris, Mrs. Aub
PROJECT Marks, Mrs. Alice Brass, Rodi
MA S R Porter, Mrs. Holland and I
AKES COLOR Bert Floyd of Apalachicola.
PORTRAITS
PORTRAITS GIRL SCOUTS IN MEETING(
OF CHILD PICTURES A meeting of the Girl Sc
troop was held Saturday morn
FREE .at the health department. M
This offer is one of the meet remark- Claudia Houstoun taught so
able ever made. We'll send you nw folk dances after which pi
beautifull' hand-colored.in-oil-paint
enlargement of any picture you want were made for an all-day h
enlarged;' Yes, any snapshot, any fa- and me
rite picture you'd like enred and Ways and means of makingmo
hand-colored. Thee'enlargements will during' the summer was discus
be size 5x7. They will bemounted on"'
highquality,double-white matoint- after which Miss Houstoun gave
ings size 7x9. To duplicate such an interesting talk on Ithe camp
enlargement, .hand-colored-in-oil-
paint, would cost you from $1.25 to Pensacola which she attended.
$3.00 in any photographic store. To next meeting will be tomorrow
get this enlargement you pay only 50c e
for the enlargemept and the hand. ternoon at the health department
painting.will be done without charge. A a "
Simply send a print or negative of
your favorite picture and fifty cents Opal Ogburn of Jacksonville
in coin. That's'all you do, and promptly
by mail yot'"l receive your hand-col the guest of Mr. and Mrs. T.
oredMnol nlar'neieent.'Send today to Stone.
'ART DITOR ,
COOPERATIVE FEATURES, INC.
360 N. Michigan Aye.,,Chicago, Il. Mrs. E. H. Horton left Sun
for Birmingham to visit for
weeks. Her daughters, Sara
Katherine, who have been visit
in the Alabama city for the p
three weeks, will return ho


For Your-

PROTECTION

Our special filtering process
and quick-freeze method as-
sures you ice that REALLY
Is pure!' t protictsii"yur food
therefore it protects you.
There is no substitute for the
value of. REAL Ice.
THE WEI1L-~VIFORME~
U, SEICE
Deliveries by Phone
or Regulqr oute

PHONE .47



ST. JO -E r-ICE'1
CO M.PNY
COMPANY


with her.

Roy Gibson returned home Si
day from Donaldsonville, G
where he had visited; for a we
He left Sunday night to join D
Rich's orchestra for a summer
gagement at Richmond, Va.

Mr. and Mrs. Otis Pyle and sm
daughter spent Sunday in Car
belle visiting relatives.

Mr. and Mrs. Fred CPrtis a
son, D'anny, left Monday for Tam
to visit relatives.

Mr. and Mrs. Marc Fleishel, f
merly of Shamrock, moved to t
city this week to make their hon
h"
Miss Katherine Dearing. 1
Monday for a two weeks' vacati
-which willr'be'spent with her p.
ents in Blountstowi.

: The M'is ;Bertb~ anDd .lp
Green 6f Alexandria, ta., are 't
guests of Mr. and .Mrs. Jol
Ghoul.
r- .* '-
I' H. A. Drake attended the po
Masters' convention held In Tall
hassee Friday and' Saturday.

SIrs. Ferrell .Allen "'ai& "M
Stanford Bragdbn. f Apalachico
vif1it.d Monday with .Mrs. P.
;Farmer.


Let GARLIC Help Fight
HarmfulGolon Bacteria
Dut of sorts ? Harmful bacteria in accumu-
lated waste matter in your\colon may be
poisoning you and causing distressing
headaches and dizziness. Try DEARBORN
i'Ec ''odorless Garlic Tablets. Come in


O1 ZJr and get a FREE trial package.
DECORATION HINT NEDLEY-BAILEY LeHardy's Pharmacy 12-13
.." A wedding of interest to resi-
,ting dents of Port St. Joe was that of
eve- Miss Phillipa Nedley, daughter ot. C
the ^Mr. and Mrs. Michael Philip Nea- C O
nnie ley of Apalachicola, to Henry God- DE NT I ST
the dardt Bailey, son of Thomas C.
the "leyard t Bailey, son of Thomas C. Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
ws Bailey and the late Mrs. Bailey o Sundays By Appointment
was Ocala, which was solemnized at 6 Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe
Iarl- o'clock Thursday afternoon of last
ere- week in St. Joseph's Hall, Apa.
"* lachicola, with the Refr. John EYES
M'rs. O'Sullivan, pastor of St. Patrick's EY S
re- Catholic church, officiating.
Miss Elsie Nedley, sister of the
dion bride, was maid of honor, and tee.
,the bridesmaids were Miss Dorothy:
Kett. Anderson and Miss Gladys John-
itro- atC son. Benjamin Burke, cousin of g lasses fitted when needed
ks. ., the bride, was best man, and the Made In Our Own Laboratory
ison i a,o All Work Unconditionally
groomsmen were Carol Buzzet and AII nd
m" James Russell. The bride was Guaranteed
h. given in, marriage by her father- Office Hours: 9 a 'fmt 6 8 p. m.
~~itia- 'After spending some time with T NW ERR
was charming Ga i-Menke, North- their guests atn a. reception given a .
In- westerrin'bed, thinks th'e wood-rw by Mr. and Mrs' Nedley, the young : 1-POMlT T
Mrs. :icck~t.' boahdui itlf br&ss i.ani cbhvle left for a weddingg trial. IPANAMA CITY, FLA.
sed ideal container for garden flow- T'lh-ey will make -their home in
'by eras. Ocal.
S* ::: 'iTho's "attending, the wedding' r
bers. th S from Poi St. Joe were Ivy Nedley S LOMON'S
a No fs, r other and the Misses -Kathleen, Melba .
ai- and Iva Mae Tdl. Pasteurized
see; is, an-ta'dly
n, QuickTomato ly COMMUNION SERVICES M I LXK
nern T ck omatoJel"y Holy Communion services wil 4
ern eheld at the St ames Episcopl Pasteurized for Your Protectio r,
rris, be-held At the St. James Episcopal
Jrey Dorothy Greig church Sunday morning at 9:15.,
man Sunday school at 10 a. m. and eve-
Mrs. .. ~' i \ .4 ning services at 8 o'clock.

SB Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Griffin and ,
G .daughters have returned to their
,out home in Lake City following a i' 4
ing week's visit in the city as guests
iss of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Daughtry.
,me ~." 4
ans Joe Mira left Monday for New
ike. York to join his wife and daugh-
ney ter, who have been visiting rela- BEST FOR PURITY,
sed i tives there for the past three QUALITY and TASTE
an 1 weeks.
in
The ... 'I Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Sharit and SOLOMON'S
at- sNng, so m y dishes re- on, Joe, Jr., and Mrs. Robert Bel-
; KenINdcoo king, so mgad y dishes re-
rant. N-ookingks, sompanydise the- grlows and son, Bobby, returned to
e. uire effort that it's real joy ows and son, Bobby, returned t
to find an occasional one that prac the city Monday after visiting re- DA
ib tically makes itself. atives in Washington and Rich, Distributors for
H. This Tomato Jelly Salad 'is like mond and taking in the New York BRUCE'S JUICES
that. It's a quickie that can be putBRUCES-JUICES
together even during such distract World's Fair. aVAN
tions as caused by a pot boiling 'a n : IV EYVANLANDI.NGHAM ''i
day over, the back door bell ringing Glen Grimsley, Ed Hufft and Local Representative ,
two and howls from the ba by. It 4as a Jessie Stone left Tuesday for Pen-
bright.lively flavor and.looks pretty -. ......
and on the plate nested' incrisp greens sacola for C. M. T. C. training.
ing 1 package lemon-flavored gelatine
ast 1 cup hot water Mrs. P. D. Farmer spent Tues-
me 1 cup tomato juice, WOULD'YOU GIVE
me Pour the boiling water over the day in Panama City.
lemon-flavored gelatine and stir a *
until dissolved. Then add the MOVIES HERE TO STAY!
un- tomato juice. Pour in a mold, and
set- In, the refrigerator until firm. r-- "_'"I-"
Fill center with lettuce. Serve
ek. with inayofinaise, salad dressing or
)on horser,.dish dressing.
en- a a
BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT
Born, to Mr. and Mrs. G. L.
all Bowern, to Mr. Highland Mrs.View, an 8 OST people who use Dr. Miles
in- Bowen of Highland View, an 8/- M 'Anti-Pain Pills say th2t one
r pound daughter. The little lady Anti-Pain Pills say that one
has been named Corpill usually relieves their head-
has been named Cora Lee. aches. 'In the regular package,
:nd I Dr. Miles Anti-Pain Pills cost
pa Miss Alice Ruth Gibson TftfSun- i one penny each. In the economy
day for Charlotte, N. C., to attend packages, one penny buys -,J.
business school. pills.
or-
.he Mr. and Mrs. C. Thursby and Why Don'tYou Try r. mes
ne. children spent Sunday in Bristol Anti-Pain Pills?
visiting relatives. They taste odact promptly,
eft A *do not upset the stomach, con-
on Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Rollins and, tain no opiates or laxative medi-
ar- daughter, Peggy, were week-end -. Mickey Roonew; a..
visitors in Gordion, !Ala. Miss Alice Mickey Rooney, who is starred m 'a'.,: 'l awuay rom a
'Keiinedy, wlio had been their guest in "Young 'Tom Edison," the bio dgste we you are sui6~fr-
rIs f~'i -two weeks, accompanied them graphical drama of Thomas. A. -H o a r eatWie. ei i1,
he home. Edlson',s boyhood, coming Sunday r Miag~a 'a se P.rs.
Shn' unday Why ot get' 'a p'akae '
lhn A.. ',' '. *,* and Monday to the Port Theater, ]sjes nidti-Pain lS"s today and
Billy'Coody 'is exPe'itedi to return received his-prze fan -telegram be.epare or sb.
'tomorrow '-froni Nbrth"' Adamb, during:th6 making of the picture. -
st- Mass, where he has bebt the guest It was from W. P: Wall of Harris-
4-' of his brother, Lucius Coody and butg, 'Pf., and read: "'Took my
family. grandnaothe wo I tethsnnyrTHI- eti 0
S* .tr grandmother who is ninety-one I
.s 'Tfib4Mis'ies Luijietfe "Haimoek years old to see 'her first picture
la and .Margene Smith are guests lost night. It was 'Babes in Arms.'
D. this week oif Mra:-:nd' i 1rD.' C.: She said pictures are here to
Smith at their home at Niles. stay."


Rev. Frank Dearing of Panama
City spent Tuesday and Wednes-
day here as the guest of Mr. and
Mrs. Sammie Davis.


Society Personals Churches

LANETA DAVIS, Editor


;'- ;'~r ---- ~"";-: ~- PAGE FIVE


-FRIDAY.;-JUNS 14, '90~


-THE, STAR,- *TAR;'PORT -ST6 -JOE, GULP, COUNTY, FL'ORIIDA~i1








PAG SI H TR OTS.JE UFCUTY LRD RDY UE1,14


Indianapolis 500-Mile Race Winner


Wilbur Shaw won his third Indianapolis 500-Mile Race on Memorial Day and became the fira man
in the history of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway to win two years in succession. Like the other
32 drivers in this year's race, Shaw rode on Firestone tires, and when he flashed across the finish
line at the end of the 500-mile grind it marked the twenty-first consecutive victory for Firestone.


UNIONS PRESENT
THEIR SIDE OF
MILL SHUT-DOWN

S(Continued from Page 1)
incident brought to a crisis the in-
humane perpetuations instigated by
Mr. Navarre against many memn
bers of the mill personnel.
The machinists, in view of the
ftet that for every grievance
settled two more were perpetrated,
voted to ask for the resignation or
Mr. Navarre through the regular
channels of negotiation. The minor
management of the St. Joe Paper
company, evidently deciding to
handle this in their own way, de-
maanded that the union hand over
charges and written testimony or
the various workers, backing up
the charges. Since this minor com-
pany official had no voice in settl-
ing this issue, the union refuse
to give up its testimony.,
At a call meeting the machinists)
-voted- to. close operations of the
mill at 7:a. m, Saturday until some
agreement could be reached with
the company. Mr. Ezell, president
of the machinists, made a last air
peal to Mr. Ball Friday night to
enter into negotiations before the
mill went down. Mr. Ball replied
that it was not office hours ane
nothing could be done before morn-
ing. Mr. Ezell. reported back to the
men what had transpired. The
men, who have always responded
to calls to go out to the mill and
serve any hour of the day or night
In an emergency, felt Mr. Ball was
taking a very indifferent attitude
in this, an emergency of the
gravest nature. Consequently they
agreed the mill should go down as
ordered.
Instead of allowing the men to
close the nIll down as ordered,
insuring protection to machinery
and removing all fire hazards, the
management rushed out and or-
dered the men to shift down and
clear out at once. This operation
began at 1:24 a. m., five and one-
half hours ahead of schedule, with-
out regard to machinery, men or
fire hazards.
Our committees are ready to ne-
gotiate and have been 'since before
consideration was made to close
the mill down.
C. C. rTTLSON. President
Paper Makers Local.
A. L. EZELL, President
Machinists Local.
L. M. MOZLEY, President
Electrical Workers Local.

Mrs. J. B. Gloeckler and daugh-
ter, Virginia, are visiting in Pen-
sacola this week.
LEGAL ADVERTISING
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA.
IN CHANCERY
CHARLES B. JOHNSON, Plaintiff,
vs. DOROTHY B. JOHNSON, De-
fendant.
THE STATE OF FLORIDA:
To: DOROTHY B. JOHNSON, 5610
North Ashland Avenue, Chicago,
Illinois.
It is hereby Ordered that you
are required to appear on the first
day of July, A. D. 1940, before the
above entitled Court to the bill of
Complaint'filed against you in the
above entitled cause, and "Th'e
Star" is hereby designated as the
newspaper in which this Order
shall be published once a week for
four. consecutive weeks.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said Court, this 29th day or
May, 1940, at Wewahitchka, in the
State and County aforesaid.
(Court Seal) J. R. HUNTER,
Cldrk Circuit Court,
Gulf County, Florida,,
E. CLAY LEWIS, JR.
Solicitor for Plaintiff ..... 28


,DRIVE TO PURCHASE
PLANES FOR ALLIES IS
STARTED IN FLORIDA

Backing his recommendation
with a check for $100, Alex Alex-
andros, St. Petersburg business
man, in an open letter to the, St.
'Petersburg Times, invited the
community and. the rest of the
nation to establish donation funds
for buying American-made war
planes for delivery to the Allies.
Aleiandros, .a naturalized citi-
zen from Smyrna, Greece, served
in France during the World War
as a civilian employee .of -the
American Expeditionary Force.
"My plan will eliminate red
tape," Alexandios declared. "I be-
lieve the federal goVernment wilt
give us a smile and its blessings
if we start it."'

COUNTY GETS $1,346 IN
WELFARE ASSISTANCE

With Florida's public assistance
program now leveled off to come
within applroriations authorized
by the, last session of the legisla-
ture, Gulf county received during
the month of May cash grants to-
taling $1,346.00, according to an-
nouncement .received ',rom the
Jacksonville ,offices of the state
welfare board.
SThe grants were divided among
recipients in the three categories,
as follows: Old age assistance,
$1,147; aid to dependent children,
$141; aid to the blind, $58.
In addition to public assistance,
the county also benefitted through
surplus commodity distributions
and through remittance to de-
pend:ents by enrollees in the Civi-
lian Conservation Corps. Certift-
cation for WPA work relief was
also continued throughout the
state during the month.

GULF COAST LEAGUE
Sunday's Games
Kenney's Mill vs. Apalachicola,
at Apalachicola.
Panama City vs. Wewahitchka,
at Wewahitchka.
Carrabelle vs. Port St. Joe, at
Port St. Joe.
Wednesday's Games
Panama City vs. Apalachicola,
at Apalachicola."
Wewahitchka vs. Port St. Joe,
at Port St. Joe.
Kenney's Mill vs. Carrabelle, at
Carrabelle.
-k(
EGG TOOTH
In connection with the raising
of quail by Gulf county sportsmen
for stocking the county it might
be interesting to know that quail
chicks, like many other young
birds and fowls, have a tiny egg
"tooth" on their beaks with which
to open their shells. This marvel-
ously convenient device is shed
two or three days after hatching,
since the chick has no further use
for it.

Mrs. A. I. duPont is visiting in
the city this week. ..


MAY GET WILD LIFE
PROPAGATION DEPOT
FOR GULF COUNTY

S(Continued from Page 1)
commission take over from oui
federal government all the wild
life propagating facilities now lo-
cated at Choctawhatchee National
Forest, if possible, and transfer
same to Gulf:tounty."
H. H. Saunders, on behalf of the
St. Joe Paper company, said "This
is to request that you use your
good efforts to have the state con-
servation commission take over al
the equipment and specimens that
are now on hand and transfer this
station to' Gulf county. I believe
there are any number of locations
in this county that would be ideally
suitable for this station, and the
residents of Gul,.,.county would
greatly appreciate W having it lo-
cated in this county."
W. S. Smith, publisher of The
Star, pointed out the good work in
the way of conservation and prop-
agation' of wild life that is being
done by local sportsmen and also
urged that-the propagation depot
be transferred to Gulf county.
Copies of the above let-
ters were sent to Senators C. O.
Andrews and Claude Pepper ano:
Representative Millard Caldwell In
an effort to enlist their aid in
bringing the depot to this county.
Senator Andrews in reply stated
that "you may be sure that I will
be glad t" help in every possible
way to carry out the suggestion."
Said Senator Pepper: "You can
count on it that I will be only too
glad to be-of every possible assist-
ance in interesting the federal foi
est servicefto donate the stock and
equipment now on hand to the
state conservation commission for
location in Gulf county."

Send The Star to a friend.


CONTINUOUS DAILY
From 2:45 P. M.
Saturday 1:15 P. M.
ALWAYS WELCOME


FLEISCHEL TO BUILD construction next week of a large
residence.
Marc Fleishchel, who this week ----- ---
moved to Port St. Joe from Sham- A couple of Tampa men won at
rock, has purchased property on bolita the other day. They held up
Highway No. 10 adjoining Monu- an operator at pistol point and se-
,ment Park and expects to begin cured $95.



JUNIOR BAND


Will Be Continued

The Junior Band which has been conducted by Mr. Dan Farmer
previous to the closing of school will be conducted under my
direction at the band room on the school premises 3 days weekly
MONDAYS WEDNESDAYS FRIDAYS
The charge has been $1.50 per month, but under my direction
the charge will be-


$1.00 a Month

I would like to have all parents whose children are in the band
and who desire to see them continue with their music, urg$
them to be present for this instruction.


Preston R. White

P W hR ;1


REMEMBER DAD



FATHER'S DAY

SUNDAY, JUNE 16


S NO FADE


SHIRTS


Special for
FATHER'S DAY



$1.39


At Zims you will find complete stocks of Men's Wear Suits,
Hats,'-Shoes, Ties and Furnishings. We offer you a gift
variety for Father's Day, and every day, that Is unsurpassed
in Port St. Joe.


Next Roberts' Grocery


S MEN'S

Port St. JoWE, Fla.R

Port St. Joe, Fla.


Phone 109 for Schedule
Opens Sunday 1:45 P. M
and 8:45 P. M.
Roy E. Williams, Mgr.


0 R


Anniversary Week of Hits

SUNDAY MONDAY JUNE 16 AND 17

BIGGER AND BETTER THAN "BOYS TOWN"


pROONEY

I EDISON


:f kthFay'Bainter. i George Bancroft
Virginia Weidler Eugene Pallette'
ir -.!


Added Joy: RIOTOUS CARTOON


; "EUROPE AFLAME AT WAR"


""


55 I I


PAGE SIX


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


r FRIDAY, JUNE 14, 1940


's