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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00087
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: June 7, 1940
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00087

Full Text



The Star-Florida's fastest grow-
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St Joe.


THE


STAR


Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast.
est growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


VOLUME III PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 1940 NUMBER 35


Services of Kidd

Appreciated By

Paper Company

Manager of Local Mill Will Return
To Employ of Mead Corpora-
tion After July 1

In connection with purchase or
the Mead corporation's interest in
the St. Joe Paper company by the
Gulf Coast Properties, a duPont
subsidiary, announcement of which
was carried exclusively by' .Th
S'tar last week, H'. ,A. Kid'd,, ge9-
eril manager of the- mill, has re-
'ceiied the follow ng letter. from ,th:
St. Joe Paper ''omlpany.expressing-
'ppreciation'for 'his' services (the
letter was .received too late foi
publication last week):
Mr. Herbert A. Kidd,
General Manager,
St. Joe Paper Company.
Dear Mr. Kidd-A letter has
been directed to the employes 0o
the St. Joe Paper company notify-
ing them, of the purchase by Gult
Coast Properties of the Mead cor-
poration's, interest in the St. Joe
,Paper company.. This is naturally
the first official notice which 'has
been issued concerning this trans-
action. .
When you came to the St. SJoe
Paper company, as general man-
ager, it was distinctly understood
that your services were tempo1
arily loaned by y*ur former long-
(Continued on Page 3)


Game: Bird Beingr-

SRaised For Sport

Local Sportsmen Hatching ,Quail
And Pheasant Eggs to
Stock County

Sp6rtsmeh .if Port St. Joe re-
cently purchased 100 pheasant
eggs from a hatchery at Bethalto,
Ill., to be hatched and loosedi in
Gulf county for stocking the wood-
lands with these birds for the bene-
fit of hunters. In addition, through
the efforts of Horace Soule of the
St. Joe Hardware store, and W. S.
Smith, editor of The Star, who
was Gulf county campaign man-
ager for Governor Fred Cone in
the recent campaign, 208 quail
eggs have been secured from the
hatchery at Holt, Fln., 'on recom-
mendation of Governor Cone, for
hatching.
The sportsmen have established'
a hatchery at Overstreet, in charge
.of James Guilford, where seven
incubators are handling the eggs.
Pens and runs have been con-
structed, and as soon as the birds
have reached maturity, the ma-
jority of them will be released in
various parts of the county.
--------
.HUNT NAMED AS HEAD OP
DEMOCRATIC COMMITTEE

The Gulf County Democratic
Executive Committee met in We-
wahitchka last Friday for the pur-
pose of organizing and making
plans for the general election.
F. L. Hunt was'named as chair-
man, Mrs. A. H. Cook, vice-chair-
man, and Sammy Patrick was re-
named as escretary. Other mem-
bers are Eugene Kemp, T. J. Kin-
ard, L. W. Owens, J. M. Cleckley,
J. W. Sealey, T. P. Vann, A. H.
Matthews, Miss Della Ward, Mrs.
M. 'L. Fuller, Miss Minnie Kemp,
Mrs. Kate Lanier, Mrs. A. D. Law-
-son, Mrs. W. C. Whaley and Mrs.
Mack Fuller.


TAKEN FROM 'POCKET


. 1 o o f, .r rt '*r
A petty officer of the Royal
Ndvy assists a i un'dei ld
-of the Brrtish'' E)-e ditiot ry'
Force up the gangway of a Brit-
ish destroyer' at an unidentified
.French' p6rt 'as the B.~ E. 'F. Is
evacuated'' f-on the '"pocket'" in
Flanders. French soldiers follow
the Brito',n on board the' vessel
:which carried them to safety In
:Englarif. '' :

Danley Employes Attend '
A. .nual Banquet In Panama

The annual -Danley Furniture
company batqi, :was,,h1ild,.lT'hurs-
day night 'of last week 'at the Pan-


Dell Mahon Is FEEL

Taken By Death

Well Known ResicdentPasses. On
After Five Weeks' illness;
Services Held Sunday

Delma C. Mahon, aged 56, passed
away last Friday morning at a
Thomasville, Ga., hospital following
an illness of five weeks from pen-
4onitis. He' is survived by his
widow; one son, Morton, of\this
city; two sisters, Mrs. George A.
Patton of Port St.'Joe and Mrs. H.
D. Marks of Apalachicola, and one
brother, Charles 'Mahon of this
city.
Mr. Mahon was born in Lauret I
Creek, W. Va., on May 30, 1884, :
and came'to Apalachicola with'his
parents when a small boy. After
completing schoolhe went to CO -, w
iumlbus, Ga., and finished in busi- .Down" t
ness 'school. He was connected .ton bati.
with the Central of Georgia rail- Philadel
roa;i for two years, then returning ,bom a
to West Virginia, where he 'went ship 'eV
into business. "He :'ras united' n States
marriage to Miss Sally Morton and the deft
two sons, Delma 'and Morton, were I.lt Ih.
born of the'tiion.' la
r' Mr:' Mahon and his family came
'to Port St. Joe in 1917 and he and Ship
:his wiie "operated the; Port 'Inn
since that time. A
'Furieral services we're' held Sun-
day in Ap'alachicola .ih charge ot '"'
the S'angarte Funeral Home and Norwegla
conducted from the home of Mrs. F'r C
.'D. 'Marks, with Ret. U..E. Mart- Gu


ALLIKE FIGHTIfNG?


he ways starts the 3,00'0-
Isihp Washington at.the
phia,'navy..yard as guna
nd the greatest fighting
er built in the United
takes her place among
enders qf these shores.
e first new battleship to
ched lih 19 ears.
p _

Is Guarded

ainst Sabotage

in Vessel. In Port Here
argo of Lumber, Has.'
ards Placed Aboard


amIa uliy ianley furniture store ttao the Port St. Joe ethodist
with.. 54 employes from all .six church 'and Rev. Wright. of the When the Norwegian steamAhip
stores attending. .. Apalachicola Methcllist church of- 'Tanajford tied., up at the local
Spring flowers were beautifully flciatin Internire waS in Mag- dock this week to~~i he on a cargo.
arranged'on the banquet tble and nolia cemetery, Apalachicola.' of lumber from the St. Joe, Lum-
large vases of flowers throughout Active 'pallbearers were R'. L. her and Export company designed
the room lent an air of festivity. Robertson, George' Gore, Elgin Bay- for .South Africa, two local men
Shoulder corsages were presented less, Clay Lewis, Gene Austin and were placed aboard the vessel as
to' the'ladies anid boutonnieres .to Charles Marks. Honorary pall- guards to see that no one except
the men as they entered.' ''" barriers were lRobert Bellows, Nick members o'f the 'crew and steve-
Joe Marley, Jr., manager of the Comforter, B. W. Eells, W.- T.. EIa- dores assigned to loading the ves-
Marianna store, acted as toastma- wards, G. P. Wood, Henry Drake, el came .aboard. Tom Owens and
ter, with ill uy, manager of the Dr. E. M. Brevard,' Milion Slilth, 'Scotty' Lillenfeld were chose to
Panama City store, giving the ad- C. G. CostinL.' LW. Owens, 'C. act as guards.
dress of welcome, and Olin Johl- Nedley;, .1. P. Nedley,p'Dr:' A. L. Such action is necessary at this
son, manager of the Geneva, Ala., Ward, Dr. L. H. Bartee, Marvin time to prevent possible sabotage
branch, the response. Freeman, T.' H. Ston,Harry Sain- to the.vessel, as Norway is at war
An interesting 'program was ders,. Thos. R. L. Carter, Byrd E. with Germany. Similar precautions
'given in the form of "quiz ques- Parker, Tom McPhaul and Basil E. will be taken with a French ship
tions," with H. D. Danley acting Kenney. '' which Is expected to call here this
as "Dr. I. Q." Prizes in the form The many beautiful floral offer- week or early next week.
of silver dollars were awarded to ings were mute tribute to the es- -- ----
employes of the Port St. Joe store,. teem in which Mr. Mahon was held SOME BABY!
Mrs. Joe Marley of Marianna, and by those who knew him in this Bradford county points with
Dewey Smith of Panama City. Ira- and nearby communities. pride to a new arrival in the form
vors of beautifully painted sea-' -- -- --- of a 17-pound' baby boy born last
shells were attached to the attrac- Florida leads all other states in week to Mr. and Mrs. L. R. Star-
tive place cards. the amount of defense money atl ling of Heilbronn Springs, near
Attending from the Port St. Joe lotted, with over $20,000,000 rep- Starke. ,It is believed that thti
store were John Blount, Joe Mor- resented in appropriations for mill- Starling's, hold a world's record
row, Mack Fleming, L. J. Herring tary, air and naval base expansion for a child so large at birth. The
and Mrs. James Duffell. and new construction in this state. newcomer is their twelfth child.

NATIONAL DEFENSE COUNCIL MEETS WITH PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT





101



-.2







The members of the newly-appointed National De- William S. Knudsen, president of General Motors
fense Council :met with President Roosevelt at the corporation; President Roosevelt; Miss Harriett El-
White House last week to survey the steps already lott, dean of women of North Carolina University;
taken to Improve our defense position. Left to Leon Henderson, member 'securities commission;
right: Ralph Budd, chairman of the board of the Chester C. Davis, federal reserve board; William
Burlington railway; Edward R. Stettinius, Jr., H. McReynolds, administrative assistant to PresI-
chairman of the United States Steel corporation; dent Roosevelt and secretary to the council.


"Spy" Stories In

Circulation Here

Found to Be False

No. Arrests Made In Florida By
Federal Bureau of In-
vestigation

Last week the editor had visions
of a front page streamer something
like this: "FIFTH COLUMNISTS
NABBED IN PORY ST. JOE" wnen
he heard storie.C that two men in
the city had been ,taken.into cus-
tody by the United States Federal
Bureau of Investigation on charges
of "fifth column" activities and be-
ing Nazi spies. But after check-
.ing from all possible angles it was
found that there was no basis to
.the wild tales' going the rountdls by
word"of mouth.
Street gossip' had it that one
man had been arrested and had
.been in. possession of a map of the
entire. Gulf coast with all military
points and manufacturing plants
indicated on it, .and that his hoine
had been raided and a short-wave
ra'dlo transmitting station found.
The, truth of the matter was that
the. gentleman in question had left
the city Tuesday- for Tallahassee
to cast his ballot.,
Tales.of the arrest of a second
'"spy" also proved to be false, so
the editor filled the front page
with interesting but ngn-sensation-
al. stories of the doings of home
folks.
: FBI. officials have announced
that no arrests hav been made in
FlOrida,/ for "ltftheoliUmn,' activi-
ties, the satatertned' be'iig 4r*tendd"
toi put at rest many wild rumors
.n. circulation similar to those here
last week to the effect that various
persons. in the state had been
taken into custody.
.'*.*--------- .

Teachers Named

For Coming Term

John L. Stapleton of Cottondale Is
: Selected As .Prirdipalt-to Re-
place D. G. McPherson

The trustees'of the Port St. Joe
schools have selected teachers for
the ensuing term and have named
John L. Stapleton, former principal
of the Cottondale schools, to head
the local plant, replacing D. G.
McPherson, who resigned to be-
come principal of the Cottondale
schools. No one has yet been
named as secretary. Other mem-
duties of Tom Owens, who has
been elected as county superinten-
dent-of schools.
Teachers named are as follows.
Mrs. Fena McPhaul and Mrs. Min-
nine Howell, first grade; Miss
Juanita Gunn and Miss Avaryee
Collier, second grade; Mrs. Helen
Allen and Mrs. Calla Perritt, third
grade; Mrs. Hazel Ferrell and Miss
Louise Solomon, fourth grade;
Mrs. Leroy Gainous and Mrs. Doro-
thy McLawhon, fifth grade; Miss
Eileen Arnold, sixth grade; Miss
Erline McClellan, English; Miss
Julia O'Quinn, science; Miss Lil-
lian Kennington, commercial; Mrs.
Eula Pridgeon, home economics;
Miss Eva Meserve, Spanish; S. C.
Parker, mathematics; Dan Farmer,
band; Miss Louise Lee and Mrs.
0. S. Goforth.

NO KRAFT PAPER THIS WEEI
Due to the inability of the editor,
Harold Palmer, to get out and do
his 'stuff, the issue of the Kraft
Klarion, "The Paper Mill Paper,"
was not gotten out this week, but
'readers can look for it next week.








PAGE rwo IT EV


Society Personals Churches

LANETA DAVIS, Editor
I'


JUNIOR GIRLS' AUXILIARY
IN MEETING TUESDAY
The Misses Margaret Mincey
and Betty Blackburn were co-hos
tesses-to themembers of the Girls
' Auxiliary at the church Tuesday
afternoon. Following the regular
opening Hazel Cason led in prayer,
the watchword was repdatedi in
unison and the following program
presented:
-Song, "We've a Story to Tell to
the Nation" with the word "Afr-
cans" substituted for "Nation";;
"A Tree in the Bible,'' read In
unison; "A Missionary Tree," by
Hazel Cason; "Where Our Mission.
ary Tree Is Growing": (1) "How
It Looks," by Geraldine Parker,
(2) "Its Weather," by Alma Jean
Hinson, (3) "Its People, Its
Houses, Its Native Religion," by
Mrs. E. C. Cason; "The Trunk of
Our Missionary Tree," by Margaret
Mincey; "What Shall We Do Witn
Our Missionary Tree," by Wanda
Mae .Spencer; closing prayer.
A social hour followed and the
hostesses served lemonade and
cookies to members present.

SHOWER HONORS
MRS. GILBERT
Honoring Mrs. Willard Gilbert,-
a recent bride, Mrs. P. D. Farmer
and Mrs. W. M. Howell were, co-
hostesses last Fiiday afternoon at
a surprise shower at the home or
Mrs. Farmer in Oak Grove. A
'color scheme of pink and white
was carried out in the decorations.
TUpon arrival of the- guests, all
were asked to sign the bride's
book.
Two contests were enjoyed, with


BAND BOOSTER CLUB
IS REORGANIZED
A call meeting of the Ban
SBoosters club was held Monda
evening in 1e high school auditor
ium for the purpose of reorgani;
ing the club. Mrs. J. T. Mitche]
presided in the absence of th
President.
The treasurer, Mrs. J. M. Smith
read an account of the money tha
had been collected and expenac
tures rendered by Dan Farmer
and the chairman presented the
question regarding the letters front
Mr. Farmer to parents for the
necessary money to keep the band
organized during the summer. I
was agreed that since so man:
members are away on vacation
that the band be discontinued foi
the summer and reorganized when
the school term began, and :n cast
Mr. Farmer could not. accept the
offer made him to contact Miss
Jewel Presnell, field supervisor o]
music, Federal Music Project, re
garding a inew band director.
Mr.. M. L. Fuller read a letter
from the uniform company regard-
,ing delinquent payments on unl
forms and urging that the pay.
ments be made as soon as pos
sible. Ways and means of raising
money for the payments was dis-
cussed, -after which officers were
-elected as follows:
President, Mrs. J. T. McNeill;
vice-president, Mrs. J. L. Temple;
secretary, Mrs. M. L. Fuller; treas-
urer, Mrs. J. M.' Smith; chairman
of membership commiittee, Mrs.
Sammie Davis.
SPlans were made to have a


prize winners being Mrs. Can booth at the ball park to sell pea-


Trammel and Mrs. D. C. Smith, ai-
ter which--sanrwiches and puncLh
were served to the honoree and
Mesdames Trammel, D. C. Smith,
W. S. Smith, Carl Armstrong, B.
H. Graves, Cecil Hewitt, J. Grims-
ley, Otis Pyle, George Cooper, J.
A. Christmas, Tom Mitchell, Jocb
Hauser, and Miss Josephine Grims-
ley and Mrs. Frank Sharit of Ap-
alachicola.
*r', *
METHODIST CIRCLES IN
REGULAR MEETING
The circles of the Methodist
Missionary society held their regu-
lar business meeting of the month
at the church Monday afternoon
with Mrs. J. L. Temple presiding.
The meeting opened with song;
"Are Ye Able," followed with
prayer by Mrs. Jesse Bradbury, af-
ter which the regular business ses-
*sion was. held. The meeting was
adjourned by prayer.
Circle No. 2 will meet at the
home of Mrs. Charles Brown next
Monday afternoon, and Circle No.
3 will meet with Mrs. Omar
Branch.

ST. JOSEPH'S ALTAR
SOCIETY MEETS
The regular meeting of the St.
Joseph's Altar society was held at
the home of Mrs. A. I. Gangneiux
Monday afternoon, with Mrs. Rob-
ert Tapper presiding. The meeting
was opened with the Lord's Prayer,
followed by roll call and reading
of minutes. Report from the treas-
urer was heard and a motion made
for the treasurer to pay all bills
made during the past month. Dur-
ing the social hour following the
business the hostess served cake
and lemonade.

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT
Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Brogdon are
announcing the birth of a son,
James Broward, on June 5, at the
Lisenby hospital, Panama City.
Mrs. Brogdoh was formerly Miss
Marguerite Bailey of Wewahitchka.

Edward Ball of Jacksonville is
In the city on business.
a*& ** .


Miss Claudia Houstoun was
Week-end visitor in Pensacola.


nuts and cold drinks on Wednes-
day and Sunday, Mrs. Lane and
Mrs. Fuller will serve on this com-
mittee. The money jars yare col-
lected and $2.67 realized. These
jars have been placed in grocery
stores and cafes and now will b(
placed in the poolrooms and hard-
ware stores. Everyone is urged, to
drop their extra pennies, nickels
and -dimes in the jars to aid the
club in paying for the uniforms,
as they still owe several hundred
dollars on them due to the fact
that some who made pledges to
aid in payment have not been able
to do so
It was decided that the club will
meet every third Tuesday evening.

PRESBYTERIAN AUXILIARY
CELEBRATES BIRTHDAY
The Presbyterian Auxiliary cele-
brated its nineteenth birthday an-
niversary with a silver tea Monday
evening at the home of Mrs.-T. R.
L. Carter. An attractive arrange-
ment of cut flowers decorated the
home, which was opened en suite
for the occasion. In the dining
room the table, which was cov-
ered with a lace cloth, was cen-
tered with a birthday cake topped
by 19 candles.
Mrs. B. E. Kenney gave an In-
teresting talk on the reason for
the party, explaining that every
member of ,the Auxiliary will have
the opportunity to heed the call ot
the Master when he said "Suffer
little children to come unto me."
Proceeds of the tea will be used
to aid: in the vacation Bible school.
A small part, said Mrs. Kenney,
will also be used to train volunteer
workers who will teach the Bible
schools. In this way many will be
reached that would not be other-
wise. At the conclusion of her talk
refreshments were served.
.Ar *


BAPTIST WOMEN HOLD
CHURCH KITCHEN SHOWER
a The members of the Baptist Mi
y .sionary society held a chin
.. shower for the church kitchen
z- Monday afternoon Immediately o
1I arrival of the.members, all motore
* to the beach home of Mrs. C. C
Costin where 'the regular business
meeting was held, followed with
Social hour.
- The 'meeting opened with the W
SM. U. watchword repeated in un
e son, followed by the devotional b:
a Mrs. J. O. Baggett. Reports fror
e officers, chairmen and circle leach
I ers were heard, after which tn
t young people's councellor gave a)
Sinterestingi report and announces
That four girls would be sent t(
r the "Villa" for this week.
a During the social hour a contest
"What Will You Have for Din
e ner?" was enjoyed, with Mrs. Cur
Stis Palmer winner of high prize
r and Mrs. Hammock winner of low
. The hostess, assisted by Mrs. W
C. Pridgeon and Mrs. Charles Me
Clellan, served a delicious sala(
plate, crackers, cake and tea to the
thirty guests present.
.
MRS. COOPER ENTERTAINS
TUESDAY BRIDGE CLUB
Mrs. George Cooper was hostess,
to the Tuesday Bridge club this
week at her home on Eighth street
Pink' and white oleanders wer:
used to decorate the living room
where three tables were in prog
ress. At the conclusion of play
prizes were awarded to Mrs. P
D. Farmer, high; Mrs. Joe Hauser
second high; Mrs. M. B. Larkin,
cut, and Mrs. Tom Mitchell, low.
Mrs. Farmer was presented with
birthday .gifts from each member,
after which the hostess served a
salad plate, saltines and lemonade
to Mesdames Farmer, Hauser, Lar-
kin, Mitchell, W. M. Howell, Carl
Armstrong, Carl Trammell, W. S.
Smith, J. Lilienfeld, Otis Pyle and
Joe Grimsley.

MRS. TOM OWENS
HOSTESS TO CLUB
Mrs. Tom Owens entertained the
members of the Thursday Bridlge
club yesterday at her home on Long
avenue. Gladioli predominated in
the flowers used for decorating
the living and dining rooms where
the guests were entertained. Fol-
lowing several progressions, prizes
were presented to winners of high,
second high and cut, after which
the hostess served delectable re-
freshments to her guests.

MRS. FULLER ENTERTAINS
SUNDAY SCHOOL CLASS
Mrs. M. L. Fuller entertained
the members of her Sunday
school class of the Methodist
church with a beach party Weo-
"esday afternoon at 'Beacon Hill.
Swimming was enjoyed after which
a picnic lunch was served.
Enjoying the party were Wayne
Taunton, Tommy Hull, Wade and
John Barrier, Don and Billy Mari-
etta, Joyce Fuller, Rev. D. E.
Marietta and Mr. and Mrs. W.1 W.
Barrier.

EPISCOPAL S. S. SERVICES
There will be regular Sunday
school services at the St. James
Episcopal church Sunday morning.
It is announced by the health de-
partment that it is safe at this
time to reopen the Sunday schools.

W. T. Edwards and Henry Drew
of Jacksonville were business visi-
tors in the city several days last


Mrs. Jack Begette and children week.
left last week for a several weeks *r r *
visit -n Laurel Hill, Miss. Madeline and Arthur Soderbera
r* returned Monday from Jackson-
Miss Betty Jo Temple left Sun- ville after a visit of three weeks
day to visit relatives In Texas. with relatives and friends.
B. B. Conklin, J. M. Smith, Per- *
vis Howell, Arthur Lupton and Robert Bellows and Mrs. Pete
Wilbur Wells were business visi- Bernal spent Wednesday in Pensa-
tors Tuesday In Wewahitchka. cola on business.


LIONS CLUB ELECTS NEW
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS
At the regular meeting of th
Lions club held Wednesday at th
Port Inn, the following wer
elected to serve as officers and d;
rectors for the ensuing year: B
B. Conklin, re-elected president
M. P. Tomlinson, first vice-presi
s- dent; Robert Bellows, second vice
la president; Dwight Marshall, third
n vice-president; Roy, E. Williams
n secretary-treasurer; Henry Lilius
d Lion tamer; Ned Alsip, tail twister
r. Tom Owens, director, one year
s Richard Porter andi Byron Eells
a Jr., directors, two years.
The new officers and director
.will take up their duties July 1.
:- The installation ceremonies will be
y held at a social gathering at the
Im beach about July 1 with wives of
members present.
e "
n TO ENTER SUMMER SCHOOL
a Mrs. B. A. Pridgeon, Mrs. Leroy
o Gainous, Mrs. Phena McPhaul, Mrs.
Jim Perritt andi Mrs. P. Howell
,will leave Sunday for Tallahassee
to enter the summer session at the
SFlorida State College for Women.

GIRL SCOUTS TO MEET
It is announced by Miss Claudia
Houstoun, leader of the Girl Scout
t troop, that a meeting will be held
e at the health department tomor-
row morning at 11 o'clock.

Mr. and Mrs. J. O. Baggett spent
Tuesday at "The Villa" near St.
s Andrews. They were accompanied
s by Edna McLeod, Carolyn Bag-
.gett, Virginia Pridgeon and Gwen-
dolyn Howell, who will spend the
i week there as representatives of
Sthe Baptist church of this ity.

Mrs. Joe Ferrell and Mrs. Gus
Creebh will leave Monday for Ta-
lahassee to enroll for the summer
session'at Florida State College
Sfor Women.

Mrs. 0 F. Powell and sons, Othu
and Dudley, expect to leave the
first of next week for Nashville,
I Tenn., and Birmingham andi Mont-
Sgomery, Ala., for a visit of three
months.

Leslie Davis was dismissed from
a Panama City hospital Tuesday.
Harold Kelley of Washington,
D. C., is the guest this week of
his parents, Mr., and Mrs. Nick
Kelley.

Mi'r. Lester Hinds has returned
to heir home in Oliver, Ga., after
spending the past week here as a
guest of her brother-in-law and sis-
ter, Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Larkln.

Mrs. W. W. Vand'ergrift of
Thomasville, Ga., is in the city for
two weeks at the home of Mrs.
Anna L. Cooper, who is visiting in
Indiana.

Mr. and Mrs. Guy Little and
small daughter of Pascagoula,
Miss., are the guests this week o0
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Mahon and
Mr. and'Mrs. George Patton.

C. M. Hurlbut and son,, Billy
have returned to their home in Or-
lando after spending several days
here as guests of Mr. and Mrs. M.
K. Hurlbut.

Little Miss Geraldine Parker
returned Sunday from Tallahassee
where she spent two weeks with
her grandparents.

Mrs. Ellen Sowers and Miss
Ether iSowers of Winfieldl, La., ar-
rived yesterday, to be the guests
of Mr. and Mrs. John Sowers.

Mrs. George Hudson and daugh-
ter, Shirley, returned Saturday
from Pensacola where they visited
relatives.

Mr. and Mrs. Philip Lovett and
Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Montgomery
spent the week-end on the Dead
Lakes fishing.

Mrs. Bend Graves left Saturday
for Tampa to visit lier parents.


Mrs. Gus Creech has returned
home after several days spent in
e Perry with her parents.
e I *
e Mrs. Robert Odum of Panama
i- City was the guest Tuesday or
B. Mrs. B. C. Gaillard.

t- 2 I111I I11 111111111111111111llllI l lll llllllIIll|l|||| llillI
- QUALITY SERVICE

S,
; I LILTUS


JEWELRY CO.
S .WATCHES DIAMONDS
JEWELRY
S Watch and Jewelry Repairing=
PORT ST. JOE, FLA,


l iIIIIi iiIIIIIIi iii llI i llilii I. Illl i iii IIIII llllll


SATURDAY, JUNE 8

2B I G S M AS H
--HITS 2


with T Mtr
Muriel 1van


FEATURE NO. 2
THE JONES FAMILY



"On Their



Own"


"The PHANTOM CREEPS"
%,'****** e' e*, C
SUNDAY MONDAY
JUNE 9 and 10
Shadows of the "Other
Woman" ....

Critics say: "Better than
'Gone With the Wind'"



"EBECCA
1'.^ **: ,...... ,,,.,,,, ,n i
">J Xi-f" ER *L F ONTAINE J

---- Added Joy

Mickey Mouse Cartoon
"The Burning of Norway"


TUESDAY, JUNE 11
2BIGSMASH
HITS-







and -

GENE AUTREY
SMILEY BURNETTE



'South of



the Border'


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12

.ana TUL *NER Boan I LL orge MiiP






Musical Comedy 'Travel"


PAGE TWO


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY JUNE 7 190


Ll


N
b







THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, CULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FOR THE BOOK
Carved .on a tombstone of a citi-
zen of Prague is this epitaph:
"Here lies Josef Schm;:ct, who was
born in Austria, lived in Czecho-
slovakia, and died in Germany, yet
never left his native city."

LEGAL ADVERTISING

IN THE CIRCUIT. COURT, IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA.
IN CHANCERY
CHARLES B. JOHNSON, Plaintiff,
vs. DOROTHY. B. JOHNSON, De-
fendant.
THE STATE OF FLORIDA:
To: DOROTHY B. JOHNSON, 5610
North Ashland Avenue, Chicago,
Illinois.
It is hereby Ordered that you
are required 'tO appear n the first
day of July, A. D. 1940, before the
above entitled Court to the bill of
Complaint filed against you in the
above entitled cause, and "The
Star" is hereby designated, as the
newspaper in which this Order
shall be published once a week for
four consecutive weeks.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said Court, this 29th day or
May, 1940, at Wewahitchka, in the
State and County aforesaid.
(Court Seal) J..R. HUNTER,
S lerk Circuit Court,
Gulf County, Florida.
E. CLAY LEWIS, JR.
Solicitor for plaintiff ., 6-28

Lemon Juice Recipe Checks
Rbeumatio Pain aQuidckly
If ypu suffer from rheumatic,, artrits
or neuritas'pain, trW this uimple xpeapen,
sie home recipe sa thousands are using.
Get a" package of Ru-Ex Corpound today.
Mx it: witr a quart o" water, add the
juice of 4 lemons. It's esy._. .. trouble
at all and plpufa.nt.:.'.Yi neetd.5ly 2
tablespoonfuls', ttwo tines' a day. O0n
within 48 bourr -C sometimes overnight .-,
splendid result are obtained. If the pinliA
do not quickly leave and if, you o .not
feel better, Ru-Ex will cost you noting' to
tryai i i old lby. yo drurist un6ei
bilute' niosey-ik gsparantei. Ru-Ex
Compound. i for-ale and recommended by
MILLER'S DRUG STORE
Port St. Joe, Fla; -.
,-. j ._i _ __-= -


ROOM A ND


BY THE 00


D inig,,Room

Open'to-the Public
eCub.Bre;kfast, 6 to 9..7
Lunch, 12 to 2 ........... 35c
Dinner, 6'to *8--...........35c


MRS. M. Q. FREEMAN
Corner Reid Ave. and 3rd St. ,
Griffin Grocery- Building


Powerful Story

Is Dramatized

In New Picture

"Rebecca," Playing Sunday an
Monday at Port Theater, Has
Background of Mystery

Against a background of chilling
mystery and eeriness, "Rebecca'
will play Sunday and Monday a-
the Port theater with Laurence
Olivier and Joan Fontaine in the
top, starring roles, while the fea.
turned supporting cast includes C.
Aubrey Smith, .Judith Andersou,
George Sanders, Nigel Bruce, Regi-
nald Denny and Florence Bates.
The story concerns a young ana
unsophisticated girl who becomes
the bridle of the wealthy and socI-
ally prominent Maxim de, Winter.
When they return to live, on the
vast Tudor estate the second wife
learns, to her horror, that her life
is being dominated by the past or
Rebecca, Maxim's first wife, a very
beautiful woman who fascinated
all who knew her.
Furthermore, the memory of Re-
becca Is kept alive by de Winter's
housekeeper who resents .ihe sec-
ond Mrs, de Winter and does
everything"fin her pdoir' to harro'w
her. After an elaborate ball give'
at the .estate, the story move'
swiftly to a smash climax, stunning
in its surprise aqd terrifying in its
impact.

"On Their Own" 'i Mer "
SPicture of Jones Family

Their pockets are empty, their
home is gone, their dad is laid up
-but' there smiling 'through,!
They're the Joneses, Anemrica'b
first screen family, in "On Their
0wn,' the 20th Century-Fox film
playing tomorrow only at the Port
theater. It's their merriest picture
in many a moon.
SThe Jonese* take over a run;
'n"wn tuog.low cepurt, roll up their
;'I:'vei ain make it click with
'he'r tenants-and you, in a wa.
that will' make you roar with
laughter., Spring Byington, Ren
Howell, George Ernest, June Carl-
son, Florence Roberts anld Billy
Mahan are all present and 'give
grand accounts of themselves.


GIVE IT TIME:
Salesman: "What's the size ot
Port St. Joe?"
S Townsman: "It's as big as New
"ork, only it isn't built up yet."




its, i/


Y


S VWe live in the greatest country do and that seems to you wortn Sundays By Appointment
I., I I .. .... ..you wortl Sundays By Appointment
in the world. Everybody says so! doing. Well, that's what's hap- qostin Bidg. Port St. Joe
People who live in other countries opened all over America.
as well as all thoughtful Ameri- Because this was a new country ,
cans. But did you ever stop to with a government of the people Y MI
think WHY the United States is and by the people," thousands and .c
.-ecognizedi as such a great nation thousands of men could farm or
SWe haven't the most land by a run stores or build factories for
Good deal. Soviet Russia'has more turning out things that' people
..ian two times as much land as need if those were the things they
we have. Brazil and Canada are wanted to- do.
both larger. We haven't the larg- No king or government hindered eGiases fitted wi e eeded
Made In Our Own Laboratory
ast population. Russia tops us by them by saying "No, you can't do All Wo'k Uncohditlonally
millons. So do China.and India. that" or "You, must do it this Guarantood
We aren't independent of pther way." Nobody helped them, eitherr' Gua
countries because we don't grow by saying "It's better to ''do it this' Offtie Itour.a: 9i. ~M .o8 m.
or mine all the things we need for way." So they 'made some mis-; nDi '- T. FWAIRriY
)ur everyday living. We have to takes, just as you do. when, you 6 .,.l 'I -L.
0d'epend on other countries, for somn bake a new 'kind of cake for the OPTRIST
of our necessities, even; coffee for first time. But they learned by PANAMA CTYFLA
instance. We use more than halt .their mistakes, and o ten founC
of the world's supply of coffee, better ways o doing thins than ,
and we doi't grow a single pound! anybody had thought of'betore. '
Then think of all the automo- Becauee of th'i kind of indepen- : 4A. .i J..'
il'es that are rolling over the roads deace our ancestors wnt aheadi
in Am,eri,.a. It takes, quantities; o: and built. up tris country faster
-uibber to make tires for these mt- than anyone dreamed 'would be
lions of cars, and we doq't produce possible. Weie 'sti l a little sui M I L K
iny ourselves. We use three-quar- praised at it ourselves? Because 'w
Mors of the world's supply of raw do know 'that today we haveour Pr
silk, yet we.haven't a silk worm more things to eat more ,
o. our name, We. also use more clothes to wear .more money '
ugar, more hides, more nickel and to spend .. more electricity to
nany other things than we pro- werk for :is than the people in any
duce. other country on earth: ''
So it seems that it isn't our size, This' doesn't mean that thee r
i0r our' population, nor our natural aren't certain individual, t n other i
-esources that make us great. countries with more 'food, clothes
Then what is it that has made and money than certain individuals
'Is so important And rich and here. But the',total amount of fooid,
opwerful in a comparatively short clothes, money and ow'er, into i i
space of time? 't united States" is' larger, for "tne i,
The answer seems to be that it's i umber of people among whom BEST FOR IURIlTY,
aur old American way of organtlz they have to. e divided, than u ti QUALITY and TASTE
'"g anA wQrking. From the timo any .t.. er. co ,tr '
'his country was 'flrst s-rttled wayl It looks'das i ou'ray"o doin
:iack tinthe esixieen'i undress, more things must be 'preety'gti bd!'' SOLI ON S
'en and women bhie had the better way tian thby have id coun-,
lhapce, to 'work"at th'e 'fhihgs they tries Wrhiereone oebig mania controls l
wanted to than in any other couA- 'the activities of everybody. AnO LJ
"ry In the world. You knowv ho% | doesn't it seem asif i t would ble D.t butt f'r
iuch.,easier it is for you to get a mighty good idea for us to han ',
through a big morning's work on 'to this American way of doing
when it's something you want to things? IVEY- VANIANDNGHAM
S'. 'Local Representative
,NEW USE FOR FARM SURPLUS' BOUNDARY-AMERICAN STYLE :. .



REAL ICE
IS HEALTHY and

SAFE


A RE there days when it seems
S tat the radio, the ringing of
the door or telephone bell, the
clatter of dishes, or even the laughter and, voices
of children nearly drive you frantic-days when
*you are restless, and cranky?
Do you lie awake nights?
When these hectic days and wakeful nights in-
Serfere. with your -work and take the pleasure out
of life for you, try
DR. MILES NERVINE
Dr. Miles Nervine is a combination of effective
nerve sedatives. Originated nearly sixty years
Sgo. it is as up to date as today newspaper.
Dr. Miles Nervine has brought relief to millions
of nervous sufferers. You may find it exactly whaf
you need. ad nu f i.
S Will you try Dr. Miles Nervine? rdiaon. In
Your druggist has it. package.
S. Sabottle ;25


L1I


With the war raging in Europe
Here's how sugar planters in the it's well to remember and be
Hawaiian Islands are solving the th ankful for the longest unforti- Z /i
problem of a surplus of agricu;- fitd border in the world. Photo ll '
tural products. They are turning shows Canadian and American I'illl
sugar into rum. Photo shows ar- soldiers in uniforms of 1812 at j
rival of first shipment of Ha- old Fort Niagara in commemora- A T
waiian rum into the United tion of more than a century or REAL I CE
States at San Francisco. peace. IS MOIE
-____ ____- IS MORE
ONE HIGHER EASILY PLEASED Economical
"Te king is all powerful," ex.I Mrs. Jones: "What does your
horted the speaker, trying to instill sand generally want for break- Low cost and guaranteed
patriotism into his listeners. "The fst?" purity make REAL Ice mor
king can do no wrong; there is no Mrs. Smith: "Anything that 1 economical and' serviceable
one greater than the king." don't happen to have in the Daily deliveries give you the
"You probably never heard ot house." best guarantee of satisfaction
the ace, have you mister?" asked
a voice from the rear; Let GARLIC Help fight PHONE 47

INVARIABLY HarmfulColon Bacteria ST. JOE IC I
Out of sorts ? Harmful bacteria in accumu-
Science Professor: "What hap- lated waste matter in your colon may be
Science Proessor: "What hap- oning youand causing distressing M P A N Y
pens what a body is immersed in headahlies and dizziness. Try DEARBORN
water '" odorless Garlic Tablets. Come in
water?"' E a.nd get a FREE trial package. MAX KILBOURN, Prop.
Co-ed: "The telephone rings." LeHardy's Pharrnacy 12-13


B






n


E1


PAGE FOUR


FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 1940

ll l llllllllllllllllll lllll lll lll lll ill lll l l ll ll llll

Star adsget results
IIIlll i ,li,1,IIII llilIIIIIIIIIi i i i, IIIII,


DR. J C. COE
-- DE N TI S T
O -ffiO c U rs! 4,. 4 t 1 .


b

k.
v


1.


d


j








THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla.,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
unde- Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year........$2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months..........65c


-f Telephone 51 J-


The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

WHAT WOULD WE DEFEND?
The nation is embarking on a defense pro-
gram unprecedented in its peace-time history.
But there is more to national defense than
simply appropriating money for ships and
planes and tanks and soldiers. No matter
how great a nation's resources, an adequate
defense structure cannot be created over-
night. And-wheni a nation has long been ac-
customed to the ways of peace, it is an ex-
tremely difficult thing to' adapt it to the ways,
of .war.
The defense program involves many ques-
tions, some as yet unanswered.' First and by
far-the most important question is simply
this; What are we going to defend? A mili-
tary establishment sufficient to guard our ter-
ritorial borders 'is one thing-a military es-
tablishment adequate to guard the Philippines,
northern South' America, Greenland, the Brit-
ish We st Indies and other far-flung places,
is obviously .arother. That question cannot be
fully answered until it becomes completely
clear who is going to be .the winner in the
European war. ,.
If the Allies win we will have little to fear,
and we feel that if they can hold out for an-
other 60. days they should win. If Germany
-wins (and it is apparent that our whole pend-
ing defense plan is based upon that grim pos-
sibility) the fate of the great British fleet
will be the thing in which the United States
has the most vital interest. Should that fleet
fall into the hands of the dictators, our post-
tion will be. dangerous indeed, for we do not
possess a two-ocean navy. Ours, say the
experts, is good enough to protect us in either.
the Pacific or the Atlantic, but not in both.
And it would take many years to build a two-
ocean fleet. That explains the widespread
hope that if the Allies lose, the British fleet -
wil be either scuttled or, better yet, sent to'
Canada, where it could work in co-operation
with ours.

It won't be long now until the Democrats
and the Republicans meet in more or less
solemn conclaves to select their 1940 standarQ
bearers. And in the meantime, a long lineup
of political hopefuls, their hearts beating ner-
vously, are working overtime in an attempt
to convince the voters, the delegates and the
party machine leaders that they are' the logi-
cal choice for the number one position in the
United States. So far as the party platforms
are concerned, they will probably mean little,
-and will say next to nothing at great length. t
Both parties will pledge themselves to stay
out of war, to aid the needy and the farmers,
to cut government costs if, as and when-ani a
so on. It will be the candidates who count, f
not the windy planks. And it should be a red i
hot campaign. t
f
President Roosevelt calls on the Republican
presidential candidates to make known their b
specific views on national politics, and just r
for that the'Republican candidates call on Mr. d
R. to make public his intentions as to a third a
term. With no answers from either side the s
referee declared that round a draw.-Macon t
Telegraph.

SBest simile of the week: Happy as an old c
maid being held for ransom. v


THE ENEMIES WITHIN THE GATES
Events in Europe have underlined and em-
phasized the urgent need for improving and
expanding our national defenses, and making
sure that the United States, its shores and its
traditional ways of life, are rendered secure
To do this most effectively, our military
experts are of course studying very closely
the methods of the "total war" that has over-
run so many helpless countries abroad-the
modern form of war that, as one observer
has commented, is fought "with the morals
of the cave man and the weapons of an ex-
quisite civilization."
You need to know the danger that faces
your country before you can guard against it
successfully.
But there is one further step. The manner
in which Norway, Poland and Belgium have
been brought to their knees wasn't exclusively
based upon military power. Before a blow was
struck, security was undermined from within.
The advice of Goethe-"Divide and command"
-was heeded with telling and destructive ef-
fect. The' "fifth column" of traitors and im-
ported agents did their destructive work be-
fore war even began.
The danger that these tactics will be re-
peated here also faces our own land. It is not
enough to have military preparedness; we
must also establish internal unity, internal
security.
To achieve this aim, certain principles need
to be kept in mind:
We must guard-not in a mood of hysteria,
but through sound common sense--against
the misguided groups and individuals in oui
own country who would sacrifice our prin-
ciples of living for some other way of life.
It is they who, by word or deed, would fill
the role .of "fifth columnists" in America if
the, opportunity were offered.
We must not let the erroneous thinking of
a second group muddle our thoughts on pre-
paredness,. This group does not recognize. the
inseparability of our various freedoms-free-
dom of speech, a government of representa-
tive democracy, and a business system of pri-
vate enterprise-and its failure to appreciate
this important truth. is likely to be actually
as- dangerous as the attitude of the' deliberate
enemies of our way of life.
With these principles in mind, and with the
courageous maintenance of national unity and
individual, patriotism, America cart guard
against the "enemies within the gates." With-
out this stand, America invites disaster!

INSULT TO OUR INTELLIGENCE d
Can the leopard change his spots? When
the metamorphical leopard is the German- c
American Bund, we would say that any ef- t
fort to alter effectively its epidermic top- i
ography must be doomed inevitably to fail-
ure. That is why we are still inclined to look t
upon Bund-meetings, no matter what guise
they now may assume, with infinite distrust. r
We have in mind the opening, Monday, for d
the 1940 season, of Camp Siegfried, operated
by a Bund affiliate. A year ago, when mem- o
bers gathered at this Yaphank, N. Y., organi- s
nation headquarters, they sported uniforms i,
strikingly similar to those worn by blitzkreig- o
ing Nazis now pursuing their murdering, pil-
.aging and destroying way through the Neth-
erlands, Belgium and northern France. Then,
:hese Bundsters conducted their ceremonies
against a background of waving swastika
flags and to the accompaniment of numerous
and vociferous "heils." This year the unlt
orms, the "heils" and the swastikas are miss-
ifg. But, unless we miss our guess, the :
:reasonous urge that prompted their use be-
fore, is with Bund members just the same. d
With democracy reeling from totalitarian
)lows, it is indeed a sad commentary on ouT
national intelligence that persons who have fi
demonstrated so effectively in the past, their m
abhorrence of American institutions, should fc
still be permitted to continue their activities at
inmolested.-Miami Post.

Meeting a drunk driver isn't really danger- a
)us unless he crosses you up by going zig
vhen he is. due to zag.-Birmingham News.


L LETTERS
TO THE EDITOR

W. S. Smith, Editor
The Star.
Dear Mr. Smith-It is difficult
to recall when a candidate for pub-
lic office has been treated as cor-
dially by the' newspapers of our
state as I have been in the cam-
paign just ended.
I want you:to know that I am
grateful to you and hope that you
will 'grant me the favor o'f depena-
ing uipon you 'for suggestions and
advice during the ensuilig term.
Please also write me at any
time you have something which
you think will bq helpful. You will
alwa a find me both attentive and
grateful.
With cordial best wishes, I am,
Sincerely yours,
S CHAS. O. ANDREWS,
United States Senator.

Editor The Star:
I wish to thank you for the past
favors and publicity given to me
luring my campaign.
The following is a statement I
vould like to get before the voters
of the Third Congressional Dis-
rict. If you can carry it as a news
ter, I will appreciate it greatly.
"I sincerely appreciate the cour-
esies shown me during my cam-
paign for congress, and the vote
given me by the people of the
Third Congressional District Tues-
ay, May 28th.
"I am interested in the progress
f our district and the welfare ot
:s people. I wish for Robert P.
iikes a successful administration
n his office, and would like to co-
perate in every way."
Sincerely yours,
PARKHILL MAYS.



Lodge Notices

Order of Eastern Star
Meets on second and fourth
'uesdays of each month in the
[asonic hall, over, postoffice. Vis-i
ors who are members are cor-
ially invited to be present.
American Legion
Gulf County Post 116 meets the
rst and third Mondays of each
nonth at the Legion Hut.
American Legion Auxiliary meets
fourth Friday of month, 8 o'clock,
t Legion Hut.
Masonic Lodge
St. Joe Lodge 111 meets second
nd fourth Friday nights at 8:30
clock in Masonic hall.
Save by reading the ads!
Save by reading the ads!


The Low Downi
from
Willis Swamp
I -
-Editor The Star:
I don't know just how it's done,
but the fillin' station owners.seein
to have the" knack of. pickin' out
the up-and-comin' young fellers.to
run their service- stations. You
don't'anymore than git- your foot
off the brake at the gasoline pump
till there's a cheerful 'kind of
young duck coming' on the run.
Boy, they're salesmen. You like
'em. :'
If you're in a 1940, s.uper-12 or
If you limp in with a Model T, it's
all the same. They act like they had
been waiting' 'round there all day
just to wait on you, personal. If
you buy 15 gallons or one gallon
or just want some air -or .water-
it don't make an iota of difference
-they're tickled to see you. They
make business fun-but it's still.
Business. But sometimes when you
are in a hurry and tell 'emr not to
wipe off the windshield, they go
ahead' and do it just the same-
and grin at your impatience.
But there ain't no patent on
wide-awake, courteous service-it
ain't confined to the service sta-
tions. Any outfit can use it, and
it'll produce results.
Yours with the low down,
JO SERRA.

SERVICES OF KIDD
APPRECIATED BY
PAPER COMPANY

(Continued from Page 1)
time associates, the Mead corpora-
tion.
As a part of the consideration by
which Gulf Coast Properties ac-
quired the Mead interests in the
St. Joe Paper company, your asso-
ciates in the Mead company stipu-
lated that you be released to them,
if possible by June 1st, to carry
on with certain projects on which
your knowledge, counsel and ad-
vice were urgently needed.
We have not found it feasible,to
-elease you prior to July 1st, and
we want to express our appreca-
tion to you and your associates be-
cause you have today agreed to
remain with us in an advisory ca-
pacity until that date.
Further, we want to express our
sincere appreciation for the mar-
velous job which you and the men
under you have done at Port St.
Joe.
With every good wish, we are,
Yours sincerely,
St. Joe Paper Company,
W. T. Edwards,
Vice-Presldnt.'


I


FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 1940


PAGE THREE










U. S. CRUISER DISPATCHED ON 'GOOD-WILL' MISSION TO SOUTH AMERICA


4-H ~ -; r

-a,

'4. __ ..~ -


a WaRe -,rirr ~-~


The 10,000-ton cruiser Quincy, carrying two air-
planes, is pushing toward the east coast of 3ou'h
Amer;ca on what is briefly announced by the navy
to ba a "good we'll' cruise,.but on what is reliably
reported to be th- special mir..on of aiding s:--cral


JUNE BRIDES-IT'S A HOPE CHEST


L t n-A'-erican countries, if necessary, in meeting
Nazi fifth column activities. The Quincy's r rst
etcp will be R'o de Janeiro, but it is believed -tnc
cruiser wi'I proceed on to Monteviedo, where Lru-
".Ir'v~ o fic'als are alarmed over Nazi activities.


NEW DANCE


Local June brides probably wouldri't Ike it, but this great piece oft
hammered brass, weighing several hundred pounds, recent: addition
to the Ethel Traphagen collection of rare chests at New York, is
an Indian hope chest from Agra, India, commonly used by. prospec-
tive brides of the wealthier families.

ARABIAN MULES-ONLY ONES OF THEIR KIND

P--- i
%

". .4.~~~~ ~~~'. P' "' .. .l ''


,.







Tom and Jerry are the names of a span of spotted Arabian mules
owned by Frank Soldow, Humboldt, Iowa, farmer. They are the
only mules of this type in existence, as far as, is known. They are
eight and nine years old and were born in New Mexico. The mother
was Arabian and the sire a Spanish jack.


Mr. and Mrs. Fred O. Drake and
children of Tallahassee were the
week-end guests of Mr. and' Mrs.
H. A. Drake.



ART.

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MAKES COLOR "-

PORTRAITS j .

OF CHILD PICTURES

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360 N. Mielsian Ave., Chicago, Itl


GEORGIA PEACH


Miss Marjorie Dekle of Cordele,
Ga., who has been selected azs
the most beautiful co-ed on the
University of Georgia campus
this year in the annual Pandora
Review, sponsored by the univer-
sity yearbook. She is also an en-
try in the "Most Beautiful Co-ed
In America -oritest.

Send The Star to, a friend.


Influence of the war in Europe
is felt on America's dance floor
in this new dance called thb
"Relyea" which takes its, motif
from the armies of-Europe and
includes salutes, marching and
I'eel stamping. Here society gir-
Ruth Bryon dances the step witn
her partner in a swank night
, spot in Chicago.


Inviting Dish


foraWarmDay

Dorothy Greig

THIS tuna fish dish can be either
Sa plain-Jane or flossy-Fanny, all
depending upon how you dress it
up.
On toast, it's a simple every day
family dish. But mounded in a
flaky patty shell, flanked by plump
asparagus and glazed cinnamon
apples, it can take prideful place
on a bridge luncheon table. Plain
or fancy, however, it's a dish to


id

Tuna fish a la king is served in
catty shells, with fresh asparagus
and glazed cinnamon apples
tempt warm weather appetites be-
cause though nourishing and
creamy rich, it is light.
Tuha Fish a la King
1 can Tuna Fish (7 ozs.)
1 can condensed cream of mush-
room soup
% cup top milk
% cup pimlento, cut in strips
Place soup in double boilcr, and
stir well. Add milk gradually..Pe.t the
tuna fish into a strainer. and. l~ur'a
cup of hot water over-it. Add tuna
fish and pimiento to' hot sauce.'
Heat well and serve in pafty shells.


FLASHING down the straightaways at
speeds as high as 160 miles an hour, Wilbur
Shaw streaked to victory in this great race.
Here's proof of Safety Proof of Blowout
Protection-Proof of Tire Superiority-backed,
not by claims, but by performance.
Patented construction features in the Firestone
Tires used by these great drivers on the
speedway are incorporated in the Firestone
Champion Tires you buy for the highway.
For greater safety, economy'and
dependability, equip your car with a set today.
2- ir^^^yis F~ 'lS^K-a, ss~a a ss.SS


pt esto0ne
STANDARD TIRES 98
The Value Sensation of 1940. 6.00-16
This famous tire with all its And Your
extra values is backed by a Old Tire
written Lifetime Guarantee.


PICK YOUR SIZE
4.40/4.60-21 ....... $5.78
4.76/6.00-19....... 5.96
6.60-16............ 7.09
6.26/6.0-17....... 7.31
6256/6.0-18....... 6.90
6.26/6.60-16....... 9.68
Other Sizes, Including
TRUCK TIRES
Proportionately Low


Listen to the "Voice of Firestone," Visit the Firestone Building at
Monday evenings, N.B.C. Red Network. the New York World's Fair.



t. Joe Texaco Station


PHONE 100


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


I


'-- ** m


I


FRIDAY, J-UNE 7, 1940


THE: STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE FIVE


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,.,,-~t~B


---- .-... _.....~ -~ --4
CL`--


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Sa


SIKES TO WASHINGTON
Bob Sikes of Crestview, who re-
ceived the Democratic nomination
for member of congress from the
Third district, left Wednesday for
Washington where he will be in
contact with congressional and
party leaders during the remainder
of the session. Congress is, ex-
pected to adjourn about mid-June,
after which Sikes has announced
that. he will make an extended
tour of the district
-r----
MELONS ON WAY
The first carload of watermelons
to leave this state this season was
shipped last week from Oka-
humpka, near Leesburg. Northern
markets are said to be firm with
excellent demand for Florida
melons.
-----------
HEAVY RAINS
Miamians, it is said, are develop-
ing web feet because of torrential
rains that have deluged that area
during the past few days. The
weather bureau registered a total
of 16.21 inches of rain in threat
days last week, which nearly
equaled the all-time record of
17.26 established in 1930.

MAY GET BOMB FACTOR%
The Eustis Lake Region reports
this week that G. A. Sauer of Ei.
'stis, inventor of the liquid oxygen
*bomb, has been in conference witn
British air officials and prospects
are that a factory will be estab-
lished at Eustis for the manufac-
ture of this type bomb at an early
date.

QUITE A TOAST
A toast, given recently by one of
tire members of an Irish society.
was: "Here's to Patrick O'Halli-
gan, the president of this grand
group- may he live to eat the
chicken that scratches over 'his
grave."

Banks Johnston of Largo and 3.
"W. Chapman of Tallahassee were
guests Monday of Mr. and Mrs.
Sammie Davis.

Mrs. D. G. Farmer returned to
'the city Tuesday following a visit
of several days with relatives in
Elba, Ala.

Mrs. Ed Graves and Mrs. C.. A.
Morton left yesterday for their
home In Jacksonville after spend-
ing several days in' this city.



CLASSIFED ADS


AT PORT TUESDAY


Gene Autrey


Mr. and Mrs. S. L. McCall have
as their guest Mrs. G. L. McCall or
Quincy.

Mr. and Mrs. Hoke Larkin spent
the week-end in Bristol visiting
relatives

Carlyle Matthews, Cy Williams&
and Billy Hammock visited in Tat-
lahassee last Friday.


Annual Vacation Bible School PORT NEWS
To Open at Church June 17 S.s. Jean o: the Bull Line sailed
Tuesday for eastern ports with a
The Presbyterian church wili cargo of paper from the St. Joe
hold its Daily Vacation Bible Paper company.
'School. for two weeks, from Juni Motorship Alkaliner made port
17 to 28. Tom Makin, a student Wednesday morning with a cargo
at Columbia Theological Seminar), of salt cake for the St. Joe Paper
will be in charge of the school. Ai company from Lake Charles, La.
invitation is extended to all child. Sailed yesterday afternoon.
dren of the city to attend. S.S. Tanajford, Norwegian regisl
During the time Mr. Makin 1s try, is in port loading a cargo o;
here with the school ,he will con lumber for South Africa.


'Inct evangelistic meetings every
night at the Presbyterian church.
beginning Sunday night, June 1.
The public is cordially invited to
attend these services.
--c------
Ivey Vanlan'dipgham was a busi-
ness visitor Sunday in Jackson-
ville.

Mrs. Roy Williams and children
have returned from Fitzgerald, Ga.,
where they visited her parents.

Mrs. R. D. Prows left last week
for Baskin, La., to visit her par-
eits.


CARD OF THANKS
We wish to express our thanks
and deep appreciation for the
many expressions of love and sym-
pathy and for the beautiful floral
tributes during the illness ane
death of our loved one.
Mrs. D. C. Mahon.
Morton Mahon.
Mrs. H. D. Marks.
Mrs. George A. Patton.
Charles Mahon.

Mrs. W. S. Holley of Quincy was
-the week-end guest of Mr. and Mrs.
Jack Fllingim.


ST. JOE YOUTH ENTERS AIR
CORPS TECHNICAL SCHOOL
Joe Lilienfeld, graduate of the
Port iSt. Joe high school, class of
'40, has entered the United States
Air Corps Technical School at
Chanute Field, Rantoul, Ill., and
will report for duty next week.
Two other local boys, Glenn
Grimsley and Edward Hufft, also
graduates of the local high school,
have applied for entry to the
air school.
-----C-------
PARDON BOARD TO MEET
The state pardon board will hold
a four-day session at Tallahassee
starting June 17, to hear pending
appeals for clemency. During the
first two days the board will hear
pleas from persons residing iil the
first, fourth and fifth districts, and
on the final two days will hear
pleas from those in the second and
third' districts.

Rev. Hamilton West of Gaines-
ville and Rev. Frank Dearing of
Panama City visited in this -city
Sunday.


ROOMS \r-OR RENT
TOR RENT-Large nice -room for
two working people; adjoining
'bath; use of telephone. Reason-
able charge. Call 104-2. It
FEMALE HELP WANTED
*WANTED-Coloredi girl to wori
half day, seven days per week.
See Mrs. W. S. Smith at The
Star office. tt


LEGAL ADVERTISING


The United States of America
Northern District of Florida
Whereas, on -the 30th day of
April, 1940, Panama Machinery ,.
Supply Company, a Corporation,
filed, its libel in the District Court
of the United States for the Nort;i-
ern District of Florida against the
Gas Screw Vessel "M. M. Marks,'
her boats, tackle, anparel and uir-
niture, in a cause of Contract Civil
and Maritime.
And Whereas, by virtue of pro-
cess in due form of law, to me d;-
rected, returnable on the 20th day
of June, 1940, I have seized anti
taken the said "M. M. Marks" and
have rer in my custody.
Notice is Hereby Given, that a
District Court will be held in the
United. States Court Room, in the
City of Pensacola, Florida, on the
20th day of June, 1940, for Eei
trial of said premises,- and the
owner or owners, and all persons
who may have or claim any intei-
est, are hereby cited to b- and ap-
pear at the time and place afore-
said, to show cause, -if any they
have, why a final decree should not
pass as prayed.
J. B. ROYAL,
TT. S. Marshal.
Northern District of Florida.


... ".,? ^s .. '-B ya F -



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St. Joe Motor Co.
PHONE 37

St. Joe Iiotor Co. PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


THE STAR, -PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 1940


PAGE SIX