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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00086
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: May 31, 1940
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00086

Full Text




The Star-Florida's fastest grow-
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upiuilding of
the City of Port St Joe.


STAR


Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast.
est growing little city. In
the heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center

VCLUME Ill PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, MAY 31, 1940. NUMBER 34


CONGRESSMAN


Robert Sikes

Bob Sikes Named

As Congressman

Crestview Newspaper Man Defeats
'Parkhill. Mays for Seat to Be
Vacated By Caldwell

Robert Sikes, Crestview n,:.p-,
per publisher, was elected as con-
gressman from .the Third District
over Parkhill Mays of Monticello
by a vote of 42,18 to 38,426 with
but 11 precincts, in the- district un- -
reported yesterday. ''
Sikes will take the seat to be re-
linquished at the. end of the year
by Representative Millard Caldwell
of Milton.
Gulf county's vote on this race
was Sikes 902, Mays 974.

Blood Given In

Effort To Save

Life of I Mahon

Local Men Donate' -Life Fluid at
Thomasville, Ga; Hospital:
For. Aillng,4Man

Five local men, L. E. Robertson,
'M. O. Freeman, .Moron .Mahon, E.'
Clay, Lews, Jr., andcRichard Ma-
hon went to Thomiasille. 'Ga., last
Friday for the purpo~c .:f giving
their blood by iranstif ion to D. C.
Mahon who has been in a hospital
in the Georgia city for some time
suffering from peritonitis.
Mtr. Mahon had undergone an op--
eration and the doctors despaired
of his life unless transfusions could
be given. A call was sent to Port
St. Joe asking for. oiood ononrs
and the response was immediate.
Those giving their blood were
Mr. Freeman, Morton Mahon and
Richard Mahon, it not being neces-
sary for Mr. Robertson and Mr.
-Lewis to contribute the life-giving
'fluid.
At last reports Mr. Mahon was
still in a critical condition, but
was given'a chance of recovering.

LARSON ELECTED AS
STATE TREASURER

In the race for state treasurer,.a
cabinet post to be given up. by rW.
V. Knott of Tallahassee,- J. Edwin
Larson .of Jacksonville, former col-
lector of internal revenue,. de-
feated W. M. Wainwright, state
auditor, of Starke, the. count being
up to yesterday,.with several pre-
cincts yet to report:. Larson. 201,-.
086; Wainwright 176,107.
The.,. tally was close,.in... Gulf
county, Larson receiving 821 votes
and Wainwright 837.


Holland Elected



As Governor By



70,000 Majority


Theater Plans for

2nd Anniversary

Week of Hits; Stage Attractions
And Big Free Dance Will
Mark' Event

Roy Williams, manager of th\
Port theater, announces completion
of plans for observance of the sec-
uid anniversary of the opening of
roie new theater, the celebration to
..e held during the week of June
16.
Sunday, June 16, will see Mickey
S ooney in "Young Tom Edison'
1 the screen, with Frank Lodwicl,
nd his 12-piece orchestra appear-
. lg on the stage during the eve-
r ing performance ii' ppr6graiii of
', odern music with plenty 6'f swing.
The regular double feature will
rlay Tuesday, being "Viva Cisco
i'id" and. "Breed of the-Border"
warringg Bob Steele.
"Saturday's Children," Maxwell
Anderson's Pulitzer- prize-winnini
play, is the attraction for Wednes-
,liy, starring John Garfield, Anne
Shirley and Claude Rains.,
For Thursday, "One Million B.
:." will be the screen feature,
(Continued on Page ;6)'

Memorial Service

Held LastEvening


At, Baptist
vision


I -- -.SESSARD L. HOLLAND'
Soters -f f -i n-e-d- I


voters of Gilt:f .ount- joined ihe
greater portion o0 Florida citizens
S,p.Ja in giving a mrjorit vot.-
o Spessa.rd L. -Ho:lland for gover-*
nor, th6 count here being Hollanad
1304, *Whitehair' 649.1 Holland's'
majority over -bhe Itae issued', the
,'6,000 mark, totals up to yesterday
being .olland 272,652, Whitehair
202,352, with but a few precincts
yet to be heard from and the ab-


sentee ballots to be counted.

Th- placing of Holland in the
governor's chair indicates that the
peo-pl' of the state are not to be
swayed by the expenditure of
huge sums of money by any can-
'dida'te and cannot be misled by a
''mud slinging" campaign such as
was conducted' during the last few
days of' this gubernatorial ca-m-
paign by supporters and henchmen
of the defeated candidate.


Pridgeonr'W innerhI n was chosen by Gulf county voters
Tuesday as their county judge for
County Judge Race the ensuing term, the unofficial re-
a J turns giving Pridgeon 1,083 votes
to 869 for Thos. R. L. Carter, in-
Beats Incumbent Thos. R. L. Car- cumbent.
ter By Vote of 1,083 -----
To 869 Mrs. J. J. Darcey and children
Returned Tuesday from Tuscaloosa,
J. E. Pridgeon of Wewahitchka Ala., where they visited relatives.


.Church .Und0- Super-
of American Le-
gion Post


IMemorial services were held last
.evening at 8 o'clock at the First
?aptist church under supervision
of Oulf County Post No. 116, Amer-,
i-an Legion. Speaker of the' eve-
ning was Harvey Wood of TaIla-
iiassee, director of Boy's State and'
national executive commltteemain
lor -the American Legion.
Post Commander T. M. Schnei-
der was in charge of the program
as chairman, and taking part were
Rev. D. E. Marietta, Rev. J. W.
Sisemore, Rev. W. A. Daniet, Miss
Alice Baggett and the high school
band.

Whitfield and Daniel
Elected to Commission

The closest race in Gulf county
was that between W. G. Hardy and
Roy Whitfield for county commis-
sioner from the Third District.
The complete unofficial count gave
Whitfield 963 and Hardy 957. The
outcome of this race may still be.
changed wth the county commis-
sioners meeting today for the of-
ficial canvass of the ballots and to
count absentee ballots.
Jim Daniel was elected commis-
sioner from District Two over F.
L. Kemp by a vote of 1,193 to 646.


Flame-Throwing Tank---Weapon of Hitler's Army


ep~i '~Src,'g~ fj ;


C~
-e .r ~


Flame-throwing tanks, Hitler is ern France to the,'channel pqrts. Use f.-the:flame throwers, was
reported .to have beetn using in may. be- the, new secret. weapon ..discontinued for machine guns,
the German drive across no~th- so often mentioned by the Nazis. as they have but a 70-yard range


RETAINS SEAT


Charles 0. Andrews

Andrews Returned

To U.S. Senate Seat

Incumbent Wins Over Railroad
Commissioner Jerry Carter By
More Than Two to One

Senator Charles O. Andrews, in-
cumbent, was returned"Td hlg seat
as' United States senator from
Florida by the voters Tuesday-by
a majority of better than two to
one over his opponent, Railroaa
(Conimi;lsoner Jerry Cartel *
, Returns yesterday from 1406 of
the state's 1429 precincts gave An-
drews 303,662 andi Carter 133,548.
Gulf county went strong for An-
drews, totals being, Andrews 1257,
Carter 618.
~-9'
DuPont Interests

Take Over Meade

Paper Mi0l Stock

Local Mill Now Owned One Hun-
dred Per Cent By Gulf
Coast Properties

After several months' considera-
tion by the Meade' Corporation and
Gulf Coast Properties, Inc., a sub-
sidiary of the estate of the late Al-
fred I. duPont, an agreement was
reached- this week whereby Gulf
Coast Properties has acquired a
100 per cent interest in the St. Joe
Paper company.
It is understood that H. A. Kidd,
who has been general, manager of
the local mill for some time past,
will discontinue his connections
with the mill on July 1. No other
changes in the personnel are con.
templated.
The following statement was is-
sued to employes of the mill by
W. T. Edwards, vice-president of
Gulf Coast Properties:
To the Employes of the St. Joe
Paper Company:
Heretofore Gulf Coast Proper-
(C.-,ntinued on Page 6)
______-'C
SOFT BALL LEAGUE
TO BE ORGANIZED

Pr'!.-:, :re being completed for
S,:, .i..l r.i a soft ball league in the
.:it., a-.i donations are being re-
.....I I.i construction of a diamond
,-I tln.: i'we track field back of the
i_nrtenrr i building.
Tih S Joseph Land and De-
v.elq-.inntr company has granted
i.i m,.:,anll' for use of the field for
trins ri",pose, the St. Joe Paper
company will supply twelve reflec-
tots for ltgliting of'the field, and
Kenney's Mill iill furnish the
poles for mounting the lights,


Il~k~ "s~s~eji

~ r"
~F~i


F.711 1-








PAGE TWO THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF, COUNTY, FLORiDA FRIDAY, MAY 31, 194O~


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of Match 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year....... $2.00 Six Months,.....$1.00
Three Months..........65c

-' Telephone 51 k-

The spoken word is given scant attention:
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

THE PEOPLE WIN
It is now Governor-Elect Spessard L. Hol-
land, and with his election to the governor's
chair it isn't only Holland who wins, but the
people of Florida, for at this time in our his-
tory, with most of the world gone mad, we
need a determined and courageous leader who
can awaken and unite our people so that we
can stand as one in defense of our homes, our
lives and our liberties.
Florida today needs leadership-courageous,
able, forceful and fearless leadership, coupled
with vision and a sympathetic understanding
of the crisis we face and the ability and ex-
perience, to meet it well prepared, and in
Spessard L. Holland we have that leader-
the peoples' choice.

THE CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION
The Florida Fair and Gasparilla association
at Tampa already is laying plans for a huge
Centennial Exposition in 1945 marking the
100th anniversary of the admission of Florida
into the Union, and the association is calling
utgn o 1e -tat e'.a. a: whole to give the fullest
co-operation for this event.
While in our opinion such an event should
be celebrated at Port St. Joe, site of the first
constitutional convention and birthplace of
the state, we do not have the facilities to
stage a celebration of this character on the
scale it should be staged and, therefore, we
should join heartily with the fair association
and give them our fullest co-operation.
Port St. Joe undoubtedly will receive much
publicity from this exposition and we should,
by all means, have some sort of exhibit at the
affair and our people should take an active
interest in promoting it.
Let's start planning for it now-not walt
until a, few months before the exposition to
develop our plans of participation.


LETTERS
TO THE EDITOR

Texas City, Texas
May 16, 1940
W. .S. Smith, Editor
The Star
Port St. Joe, Fla.
Dear Mr. Smith-A friend of
mine sent me a copy of your neat
and, enterprising paper. In 1902 I
was captain of the first sternwheel
steamer to ply the Dead Lakes and
Chipola river to the steel bridge.
In those pioneer days naval stores
and their supplies was the princl-
pal traffic.,
I made many friends and havb
always been interested in that sec-
tion. I later operated a boat out
of Carrabelle, and at three differ-
ent times edited newspapers In
Carrabelle. I know many people all
over the Third Congressonal Dis-
trict and know all the candidates
now running.
I enclose a poem if you would
care to use it.
Best wishes and regards,
IRA SASANORN, SR.
The poem follows:
Interesting Port St.'Joe Star
Is the best newspaper by far


NOW'S OUR OPPORTUNITY
With the present enormous demand for
airplanes in Europe, with President Roose-
velt's declaration that the United States needs
50,000 fighting planes, and with the aircraft
industry looking to the South for suitable io-
cations, opportunity indeed is knocking at the
door of Port St. Joe.
We are endowed with the finest year-round
climate in the world, and the land about the
city would lend itself admirably to compara-
tively inexpensive conversion into fine' flying
fields. In addition we have one of the finest
ports in the South, and the bay would lend it-
self for the testing of amphibian planes.
Already inquiries have been received here
from airplane manufacturers in regard to se-
curing sites, and we should follow up these
inquiries by providing all available data and
contacting those concerns that are looking
for sites in our state.

"FIFTH COLUMN" TECHNIQUE
As the big totalitarian states of Europe
continue the inhuman and methodical process
of crushing the "neutral" nations under their
iron heels, Americans are able to observe-
at a distance-the "fifth column" technique
in action.
Briefly, this technique involves the intro--
duction of spies, sabotage artists, and sympa-
thizers into a country with which your na-
tion is not at war. This "fifth column" gradu-
ally establishes itself in positions where it cant
do the maximum amount of damage once the
two countries in question go to war. We
wouldn't- be at all surprised if there weren't.
foreigners of this sort right here in Port St.
Joe right now waiting for "the day."
There have been frequent occasions since
when the phrase has been justifably applied
to happenings in troubled Europe. Washing-
ton is currently anxious to keep anything re-
motely similar from occurring in the United
States.
For' that reason, those who are sincerely
interested in the welfare of this country have
been looking with a narrow eye upon -any-
thing which would aid ard abet, however In-
innocently, "fifth column" activities.

June time will be milk.'time this year. The
entire thirty days will be given to observance
of National Dairy Month. "Drink more milk"
is the slogan for the month, and that is fine
advice for everyone.

The United States still watches bloody
Europe. But we should be keeping a close
eye on the Far East. For there is the most
immediate threat to American peace and se-
curity.


Of .Gulf county's industrial Port
St. Joe,
Filled each week with facts and
news galore.
Editor W. S. Smith, of strong con-
viction,
Publishes all facts-not fiction.
The citizens certainly act wise
By using its columns to adver-
tise.
The paper covers the entire field,
With interesting news, nothing
to shield.
Hence give it strong support:
Boost your city and build up
your pbrt.
May the paper continue to grow,
Boosting beautiful, industrial
Port St. Joe.
Make it your news and guiding
atar;
Advertise to the world, near and
far.
L -4Sc-- -
Smith Is Named As
School Board Member

Jesse M. Smith was elected as
member of the school board; from
this district over Wilbur 'Wells by
a count of 942 to 912.
-----
Miss Eileen Arnold of Quincy
was the guest Tuesday of lr. and
Mrs. J. M. Smith.


DRUG STORE COMPLIMENTED:
Miller's Drug Store, owned and
operated by R. F. Miller, this week
received a letter from the United
Drug company that the local store
ranked 64th out of 10,000 Rexall
stores throughout the nation. The
letter complimented Mr. Miller on
the popularity of his store causing
it 'to climb to a high ranking posi-
tion among the drug stores of 1ht
United States.

Friends of Mrs. O. L. McCranle
of Valdosta, Ga., formerly of this
city, will be glad to know that sne
is doing nicely following an opera-
tion in a Valdosta hospital last
week.

Mr. and Mrs. L. P. Sutton and
children left yesterday for Tusca-
loosa, Ala., to visit relatives tor
several days.

Roselle "Mickey' Stone returned
home Sunday from Gainesville
where he has been attending the
University of Florida.
t <*
Robert Bellows, B. W. Eells, Nick
Comforter and Capt. Robert Tap-
per visited Dell Mahon at a the
Thomasville, Ga.; hospital: Monday,:

Mr. and Mrs. H.' H.' Saunders
spent Sunday' in lThomasiille, Ga.


Clearly marked as a neutral
vessel the liner President Roos--
velt sailed from New York the
.end of last week, bound for Gal-.
way Ireland, to bring back Amer-
ican citizens stranded\in the war


A new kind of airplane, one
molded and baked in an oven at
a temperature of 250 degrees, ls
assembled at an aircraft plant at
Van Nuys, Calif. The manufac-
turers hope that this "baked
plane" will prove the answer to


SHULER NAMED SENATOR
IN THE FIFTH DISTRICT
Jay A. Shuler of Apalachicola
was elected to succeed Senator H.
N. Walker as state senator from
the Fifth district, defeating Rep-
resentative R. Don McLeodi, also o.
Apalachicola.

Little Miss Joyce Redd of Pan-
ama City is the guest this week
of her uncle and aunt, Mr. anu
Mrs. Leroy Gainous.

Mr. and Mrs J. W. Sisemore
of this city and Mr. and, Mrs. T.
W; Sisemore of Amarilla, Texas,
sibentMonday at 'Wakulla Sprilgs.
S.* '.* *
Mrs. W. F. Rafidolph of Apalachl-
Cola istited In the city Wednesday.


zone. The ship can accommo-
date about 1000 passengers. The
ship is fully identified, will be
lighted at night, unarmed, carry
no cargo, and is traveling with-
out convoy.


the mass production require-
ments of President Roosevelt's
national defense program. In the
picture above, the tail surfaces
and the wing, which have been
molded to a precision fit are be-
ing lifted into position.


PORT NEWS-
Tanker S.S. Thermo this week
discharged a cargo of fuel oil for
the St. Joe Paper company.
-----------
Miss Myrtice Coody and Billy
Coody expect to leave tomorrow
for North Adams, Mass., for a visit
of several weeks. While there they)
will be the guests of Mr. and Mrs.
Lucius Coody and family.

Mrs. B. A. Pridigeon spent Mon-
day in Apalachicola.

Miss Louise Ball of Campbellton
is the guest this week of Mr. and
Mrs: Ivey Vanlandingham.

Trade at'home---your local mets
chants have just what you want.


TO RESCUE STRANDED AMERICANS


THE OVEN-BAKED AIRPLANE


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF, COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, MAY 31, 194CP


PAGE TWO









FRIDAY, MAY 31, 1940 THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PAGE THREE


Germans Move Up Artillery In Belgium


There's a fellow been loafing so- The dictators would change the
long in front of LeHardy's Bar title of that grand old hymn "Lead
that Spanish moss has started to Kindly Light" by substituing the
Erow on his north side. word. "Blindly."


RUBBER ADVANCED


WITHIN THE PAST 60 DAYS




B9l-iw&,OWN,,

WHI-LE Yj.TV-CAN STILL




f ui

S^^TANDARD! ^1TIRES.i



AT THESU.LOW PICES


Heavy German artillery, "some-
where in Belgium," pulled by
trucks, advancing to the front.


Talented Cast In


Picture shows the size of the big
guns being used in the present
fighting. This photograph was


CHOCOLATE


passed by the German censor and
sent by radiophoto to the Port
St. Joe Star.


CCC to Enroll 1800


Film Playing Today Devil's Food Cake Young Men In July


"Ma! He's Making Eyes At Me"
Has Romance, Comedy and
,Colorful Dance Revues

Announced as a blend of ro-
mance and comedy with colorful
dance revues, Universal's new mu-
sical film, "Ma! He's Making Eyes
at Me," plays today only at the
Port theater.
Tom Brown, as a live-wire.young
press agent with a, million idea e.
and Constance Moore as a pretty
Broadiway model, share roman.:l,
honors in the swiftly paced play.
Action in the story revolves
around the 4ffortl of Bio.wn .to
make American girls more fashion
conscious and save a swank Fifth
avenue shop from bankruptcy. CoT-
orful revue numbers in the picture
feature comedy routines by Chan,
berlin and Mitchell, the dancing
of Vivien Fay and a swing version
of "The Blue Danube," sung by
Marie Greene and her "Merry Min-
strels" of radio fame. Constance
Moore sings the title song, "Ma!
He's Making Eyes at Me."

WAR RESULTS'IN PLANTING
OF RUBBER TREES IN STATE

GGrowing concern over the Euro-
pean war affecting the rubber sup-
ply of the united (States caused the.
U. S. Bureau of Plant Industry to.
intensify experiments with growing
of rubber trees in Florida. A few
trees, of the Nevea type, today's
principal source of rubber, havr,
been set out near Homestead, and
indications point to successful
raising of the plant.
Rubber prices now range at from
14 to 18 cents per pound.

AT PORT WEDNESDAY


Vincent Price and Nan Grey in
"The Invisible Man Returns,"
playing Wednesday only at the
Port theater.


Save by reading the ads!


Oh Boy!
Dorothy Greig

qTHE male of the species has a
Quite unabashed liking for rich
chocolate devil's food cake with
lots of icing. We don't know whether
it's the chocolate flavor, the icing,
the fact that it's cake, or maybe
the happy combination of all three.
nI


N Davil's Food Cake that requires
no sour milk.

But young or old, men go for it. So
as a kindly deed in a troubled world
let's serve this particular type of
cake. often. It's a grand and glori-
ous finish to a meal, and one 'that
sends everyone on their way in a
happy frame of mind:
2 cups sifted cake flour
% teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon baking powder
% cup shortening (one-half butter)
12 cups sugar
3 eggs, separated
2 squares chocolate, melted
1 can condensed tomato soup
Sift the cake flour, then measure.
Add the baking soda and baking
powder. Then sift again. Cream the
shortening and add the sugar gradu-
ally, beating until fluffy. Then add
the well-beaten egg yolks and the
melted chocolate. Add the flour mix-
ture alternately with the tomato
soup, stirring after each addition.
Fold in the stiffly beaten egg whites.
Turn into buttered cake pans (about
9 inches square) and bake in a mod-
erata (350 F.) oven about 25 min-
utes Makes one 2-layer cake.
Put layers together and cover top
wi't> :, Sven Minute Icinz.
--------4--
GULF COAST LEAGUE
Sunday's Games
Apalachicola vs. Panama City at
Panama City.
Port St. Joe vs. Wewahitchka at
Wewahitchka.
Carrabelle vs. Kenney Exporters
at Port St. Joe.
Wednesday's Games
Port St. Joe vs. Apalachicola at
Apalachicola.
Wewahitchka vs. Carrabelle at
Carrabelle.
Panama City vs. Kenney Ex-
porters at Port St. Joe.
-- ------
CAMP OVEN
A tin or aluminum pie plate in-
verted over the top of a skillet
makes a fine camp oven. Set the
skillet over a shallow bed of coals
and place a few coals. on top of
the pie plate.

The annual value of Florida fish
and other seafoods is $20,000,000.


In Event of' War Their Status Will
Be Strictly That of Any
Other Civilians

During the period July 1 to 2t
Florida will enroll 1800 youngmen
for t he Civilian Conservation
Corps, according to announcement
yesterday by the state welfare
board at Jacksonville.
CCC selectees are in no sense en-
listing for military service, their
status being strictly that of civil-
ians, as the name of the corps inr
plies. Should the United States en-
ter the war, the status of the CC(
enrollees would be exactly the same
as that of other young men of
their age.
They would be no more subject
to draft than any of their friends
and brothers back home, and it
recruiting should be authorized
they would have the same privilege
of volunteering for military service
as other American boys. They
would have one advantage in the
event of becoming fighting men-
that of being in top physical con-
dition and therefore more able to
withstand physical hardships.

Batting Averages
PORT ST. JOE BALL CLUB
Up to Sunday, May 26


Player--
Belin .........
Mitchell .....
Grant ........
Chavers .....
Porter ........
T. Johnson ...
A. Dendy ......
McKnight ....
McLean ......
Owens .......
F. Moran .
Sowers ......
J. Player ....
Taunton ...
Stuckey ....
Williams .....
Tryons .......
Hinote ........


Pitchers' Averages
Pitcher- G W L S
Stuck'ey ....... 3 1 0 8
T. Johnson .... 1 0 6
Hinote .......... 5 1 3 33
Tryons ........ 2 0 1 5
Chavers ....... 1 0 1 1

TEAM STANDINGS
Team- W I
Apalachicola .......... 7
Carrabelle ............. 5
Exporters ............. 4
Port St. Joe .......... 3
Panama City .......... 3
Wewahitchka .......... 2


Av.
.700
.524
.500
.400
.M37
.333
.316
.316
.30o
.304
.250
.231
.216
.176
.111
.111
.111
.100


Av.
1.000
1.000
.250
S.000
.000


Pct.
.875
.625
.500
.375
.375
.250


RESULTS SUNDAY'S GAMES
Wewahitchka, 6; Exporters, 2.
Apalachicola, 8; Carrabelle, 7.
Port St. Joe, 15; Panama City, 5.


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$5.58
5.78
6.21
7.77
7.08
6.75
8.37
8.66
9.37


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PAGE THREE


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, MAY 31, 1940








PAGEFOU TH STA, PST T. OE,-GUL- CUNTY FLRID FRDAYMAY31.194


ADDITIONAL DISTRICT
JUDGESHIP FOR FLORIDA

WASHINGTON, D. C., May 30-
(FNS)-President Roosevelt this
week signed' legislation creating an
additional district judgeship to
serve both the northern and soutn-
ern districts of Florida. The next
vacancy will not be filled,.the new
judge automatically taking office.

It is against the law to transport
seafoods in Florida without first
having procured a permit and num-
ber from the state conservation de-
partment.

Send The Star to a friend.


Let GARLIC Np Fight
Harrmftul-Won a0teria
out of sorts ? Harmful bacteria in accumu-
lated waste matter in your colon may be
poisoning you and causing distressing
headaches and dizziness. Try DEARBORN
'odorless Garlic Tablets, Come in
and get a.FREE trial package.
LeHardy's Pharmacy 12-13

Lemon Juice Recipe Checks
Rheumatic Paip Qicky
If you suffer from rheumatic, arthritis
or neuritis pain,. try this simple inexpen-
sive home recipe that thousands are using.
Get a package of Ru-Ex Compound today.
Mix it with a quart of Water, add the
juice of 4 lemons. It's easy. No trouble
at all and pleacant. You need only 2
ttiilespoonfulls tr.o tirri a day. Often
within 48 hc-,'r .rnei;rr-s i overnight
splendid re ,lrts ar. ohbjincd. If the pains
-do not quickly leave anrd if you do not
feel better, Ru-Ez will ca ou nothing to
try as it is gold by. your'druggist under
an absolute money-back guarantee. Ra-Ex
Compound is for. sdle-and recommended by
MILLER'S DRUG STORE
Port, St.. Joe, Fla.



o ART

PROJECT

M AKES COLOR

PORTRAITS I ;" "

OF CHILD PICTURES

REE
Thi. offer is one of the most remark-
able ever made. \Ve'll send you a
beautifully ,hand-colored-in-oil-paint
enlargement' of any picture you want
enlarged. Yes, any snapshot, any fa-
vorite picture you'd l,; cnlarge.d and
hand-coloredi Tihee e!lar events will
be size Sx7.'They will be mounted on
h;gh qualiFy, double-white mat mount-
insi, sire 7rx. To duplicate such an
enlargement, hand-colored-in-oil-
paint, would cost you from $1.2S to
$3.00 in any photographic store. To
get this enlargement you pay only 5Oc.
for the enlargement and the hand-
painting will he done without charge.
Simply send a print ,or negative of
your favorite picture and /fty cents..
incoin; That's all you do,'and promptly
by mail you'll receive your hand-col-
ored-in-oil enlargement. Send- odla to
ARTi EDITOR:..
COOPERATIVE FEAT'JRES, INC..
360 N. Michigan Ave., Chicagoi,.l


Schedule Change

Of Health Director

Made Necessary By Addition of
Wakulla County to Franklin-
Gulf County Health Unit

Because of the addition of Wa-
kulla county to the Franklin-Gulf
County Health Unit, for, the pres-
ent it is necessary for Dr. R. J.
Lramb, director, to make a number
of changes in his schedule of days
in certain places.
Beginning Monday, June 3, all
clinics for the north endi of Gulf
'cu:nt. will be held in Wewa-
hiitchka on Mondays instead of
Wednesday, and for the present
come at the same time of day. Di-.
Lamb can.be seen by appointment
in Port St. Joe during the latter
part of the. afternoon, on Mondays.
Each Tuesday .Dr.. Laqb: will be,
in Apalachicola instead of Wednes-
day, and in Carrabelle: Tuesday af-
ternoon to give. any. person an. op;
rortunity for consultation.
SOn Wednesday he ,will spend the
-ntire day in Wakpila, county, and
an Thursday will be In Port St.:
Toe the entire day,, attending
clinics. On Friday. he .willu'spenv.
the entire; day inIApalaceicplal .and
an Saturday morning will,; be
where he. is needed most,
Inf Wewahitchka the, prenatal
clinic will. be combined.with: a well
baby clinic for the present, where
parents will be able to bring their
children n .twice monthly for a
check-up.,
Beginning .June 5 a well baby
clinic will be established on the
'irst and third Wednesday and a
prenatal on the second and fourth
Wednesday of each month,
In.Port St. Joe there will be two.
well baby andtwo prenatal clinics
',eld each. month on Thursday
'nornings, to be announced more
definitely .later.
Frid:ays will be Dr. Lamb's gen-
,ral day in Apalachicola so.. Tha
anyone wishing to ses, himn can
:ome in, and Saturday morning, he
vill be. were he thinks his serv-
:'a's will be most useful.
"I am making these changes
vith the consent ofthe physician~;
''a charge. so that you will be ab..
ruted of your service'on these par-
irular days,'' said 'Dr.- Lamb, in
'-,nounding the. new schedule. "I
vant to take this means of thank-
n' the people of the two counties
or assisting me so materially, In
Setting on this tuberculosis -pru-
gram, and I hope that those need-
ing. it will take advantage of our
service."
--------

Popular Song Is

Called Bing's Best

Is Title Melody for "if I Had My
Way," Playing Sunday and
Monday at the Port

Bing Crosby's recording of the
title song for his new picture, "It
I Had My Way," playing Sunday
and Mond'ay at the Port theater, is
the best in the singer's career, in
be opinion of David Butler, who
produced and directed the film.
The song is a revival of an old-
'ime hit by James Kendis and Lou
'cein, and is one of the two solos
Ei:ig sings in the picture. The
o;.her is a new number titled "April
Flayed the Fiddle."
Bing and his youngest co-star,
little Gloria Jean, sing three new
duets, "I Haven't Time to Be a
Millionaire," "Meet the Sun Hals-
way" and "Pessimistic Character.'
In addition to the musical se-
quences, "If I Had My Way" con-
ta'ns many iomedy-drama higli-
lights. Charles Winninger and El
Brendel head the supporting cast
which includes such stars of yes-
teryear as Trixie Friganza, Grace
LaRue, Eddie Leonard, Julian El.
tinge and Blanche Ring.
------------
a' It's a waste of breath' to 'tell &a
Loman,. to '%be-eer-. ,ge...-


ON AMOUNTINGN TO SOMETHING
ON "AMOUNTING TO SOMETHING?'


The new "hired girl" was due to
arrive that afternoon. Her brother
was driving her over rrom Pan-
ama City, and Grandmother was
getting her room ready.
"The Wagners are substantial
people," Grandmother said. "They
keep a clean house and pay theli
bills. I'm expecting this Milly to
amount to something. Now that
Poe girl tch tch .. just
look at the way she left her room!
I don't think she swept under the
bed the whole time she was here."
i Grandmother had never approves
3f the Poe girl. She had "ratted"
her hair and made eyes at the
aired mane and complained of be-
fhg tired on wash day even before
,I the sheets were on the line.
And by .the timeshe was hanging
-out the colored clothes, she would
stop and rest, on her way from the
line, on the bench under ti'e. apple
-ree and fan herself with her sun
'onnet.
A "hired girl" who got tired be-
fore the Monday washing was on
the line was just out of luck in
Grandmother's household. Because
after that there was dinner to get
o-or grandfather and the boys ana
:he hired man. A big -dinner of
:neat and potatoes and vegetables
'hat had to be brought in from the
garden, and a piidding or pie
cooked over a wood fire in the big
range. Afterwards there were
dishse to do, and the wash house
to scrub. Later on in the afternoon
tie. sweet-smelling clothes had to
be brought in off the line, then
sprinkled and tucked away in damp
rolls' in a big wicker basket. Then
there was supper to get and more
dishes to wash; chickens to feeu
and water and the mllK som stx
cows to strain .before the milk
things could be washed, and
scalded.'
Tuesday..wa .ironing 'day, and no;
matter how hot the weather,
Grandmother and the 'hired girl"
kept at it until it was done, their


irons heating on the big. cook
stove. Grandmother always, baked
bread on ironing day so that the
fire might do double duty.
Wednesday was cleaning day and
Grandmother was not content un-
til every square inch of carpet in
her big house had been swept and
all of the woodwork as well as the
furniture dusted and the, 12 oil
lamps given more than their daily,
cleaning.
Thursday .was .mending day .and
a girl might expect to get some
rest while'she sat darning sox and
putting big honest patches on torn
blue 'work shirts. Only that Grand-
mother always found. "extras!'. for,
mending day.
Friday mornings. GrandmotheL
spent weeding in her vegetable
garden and in the aftei-noon she
hitched old Cleo to the phaeton
and drove to the village to do her
week's buying.- The girl was ex-
pected to go along foi company
and to have a chance -to look
around the stores herself. It' was
her afternoon. off whether she
wanted to go or not!
Saturday there was so much
bustle and stir in Grandmother's
house getting ready for Sunday
that no one' ever had time to so
much as sit down even for fiv,
minutes. Bread and pies and cook-
ies were baked. Chickens were
killed and dressed;- vegetables
gathered and cleaned for two days
instead of one. And if company
was coming for Sunday dinner,
there was extra cleaning to do.
Grandmother worked right along
with the "hired girl," as was the
necessary custom in those days.
And it was no easy job for either
of them to cook and clean and
wash and mend dfor a household of
'six without a single piece of me-
chanical equipment.
In'those days before modern con-
veniences had'- transformed her
world, a woman, whether mistress
or maid, jolly well HAD to
"amount' to something."


Seed Sowing is an Art


Garden Fan Should Learn


When a gardener buys a packet
o- seed, usually it bears terse direc-
tions, such as "Sow in the open
ground when the weather is warm,"
"Sow in heat," etc. They sound
simple enough, but one accustomed
to sowing seed Wvould hardly agree
that it is as simple as it sounds.
Seed sowing is quite an art in it-
self, easily learned, but details must
be observed for full-success. For-
tunately, seed is the cheapest com-
modity on the market, and' proba-
bly more seed is wasted through
poor methods or careless work in
sowing than from any other reason.
Knowledge of correct methods of
seed sowing undoubtedly would in-
crease the good reputation of seeds-
men, who are all 'too often blamed
for ill success.
The seed in its function as the
originator of plant life is a small
body, often a very,tiny one, which
contains a microscopic plant called
the embryo with a. quantity of food
matter stored in the seed and often
in the thickened first pair of leaves
known as seedleaves or cotyledons
which differ from the true leaves
of the plant, which appear later.
Sometimes the stored food supply
is missing in seeds. The whole is
surrounded by a more or less hard
and thick shell or coating.
Under proper conditions the em-
bryo escapes from this protecting
cover and the mature plant results.
The escape is called germination.
At the start of germination, the pri-
mary parts that later become root
and stem thrust through the seed


covering, the root turning down-
ward and the stem upward. Mois-
ture and temperature are the two
factors that control germination,
and they are the two factors that
must be considered in successful
seed sowing.
In the mechanics of seed sowing,
the first point tF observe is never
to bury the seed too deeply in the
soil. If planted too deeply it may
be smothered before it can find
strength to thrust through the soil,
exhausting all the stored food sup-
ply of the seed in the effort. Deep
sowing is a most frequent mistake
and the commonest cause of poor
success with seeds. Cover a seed
with its-own depth of soil. This is
the best rule of thumb. Tiny sccds
merely lie on the surface


Before marriage woman's, cry- Freedom of the press -is too
Ing touches.,a man's heart; after sharp a sword for the dictators to
marriage. it touches his.pocket- allow in the hands of their" be-
book .. loved followers.


Star ads get results

IllilHlliflllllllll lllllllllllll inll lllllinliinlll i


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Sunday -By 'Appointment
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EYES EXAMINED


Glasses fitted when' needled
Made In Our Own Laboratory
SAl Wb6rk Unconditionaliy
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Office Hours: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

DR. G. T. NEWBERRY
OPTOMETRIST
PANAMA dITY, FLA.



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PAGE FOUR


THE-.STAR, POR-T ST. JOEr GULF. COUNTY) FLORIDA


FRIDAY,- MAY 31, 1940








J


Society


MRS. B. E. KENNEY, JR.
ENTERTAINS FOR GUEST
Honoring Mrs. J. G. Gainey of
Blountstown, who was her guest
last week, Mrs. Basil E. Kenney,
Jr;, entertained with three tables
of bridge at her home at Kenney's
mill last Friday. The home wab
tastefully decorated with spring
flowers for the occasion. Preceding
the hour of play, a buffet luncheon
was served. The table was centered
with a cut glass bowl of flowers
balanced by tall lighted tapers. At
the conclusion of play prizes were
awarded to Mrs. B. E.. Kenney, Sr.,
high, Mrs. J. B. Gloeckler, cut,
and Mrs. Nick Comforter, low.
Mrs. Gainey and Mrs. T. E. Castle-
berry of Fitzgerald, Ga., were pre-
sented wth guest prizes.

PRESBYTERIAN AUXILIARY
IN MEETING AT CHURCH
The Presbyterian Auxiliary met
Monday afternoon at the church
with Mrs. Thos. R. L. Carter pre-
siding. Topic for the afternoon was
"Christian Education." Following
the program plans were maae tor
the annual birthday party to be
held at Mrs. Carter's beach home
next Monday evening at 8 o'clock.
Mrs. Carter announced that a
leader had been secured for the
Vacation Bible School which will
open June 15, the morning classes
for the younger people and the
evening classes for the older mem-
bers. The next meeting will be
held at the home of Mrs. B. E.
Kenney, June 9.

EPISCOPAL AUXILIARY
MEETS WITH MRS. LeHARDY
Mrs. C. A. LeHardy, Sr., enter-
tained the members of the Episco-
pal Auxiliary at her home on 4thl
street Monday afternoon. Fol-
lowing a short business session
plans were made for a luncheon at
the home of Mrs. Horace Soule on
June 6. Mrs. J. B. Gloeckler was
appointed as chairman for the
luncheon.
The program was presented by
Mrs. Basil Kenney, Jr., after which
refreshments .of sandwiches ana
lemonade were served to the ten
members, and' one guest present.

Mrs. Lester Hinds of Oliver,
Ga., is the guest of her brother-in-
law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. M.
B. Larkin.

Miss Amelia Schneider has re-
turned from Tallahassee, where
she is a student at F. S. C. W.

Mr. and ,Mrs. D. G. McPherson
of Havana spent Monday and
Tuesday in the city.

Mrs. P. T. Camp has returned to
her home in Chipley after spend-
ing last week with her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Nick Kelley.

Mrs. Kate Harrell left Monday
for Cottondale to visit for several
weeks. W. H. Howell and daugh-
ter, Gwendolyn, accompanied her,
returning Monday night.


ROOM AND.

BOARD
BY THE 7 00
WEEK $7

Dining Room

Open to the Public
Club Breakfast, 6 to 9....25c
SLunch, 12 to 2 ...........35c
Dinner, 6 to 8 ..........35c


MRS. M. O. FREEMAN
ornrer 'Reid, Ave. and 3rd St.
S Griffin Grocety Building
as ,s 4


- Personals

LANETA DAVIS, Editor


DISTRICT PRESIDENT PRAISES J. A. M. CLUB MEETS
LEGION AUXILIARY FOR WORK WITH MRS. GAINOUS


The American Legidn Auxiliary
held its regular meeting at the Hut
last Friday night with Mrs. M. L.
Fu!le", president, in the chair. Tne
meeting opened by pledging allegi-
ance to the flag, followed with
prayer by the chaplain, Mrs. Pol-
lock. The session was then turned
over to the program chairman, Mrs.
G. White, who presented the fol-
lowing interesting program:
Talk on "Poppy Day" by Larry
Evans. Poem, "The Poppy in Your
Coat Lapel," by Mrs. Rish. A short
talk on the Auxiliary work of the
Legion by Ivey Vanlandingham.
Following the program a short
business session was held during
which social welfare reports were
made and a report received from
the finance chairman. The resign.-
tion of Mrs. Sammie Davis as
Junior leader was accepted ane
Mrs. G. H. Wellington appointed
as leader for the present. Motion
was made and carried for each
member to pay five cents per
month to the flower fund. Mrs.
Wellington reported on the kitchen
shower. .
The president then introduced
Mrs. C. E. Swank of Panama City,
district president. All joined in
singing with her one verse of
"America," after which she gave
a most interesting talk on the
Auxiliary work and complimented
"e local unit on the fine work it
has. accomplished.
Mrs. Huston, president of the
Panama City Auxiliary, was intro-
duced and gave a report on the
convention and on "Boy's State."
Mrs. H. C. Whitaker also gave a
short talk on "Boy's State in Ne-
braska," after which the meeting
adjourned for the social hour, at
which time the hostesses served
ice cream and cake to the nine-
teen members and three visitors
present. Hostesses for the evening
were Mrs. H. C. Whitaker and
Mrs. W. C. Pridgeon.

MARTHA CIRCLE IN CHARGE
OF ROYAL SERVICE PROGRAM
The Royal Service program for
the month of May was rendered at
the Baptist church Monday after-
noon by the Martha Circle of the
Baptist Missionary society. Mrs.
J. 0. Baggett, chairman, announced
the topic for the afternoon, "Youth
Steadfast for Christ."
The opening song, "How Firm a
Foundation," was followed by the
Bible study, "God's Challenge to
Youth," and prayer by Mrs. L. R.
Holliday. The program was de.
veloped by Mesdames M. J. Fillin-
gim, Curtis Palmer, E.- B. Denfly,
W. L. Durant, J. O. Baggett, W. H.
Howell, Joe Morrow, Lupe, W. C.
Pridgeon and E. C. Cason after
which prayer was led by Mrs. R.
J. Staton.
Plans were made for a plate and
cup shower for the church kitchen
next Monday' and following the
business meeting to motor to Bea-
con Hill for a social hour at ilne
home of Mrs. C. G. Costiil.

Miss Doris Greer of Cusetta, Ga.,
is the guest of her father, J. H
Greer.

Mrs. J. C. Gainey and two chil-
dren, Elizabeth and Mary Ann, of
Blountstown, spent last week here
.as guests of Mr. and Mrs. Basil E.
Kenney, Jr. Dr. Gainey spent Sun-
day in the city and his family re-
turned to Blountstown with him.
fX 1 ,*
Miss Hilda Redd of West Bay is
the guest this week of Mr. and
Mrs. Franklin Adams.

Mrs. J. M. Smith and daughter
Marigene, Mrs. Jack Samford and
children,, Joyce and Jack, and.
Betty Jo Temple spent' Saturday
shopping in Panama City.


Mrs. Leroy Gainous entertained
'he, J. A. M. club at her home
Monday afternoon, Vases of Easter
lilies decorated the living room
where the guests were entertained.
A contest, "A Shirt-Walst rKo-
-mnance," was enjoyed, winners be-
ing Mrs. Sammie Davis, high, and
Mrs. Ed Pridgeon, low.
The hostess served refreshmen's
of macaroni salad, cream cheese
and ham sandwiches, cookies and
iced. tea to Mesadames B. A: Pric-
feon, H. A. Drake, W. H. Howell,
Ed Pridgeon, W. C. Pridgeon, C. D.
Boyer, L. Perritt and Sammie Da.
vis, Miss Myrtice Coody and in-
vited guest, Mrs. W. Wells.

METHODIST W. M. S. ENJOYS
INTERESTING PROGRAM
The regular meeting of the Meth-
odist Missionary society was held
Monday afternoon at the church
with Mrs. J. T. McNeill in charge
of the program.
The meeting opened with a sole
by Mrs. Edwin Ramsey, followed
by a hymn, "Lord', 'I Want to Be
t Christian." The responsive read-
ing was followed by a hymn, "Are
Ye Able." Topic for the meeting
was "A Christian In Deed and In
Truth." Mrs. J. C. Bradbury gave
an interesting talk an."Blazers of
Trails of Inter-racial Understand-
ings," followed by a poem, "Obedi-
ence." The meditation, "My Lord
Calls Me," was given by Mrs. L.
"T. Bartee. A'ter silent prayer Re,.
D E. Marietta dismissed the meet-
ing.

'MRS. KENNEY, SR., HOSTESS
FOR BLOUNTSTOWN GUEST
Mrs. B. E. Kenney entertaineC'
at bridge last Friday afternoon in
honor of Mrs. J. G. Gainey of
Blountstown. Gladipli and African
daisies predominated in the decor
ttion of the home, which was
opened en suite for the occasion
o:lowing several progressions airi
tallying of scores, prizes were preQ
sented to Mrs. Floyd Hunt, high.
and Mrs. B. C. Gaillard, second
high. Mrs. Gainey was presented
with a guest prize, after which the
hostess served a delectable salac
course and iced drinks.

TAYLOR-HUSBANDS
Mrs. R. J. Pitts of Wewahitchke
announces the marriage of her
daughter, Miss Leona L. Husband.,
of this city to B. T. Taylor, Jr.
son of Mr. and Mrs. B. T. Taylor
of Birmingham, Ala., on May 20
The impressive ring ceremony wal.
performed by Judge Roy Gaskir
at his home in the -presence of th-
immediate family and close friends
The bride wore a beautiful"
gown of sheer navy crepe, with
matching accessorIes, and wore t
corsage of talisman roses.
Mrs. Taylor is a graduate of the
Wewahitchka high school and th/
Spencer Business College and has
for the past six months, been em
played as clerk for the Gulf county
health department. The groom at
tended Berry School in Rome, Ga.
and has been in Port St. Joe for
the past two years, connected witl
the city, engineering the opening
and construction of new streets.
Following a trip to the groom's
home in Birmingham and a short
stay in Chattanooga, Tenn., the
young couple will return to this
city to make their home.

Miss Claudia Houstoun was a
week-end visitor in Tallahassee.

Mrs. T. E. Castleberry of Fitz-
gerald, Ga.. is visiting her son-
in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs.
J. L. Miller.
0
Mrs. Max Fleming and. Mrs.
Harold Palmer spent Monday In
Panama City.


~I


flowers attractively arranged were
used for decorations. Following
several progressions, prizes were
awarded to Mrs. W. L. Bragg, high
and Mrs. J. Lilienfeld, second high.
A delicious salad plate, French
apple pie and iced, tea was served
to Mesdames P. D. Farmer, W. M.
Howell, W. L. Bragg, J. Lilienfeld,
Gordon Thomas,' J. Grimsley and
M. B. Larkin.

MRS. CURTIS ENTERTAINS
THURSDAY BRIDGE CLUB
Mrs. Fred Curtis entertained the
Thursday Bridge club yesterday at
her home on Long avenue. Gladoli
were used for decorations in the
living room where tables were
placed, for play. Several progres-
sions were enjoyed, after which
prizes were presented' and delec-
table refreshments served to mem-
bers and invited guests present.

APPRECIATION
The members of the American
Legon Auxiliary and Junior Auxili-
ary wish to thank everyone who
so wholeheartedly co-operated with
them on Poppy Day. Especially do
they wish to thank H. A. Kid f'or
allowing them to enter the office
of the paper mill and sell to the
employees, and The Star for the
.publicity given. Proceeds of Poppy
Day go to' aid our disabled World
War veterans.

"BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT
Born, Monday, May 27, 1940, to
Mr. and, Mrs. D. J. Norris of Port


St. Joe, a son.

Marc Fle-ischel of Shamrock and
B. E. Kenney are in New Orlean-
this week attending a business
*nieting of lur-ber mill directors..

Mr. and Mrs. Willard Gilbert an-
Lee "IcEachin spent Wednesday ir
Bonifay.

Mr. and Mrs. Roy Gibson and
daughters, the Misses Alice and
Amelia, and Miss Lunnette Ham-
mock returned Tuesday from
Barnesville, Ga., where they at-
tended the graduation exercises of
Gordon Military Academy. Roy
Gibson, Jr., who has been attend-
ing the academy, accompanied
them home.

Mrs. J. E. Rollins and daughter,
Peggy, returned Tuesday from Gor-
don, Ala., where they visited rela-
tives. Miss Louise Kennedy re-
turned with them for a visit of
several weeks.

Mr. and Mrs. C. G. Costin and
family returned Monday night from
Gulfport, Miss., where they at-
tended graduation exercises of the
Gulf Coast Military Academy. Their
son, Cecil, Jr., who is a student at
the academy, accompanieI them
home to spend the summer months.

Mrs. Frank Sharit returned t.
her home in Apalachicola Tuesday
after spending a week here as the
guest of her'son-in-law and'daugh-
ter, Mr. and Mrs. P. D. Farmet.


.I3 U U U U U U U U -U 35 U U U
SATURDAY, JUNE 1

2BIGSMASH2





_.sge- Muriel Evans
.-HITS e--
r~eT9IDCmLgND


LOUISE PLATT
DONALD WOODS
Wynne GilN Ro@lt.Annrirwa

"The PHANTOM CREEPS"
.. S*.** *
SUNDAY MONDAY
JUNE 2 AND 3

BING CROSBY and
GLORIA JEAN in

"If I Had My Way"

.^. *,.'.. S**** **
TUESDAY, JUNE 4

2BIGSMASH
HITS--


Also

JACK RANDALL

'The Cheyenne Kid'


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5


MRS. PYLE HONORS Mrs. Robert Bellows and son
SMALL DAUGHTER Bobby and Mr. and Mrs. J. L.
Honoring her daughter, Linda Sharit left Wednesday for a visit
Gale, who celebrated her third of several weeks in New York,
,birthday, Mrs. Otis Pyle enter- Washington and points in Vir-
tained a number of small friends ginia.
with a lawn party at her nome on *-
Long avenue yesterday afternoon. Mr. and Mrs. Hoke Larkin re-
Games were enjoyed after which turned Wednesday from Gaines-
ice cream and cake was served to ville, where they attended the
Jane Wells, Patricia Wilder, Bar- graduation exercises of the UnI-
bara Mitchell, Ruby Lee Farmer, versity of Florida.
Shirley Hudson, Joyce and Bobby
Campbell, Francis Jones, Jam es ii lllllll l llllllllll llllllllll
Navarre, Ralph McLahon, Leroy
Gainous, Janell Mayo and Ruthic
Coe. The honoree was the recipi-
ent of many dainty and attractive
gifts and happy birthday wishes.
Mrs. Joe Grimsley and Mrs. W.
M. Howell assisted Mrs. Pyle in
entertaining the youngsters.
TODAY ONLY!
MRS. JOE HAUSER
ENTERTAINS AT BRIDGE
Mrs. Joe Hauser entertained the A E
members of the Tuesday Bridge
club at her home last week. Cut


I


THE STAR, PORT-ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE FIVE


FRIDAY, MAY 31, 1940


0 T- --







PAGESIXTHE TAR POT ST JO, GLF CUNT, FLRID FRDAYMAY31,194


NEW BPITISH CHIEF


Claims Allowed

The following claims against the
ety of Port St. Joe have been
passed and ordered paid by the
board of city commissioners:
Water and Sewer Fund
Gulf Coast Properties ....$1300.00
Neptune Meter Co. ....... 180.00
St. Joe Paper Co. ........ 60.6s
Florida Power Corp. ..... 180.75'
Gulf Hardware Co. ...... 25.17
W. D. Dare .............. 1.50
City Treasury ............ 81.10
Gulf Oil Corp. ............. 2165,
General Fund
Jessie Darcey, Jr......... $136.9N
M. P. Tomlinson .......... 100.00
M. O. Freeman .............. 40.00
City Treasury ............. 20.00
City Treasury ............ 314A3
W D. Dare ............... 3.76
J. L. Sharit .............. 32.00
St. Joe Hardware Co. ..... 4.50
The star ................. 3.50
Cook Insurance Agency ... 10.00
Quality Grocery ........... 2.35
American. LaFrance Co. ... 52.06
Water Department ........ 15.88
R. W. Childers .............27.90
Florida Power Corp. ....... 56.6B
M. H. Edwards, Jr. ...... 14.10
The Sentinel ............. 2.00
St. Joe Motor Co. ........ 47.95
Standard Oil Co. ........... 78.71
Black Cat Cafe: ........... 12.74
B. W. Eells .............. 40.0.0
St. Joe Telephone Co ..... 20.833
St..Joe Telephone Co. ... 11.22
'V. F. Knight ............ 60.CO.
M. P. Tomlinson .......... 150-.0O
TW. D. Dare ............... 15000
.A.H. Matthews .......... 27.50
'W- B. Dyxes .............. 60.00
Zlseph -Badger ............ 40.00
John Fowler ...........'.... 40:0t,
E: Clay Lewis, Jr. ...... 25:00
Estelle Dickens ........... 15,00
B. W. Eells .. ............ 15.00
J. E. Bounds ............. 15.00
.J. .L. Sharit .............. 15.00

THEATER PLANS FOR
2ND ANNIVERSARY
TContinued fro- Page 1)
showing 70-ton prehistoric mon-
sters locked in mortal combat,
:nrd 6arrbh[iril:.- that rend the
ac-th.- This strrs Victor. Mature,
*Carole Landis and Lon Chaney, Jr.
Shirley Temorie will be seen FrI-
,day in her last-p' tmre, "The Blue
Bird," in technicolor, with Spring
Byington, Eddie Collins and Sybil
Jason. As an' added attraction on
the stage, Glenn Brown and his I=-
piece orchestra direct from the
-Belmont club in Miami Beach will
be seen. 'Dhey feature Miss Helen
Montgomery as vocalist. Following
the show they will play for the big
anniversary dance at the Centen-
nial auditorium starting at 11:00
o'clock. This dance is for all pa-
trons of the theater, will be abso-
lutely free, and everyone is cor-
dially invited
The Saturday program ends the
week's celebration with a smaTh-
ing two-hit show. "Bad Man from
Red Butte" and "A Chump at Ox-
ford." As the final hour of the cele-
bration begins, an anniversary owl
show will be held, starting at 11
p. m. with Boris Karloff in "The
?Man With Nine Lives."
DRAKE REAPPOINTED
H. A. Drake, who has been post-
master at Port St. Joe for the past
21 years, this week received notice
that he has been reappointed un-
dcer the Civil Service Act.of 1938.
LEGAL ADVERTISING
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA.
IN CHANCERY
CHARLES B. JO-HNSON, Plaintiff,
vs. DOROTHY B. JOHNSON, De-
fendant.
THE STATE OF FLORIDA:
To: DOROTHY B. JOHNSON, 5610
North Ashland Avenue, Chicago,
Illinois.
It is hereby Ordered that you
are required to appear on the first
Cay of July, A. D. 1340, before the
above entitled Court to the bill o0
Complaint filed against you in the-
above entitled cause, and "The
Star" is- hereby designated as the
newspaper in which this Ord'er
shall be published once a week for
four consecutive weeks.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said Court, this 29th day or
May, 1940, at Wewahitchka, in the
State and County aforesaid.
(Court Seal) J. R. HUNTER,
CIlerk Circuit Court,
Gulf .County, Florida.
E. CLAY LEWIS, JR.
Solicitor.ifor 'PlaiaitUfft 6-28


This soundphoto shows General
Sir John Greer Dill, newly ap-
pointed chief of the British im-
perial staff, replacing General
Ironside. As chief, Dill also be-
comes head of the B. I. F.
Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Hunt were
week-end visitors in Chipley.


SCOMPARTMTCLOCK
:xTI16 TINRS





GOOVICOMPARTMENT LOCK
WHERL BANDS OF
RUSTLESSS STEEl'


STUDENT CHAPLAIN TO
PREACH HERE SUNDAY
Rev. Hamilton West, student
chaplain of the Unversity of Flor-
ida, will preach Sunday evening at
8 o'clock at the Episcopal church.
Everyone. is cordially invited to at-
tend this service.
There will be no Sunday school
Sunday morning at the Episcopal
church.
BANK TO CLOSE MONDAY
S. L. Barke, cashier of the Flor-
ida Bank at Port St. Joe, an-
nounces that the bank will be
closed all day next Monday, June
3, in honor of Jefferson Davis'
birthday.
IMr. nnd Mrs. T. V. Westbrook
and daughter of Mobile were the
week-end guests of Mr. and Mrs.
Willard Gilbert and Mr. and Mrs.
W. M. Howell.

Mrs. C. E. Swank and Mrs. Hus-
ton of Panama City attended; the
meeting of the American Legion
Auxiliary last Friday night.

Miss Louise Solomon of Perry
spent Tuesday in the city with
friends.


SMITAl CHASSIS SPMINJ
ICOVERS--
73IUMfR GUARDS
TiilEAGfII t lDICATO',
TWO WINDSHlt Dii Wi
CIGA LIOHTRl:
TWO SUN VISORS
TWIN ASH TRAYS
,TWO TAIl LAMI!PS,


III I I '


PHONE 37

. PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


DuPONT INTERESTS
TAKE OVER MEADE
PAPER MILL STOCK

(Continued from Page Ij
ties and the Meade Corporation
have owned equal interests in
the St. Joe Paper company.
SDuring the past several month
respective collateral business, in-
terests have compelled the con-
sideration by both parties of the
advisability of one or the otheL
owning the entire stock of the
St. Joe Paper company. Eachl
party has given careful study
and due consideration to the
needs and future business re-
quiremencs of the other.
Finally, by amicable and m:-
tually satisfactory arrangement,


Gulf Coast Properties has ac-
quired 100 per cent interest in
the St.. Joe: Paper company.
Gulf Coast Properties, a Flor-
ida company, is a subsidiary of
the estate of the late Alfred I.
duPont.
No changes in policy or per-
sonnel; are contemplated, and it
is the simple desire-of those who
are responsible for the adminis-
tration of Mr. duPont's estate to
make Port St. Joe a good place
in which to work and live.
To the accomplishment of this
aim, we invite the counsel and
advice of every employee of the
St. Joe Paper company.
.Cordially yours,
Gulf Coast Properties,
W. T. EDWARDS,
Vice-President.


EE


MY DEEPEST APPRECIATION

I am deeply grateful -to those friends who cast their
ballots for me in the election, and I am especially
appreciative of the activity of the friends who
worked so vigorously for my election. I trust that
my service as County Judge will be such that I will
continue to merit their confidence and support.

J. E. PRIDGEON


THIS IS THE


To Trade for a Big NEW


ALL THIS EQUIPMENT
(usually costing extra on other low-prked cars)

INCLUDED IN THE LOW PRICES

OF THE DELUXE FORDi


WE'LL TRADE for any make car n
a new Ford V-8. Bring in the ear you're driving and
let's get together.

W E'LL GIV E you aber be mVa
you ever thought possible-MORE than you exp~ed."
Why waitlonger?

WE' oLL SAVE you moneyI see .
before you choose any newoar! MAKE IT TODAYI


PAGE SIX


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, MAY 31, t940


iCIi*~l~f~


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