<%BANNER%>

UFPKY NEH LSTA



The star
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00084
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: May 17, 1940
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00084

Full Text





The Star-Florida's fastest grow-
ing little newspaper-dedicated .to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St Joe.


T-E


SI rt t $7,soo00,0oo0
S uPont red's fast.
est growing Tff y. In
B the heart of the pine belt.
A --11, R".^^^^ H^M^f


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's .Futire Industrial Center
'-f


VOLUME III PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, MAY 17, 1940 NUMBER 32
'** .. .- ,


SUCCEEDS CHAMBERLAIN McPherson Resigns

., As School Principal


Cottondale After Five Years'
-Service Here


Winston Churchill, who last Fri-
day baecam.e "rime minister of
Great .Britan, succeeding Neville
Chamberlain
4-



To eHe faeIo f

Caw r ma's 2042-

-Everybody Extended In.vitation to
Visit Professis d erv-.
lee. Division Projects

"This Work Pays Your Commun-
ity" is the slogan under highh thgb
WPA Professional and -Service Dt-
vision will hold. "'Ape;o4Aqe''" in
Gulf county from May 20 through
May 25, and wipl lfe a period in
which every citizen will be ex-
tended an invitation to visit the
projects operating in the county.
Projects ($n ,ulf., puIty Include:
sew..g ropgs at Pprt St. Joe aad
Wewahitchka, the free libraries .in
this city and the county seat, and
the adult ducatipn program.
During the week the WPA pro-
gram carried .on under -the ,P.rrofs-
sional and Servle Division .will
be outlined, .the accomplishments
achieved related, and the operation
standard's maintaipe~ described.
The object of "This Work Pays
Your Commuinity" week is to allow
Sthe public opportunity to see the
Professional and Service projects
of WPA in action and to establish
a closer relationship with the citi-
zens of every community upon a
basis of the value of these projects
to the life of the community in
the way of production, preservation
of records, compilation of statis-
tics, assistance in health programs,
economic services .and in services
to all in the field of recreation,
.education and child welfare.
Dealing closely with community
and 'home life, the Professional
and Service Division of the WPA
presents many things of interest
to every citizen-things .that Flor-
ida residents should more fully
understand-and it is hoped that
everyone will take advantage of
the "open house" period to become
better acquainted with the program
carried on right at home by WPA
workers.

RENTAL LIBRARY OPENS
The St. Joe Rental Library was
opened this week by Miss Jose-
phine Grimsley at the LeHardy
Pharmacy. The library is carrying
all of the latest books by the best
authors and is doing a rushing
business.
---------
A board. of seven experts aids
the department of agriculture in
judging the purity, quality and fit-
ness. of tea imported into this.
country.


I~B~~I"%E~BI~'P


RULERS OF BELGIUM AND THE NETHERLANDS


n '




w.een Wilhelmina cf the Nethrrigndp, ~ho s. fled to England with
her famIly after the German invasion f h 'country, and King Leo-
oold of Belgigum, hno3e' country is putting up a stiff resistance
against the .invading German army, with the help of British and
FrAnch forJes.



Golf Course Seems



Assured for St. Joe
.,


'). G. McPherson, for the pas
I e years principal of the Port 6t
| schools, Wedn'esday resigned
h;. position to accept the principal
ship of the Cottondale schools.
The resignation of Mr McPher
'-:-! came as a surprise, as he had
been appointed by the school
loard to serve for the ensuing
lterm. He explained that the new
Iposit n paid a better salary aR
llhat tn school plant at CottondIe
wJs mo'e-compact, though not ein-
ploying as many teachers as the
Port St. Joe schools.
The loss of Principal McP person
will be keenly felt, as he has done
much in keeping the schools up to
high standards, and the many
friendss he has made during his so-
murn here will miss him.
,----

U, A gents Warn

S4Mnp Induistry

Near ,pestruntion

CoIW.l, Kjls Shrimp pnd Survivors
Are Spawning In Deep Water-
Wihere Fishing Unlimited

federal ,agts. yesterday arn ai;.
that the shrimp industry along the
east of,fopr southprp states, Norrni
ind South Carplina,- Georgla ano
Florida, faces destruction unless
nme!rgency .meP.ures are taken to.
protect .the spawning shrimp.
1Un~Uually cold weather killed
opf t.e shrimp last winter, it 'is;
explained, and the survivors now
are :..pawning in the deep waters
where fishing is unlimited. The
result will ie a complete loss ot
the shrimp industry, the federal
men warn, unless some agreement
is reached for control. They ex-
pressed the opinion that any such
agreement would have to be vol-
untary among the fishermen.

Candidates To Give

Free Pniic Monday

Public Is Invited to Beacon Hill On
May 27 to Enjoy Themselves
And Meet Officeseekers

Voters of Gulf'county are invited
to trek to Beacon Hill on Monday,
May 27-the day before the second
primary-to enjoy a picnic to be
provided by office-seekers of the
county. The affair will start at
noon and continue until?
This will be the last opportunity
for candidates and voters to get
together before the final runoff,
and it is anticipated that there
will be a large crowd on hand to
partake of the bounty of those
seeking elective office.
------t-- --
PIPELINE CREW BACK IN CITY
A pipeline crew arrived 'in the
city this week to continue work or
laying the gasoline pipeline down
First street from Baltzell avenue
to the waterfront. It is understood
that plans of the Southeasterri
Pipeline company call for two or
three large storage tanks to be lo-
cated on the dock fill.
--------
A schoolhouse built near Brigh-
ton, Fla., is the first school ever
built for Seminole Indians at their
own request.


W iI Be Built In

Escabhia County

S.'0ts to Secure $1,760,000 Loai
.rom Recqastryctlon Finance.,
-. i acpomatlqn '

PENSACOLA, May 16 .(FNS.)-
Work on Escambia county's ne.
paper mill, to be constructed at .
cost of .$2,000,000 by the Florida
Pulp and Paper company, will be-
gin about June 1 it was believed
this week by sources close to the
'development.
Senator Charles O. Andrews an-
nounced' in Washington that the
Reconstruction Finance Corpora.
tion had just made a conditional
commitment on a loan of $1,760,000
to the company. The money is to
be used in the development of a
forest project.
The U. S. Geological Survey has
also reported that the pumping of
8,000,000 gallons of water daily at
the Cantonment site would have
virtually no effect on that area's
underground water supply.
. The company, it is reported, will
own about 125 acres of timber
lands and will actually raise trees
for sale. Plans call for the con-
struction of a mill which will man-
ufacture fine paper, high grade
white wrapping paper, envelope
paper and writing and tissue pa-
per.
4r-
TUBERCULOSIS PICTURE
A free motion picture show on
tuberculosis will be shown Mon-
day night by the health depart-
ment which at the present time is
conducting a drive on the disease.
The film will be shown at 6 p. m.
at the colored Methodist church;
at the colored commissary at Ken-
nrey's mill at 7 p. m., and at the
main commissary at Kenney's mitl
at 8 p. m.
--_---C---


Option Taken -On Peninsula
Site By Group of Ten-
nessee Capitalists

W tILL .STRIT-SOON

'T" iject to Consist of 18-.Hle
S"ourse, Cluhopse, Piers
,APF Cottaes

County Judge Thos. R. L. Carter
yesterday informed' .The Star that
he had been in touch for som.
time with Tennessee capitalists in
regard to securing the St. Joseph
Peninsula across the bay from this,
city, as the site for a golf course,
and that these parties have now
secured an option on the necessary
land.
Mr. Carter stated that plans call
for the construction of an 18-hole
golf course, clubhouse, private resi-
dences, a pier for yacht anchorage
on the bay side of the peninsula
and a fishing pier out into th'e
Gulf, together with a boulevard to
connect with Highway 10 at Deau
Man Curve, nine miles south of this
city.
It is the plan of the developers,
said Mr. Carter, to start work this
summer if possible, in order to
have the project completed by the
coming winter.
The developers are desirous ot
securing any historical or unusual
facts connected with the peninsula
and anyone having any data of this
character is asked to send or leave
it with Mr: Carter.
This will mean considerable to
Port St. Joe and will give a recre
national area that will be of untold
benefit to the city and to GulI
county as a whole.
k- ---
JONES BUYS CLEANING PLAN
B. L. Kelly last week sold his
dry cleaning establishment on
Third street to Robert Jones of
Wetumpka, Ala., and the business
will be known as "Bob's Dry


Work of laying seven-foot con-
crete sidewalks on Fifth street
between Monument avenue and'
Park avenue was started this
week under the city-ivide WPA
project.


COMFORTER TO BUILD
A building permit wav issued
Monday at the city clerk's office
to Nick Comforter for construction
of a five-room residence on Six-
teenth street at a cost of $2500.


1
d


WORK STARTED ON LAYING Cleaners." Mr. Jones has had 1U
FIFTH STREET SIDEWALKS year's experience in the business,


Historical Society

To Meet Thursday

To Discuss Plans for Future Con-,
structive Work In and
For Gulf County

Rev. D. E. Marietta, president of
tll' Gulf County Historical society,
announced yesterday that the body
will meet in the community club-
house in Wewahitchka next Thurs-
day evening, May 23, for the pur-
pose of completing organization of
the society and to discuss plans
for future constructive work in and'
for Gulf county..
Until further notice, meetings ot
the society will be held alternately
in this city and WewahItchka.
All those Interested: in the for-
Smation of the organization are re-
quested to be present next Thurs-
day night.


Spessard Holland

Certain of Success

Gubernatorial Candidate is Taking
His Campaign, to the Peopi-
S A t Campaign 7

Some people are saying that the
leader in the first primary cannot
win in the second, pointing out
that in two previous gubernatorial
campaigns the -high men did not
win.
But Spessard Holland. points out
that in the two previous campaigns
the high men were caught at their
peak in the first primary while a
"dark horse" was coming up. "I'm
the dark horse this time," says
Hollan, ."and from the reception
I have been getting all along the
line, I'll reach my peak just about
May 28."
Holland declared that if the
"precedent" were long established
he might have some misgivings,
but As it is based upon but two
previous elections 1ie believes la
the old saying that "the third time
is the charm."
Holland says that he Is taking
his campaign to the people in the
second primary as he did in the
first for two reasons: First, be-
cause he wants to personally thank
as many as possible of his sup-
porters and greet as many as pos-
sible of his new supporters coming
;from the camps of eliminated can-
didates, and, second, because he
feels that the people are entitled
to see him and hear, first-hand, his
renewal of the pledge to give them
good, wholesome and progressive
government for the next four
years. ,
Supporters and county leaders
all over the state for Paty, Warren,
Barbee, Fraser, Walker and Burtoa
Schoepf are swinging over to Hol-
land.
"One of the outstanding fea-
tures about this move is the fact
that the newcomers ask for noth-
ing, want no trades or promises,"
said Holland. "They appear to feel
that I am next best to their first
love candidate. All they ask is that
I give them good clean and pro-
gressive government if I am elected
as governor."
----- ----C
PATROLMAN FOR DISTRICT
George Henry, new state patrol-
man assigned to this district, with
headquarters Blountstown, was
a visitor in Port St. Joe yesterday.
He stated that he will start a drive
immediately on headlights, and ad-
vises all motorists to check their
car lights now, before the drive
is made by the patrol.


New Pa 1P Mill


N










AG T T J G


Surprise Shower for
Mrs. Dick Dickerson
.Mrs. E. H. Horton, Mrs. John
Sowers and Mrs. Jack Samford
were co-hostesses Thursday after-
noon of last week at the home of
Mrs. Horton at a surprise showed.
for Mrs. Dick Dickerson. Spring
flowers were used to decorate the
home, which was opened ensuite
for the occasion.
Following the arrival of guests,
the honoree was presented with
dainty gifts, after which the hos-
tesses served sandwiches and tea
to Mesdlames Kelly Carter, J. M.
Smith, Joel Carr, Thos. McPhaul,
H. McKinnon, William Quarles, R.
Miller, Brooks Harrell, A. D. Law-
son, T. R. L. Carter, D. Roberson,
Tom Strickland, Duke Wellington
G. L. Kennington, F. M. Rowan,
Fred Curtis, William Allen, Ralph
Carter, R. Chism, T. M. Schneider,
Jim Perritt, C. H. Horton, Troy
Jones, Sammie Davis, George Mc-
Lahon, W. M. Howell, C. Gaut-
reaux, Tom Mitchell, T. Frary, T.
Hinote, T. Gragg, J. O. Davis, C.
Adams, Basil Kenney, Ming, J. E.
Taylor, B. J. Hull, H. C. Spence,
George Hudson, P. D. Prows, B. B.
Conklin, J. J. Darcey, R. R. Minus,'
G. W. Wright, Gus Creech, and B.
L. Kelly and Miss Myrtle Whitaker.

MAY DAY FETE HELD UNDER
-AUSPICES. OF WOMAN'S CLUB
The- May Day Fete held this
week at the Centennial. building
under sponsorship of the Port St.
Joe Woman's club, proved very in-
teresting.
The program opened with a se-
lection by the hi-g school band,
after which the oill parade was
held, with Sarah Harrell as win-
-ner. The Better Baby contest was
held, with winners 'i~ing Ani Ken-
ney, A-prize winner;: Jean Bragg,
.B-prize winner for girls, and for
boys Henry Clayton was winner.
The band presented another num-
ber, followed wito a patrol march
by the Boy Scouts and a May-pole
dance by the girls.
Iced drinks, sandwiches and
cake were sold, the proceeds to go
to the club treasury.

BAPTIST MISSIONARY
SOCIETY MEETS
The circles of the Baptist Mis-
sionary society held their regular
Bible study at the church Monday
afternoon. Preceding the study the
members of the Junior Girls' Aux-
iliary presented a dramatization
of the G. A. Hymn, "We've a Story
to Tell the Nation," with twelve
girls taking part. A short busi-
ness session was held, followed
with the Bible study, taught by
Mrs. J. F. Miller. The meeting was
dismissed by repeating the Mispah.

SUNBEAMS MEET
The Sunbeam class, with their
new leader, Mrs. Wilbur Wells,
met at the Baptist church Monday
afternoon. The regular program
was carried out after which they
were dismissed. The Sunbeams
have been reorganized and wil:
meet every first and fourth Mon-
day.

Dan Farmer has returned from
Headland, Ala., where he has spent
the past week visiting relatives.

Mrs. C. C. Taunton and children
spent last Sunday in Bristol visit-
ing her mother, Mrs. J. G. Howard.

Mr. and Mrs. Oros Miller ot
Blountstown were guests Sunday
of Mr. and Mrs. D. B. Dendy and
Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Miller.

Mr. and Mrs. Ned Patton of Jack-
sonville were week-end guests of
Mr. and Mrs. George Patton.
B. W. Eells was a business visi-
tor Saturday in Panama City.


Engagement of Miss
Nedley Announced
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Philip
Nedley of Apalachicola have an-
nounced the-engagement of their
daughter, Philippa Mary, to Henry
Goddard Bailey of Ocala, the wed-
ding to be an event of June 8
at St. Joseph's Hall, Apalachicola.
Miss Nedley is the youngest
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Nedley
and is a graduate of Chapman high
school, Apalachicola, and attended
Camp Roosevelt in Ocala. She Is
a popular member of the younger
set in Apalachicola and has many
friends in Port St. Joe to whom
this announcement will be of in-
terest.

Girl Scout Investiture
Ceremony Today
The Girl Scout investiture cere-
mony will be held in Port Inn Park
this afternoon at 6 o'clock. Should
inclement weather prevent the
ceremony from being held in the
open, it will take place in thl
lobby of'the Port Inn.
This is a big moment in the lives
of these Girl Scouts and all friends
of the young ladies are cordially
invited to attend the ceremony.

METHODIST CIRCLE ONE
MEETS WITH MRS. SMITH
Circle No. 1 of. the Methodist
Missionary society met Monday af-
ternoon at the home of Mrs. W. R.
Smith on Eighth street, for a con-
tinuation of their Mother's Day
theme. A short business session
was held followed by a song and
the devotional.
The following program was pre-
sented: Poem, "Somebody's Moth-
er," by Mrs. W. P. Smith; talk on
Mother's Day by Mrs. Witt; ppem,
"When Ma Loses Her Specs," by
Mrs.' A. M' Jones, after which re-
freshments were served to Mes-
dames M. L. Fuller, C. C. Taunton,
R. A. Costin, T. H.- Stone, A. M.
Jones, Witt and H. C. Spence.

METHODIST CIRCLE NO. 3
IN MEETISG MONDAY
-Circle No. 3 of the Methodist
Missionary society met Monday a>-
ternoon at the home of Mrs. Jesse
Bradbury for their regular monthly
Bible -study, with Mrs. Bra:dbury
in charge. After the study a dlb-
cussion was held, followed with a
short business session. Punch and
cake was served to members pres-
ent during the social hour.

MADDOX-PRIDGEON
Mr. and Mrs. Edd. Pridgeon of
Wewahitchka are asnouncing the
marriage of their daughter, Minnte
Ola, to William Maddox of this
city. The wedding took place oh
March 29 in Wewahitchka.

Dr. and Mrs. A. L. Ward were
week-end visitors in Tampa.

Miss Margaret Blount of Geneva,
Ala., is the guest of her brothel
and sister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs.
John Blount.

Mr. andi Mrs. Robert Buckles
have returned to their home in
Kissimmee after spending sevei'at
days here with Mr. and Mrs. Thos.
R. L. Carter and family.

Mrs. Dell Mahon returned Tues-
day afternoon to Thomasville, Ga.,
after spending the day in the city.
She has. been in Thomasville at the
bedside of her husband, Dell Ma-
hon, who' is very ill but slowly im-
proving.

Mrs. W. S. Smith and Mrs. J. A..
Christmas spent Monday in Cot-
tondale.
Miss Katherine Smith of Martl


Society Personals Churches

LANETA DAVIS, Editor


Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Sisemore ot
Amarilla, Texas, are the guests or
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Sisemore.


FLOWERS AND

CORSAGES


Mrs Sammie Davis
Hostess to J. A. M. Club
Mrs. Sammie Davis was hostess
to members of the J. A. M. club
Monday evening at her home on
Eighth street. Baskets and vases
of roses were used. in decorating
the spacious living room where the
guests were entertained. Contests
were enjoyed, after which appro-
priate prizes were presented to
Mrs. Onnie Lou LeHardy and Mrs.
L. Gainous, high, and Mrs. J. A.
Connell and Mrs. Ed. Pridgeon,
low. At this time Mrs. C. E. Boyer
was presented with a shower ot
gifts from the club members.
Refreshments of jello topped
with whipped cream and cherries,
angel food cake, pound cake,
cheese and, iced tea were served
to Mesdames Ed. Pridgeon, C. E,
Boyer, A. D. Lawson, J. M. Smith,
H. A. Drake, L. Perritt, L. Gain-
ous and J. A. Connell, and Miss
Myrtice Coody. Invited guests were
Mrs. Onnie Lou LeHardy, Mrs. 3.
E. Rollins, Mrs. Philip Lovett and
Mrs. Elizabeth O'Day.

TUESDAY BRIDGE CLUB
MEETS WITH MRS. LeHARDY
Mrs. Frank LeHardy entertained
the members of the Tuesday Bridge
club at her home on Fourth street
this week. The porch and living
room'of the home were beautifully
decorated with cut flowers and
two tables were placed for play.
After several progressions and the
tallying of scores, prizes were
awarded to Mrs. W. L. Bragg,
high, Mrs. W. A. Wood, second
high, and Mrs. J. Hauser, -cut.
Frozen salad, saltines. cake and
tea weie served by the hostesCs to
Mesdames Hauser. Bragg, Wood,
W. M. Howell, P. D. Farmer, Roy
Williams and Carl Armstrong.

MRS. SHARIT ENTERTAISS
METHODIST CIRCLE 2
Mrs. J. L. Shirit entertained the
members of Circle No. 2 of the
Methodist Missionary society Mon-
dayafternoon at her home on the
beach drive. The meeting opened
with prayer by the circle chairman,
Mrs. Charles Brown, followed by
reports from chairmen. Mrs. Ben
Dickens was in charge of the pro-
gram and presented to the circle
"The Life of Rebecca," after which
a social hour was enjoyed.

FREE LIBRARY OPENS
It was announced this week by
Miss Alma Baggett, who is in
charge, that a free library has
been opened in the Sentinel office.
This is an NYA project, a branch
of the Wewahitchka library. All
children under the age of 12 must
have their parents sign for them
for the first books.

Mrs. Harold Palmer has returned
home after spending four weekly
in Panama City as relief operator
for the Western Union company.

Mr. and Mrs. T. A. Saunders of
Nashville, Tenn., are the guests of
their son and daughter-in-law, Mr.
and Mrs. H. H. Saunders.

Mr. and Mrs. Miles Hurlbut have
returned from Birmingham, Ala.,
where they spent several days
with relatives.

Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Drake werb
week-end visitors in Marianna. the
guests of Mr. and Mrs. T. Yancey.

Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Larkin re-
turned Monday from Bristol and
Quincy, where they spent several
days.

Mr. and Mrs. Elgin Bayles and
sons, Elgin, Jr., and Tommy, were


Penny Singleton and Arthur
Lake as they appear in "Blondie
Brings Up Baby," playing Tuesday
at the Port theater. Second feature
on the program is Russell Hayden
and Victory Jory in "The Light of
Western Stars."


anna was the guest Tuesday of the week-endi guests of Mrs. Nora ------
Mr. and Mrs. Philip Lovett. Howard. Save by reading the ads!


Mrs. Claude Adams Is
Honored With Shower
Mrs. P. D. Prows, Mrs. Howara
McKinnon and Mrs. E. H. Horton
were co-hostesses at a shower
yesterday afternoon at the home
,of Mrs. McKinnon honoring Mrs.
Claude Adams. An attractive ar-
rangement of spring flowers decor-
ated the home, which was opened
ensuite. Two contests were ei_-
joyed, after which the honoree wan
presented with many dainty gifts.
Refreshments of lemonade, sand-
wiches and cookies were served to
twenty guests.

CAROLYN BAGGETT HOSTESS
TO GIRLS' AUXILIARY
Carolyn Baggett entertained the
members of the Intermediate Girls'
Auxiliary of the Baptist church at
the home of her parents on
Seventh street. The meeting was
opened with the G. A. Hymfi and
prayer followed, led by Mrs. J. 0.
Baggett. Mrs. J. W. Sisemore,
leader, conducted the devotional.
Members taking part on the pro-
gram were Gwendolyn Spencer,
Virginia Pridgeon and Carolyri
Baggett. Mrs. A. E. McCaskey, W.
M. S. president, gave an interest-
ing talk on Mother's Day, and Mrs.
E. C. Cason talked to the girls on
"Focus Week," after which the
meeting ,was dismissed.


M* GliEOllllllillllill l l-oii llilli l .iliiliii llll
MRS. GORE HOSTESS TO
THURSDAY BRIDGE CLUB
Mrs. George Gore was hostess toB. A
the Thursday Bridge club last week BIGSMASH
at her home on Long avenue. A










C u rt i s dg B ri d g a 3 M E S Q U I T E ERli
profusion of spring flowers were
used in decorating thd living room













rMissMMargarets PeHOTd edaug- D y I-
play. After. several progressions
prizes were awardedto Mrs. B.. SATURDAY, MAY18
Pridgeon, high, and Mrs. Fred Cur- B IG S M H
tis, *cut. Refreshments were served, H I T S
to the members and two invited
guests Mra. Mira and Mrs.:Fredting HIT NO.
Curtis.H N



Miss Margaret LeHardy, daugh- '
ter of Mr. and Mrs. C. A. LeHaray, ays NTOMC
Sr.,, and Gordon Thomas of this
city were married Sundiay at the" A 1 s o
home of Judge Thos. R. L. Cartei-
who performed the ceremony in I1~
the presence of a few close friends
and relatives of the contracting
parties.
This young couple is popular in
Port St. Joe and the congratula- 'The PHANTOM CREEPS"
tions of their many friends is ex-
tended, together with best wishes 4* tf C ** ** **
from The Star. SUNDAY MONDAY
MAY 19 and 2
MRS. J. B. GLOEKLER
HOSTESS TO CLUB THE HIGHWAY TO HAPPINESS!
Mrs. J. B. Gloeckler entertained ymfar Mf
the members of the Thursday OAD SINGAPOR
Bridge club yesterday at her home
on Sixth street. Several progres- Ii in r
sions were enjoyed after which
high and cut prizes were awarded: News Color Cartoon
The hosttss served delicious r*- 0* 0 4t- -.4.4 O* 4,0 #
freshments to members and in-
vited guests presest. TUESDAY, MAY 21
BIGSMASH2
A citizen told a detective that 2 -
he couldn't trail an elephant H I TS -
across a vacant lot after a heavy HIT NO. 1
snow storm. T T

AT PORT TUESDAY ,. SINGLETON LAKE


Il~n~j2~~Blrnunllr~isulslslllli~t~


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE TWO


FRIDAY, MAY 17, 194v-


WOOD FIBRE FLOWERS

that cannot be told from the
best product of Mother Nature.
And they keep indefi-
nitely. If they'become droopy
you merely place them in the
refrigerator and in. a brief time
they are as good as new.
SEE

Mrs. W. S. Smith
STAR OFFICE PHONE 51







RIAMAY1- 1940 THESTA.PRT.T..OE.GUL.CONTY


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla.,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year........$2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months..........65c

--f Telephone 51 ,S-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.'

EUROPEAN WAR IS TOSS-UP
The way Germany is taking her objectives
it looks like a toss-up as to whether the Al-
lies or the Nazis will come out victorious.
Anything may happen.
And that situation should cause the United
States to consider what steps must be taken
against the event of a sweeping victory by
the dictators, which would put all of Europe
firmly under the heels of Hitler, Mussolini
and Stalin.
It is apparent that sentiment in this.coun-
try is heavily in favor of expanding our armed
forces as rapidly as possible. At the same time
it is equally apparent that we have no fixed
military policy, and that no one really knows
just how strong we must become in the -light
of the strength of possible enemies. One
school of thought holds that if Hitler wins,
America will be faced with the potentiality of
immediate military and economic invasion.
The great conquerors of the past have
never stopped-they have gone on' until, like
Alexander, they dominated the world, or, like
Napoleon, came to a Waterloo. Their past
successes, in other words, breed future cam-
paigns. And the very fact that their people
are hungry and exhausted makes it necessary
for the mto force their armies on, in search
of new resources and new victories.
On the other hand, some believe that the
victor in the present war will be so worn out
that it will take' generations before its ener-
gies can be sufficiently renewed ,to make more
campaigns possible.
Irrespective of who is right in this contro-
versy, it seems certain that military expan-
sion will go on here. Japan has a navy almost
on a parity with ours, and reports indicate
that Germany has fighting planes against
which our best planes would be inadequate,
'And there can be no question as to the weak-
ness of the American army. It woefully lacks
anti-aicraft guns, tanks and other essentials,
according to the army high command itself.
The trouble is that we have not decided
upon any fixed defense program-and it is
obvious that the kind of army and navy and
air force needed to defend our shores is vastly
different from the kind we would need to de-
fed the far-flung Philippines, or to again send
an A. E. F. to Europe.
In an election year, with both parties try-
ing to win the voters by any possible means,
there is little chance of a program being de-
fined-in all probability, it will remain as
vague and indecisive as it is at present and
if we do have to go to war countless thou-
sands of the young men of our land will lay
down their lives due to this unpreparedness,
just as they did in 1918. The subject is too
full of political dynamite to appeal to the of-
fice-seekers-it is easier and safer to simply
talk in general terms of national defense.

OUR NEXT GOVERNOR
Maybe we didn't pick our U. S. senator, but
we sure hit the nail on the head when we
picked Spessard Holland as the logical man
to fill the governor's chair. And the main
reason why we picked Spessard from the field
of eleven candidates was because when we
talked with him and studied his platform -we
knew that he was sincere and honest in


everything he said and stood for, and that he
had the best interests of Florida at heart.
H-e doesn't want to be governor just to be
governor; he has certain standards and ideals
which he believes, if put into effect, will
create a state government which will com-
mand respect-a government that is honest,
liberal, efficient, economical, wholly non-
sectional, and soundly democratic.
Holland's past record speaks for itself-he
stands for all that is best for the state of
Florida, and we of Gulf county should stand
solidly behind him and his ideals when we go
to the polls on May 28.

WE AIN'T MAD AT NO ONE
The following letter from George L. Burr,
Jr., campaign manager for Governor Fred P.
Cone in his race for the United Stats sen-
ate, expresses the sentiments of the editor ot
The Star to a T:
"I have just made a great discovery. O0
course, my friends have intimated it to me for
years, my father and mother .lad warned
me, and numerous persons .had advise
against being too trusting in placing my af-
fecti6ns;. but just now have I discovered
what. a fickle dame Politics really is.'
"You just can't trust her.. She. will desert
pld and tried friends for the first dashing
caballero who comes along.. Here Charlie,
"Socker," Doc and Uncle Fred.were having a'
nice friendly time a courfif" hiere, and every-
thing was goin' along just "sweIl. Charlie was
squirin' her around with" courtly manner,
Jerry was promising' to give-her pa and ma
$200 a month so that they could live in a
style to which they were unaccustomed,
"Socker" was -croonin' the sweetest love
songs, and Uncle ,Fred was the old depend-
able friend of-the family who did the work,
took all the cussings, and kept enough .money
in the exchequer to pay the bills.
"Then down comes a dashing and gay
caballero from the North, a Yankee dressed
up in good old Southern style-and driving' an
airplane. And, boy, did he take her for a
ride! She dropped Uncle Fred so she could
devote the time she had been spending' with
him to slidin' down rosy clouds with the man
with the flyin' machine. Of course she hung'
on to Charlie because she kinda liked 'his
grand and courtly style, and she' sort kept
Jerry hangin' around 'cause she just ain't.
been able to make up her mind about what
she's goin' to be able to do with pa and ma.
"She's gotta make up-her mind pretty soon
whjch one of these two lucky guy's she's
gonna marry; and when she does, Uncle Fred
and all of us folks will attend the weddin'.
We ain't mad with no one; and while we
may heave a sigh or two, we'll be the first
ones in line to kiss the bride. After all, she
has been nice to Uncle Fred and the rest o
us in years gone by, and we're all grateful
for past favors. And anyway, tomorrow is
another day, and was gotta save up some-
thing to worry about then."

WE'LL PARK WITH MAYS
We stuck with G. Pierce-Wood in the pri-
mnary congressional race because we believed
he was the best man for the job. He has been
eliminated and the runoff will be between i
Parkhill Mays and Boy Sikes. We'll park I
with Parkhill in the second primary.
And the reason for this is that Parkhill
Mays, reared in this district, and knowing c
well the people and their problems, is an ag- r
gressive, likeable, honest, upright and truth- i
ful sort of a person, and that kind of a duck,
in our opinion, is what we need in Washing- c
ton to replace Millard Caldwell who is the c
same type of person and who served this dis- c
trict well. f
Parkhill's daddy before him served as con-
gressman from this district for two terms,
and the young man is a chip off the old block i
c
Did you know that the annual interest bill i
on the federal debt is currently about $1,100,- a
300,000? This is a sizable sum even in these c
days of billion-dollar appropriations. y

Keep smiling! r


PLOPII


The Story of
rO__ i


S uobercu1os1i

Health Department Director Tell.
How Dread Disease Gets
Its Start'

By DR. R. J. LAMB
Health Department Director
Tuberculosis is caused by a liv
ing germ called the tubercle .ba
cillus. This.germ is so small thai
it can be carried into the body or
particles of dust or from sneezing
or coughing of some positive tu
berculosis patient. They' are so
small that more than 1000 can pass
through a pinhole. They may live
for several hours in moist sputum
and may resist drying .or freezing
for some time, but .once .they gel
in the body they multiply rapidly.
The germ enters the human
body in numerous ways. Careless
people spit on the floor and side-
walk. Germs may be in their spu.
tum, dried with the dust, and
be blown about and inhaled by
passers-by. Children play on dirty
floors and on the 'sidewalks. They
get the germs on their hands and
transferred inside their system.
Germs may also be transferred on
spoons, drinking cups, whistles,
pencils, pipes, etc., and the next
person using any infected article
may get the germ. These are some
of the ways in which tuberculosis
may be transferred.
No one knows just how many
cases are developed. The more im-
portant is the direct contact. For
instance, a tubercular person care-
essly coming in direct contact
with other persons in numerous
ways, may spread the .disease.
This is why it is so important to
find these cases early and take all
precautionary measures, against in-
fecting some healthy person.
It is well for every person to go
to their family physician regularly
and have a complete physical
checkup, for the usual 'danger sig-
lals of tuberculosis is tiredness,
ndigestion, loss of weight, a
chronic cough that hangs on in
.pie of all your efforts, and any
;hest pains that you cannot ac-
:ount for. Any of these -shocld be
hlecked by your family physician,
or tuberculosis is like a thief in
he night. We must, therefore, be
in the lookout for this enemy.
Few people are worried by feel-
ng a little tired occasionally or a
constant lazy feeling with possibly
indigestion, coughing, night sweats
nd loss of eight.
Tuberculosis is curable if dis-
overed early if you will consult
your physician early.
The Franklin-Gulf County Health
departmentt is putting on this tu-


The Low Down
from
Willis Swamp

Editor The Star:
.You see people rushin' up and
down the country-in a lather-
about our migrant problem, and
trying' to tell us why it happened
and how dreadful it is-and how to
c -e it.
If you was to take 'ei too seri-
ous, you would get the idea that a
spring zephyr, and, some dust was
somethin'- brand new-somethin'
just invented-F-soniethin' terrible.
You might 'get the idea that the
wind just ups and.. blows people
right smack out of Kansas "'aia
Oklahoma and clear into sunny
California.
From the Dust Bowl to the Rose
Bowl, you might '.say, 1f you was
comically inclined. I've been 'round
Kansas and Oklahoma, and the
better you're acquainted and the
more you know about these places
the less you know about a Dust
Bowl.
But people have got to be
elected-and lots of Things are con-
coctedL But it's like pokin' 'round
in a beehive-you can always di-
vert a few, and anybody who hag
been 'round a disturbed bee know
that it only takes a few to start a
problem.
Yours with the low down,
,JO SERRA.


Lodge Notices

Order of Eastern Star
Meets on second and fourth
Tuesday of each month in the
Masonic hall, over postoffice. Visi-
tors who are members are cor-
dially invited to be present.
American Legion
Gulf County Post 116 meets the
first and third Mondays of each
month at the Legion Hut.
Masonic Lodge
St. Joe Lodge 111 meets second
and fourth Friday nights at 8:30
o'clock in Masonic hall.
American Legion Auxiliary meets
fourth Friday of month, 8 o'clock,
at Legion Hut.

Send The Star to a friend.

berculosis drive for the month of
May so that we may. be instru-
mental in being of some assistance
to the local physicians -and help
find some of these early cases, and
every person should' co-operate
with their physician and the health
department.


FRIDAY, MAY.17, 1940


THE STAR, PORT- ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE THREE


S







PAG....... THE TA, O, S. JE UFCUTY LRDRDAMY1,14


State conservation agents have
the same, or even greater, author-
ity than a sheriff as an enforce-
ment officer, and they may arrest.
with or without a warrant.


LemonR Ju1ice ~eGipe Checks
RheuImatic Pain Quickly
If you suffer from rheumatic arthritis
or neuritis pain, try this simple inexpen-
sive home. recipe that thousands are using.
Get a package of Ru-Ex Compound today.
Mix it with a quart of water, add: the
juice of 4 lemons.. It's easy. No trouble
at all and pleasant. You need only 2
tablespoonfuls two .times a day. Often
within 48 hours -.sometimes overnight -
splendid results are obtained. If the pains
do not quickly leave and if you do: not'
feel better, Ru-E .will cost you nothing to
try as. it is, sold..by your druggist under
an absolute money-back -guarantee. Ru-Ex
Compound is for sale and recommended by
MILLER'S DRUG STORE
Port St. Joe, Fla.


R 0,0 AND ,

BOA R D
BY THE .
4no
WEEK. .: *.*

Diping Rqom

SOpen to the Public
SClub Breakfast, 6 to 9....25c
L Lnch, 12' to 2 ..........35c
SDinner-6 -to 8 .........35c


; RS. M. O. FREEMAN
CPrn&r*'Reid ~ve:-anid 3rdSt:.
S(Griffln Grocery Building.
* !' -' *



o ART
PROJECT .
MAKES COLOR

PORTRAITS

OF CHILD PICTURES
FREE
This oftr is one oft hbe mat remark.
able ever made. We'D seadl.. am .
beautifully, hand-co:ord-ii-oil-paint
cIrgen),et-of;ay. picture wy" tram,&
enlarged. Yea. azy snapshot, sy A-
vorite Pictur you'd like rnlared and
i hand-colored. k gte ealwge"enta slil|
be size 5z7. They will p mquapd on
high quality. doublevwbitea waM -At -
ings Iize 7x9. To duplicate sch m, -
enlargement, i ad- collored.-iloil
Sprint, woqld, cpat yo fromiU.U2,to
$3.00 in any photographic.LAg r, To
get this enlargement youM pay eol s5c
for the enlargeqent. Lad atin.hapdn ~
painting ,Ul be done witbpat rhlee.
Simply send a .print o aCLatieof
your favorite iKM0uM 4aSfir .Y
in eoln. That's all you do and promptly
by mail you II rTcerve.your haadol.--
ored-in-ol enrlargepent. end toer.to ,
ART EDITOR
COOPERATIVE FEATURES, INC.
360 N. Michigan Av., (-hW e iIcg IL


Baby Carrots creamed In Mushroom Sauce, with special spring garnish
make a delightful qhang6 f9r springtime meals.


Left's Lookk atr


SPRING VE- TABLE s
by D orqjty Greig


IN cooking (as in almost eiv
"Whihy' she would d
able be clike i ii irdge `u -d
hi a generatit&iti tt~
shamefully, Grannie's e b1s
were a miracle otflayor 'Be stingy
with trvter d'rd"nerosb vltb but-
ter," she would admonish. It Is still
good advice. There are other flavor
hints for vegetables,' toot .-"
Have you, for Instapce. ever
droppedia'llce'-f onilon aild t pAce
. of butter into the -seam cup of
water that's boiling peas? Or sai-
nnered carrots hn canned con.
'keommV? Or served cdoke f celery
e with tomato sauceT Or vhipef up'
Soaked potatoes with grated cheese,
refilled the shelrs and alld them
back'Into the' bvdi for 'd"minute
tor two -
And speaking of carrots, here's
a,, idea'for them you'll like:.. ,
Basby Carrot with Creamed
Mushro6b" Satie'. 'prln~ GarhIth
is-2 l M fAI &rrts '
1 teaspoon maIlt' iJrrr r
1 can condensed cream of mushroom
Ili sou p I -. ""' -*" '
cup mlk..
Scrape the baby carrots and leave
them diltb. Co6Wf" bbilft f milt
:water urtll tendere, 'aiout lu f tmI
Sntel. '-Then draln~- pmt'e the
cream 'df misBhrbom soup into a
sauceir~t' miz well: tep' .tf''itheb
milk tal'11il L "-T r te ffWLfo6
Ssauce'bVer.the t iiot'ibnd,'heai B-4
minutes. Turn _the carrots Into-'a
vegetable dishb and alinkle the
sprlng"'garitfh ofie the'carrots.
**' > 5tL.> 1. i !- 4 J1 '' *
The value of buildings, in the
London metropolitan area has been
estinrfat.d at around. $12,500,60,000.


I'LL TUNE -,. Dois.- THAT'S THE MOST
OUT THE IMPORTANT THING
ALKA- YOU'LL HEAR TONIGHT
SELTZER
'ANNOUNCEMENT
...' s \),.'.." I 1"- ,_,


I\ p\ese, V- .
MILLIONS suffer less from Headache, Acid Indigestion, Dstress
of Colds "Morning After" and'Muscular Fatigue because they
have heard--and, bellevedr-Alka-Seltzer radio announcements.
'To these millions, the relief obtained by the use of Alka-Seltzer
is worth far more than the genuine enjoyment they get from the
broadcasts.
The most important parts of our radio program, both to you and
to us, are the commercial announcements. Once you have tried
Alka-Seltzer we believe you will agree with us.
But try Alka-Seltzer because it is an unusually effective medi-
cine not because you enjoy the radio programs. ''
TeWHY ALKA-SELTZER IS SO EFFECTIVE
,The pain-relieving analgesic in Alka-Seltzer is in complete solu-
tion, ready to ease the distress as soon as you swallow it. The
painrelieving action is made more effective by alkaline buffers.
The alkalizing elements in Alka-Seltzer reduce excess stomach
S,,... 'acidity.- .- .
'' -Get Alka-Selzer the next time yo,
7' pass a drug store.;
SLarge 609
Small package 30
Try a glass of Alka-Seltzer your
."Drug Store Soda Fountain.


ing) Gr annig was arebe.
6t4lt pase ard other vege-
Sof' vatier- 'Why: Indeed!
and mistreated. egetables


.Sprng tarftWi .'..
12 ablespoo biedp.
tops. "ery nc fSr9pp5P'",,
2 radishes.'tlced "er' tin
SMix ;he --qhoppe4: .paral and
chIVes (or Pnuel hopp9 'green.,
onlqn tops) ad i pinkle ovr th T
"Baey~.Carrots,.wIthCreamUB()L ,
room S'auce" and garnish iththe
radish alices'Serveh 4 dr'5.
Asparagus Is another spring
vegetable that can be mhade.,eveh'
mor delicloua ,wlI ,a wopq gl ,.,
sauce-
Fresh Asparagus with
MushroemPiPri5lth(; juee
I bunch frekh 4aR5p. I
To coo"w~lole:'tl loosely in a
banqh zt 1to ..rapidly Xp ,olllng.
salt water .d qok,, upoverd,
102d nliftesoi until ten er. Lit
bunol trop kttlle, raln, .erve':.ht.
stal, arran og8 pabrsW
pourpidt e~r di etIF. '
Miltroomn-Pi anto .Booae:.
'1 ct B condepus'l Ot! ir9l-
4 cup milk -
-I ounces bi hto these
Str 'i e de ,
cra8m o miinr ( d tI





Exciti Tg Thiitp

Is Dramatized. In

SOf ce and Men'

Picture at Port Theater Wednesday
Tells Life Story..qf.Migrar
tory Workers.

Brunette tressed Betty Field
plays the role of Mae, the heroine
of "Of ,Mice and Men," playing
Wednesday at the, Port theater.
Co-starred with ,Betty are Bur-
gess Meredith and Lon Chaney,
Ji'. In :the supporting cast are
Charles Bickford, Bob 'Steele and
Noah Beery, Jr.
i..The story dramatizes the life ot
migratory workers. on Aguora
Ranch in California,.It highlights
the careers of two men; shows the
hopes,and dreams, the drama and
tragedy,, the humor and pathos or
these central figures; it details.
ranch life and its vast implications
for those humans who go from job
to job on the path to nowhere.


Card of Thanks
To all those who so ardently
supported me and gave me the
very generous vote in the May 7th
Primary, I wish to express my
deepest gratitude and sincere ap-
preciation, Although. I did not win
in the race, I still appreciate the
trust that you imposed in me when
-.soymany of you cast, your ballots
Sfor me, as your commissioner.
'" THOMAS E. GRINSLADE,
District No. 4.


Exporters Lose to

Apalachicola 2to 1

Kenney Mill Aggregation .Drops
Fast Game to Oystermen to
Go to Fourth, Place

The Kenney Mill Exporters from
Port St. Joe dropped a fast game
Sunday to the Apalachicola team
of the Gulf Coast League by. a 2
'to 1 score. The game was played
at Apalachicola. Both teams were
in exceptionally fine fettle and but
one error against each was chalked
up during the tilt.i
The Oystermen made one run in
the first inning and the second, in
the fifth,, holding this .ead ,,until,
the ninth ..inning, when the Ex-
porters .made. their score.
The box ,score follows:
BOX,,SCORE
Exporters AB ,Sl,H: P.O :A E
Lane, 2b ....... 4 0. 1 1, 2 0
Wa3trs,,sas ... 3 1 2. 2, 4 1
I. McLeo4,,.bp .,.,3 0 0 2 1 0

Blhbray,, c .. 4 0, l. 8 0 0.
Loftin lb .'.. 3 0 O 9 0 01
Jones,lf .. .... 0 0..0,.1, 0,
Johaseon,.lif.... 2 0 0 0- 0 0
Tbharpe, rf ... 3 0 0 0 0
Gibso.,,...p 1 0- 0, 1 0
Gunter......... 2 0 0 0 1 0


* Totals., ....
Apaljohlqp~a,.,
Burke, ,Abi.",,,.
J, Rusel, s s.,.,
'A. Adams, ,lI -..
9boo1woOth, cf..
B. Rpseell,, .p
-Richards, ,lb...-,
Meyers, h,.....
Maxwell, c ....
Kimbrough, gft ..
.Counts, ;rf ..

Total .....


29 .1,. 4 24. 9,1
AB: R HTPQ A'E
4 llV I"' 3" 10
,4 ,0 0 0- 2 0-
4 Ov O0 O 0 0
5 0,- 4.," 3f 0r 0

5 0' 1 9" 0 0
2 0 1 1 2 1
2 0-1 12 1- 0
2 0 0.0 ,0i,0
1 0- 0, OA 0 0

32 2 9 27 12' 1


RESULTS OF S.UNRAY'S GAMAS
- Apalachicola, 2; Eaporplis,,lr;. .
n Carrabelle.15:; Port St Joe, .,,
, Panama 'City,.7; Wewahitchka, 5.

Exportef' .pafttina -Aerages ..
Player G AB R H Pct.
l'ilbray'. .........4 14.) 6 7.i .5Q0
C. McLeod ... 1 '4 2 A 2 .500
J'altqys ...... 4 1 6 6 6..37P
Jones........... 3 11 1- 4 .363
Odom ......... 3 13 4- 4 ..308
I-ne ........... 4 17 5 5 .291
i. McLeod ..i.*.. 4 18-t 3';'5 -'.278


,- uniteF i .-. .. ...
C. Johnson .....
P. Johnson ...,


3 9..,
2 -6
4 13


Tharpe,.;, .... 1 2 7
'tbfttin. ........ 10,
Gardner ........ 1 4
Gibson- .......... 2 1
Schail. .,.. ... 1 0
Loss of .Sunday's game
Kenney aggregation in


sition; Carrabelle leads
unbroken record of win


1 .,:2 .222
0 1 .167
4 2 ,.154
0 1 .143
0' 0 -.000
0 0 .000
0 0..000
0 0 .000
placed the
fourth po-
s with an
S. ,


Sunday's Games
Apalachicola vs. Port St. Joe.
Carrabelle vs. Wewahitchka.
Exporters vs. Panama .City.
Next Wednesday's Games
''Wewahitchka vs. Apalachicola.
Panama City vs. Carrabelle.
Exporters vs. Port St. Joe.
The last-named club in each in-
stance is the home club.


Appreciation
To .the Voters of Gulf County:
Please accept my, most sincere
thanks for placing in me your trust
and confidence by nominating me
for the office of Superintendent ot
Public Instruction of Gulf County.
I am most grateful for the. honor
you have shown me, and will en-
c'eavor to discharge the duties of
the office to the very best of my
ability. I want you all to feel. free.
to come to me at any, time with
any problems that might arise In
connection with the schools of
Gulf County. You.will always find
me ready, and eager,to do anything
in my power to improve our
schools.
Sincerely yours,
TOMMY OWENS.


Star adsget results

1llllllllllllll'lll11111111111111111111111111111111Ill!lllllllllllll


DRI.J, C. COE
--.D E N T I ST --
Offic Hlours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sundays-By Appointment
Costing BJdgi .,. Port-St. Joe



EYES EXAMINED


Glasses fitted when; needed.
Made In Our Own Laboratory
All Work Unconditionally
Guaranteed'-4'
OfficeHop.ur; 9a. m.- to 6 p. m.

tDR.LIG.T. NEWBERR-Vqo
OPTOMETRIST "
PANAMA CIT',' FLA.l 0



SOLOMONS:'

i Paletirized 4


Pasteurized for Your.'Protdctior 4


k --
4 ,!r '


BEST YQR POURITY;,
QUAt, TX and TASTE


SOMON's"



p Dl~trlb~*esar, forl -;
BRUOE'4, -JtUjOESs1
I VLY VANLANDINGMAM
Local R cpt'nstiwats
rr -~~ 1 ;;,,~. ,,,.,


-t'~ ''..T5


SREALD:ICE '
IS HEALTHY and

:SAFEE!


REAL ICE
IS MORE
Economical


LoW cost and guaranteed
purity make REAL Ice more
economical and serviceable.
Daily deliveries give you the
best guarantee of satisfaction
PHONE 47 .

ST. JOE 'ICE

COM PAA NY"
MAX KILBOURN, .Prop.


A


FRIDAY, MAY 17, 1940


THE STAR, PORT. ST. JOE, GULF: COUNTY,- FLORIDA


PAGE FOUR






PAGE FIVR


THE STAR. PORT-ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


,I/n A A V M 17 lf4nl


THE FIRES OF WAR LEAP ACROSS THE LOW COUNTRIES
z Lcuwardcn nigr,
-oHdinir Oldsburg
Norwicho Held-
ENGLAND __e n, Z
Alkmaar~
Ofambridgi A7.ikm r sserlaA-e aKp'7ppe
lpswic HAARn LEM,7 11
liAMSTERDA
a ich a icZvcniqn9c~i l ..0* evenf HANOVEr
t.- ~DON tNEJ4AGUI: nENE1IERLA 4DS 'Enschz.dc OsnabruccK
Dcii iici Anc
ROTTIROA I _cc1I""' hr
i~OdrcdI c ijeqn. MrriUE5STER11
Chatham Her "Ib Eh
Cantcrbu ryo Fiang tbur,
E- -, osten-dhodc,' 0 scn"
"q ,G H EN X foldr
-A TWERP .HercnthaIS
Clai ufln r T~~, .i,,UISSELDORF 4SE
( >rcs ~alin 5RcmoNaE
BOULOGNE- kur' n, S I 1HarJ1
8P BRUSLS L MaStricht COLOGNE
LILLE0 BELGIU M oAACHEM
LIEGE, Ge mCrich BONN
,- *-Ch Irlcr MMUR Eupc'l
Dinnt Malmc4 CBLENL


or A M.IREIMS A T$ :11Z:1 \ M J. I '
Germany's lightning invasion of tre low countries Liege fortresses (6). Brussels ancr Antwerp (5)
resulted in the surrender Tueeday of the Nether- were both attacked by Nazi bombers. Luxemburg
lands, giving the Nazis air bases within easy strik. has been verrun by the Germans and fierce fight-
ing distance of England. Motorized troops entered ing has been going on at Sedan, France, south of
The Hague Wednesday and have taken over the Luxemburg, where French and British troops are
Rotterdam airport. Heaviest fighting in the invasion engagingthe invaders, it being reported that 600,000
of Holland occurred at Delfzijl (1) and along the men are engaged in battle at that point. Troops of
Yssel river (2) and at Rotterdam (3) where par4- Holland have crossed the border into Belgium and,
chute troops were dropped by German planes. In are being formed into an army to continue the
Belgium the Germans claim to have advanced to struggle. This map probably will be out of date
the Albert Canal and taken the Maastricht and by the time it is in the hands of readers of The Star.


LITERAL TRANSLATION NICE GAL
Immigration Officer to Chinese: John: "Jeanne certainly is pol-
"What's your name?" ished, isn't she?"
Chinaman: ".Sneeze." Jone: "Sure is. Everything she
Officer: "Is that your Chinese says casts a reflection on some-
name?",' body."
Chinaman: "No. Chinese iame -
is 'Ah Choo'." A piece of paraffine candle is an
S:-- excellent fire starter when wood is
Fifty years ago farmers' never vet. Shave some flakes from the
aeskdT~Q government advice paraffine over some splinters. Light
.no l0. _, need anl- y ad nd, t-'' t1ie ..airl!e a in el it und-r lvhe
of e tIe b o -r'::< ;h':' e da:-. I:rinjli]'t a i i hr.- D'WIiarib.3.
oj, el':.4
' Or~Y~. 2~


GERMANS IN ACTION


E 250.000 WHO VOTED FOR A NEW
UNITED STATES SENATOR
. ...._ I, Conscientiously Compare Carter
HIS RECORD ,-; .:HIS PLEDGE
.Secured for Florida lower pas- Stronger .national defense.
senger and freight rates. Enacineht. if :Townsenrd PladL.
Helped get constitutional am- 'RepeAl: -4-..rrl Act, fair legibla-
pndment giving public schools, r i:n [r I'x -service ment.- -.
teachers, more money.. At-jl-- hfig sugar and. vegetable .
Three times Hotel Comfmis-' .. 4 Irrl Otp' insurance, ,
sooner. Twice Railroad :Coin-; :..No governtnent control of life
missioner; '. .,ir: aslh reserves.
Jerry W. Carter ,s a SELF-MADE,.MAN and is still in the making'
Vote for Carter Work for Carter Elect Carter


Re-elect,

CHARLES 0. ANDREWS
UNITED STATES SENATOR
Sen. Andrews has fought for and can be depended upon to
continue fighting for:
1. Keeping the unitedd States out of war, except in defense of the
Monroe Doctrine, and sufficient preparedness to make such a con-
flict improbable.
2. The protection and develop- af
ment of Florida's agricultural
products. particularly its win-
ter fruits and vegetables. Sea
Island cotton, and tobacco: the
removal of all restrictions ( -
against the production of sugar
in the State.. ,
3. Permanent security for the "'
aged. the blind, the disabled: ( ', '
adequate provision for disabled '
veterans, their widows and de- _j '
pendents. Deeds- Not PromnfIs '





Notice to Dog Owners

Notice is hereby given that I will be at the City Hall
from two (2) until four (4) o'cloock P. M. the week of
May 13th to 18th for the purpose of inoculating dogs
Issuing licenses as prescribed by City Ordinance. Li-
cense for each dog within the City is $1.50. No charge
will be made for inoculation.
All dogs found within the City after May 20th that do
not have license and inoculation identification will be
impounded and destroyed as required by Ordinance.

TROY JONES,
Chief of Polie, City of Port St. Joe


This radio picture, passed by the
German censor, shows German
mine throwers In action some-
where in Holland, Sunday, May
12.

Some folks have the idea women
don't swear, but stand near one
who has blown a tire five miles
from a garage.


HERE'S the biggest tire
news of the year! Just imagine
-the famous Firestone
Standard Tire, backed by a
written lifetime guarantee, at
25% discount from list price.
You get extra protection
against blowouts because the
tire body is made of patented
Firestone Gum-Dipped cords.
And the tough, silent, long-
wearing tread gives you longer
mileage with non-skid safety.


GOOD Printing LIFETIME
Every Firesto
Costs.Less writtenlifeti
limited to 12,
but for the f
There is an old saw without time
"Whatever -is worth doing
is worth doing well." ..
Especially is this true of
printing. Printing, handled
as we know how to do the
work, is a good investment
of money


LET US SHOW YOU HOW
WE CAN IMPROVE YOUR .75/5.00-
PRESENT
Letterheads 4 91
Statements ND YOI LD
Circulars
Folders
Cards


We know that we can prove LoW
to you that Good Printing
Costs, Less
Listen to the Vo
Ricard Crooks, Mt
THE STAR
ST. JOE
Your Home Town Printers
PHONE 51 FOR SERVICt PHONE 100


PICK YOUR SIZE AT THESE

LOWRICES
LIST YOU PAY
PRICE ONLY


4.40/4.50-21............
4.75/5.00-19...........
4.50/4.75/5.00-20..
5.25-21..........
5.25/5.50-17..........
5.25/5.50-18.......


$7.70
7.95
8.60
10.65
9.75
9.20


$5.58
5.78
6.21
7.77
7.08
6.75


ice of Firestone with See Firestone Champion Tires made ir
rrgaret Speaks, Monday S the Firestone Factory and Exhibitio,
de NB.C. Red Network. Building at the New Yorork Wold's F

- TEXACO Service Station
.PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


CL-C


..


2








THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY,, FLORIDA FRIDAY, MAY 17, 1940


Summer Flowering Bulbs

Fill Many Garden Roles

Summer bulbs are taking a more
important place in'the garden each/ "
year. This is especially true of the
gladiolus, everybody's flower, which
may make the garden gay- from
July to frost by planting a week or
ten days apart starting in early
May.
The montbretia is a handsome
bulb allied to the gladiolus in bril-
liant reds, oranges and yellows,
nearly hardy, that deserves wider
acquaintance. It is a handsome gar-
den subject and has more'graceful
stems for cutting than the glad.
The tuberose is needed, at least a
few bulbs for its delicious scent.
Fairy lily bulbs (Zephyranthus)
tucked in here and there will send /
up their pinl' and white starry \
blooms- continuously through the
summer.
For shady beds or for shaded C
perch boxes the magnificent tuber-
ous begonias are the best possible
subjects either in double or single.
For pots and boxes for shaded Zephyranthus or Fairy Lilies.
porches protected from sun and
rain, the huge bells of the gorgeous- tiful summer bulbous subject for
ly colored gloxinias offer .no cul- beds and boxes:. The beauty about
tural difficulties and magnificent bulbs is their sure fire blooming
display. quality given any kind of a fair
The yellow calla is another beau- chance o grow.


At the Churches 9n -w
SAnd Hope R P


FIRST rjAPTIST CHUJr.H
Rev. J. W. Sisemore, MipWilter
_9:45 a. m.-Sunday School.
4:00 p. m.--Radio Service.
7:00 p. m.-l'raiing Union.
7:45 p. m.-Preaching Service.
Teachers' .meeting at -7;,3.0 'Wd-
nesday evenings.

ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Rev. E. T. Corbin, Pastor
10:00 a. m.-Sunday School.
31:00 a.-m.-Pr-aching sery.ce.
,6 p. m.-Christ's Ambassadors.
7:30 p. m.-Evening Seiylee.
Ladies Auxiliary meets 'TMu.sd4y
afternoons. Prayermeeting every
Wednesday evening.
METHODIST CHU .eH
Rev. D. E. Marietta, Mlnister
9:-45 a. m.-Suidly School.
11:00 a. m.--Morning -.wors8p-.
7:45 p. m.--Eevsnng worship.
Missionary-society meets Mol .ay
afternoons,. o'clock.

ST. JOSEPH'S' CATHOLIC
Fr. Thomnas ,J. Maaey
First Sunday.7, '.O;0 -a. rly
AMass. -Seaond, -third axid fourth
Sundays at.10:1,5, a. gn.
Altar .society meets 3, 30 -p. m,
on first .bondal y ipn month.

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Rev. W. A. Daniel, Pastor
10:00 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.-Preaching service.
S:00 p, m.-Evening service.

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL
RTev. Frank Dearing, Rector
10 a. .---Church School.
S:00 p. m.-Evening services.
Holy Communiou services on the
third Sunday at 0:30 a. m.


in ;South Seos


Den -of the Kraft -Music ,all ancd
,is QJd Pal, BP.b Hope,
Look Over Nat!ve Gals

"The Road to SIngappre-," star-
-ing ,Bing ,Cro.sby, Bob Hope anc
Dororhy Lanpour, comes'to the Port
-theater next Sunday and ,Mondta>.
The story starts with.Bing and Bob
,disposing of several roigantic en
tanglements. ;Then they get awaa>
fro,m :Bng'~ father by the simple
;roces. of starting a riot at the
angageiustt party at whichh Bing's
iRaAnee, Judlth Barrett, is an-
n,o,_Ltcing ,the betrothal.
SNext tf~e the pair turn upit Is
.in Kaigopo in .the South Seas.
-Their .,ate ,or womenn .bbs some-
,,what .,w.en :they ;meet Miss, 1Ia-
pnour, who -proce.eds:to move in on

Then fate tricks the lads av
ppa flnds *where Bing is ;living,
and he .aAd Miss Barrett arrive
wlth ,al sails -set to. sail into Bing.
F'ey ,get. him to promise to come
with them on ,a world cruise, leav-
ing MissLamour to Bob. It all gets
straightened out, but only after
plenty of horseplay and suspense.

American kids should be glad
they live in this country. Suppose
they lived in Holland and had to
be .spanked with a wooden shoe?


AREAS OF WARRING NATIONS square miles, and Norway, 124,129 Sixteenth century armor mome-
Ssquare miles. This is a total or times had fantastic touches, such
Some people might have the idea 149,082 square miles, or about two as a helmet shaped like a lion's
that the taking of Denmark, Hoi- and one-half times the size of the head now treasured at.the Metro-
land and Norway by Germany gives state of Florida, which has an area politan Museum.
them huge additional .land areas of 58,666 square miles.
from which to draw supplies. But Total area of Germany proper is
in truth, while the areas may be b181,714 square m iles, while Eng- ra
rland covers 88,745 square mriles.
large according to :European stan- d covers 745 uare wish to express my sincere ap-
The continental area of the
dards, they are small when com- UThe contental area xc of taa preciation to the people of Gulf
pared to the United States. nted es e e of ay county for their support and influ-
possessions, is 3,026,789 square
The area of Holland is but 13,213 mles, ence in my successful campaign.
square miles; Denmark, 16,574 JAKE BELIN.






Who says you can't have






EVERYTHING!


YOu c9an have VS performance-
asg.Igas economy, too!
.l.8a h9p. Ford gave 24.92 mile per
gallon in the annual official Gilmore.
Yosemite road test, open to all cars.
ihis, 7as eCst Wmilgage of all standard-
equipped cars in this class!

0'" an ha've aPsy-handling-
with big-car ro. m and ride!
everyone kios ho y.isy it is to drive
a.Ford.B t.~ qn,,gecoul4kpow, till he gets '
ir-ide, ;iw big this Ford is in leg.
fgei, ._et-trpm., nknee-room .. nor
wtr ta thrillingly spft, steady, big-car
.rid wit.gives!

Yohan. have low ,cost .upkeep- '
.1 ejoy realC, finecar featrs!


'I



-. .'. ;


Yq4itgeas op a, Ford with the easy-
.aiq tlypfgger-tip shift used on costly
4;ps- YWl git a qpgsi-centrifugal clutch
givyg lprgtler a grqsspre at shbfting
a~es also typical of co;dly Ic* .z. ..to
..~hpdig ,4:ta ,.t-ggest hydraulic t
eaig QF alq~p. cost cr. X~pur
FpOd Dlersey an4w ilwing to ,4e
%*... him naow!


rTO CAN HAVE A






S-and8 that's what you'll want when you try it!


#ear FRAlCIS P. WHITE//I/R on the RADIO IMONDAY,WEDNESDAY and FRIDAY NIGHTS
GREAT SLKERON STATIONS WMBR WDBO WDAE WQAM WJNO WFTM WTAL WCOA 9:30 to 9:45 'd imed 8:30 t 8:45Uir Star
uni mmm arwmmm on . ....


MYy opponent introduced
the "color added" bill*
This law permits artificial coloring
of green and immature citrus fruit. It
has cost Florida Citrus farmers mil-
lions of dollars by bringing Florida
citrus fruit into disrepute all over
the nation.
*ee Sea li Bill 37, Juraal Pag ., 10. 3 S loea.



A Myopponent voted against
i homestead Exemption

LHe voted "NO" when the Home-
.stead Exemption Act was passed'in
1933.* During the 1935 and 1937
sessions of legislature he voted
against consideration of state owned
tax certificates on property covered by the Home-
stead Exemption amendment.
Pad by t R H R eoa w* of ,, lutlo r 20. Jor.aal Pne 4n. 1933U 8Iul.


/ ...\ My opponent REFUSED to
vote in favor of FREE
SCHOOL BMOKS!
He claims that he voted in favor
of free school books but the record
shows that he DID NOT VOTE on
this Bill. although he DID VOTE 29 times on other
Bills that day, April 23, 1935.*
*s ,e r,, rd eI Se na.l B1ill 112 J rmal Pa e 25l, 193 ssIln.

My opponent sponsored
/ Acts which denied han-
dreds the right to vote
He sponsored bills thatdisfranchised
hundreds of citizens of Frostproof
and Auburndale.*
The Auburndale Act was so drastic that the Governor
vetoed it with these words: "I am in favor of Home
Rule .but I cannot, as Governor of this State, ap-
prove a Bill that takes away the birthright of free
American citizens." Then my opponent supported the
Auburndale Bill when it was passed over the Gover-
nors veto.
R5. Bilad of HaIlou aill 49. J l Pap N. I S.193 o i; a Wi sarI10, 0
JIWuffl P.ll M45. 1W939 S9lti,


rd of a man who is interested in the welfare of his State and the RIGHTS of its citizen,
TEACHERS' RETIREMENT FUND NINE MONTHS SCHOOL TERM
DECENT WAGES FOR TEACHERS FREE SCHOOL BOOKS
$40.00 A MONTH OLD AGE PENSION
The boy who wasn't afraid of hard work will be the Governor who gets things done.


AID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT--PAID FOR BY FRIENDS OF FRANCIS P. WHITEHAIR


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY,- MAY 17, 1940


*t