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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00078
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: April 5, 1940
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00078

Full Text





The Star-Florida's fastest grow-
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St Joe.


THE


STAR


Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast.
est growing little ty. In
the heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


VOLUME III PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY., FLORIDA, FRIDAY, APRIL 5, 1940 NUMBER 26


Annular Eclipse

Will Be Visible In

This City Sunday


Port St. Joe, Almost In Centel
Of Shadow, Will See the
Greatest Coverage

Residents. of Port St. Joe and
Gulf county will view one of the
best shows of the heavens Sunday
when an annular eclipse of the
sun will take place. At no point
will totality occur, but this city is
almost in the center of the 200
_mile-wide strip where the greatest
totality will be seen.
Begins at 3:28 p. m.
The eclipse will begin here at
3:28 p.,m., eastern standard time;
maximum eclipse will be at 4:5b
p. m., and the show will end at
6:11 p. m. Diameter of the sun
covered will be 93 per cent, whicn
is the greatest coverage to be
seen anywhere.
This eclipse is 'called the "an-
nular," from the Latin annuluss,"
meaning "ring." In this favored
zone the sun will be entirely
"blacked out" for a short time-
; about 7% minutes-with the ex-
ception of a narrow circle of bril-
liance around its rim.
Solar eclipses occur when the
moogUets,-between, the, earth and
the sun. This can- take place. only
at new moon, and since our lunar
neighbor is much smaller than the
earth, it can hide the sun from
only a small part of the world at
one time.
The sun's diameter is almost ex-
actly 400 times the moon's. The
sun is about 400 times as distant
from the earth as the moon, there-
fore these bodies appear to be ap-
proximately the same size. But at
times the moon is farther from the
earth than at others,, and Sunday
the moon will be at almost its
greatest. distance from the earth
and will appear slightly too small
to cover the sun entirely, thus
giving the ring eclipse.
How To View the Eclipse
The simplest method of viewing
the,eclipse is to peek through.the
smallest hole you can make in a
piece of cardboard and still see.
This cuts down the intensity of
the light, but is not very satisfac-
tory.
A good view may be obtained
by looking through a piece of glass
large enough to cover both eyes,
one side of which has been well
smoked over a candle flame.
An over-exposed photographic
negative acts in the same manner
as the smoked glass and generally
does away with smudged noses. If
thin clouds dim the sun, no eye
shading will be necessary.
Don't'look at the sun through a
telescope or field glasses unless
smoked glass or a piece of film is
placed over the' front lenses, as
blindness or injury to the eyes
might result.
-----k------
Wells Seeks Re-election
As Member School Board

Wilbur Wells, present member
of the Gulf county school board
from this district, Is seeking re-
election to the board.
"I feel that my record as a mem-
ber of the board entitles me to
honest consideration," says Mi.
Wells, "and if elected I promise
my continued support for all pro-
gressive schools measures for our
county."


Jessie Smith Announces Fighting
For County School Board Ra roas Figting

Jessie M. Smith. a resident or Iln I.nf Titjeh UnRlnd


Port St. Joe for the past 28 years
and member of the local school
board, announces in this issue or
The Star that he will be a candi-
date for member of the Gulf county
school board from this district.
Everybody knows Jessie, who Is
employed as an engineer on the
A. N. railroad, and he feels that
his three years spent as trustee,
coupled with his intimate knowl-
edge of county affairs, fully quali-
fies him for the position.
---- -----

List of County

Candidates

Here is a complete list of candi-
dates qualifying for county and
district offices. Look 'em over and
take your choice:
REPRESENTATIVE
D. B. Lewis, E. Clay Lewis, Jr.,
B. W. Eells, W4 S. "Buddy" McLin.
SHERIFF
Byrd E. Parker.
TAX COLLECTOR
E. C. Pridgeon, Shelby Brown.
TAX ASSESSOR
Samuel A. Patrick.
CLERK CIRCUIT COURT
J. R. Huntef'.
COUNTY JUDGE
Thos. R. L. Carter, D. H. 'Hamp'
Bynum, J. E. Pridgeon, Sam P.
Husband.
- SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT
IChauncey L. Costing, Tom Owens.
SUPERVISOR REGISTRATION
C. G. Rish, A. Z. Culbreth, Adele
Lister, Mrs. Belle Land Bateman.
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
District One-C. F. Hanlon, W.
Roy Connell, W. E. "Bild" Brock-
ette.
District 2-Jim S. Daniels, Floyd
C. Listerc, F. L. Kemp, Leslie
Griffin.
District 3-Roy B. Whitfield, W.
G. Hardy, J. C. Laurimore, A. B.
Rhames.
District 4-Thos. Grinslade, W.


C. Whaley. Jesse Gaskin.,


1 I JUa3UJt oI JIUMOLFJIIIU


Against Pipe Line


Aver Project Would Cost Them
Millions In Revenue and
Throw Men Out of Jobs

The railroads of Florida and
Georgia are putting up a strenu-
ous last ditch fight against con-
struction of the gasoline pipe line
from Port St. Joe to Chattanooga,
Tenn., by the Southeastern Pipe
Line company.
At a hearing held in Atlanta, Ga.,
late last week, T. J. McGrath, g6n-
eral counsel for 20 railroad labor
unions in the United States ana
Canada, stated that the pipe line
would cost the railroads. $20,000,-
000 in revenue and throw 2000
railroad employes out ot jobs.
McGrath challenged the state-
ment of Steve Clay, attorney foi
the pipe line company, that the
'line would employ 10 men in each
of the 17 counties it passes
through, stating that on the basis
of the national average the pipe
line would require only 100 men to
replace the 2000 railroad employes
who would lose their jobs.
Not Familiar With Decisions
On cross-examination, McGrath
admitted,that 'he had not read the
opinion of Attorney Oeperal Ellis
Arnall of Georgia holding that/ the
state highway board has authority
to permit the pipe line to run un-
der state highways provided i1
does not endanger the traveling
public.'
,McGrath also said he was not
familiar with a recent decision of
the United States Supreme Court
holding that pipe lines are com-
mon carriers and under the. regu-
lation of interstate commerce, all
of which seemed to show up Mr.
McGrath as a very mediocre at-
torney, coming to court without
nran action 6


District 5-George Tapper, Nick T. E. Baker of Chattanooga pre-


Comforter.
MEMBER SCHOOL BOARD
Carter Ward, Dr. Thomas. Meri-
wether. District 3--Clyd'e Jones,
Purvis Howell, Wilbur Wells, E.
H. Horton, Jesse M. Smith.
STATE DEMOCRATIC COM-
MITTEEWOMAN
Mrs. Malzie Gainer Griffin, Mrs.
Basil E. Kenney, Mrs. Belle Cum-
bie.
STATE DEMOCRATIC COM-
MITTEEMAN
Jake Belin, Roy Stanley.
CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEE-
MAN, 3RD DISTRICT
T. H. Stone.

Blountstown Man Buys
Kern Jewelry Company

R. R. Wilks of Blountstown this
week purchased the jewelry store,
on Reid avenue operated for sev-
eral years by J. L. Kerr and took
charge Monday. Mr. Kerr left on
Tuesday for Chicago, where he
will join his wife.
Mr. Wilks, who has been associ-
ated with the Brantley Jewelry
company in Blountstown, is hold1
ing a special sale to move stock
on the shelves to make room for
a new line of merchandise. HIl
advertisement will be found else-
where in this issue.

It is estimated upon the best au-
thority the average sports fisher-
man spends $200 a year on his fa-
vorite recreation.


dicted that the city of Chattanooga
would not permit the pipe line to
enter the city, which is to be its
northern terminus. He said the
city commissioners had tied two to
two on issuing a permit, and one
commissioner had, refused to vote.
Attorney Clay, for the pipe line


company, brought out that Baker
is a railroad employee in Chatta-


nooga.
Port St. Joe should look for-
ward to early completion of the
pipe line, with a conesquent in-
crease of business here with the
additional payroll, as the railroads
apparently are losing out at every
turn in their battle against a more
progressive means ot transporta-
tion of petroleum products.

Port St. Joe Gets

State Premiere of

"Biscuit Eater"

Movie Made In Albany, Ga., Will
Be Seen First Time at Port
Theater April 17

The Florida. premiere of "The
Biscuit Eater," made at Albany,
Ga., will be held at the Port the-
ater Wednesday, April 17, one day
only, according to announcement
made yesterday by Manager Roy
Williams. Showing of this picture
here will help put Port St. Joe in
(Continued on Page 5)


1935 to 1938," said Mr. Whaley in
making his announcement. "One
of my main objectives will be to
give the Port St. Joe section an.
other district, giving this section
of the county a representation on
the board that it is entitled to and
does not get at the present time.
"We have four commissioners in
the north end of the county with
1000 population," concluded Mr.
Whaley, "and but one commis-
sioner in the south end with 3000


S.S. Kofresi of the Waterman
Steaniship Co. sailed Sunday with
a cargo of lumber from the St. Joe
Lumber & Export Co.
Schooner General Wood is in
port loading cargo of lumber for
delivery in Jamaica.


population. Another commissioner,
or even two more, will balance up
the county representation."


Clyde Jones Asks Election Publisher of Star Is
As Member School Board iUliI e of Is

Clyde W. Jones, born and raised Gulf Chairman for
in Port St. Joe, is announcing his
candidacy for member of the Gul- n e Campaign
Cones 'Campaign
county school board from this dis-
trict.
"If it's for the benefit of our
schools, I'm for it," says Clyde. Sub-Chairmen Being Named,
"Anything that will retard our In Every District to
schools, I'm against. I want to see Carry On Work
our schools, progress to the point
where they are as good or better W. S. Smith, publisher of The r-
than any in this section of the Star, will manage the campaign of
state." Governor Fred P. Cone for the'
United States senate in Gulf
Walker Knows county. He expects to take active
charge of the Cone political forces "
Needs of State in the county and predicts a,
record vote for "Old Suwannee" at'.
Gu nDelivers the primaries on May 7.
Gubernatorial Asp iraSub-chairmen are fow being ap.'
Address Here Yesterday
Morning pointed in every precinct of the
MrnI county, and it is expected that

Hans Walker, candidate or govevery, voter in the county will have
Hans Walker, candidate for gov- an opportunity to listen to the evi-
ernor of Florida, spoke here yes- an d exminet to listen tothe e
terday morning immediately fo dence and examine Cone literature
terday morning immediately fob-
lowing an address by Senator C. f. before the balloting takes place.
wng n ddreHeadquartet's At Star Office
Andrews.
Walker assured his listeners County headquarters have been
established in The Star building
that he is conversant with theThe Star building
that he is conversant with th on Williams avenue and Mr. Simth
problems o the state and knows on Wlliams avenue and Mr. Simth
problems of the ste ad kows has taken personal charge of di-
the conditions and problems faced acting Cone workers in
recting Cone workers in the
by the citizens of all parts o unty.
Florida. county.
Florida. County organizations have now
Discussing the public school sye-
Discsig the public school sys- been completed in 63 of Florida's
tern, he declared he would, "foster 67 counties, according to Cone
and support appropriations suffi- 67 counties, acco.ing to Cone
and suort aroriations su- state headquarters, and by the end
cient to insure all children o
everyn county Ie all children o of the week there will be no miss-
teerym with fulree schoonineoo hs ing links, Governor Cone is rally*-
term with free -scho .boo 4s M, Ing support from all sections i o .
both elementary and high schoolthe state and from voters in all
pupils and I. will sponsor a
bill for the payment of an annual walks of life, who are writing in
bill for the payment of an annual go r
to endorse the governor's record
salary for, teachers, to be paid ono economy dun s admi
for economy during his admlniso
a monthly basis, and will support o
the retirement plan for teachers'* traction.
The "Big Push" of the Cone
Walker also emphasized his in-cam ign the e e
terest in the problems of farmers, campaign for the snte will ber
and a $40 monthly payment for i this weo k, when the governor,
the aged of the state. He averred with his sound truck, expects to
he is opposed to the gross receipts en an intensive campaign that
he s opposed to the gross receipts will carry him into all sections of
tax and continuance of the portion the state before the primary On
of the gasoline tax exacted on gas- May 7.
line used in farm tractors and In Good Physical Condition
boats of fishermen.
boats of fishermen.Close intimates of the governor
"Having a labor record, I am in se imate the gmendou
position to know labor's problems," are amastd at the tremendous
he said. "I will co-operate with i the as s a
the working man and. labor in its during the p ast several wee t
efforts to maintain a good standard shington and several tours o
of living in our state. I have worn
overalls and I know that labor the te. g
asks only to have a fair chance to Ty kition, bu when hed insisted
cal condition, but when he insisted
make an honest living and an op-
portunity to provide security for honest coasts ao of rda immedateln
declining years. I pledge my et-
ar- following his return from Wash-
Forts toward enactment of legThia-
forts toward enactment of legs ington, they tried to persuade him
:ion to accomplish this."
tion to aclker complntinued his tour to to take several days of rest before
Walker continued his tour to
Apalachicola and will speak in I ostartg Governorn Cone sister
However, Governor Cone insisted
rallahassee tonight.
Tallahassee tonight. that he never felt better in his
-----+----- Ih
life, and to prove the truth of his
W. C. Whaley Asks Election statement he worked about 16
As County Commissioner hours, every day during his tour
of the east and west coasts.
W. C. Whaley in this issue of On return ow the governor's
The Star is announcing his candl- party to Tallahassee, all the mem-
lacy for the office of county com- bears except the governor com-
nissioner from District No. 4, plained of being pretty well fagged
Dalkeith. He has been a resident out, but Governor Cone termed his
of this section for 20 years. Jaunt as "just a little work out"
"If elected, I will endeavor to preliminary to doing some real
give the same: progressive service campaigning.
to the county that I rendered _______
while serving on the board froffi PORT NEWS


ti








PG O T S P S


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla.,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year........ $2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months..........65c

--( Telephone 51 ) -

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

"OLD SUWANNEE" IS THE MAN
We've been looking over the senatorial
candidates pretty closely the past few days,
and it looks like Fred P. Cone, "Old Suwan-
nee" as he is familiarly known, will be one
of the leading contenders and go into the
second primary.
Charlie Andrews and Jerry Carter are go-
ing to be way up there, too, and these three
will pull the greatest number of votes.
We don't believe Bernarr McFadden, the
last-ininute candidate, Doc Hazen and Charles
"Socker" Coe will cut much ice.. McFadden
is out for what publicity he can get out of it
and just entered the race on account of jeal-
ousy, since it is rumored that "Socker's" can-
didacy -is half-way backed by The Saturday
Evening Post. We might come right out.and
say that McFadden is a True Love Stories
candidate.
Jerry Carter, 'with his down-to-earth
"Cracker" philosophy and stories, will go over
big, and Andrews will poll heavy in this sec-
tion, but we believe that Fred will top the
list when the votes are counted.
Let's forget sectionalism and vote for the
man whose past record shows he can do the
most for Florida-and that man is Fred P.
Cone. He proved "we don't need any more
taxes" and his voice and his courage are
needed right now in Washington.

WHEN A NEWSPAPER DIES
The Hurley Herald, for years a live news-
paper representing a live community, has
suspended publication. Although it is a com-
mon fault not to miss the water until the well
runs dry, many Hurley residents are wise
enough to know that the loss of their news-
paper will sound the death knell of their town.
The most valuable asset any community can
have is its newspaper.
A newspaper cannot survive without sup-
port, for which it gives far more than value
received in return.
A newspaper is the only advertising me-
dium that reports the progress of a commuit-
ity, and records its' history faithfully.
Newspaper advertising always produces
larger returns than those of any other me-
dium. Manufacturers of automobiles and
other articles and commodities who lead in
the sale of their products are large users ot
newspaper space., They know that newspaper
advertising pays because they can reach more
people, and particularly more people who read
the advertisements and.who have the money
to buy.
Besides, no matter what the circumstances
may be, a newspaper keeps the last vigil
When it folds up, a community is already
dead because it has chosen to die.-Lemmon
(S. D.) Leader.

It took the United States government the
first 133 years of its existence to spend sixty-
six billion dollars, in the course of which the
expense of five wars was defrayed, including
the Civil War and the World War. That was
yesterday. Today it takes the federal govern-
ment a mere eight years to spend $65,628,-
526,692. It's truly a speedy age.

The standpatters are not so annoying as
the backpatters right now.


J WE LIVE ON CREDIT
Credit keeps the wheels of commerce and
industry turning. We know, because we or-
der paper from the paper company and sell
it in printed form before we pay for it, thus
paying for the paper and making our bit oi
profit before the paper company gets theirs.
When you come to think of it, relatively
few business transactions involve the immedi-
ate use of cash, unless it's a cash and carry
grocery or a dime store where you're spend-
ing your money-and even in these places, it
you've an honest face, you can get credit.
When you make a call over the lines of the
St. Joe Telephone company and its affiliates,
when you buy a new car or a used one from
Otto Anderson, when you get some new fur-
niture from Chavers-Fowhand or Danley's,
when you order tonight's groceries, as a rule
you defer payment until some future day.
And the telephone company and the automo-
bile dealer and the furniture company and
the grocer also live by credit-when they buy.
from wholesalers and manufacturers it is
agreed that payment will be made, not at the
time of delivery, but 30, 60 or 90 days hence.
Some 90 per cent of all business transac-
tions here in Port St. Joe require the use of
credit. It has been proven throughout the
country that only in 10 pei cent is "cash on
the barrelhead" involved, though right now,
in the printing business, the average is prob-
ably higher, as all candidates' business is
strictly "cash on the barrethead."
And a very large part of all credit is pro-
vided by banks. And when the Port St. Joe
bank, the Wewahitchka-bank or the Apalachi-
cola bank loans you or me a thousand dollars
-if you can imagine a banker loaning a news-
paper man a thousand. dollars-he is doing
precisely what the grocer does when he trusts
you for $10 worth of grub until pay day.
However, the banker is bound by rigid rules
to.protect his depositoo.rs, from loss where
the groceryman is not, unless the store Is
owned by several stockholders. It is the job
of the banker to analyze your past credit
record, your abilities, your character and your
prospects. And if it appears that you will be
able to repay the loan, the money is yours.
If he thinks you can't repay it, he must de-
cline the loan, irrespective of his personal
feelings.
Without credit our economic and' industrial
structure, as we know it, would collapse. So,
if you want to keep in good standing with
the butcher, the baker, the candlestick maker
and the banker, keep your bills paid up-
you'll find it well worth while some day if
you should happen to need some ready cash
in a hurry or some credit at the local stores.

The railroads are fighting construction of
the oil pipeline from Port St. Joe to Tennes-
see, yet right down here on our own docks
we see cars of the Seaboard Airline loaded
with pipe for transportation to points along
the right-of-way of the pipeline. The rail-
roads may be fighting the line, but they don't
hesitate taking money for transportation of
the pipe.

Many are wondering why Barnarr McFad-
den is running for the senate in Florida. One
answer would explain almost all his actions
-"publicity." His life is founded on publicity
and he will get publicity of a kind he could
get in no other way. Whom would he repre-
sent if elected, Florida or Miami Beach?-
Holmes County Advertiser.

Belated cold weather has delayed the blos-
soming of dogwoods and gobbling of turkeys.
-Okaloosa Messenger. But it sure hasn't
interfered much with the ballyhooing of the
politicians.

According to the Federal Surplus Com-
modities Corporation, 14,000,000 families in
the United States have an average annual in-
come of $312, and an additional 8,000,000 fam-
ilies have an average income of only $758. As
a result, 22,000,000 families can spend only
,$1 to' $1.62 per week per person for food.


CONFUCIUS SAY-


WHY?
The board of county commissioners of Gulf county at
their regular meeting on February 6 received bids from The
Star and from the Gulf County Breeze for publication of min-
utes of the board, which publication carries with it the desig-
nation of "official organ of Gulf county" with the consequent
publication of the greater portion of legal advertising within
the county. Bid of The Star for publication of the minutes
was for $20 per month which, in the opinion of the editor, is
what such publication is worth when the news value of the
minutes is taken into consideration. Bid of the Breeze was
for-$35 per month. The bid of the Breeze was accepted by
the board'of county commissioners.
WHY?
The bid of The Star would have saved the taxpayers of
Gulf county $180 per year. Of course, that is a small amount,
but if other business of the county is carried on in the same
manner, with contracts awarded to the select few regardless
of whether their bid is the lowest, then apparently the matter
of competitive bids is merely a farce.
The Star is a legal publication. The Star submitted the
lowest bid for the work. Then WHY WASN'T THE STAR
GIVEN THE CONTRACT?
We suggest that you ask your county commissioners.


The Low Down
from
Willis Swamp
i~ -
Editor The Star:
I've got a kind of horseback
opinion on "what's wrong with this
her. counmtrv of mours-we've gotten


political rally down here yesterday
and, the candidates got up and
told what good fellers they was
and what they was goin' to do for
us-and we didn't believe'' em, fo;
just as soon as. they git into of-
fice they're going' to forget all
them there fancy promises. And
at this here rally the corn draining's
flowed like glue, but everybody
put away a whoppin' lot of fish.


away from eatin' breakfast.
A faint nibble of toast is about SERVICES ARE HELD
all our tired innards will. stand for FOR WADE WILLIAMS
at 7 a. m.
This here country when it was Murdered War Veterans Is Laid to
TRis here country when it was
growing' up, it would swap some Rest In Jehu Cemetery
stories in the evening' around the
fireside-with a bushel of apples Funeral services were held, on
close at hand-and by 9 or 10 it Thursday of last week for Wade
Would be in bed. Williams, 46, World War veteran,
And at 6 in the morning the who was found shot to death on
a-roma of bacon and those other the highway near Wewahitchka.
grand, kitchen smells, they woulG: IrntErment was in Jehu cemetery
waft in, and they meant some- near the county seat, with Rev. E.
thing. They got the household to- H. Garrott of the Wewahitchka
gether, clear-eyed and clear-headed Baptist church in charge. He was
and in a cheerful mood. Sourpusses assisted by members of Gulf
at breakfast time-they didn't County Post 116, American Le-
Sgion, of which Williams was a
have 'em. mem
But today it's vice versa-nothin' ber.


gets steamed up 'til around mid-
night. And the next day, with a
fuzzy tongue and a muddled nog-I
gin, we're ripe for any duck who
happens along with some new ism
or recipe for government, where
everybody basks in the shade-
and prospers.
This country needs more bacon
and eggs for breakfast.
Yours with the low down,
JO SERRA.
P. S.-We had a whopping' big


Pallbearers were S. B. Brown, E.
V. Pollock, Byrd Parker and Gadi
White, members of the Legion, and
George Gaskin and Jesse Gaskin.

OMISSION

In reporting the district meet-
ing of the American Legion held
at Chattahoochee last week we in-
advertently omitted the names of
S. L. Barke and D. B. Lewis, who
were delegates to the meet from
the Gulf county post.


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, APRIL 5, 1940


PAGE TWO







RLA ,,J


UlllllllliIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHllllIt

Star ads get results




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Fertilizer Brings Florida Farmers

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Extra dollar returns on Wheat, Vegetables, and Corn, which farmers
received Nationally for each dollar spent on fertilizer.


The gigantic sum-three billion
dollars-which farmers have re-
ceived from the Gdvernment under
the AAA since 193& is equaled by
the extra dollar value of increased
yields produced by fertilizer in the
same period, according to estimates
made from personal interviews with
32,000 farmers in 35 States.
Florida farmers gave the inter-
viewers grass-root facts which
show that for every dollar they
spent for fertilizer they received an
average return in increased yields
of $3.27. In other words, Florida
farmers spent' $18,042,000 for fer-
tilizer. The extra return which
they received from its use amount-
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creased income above the cost of
the fertilizer of $40,893,000.
The returns from each dollar
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shown by The National Fertilizer
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crop to crop. Tobacco led the list
with an increased value return of
$11.06. Cotton ranked well up with
a return of $3.79. Other crops re-
ported were citrus fruits, 'which
brought $3.27 for each dollar in-
vested; potatoes, $3.64; cabbage,
$3.60; and watermelons, $3.89.
Florida farmers also had their
say about the effects of fertilizer
on quality of crops. Over 40 per
cent said they got 'better market
quality in all cash crops, while 4
per cent said they got better feed-
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36 per cent declared they observed
better shipping quality in fruits
and vegetables..
Average return in increased
yields for all crops in all States
shown by the-survey was $3.60 for
each dollar spent on fertilizer. Na-
tionwide, the crops showing highest
rate of return were: tobacco, cot-
ton, fruits, and vegetables.


Young Demos

To Broadcast

Schedule Two Statewide Programs
To Familiarize Voters With
Candidates' Platforms

Florida's Young Democrats have
scheduled two statewide radio
broadcasts to familiarize voters
with the platforms of candidates
for the United States senate, gov-
ernor, attorney general, state
comptroller and state treasurer.
The first broadcast was given
Saturday from Orlando and the
second one will be from Miami on
April 27.
The projects are entirely a non-
profit service, undertaken solely
because of the Young Democrats'
interest in-good government. They
want to give candidates with
limited funds the opportunity fo.
campaigning on a more equal basis
with their better financed oppon-
ents.
...- -4-
COUNTY SCHOOLS GET CASHi

Gulf county schools this week


received $3,101.51 from the state
which is the county's share of the
school distribution totaling $873,-
296.18.



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Garner Man of the People,


Sound, Rugged and Honest


The time has definitely arrived in
America when positions of trust and
responsibility should be placed exclu
sively in the hands of the elders, de-
clared Roy Miller. oldtime editor of
Texas. in speaking recently at a gath-
ering of old friends and neighbors of
John Nance Garner, vice president, in
the little village of Detroit. Texas,
where the distinguished Texan was
born nearly sixty-nine years ago.
"There is no substitute, either in
public or private life, for experience.
and experience, of course, comes only
with years. As a matter of fact; the
only thing that is old about John
Nance Garner is some of his political
philosophy. He still believes, in the
old-fashioned 'virtues of economy.
thrif., and self-reliance. In other
words, he believes in the oldfash-
ioned, fundamental principles of de-
mocracy, and no man in America, in
both his public and private life, exem-
plifies those principles to such a de-
gree as does this great man.
"While achieving high place politi-
cally, he has made substantial success
of his private life, and it is his proud
boast that he owes no human being a
thin dime. He believes in the pay-
as-you-go system, and what a blessing
it would be if that system could be
applied to America today.
"Lest I be misunderstood, let me
say here, with all of the emphasis 1
can command, that John Garner is no
reactionary in his political philosophy.
Indeed, he is not even a conservative,
if the term be applied with the mean-
ing with which it was clothed in years
gone by.
"John Garner is a liberal and a great
liberal. He was a liberal Democrat
practicing liberalism many years be-
fore some of the most vocal, present-
day sponsors of liberalism were even
born. But there is no tinge or taint of
radicalism in the liberalism of John
Garner. His liberalism is that which
would guarantee to every American
citizen the right and opportunity to
work out his or her salvation with the
least possible interference upon the
part of the Government. Therefore, he
believes in all necessary legislation
and regulation to protect the weak
against the strong, the poor against
the -ich, the owner of property against
those who would destroy the owner-
-ship of property; in short. equality of
opportunity for every Ameripan citi-
zen. He believes in Democracy and
prefers to be known as a Democrat
in the old-fashioned interpretation of


the term without qualification, prefix.
or suffix.
"In such' an' atmosphere as this, I
'think we find the real soul and per-
sonality of America. From such hum-
ble surroundings as these, typified by
the lowly log cabins where John Gar-
ner and his sainted mother were born.
have come the truly great' in
America's glorious history. They
knew, as he knows, what America is.,
what America stands "or, and how
and why our American system of gov-
ernment was conceived. They knew,
as he knows, what it means to toil
and strive and work. They knew. as
he knows, that there is.no substitute
for self-reliance and individual initia-
tive, and that any system of govern-
ment which takes from the individual
these fundamental tenets of liberty
cannot long endure as a democracy oi
freemen. They knew, as he knows, that
for pen to be free they must be guar-
anteed only freedom of opportunity
to work out their own destinies, and
that the highest purpose and duty of
government in a democracy is to as-
sure to every citizen an equal chance
with his neighbor. This is the essence
of John Garner's political philosophy
"I have no patience with those who
would seek to analyze the percentage
of one's Americanism. It is not a di-
visible thing. It is not something that
can be broken up into parts and ap-
praised in its constituent elements.
Either one is an American or he is
not. Nevertheless. I cannot help but
feel that there never was a time in the
history of our beloved country wheh
the need for the leadership of those
whose Americanism is beyond all per-
adventure of doubt was so essentially
and vitally necessary to the preserva-
tion of America and American insti-
tutions as it is at the present moment.
"Here in Red River County, where
John Garner's widowed grandmother
with her six fatherless children came
from Tennessee almost a hundred
years ago, built yonder log cabin, and
joined the ranks of valiant pioneers
who blazed a trail for civilization and
laid deep and broad the firm founda-
tions of Imperial Texas, may we find.
indeed, 'the soil from which true
Americanism is generated and born.
Here.in this community, plain, home-
like, typically American. is the birth-
place of a great American who, in my
humble opinion, has been marked by
the hand of destiny to become the
President of the greatest, richest, and
most powerful nation of all time, the
United States of America."


-* - -- - --- ----- --



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Candidates! The Star gives you prompt printing service:


T"E STAR, PORT. ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE THREE


F IDAY APRIL 5 1940


f







ASY


Society

ii


MISS MARIGENE SMITH
CELEBRATES BIRTHDAY
Complimenting her daughter
Miss Marigene Smith, who ce
brated her sixteenth birthday We
nesday, Mrs. J. M. Smith ent.
trained a number of the younger s
with a weiner roast at Beac
Hill Wednesday evening. Aft
roasting weiners and enjoyi:
games on the beach, dancing w
Indulged in at Van's.
Those present were the Miss
Margie Costin, Dorothy Trawic
Betty Jo Temple, Murnice Tau
ton and Lunnette Hammock, an
Carlyle Matthews, Haskell Overb
Cornelius VanHorn, Doyle Smit
Howard Taunton, Winston Jon
and Jimmie McNeill.

INTERMEDIATE GIRLS
STUDY STEWARDSHIP
The Intermediate Girls' Auxilia
of the Baptist church met Thui
day afternoon of last week at tl
home of Virginia Pridgeon, wi
Mrs, J. W. Sisemore as leade
Topic for the afternoon was "Ste,
ardship."
After the regular opening cer
.monies an interesting program
was 'presented by Virginia Pri
geon, Carolyn Baggett, Doroth
Costin and Jimmie Palmer. A sol
"Our Best," was rendered b
Gwendolyn Spencer after which
social hour was enjoyed and r
freshments served.

MRS.'ALLEN HOSTESS
TO TUESDAY CLUB
Mrs. Billy Allen was hostess 1
the Tuesday Bridge club this wee
father home. Cut flowers in attra
ftive vases were used to decorate
th4 living room where tables wer
placed for play. After several pr
gressions, prizes were presented t
Mrs. B. J. Hull, high; Mrs. Ralp
Carter, second high, and Mr:
George Hudson, cut.
The hostess served a chicken
salad, plate and iced tea to MeB
dames, Hudson, Hull, Carter, I
Chism, John Sowers, W. Talle
and T. A. Gragg.

LEGION SUPPER
TOMORROW NIGHT
The American Legion post wil
hold a chicken supper tomorrow
evening in the building former:
occupied by the Chavers-Fowhand
Furniture company on Reid avenue
A cordial invitation to take sup
per with' the Legionnaires is ex
tended the public, and plates wil
be 50 cents per each.

Ivey Vanlandinghom, local dis
tributor for Solomon's dairy pro
ducts in Port St. Jooe, has moveC
from Long avenue to the Miles
Hurlbut garage-apartment' on 8th
street.




SELLING OUT


R. R. WILKS
p4
NEW OWNER
-- of the -
KERR JEWELRY CO.
Is Selling Out Old Stock
To Make Room for
New Merchandise

Fountain Pen and Pencil Sets
Rings-Diamond and Plain Sets
Pens of All Descriptions


We Specialize In
WATCH and CLOCK REPAIR


"We Teach Watches to Tell
the Truth"'
------------. --


- Personals

LANETA DAVIS, Editor


MISS AGNES MAE JONES AND
DEVEREAUX LAY ARE WED
er, Mr. and Mrs. Asbury Morgai
le- Jones announce the marriage o
ea- their daughter, Agnes Mae, ti
ei- Devereaux B. Lay on Sunday
;ei March 31, 1940.
on The ceremony was solemnized a
.er the home of the bride's parents in
ng this city by Rev. D. E. Marietta
as pastor of the Methodist church, in
the presence of members of the
es family and relatives.
ck, The bride wore a spring en
in- semble of gold with powder blue
nd accessories, and wore a shoulder
Dy, corsage of gardenias.. The living
th, room of the Jones home was dec
es orated with white gladioli, snap
dragons and other spring flowers
arranged against a background
of green foliage. White candles
burned in tall floor standards.
ry Following the ceremony the
rs. young couple' left for a wedding
he trip to New Orleans. On their re-
th turn they will make their home
. on McClellan avenue.
w.
METHODIST MISSIONARY
.e- SOCIETY MEETS MONDAY
t The regular business meeting ol
d- the month was held by the Metho-
hy dist Missionary society Monday at
o, ternoon at the church.
,y The meeting opened with a
a hymn, followed by prayer by Mrs.
e- G. A. Patton. Mrs. R. W. Smitn
gave an interesting report from
the district conference held in Do-
than last week. Prior to the scrlyp
ture lesson given by Mrs. B. R.
o Dickens and Mrs. J. Bradbury,
k Mrs. J. T. McNeill presented the
c- year book program on the life of
Ite sabella Thorton, after which Mrs.
SJ. L. Sharit gave an interesting,
talk on the life of this worker.
to
h J. A. M. CLUB ENTERTAINED
BY MRS. E. C. PRIDGEON
irs. E. C. Pridgeon entertained
Sthe J. A. M. club at her hpme Mon-
day night. Bridal wreath in vases
Sand baskets attractively decorated
ythe living and dining rooms which
were opened en suite. Chatting
and sewing was enjoyed, after
which the hostess served a de-
licious salad plate, cherry pie
11 topped with whipped cream, coffee
w and tea.

d MRS. BRAGG ENTERTAINS
AT BRIDGE TUESDAY
i Mrs. W. L. Bragg entertained
Tuesday afternoon with one table
1 of bridge at her home in Oak
Grove. At the conclusion of play,
ice cream, sandwiches, cookies and
tea were served to Mrs. Frank
SLeHardy, Mrs. P. D. Farmer, Mrs.
SJ. Hauser, Mrs. George. Cooper and
a Mrs. Smith.
1
NO PREACHING SERVICES AT
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
There will be' no preaching serv-
ice either morning or evening at
other points in his charge. Sunday
owning to the minister visiting at
other points n hs charge. ISunday
school will be held as usual.

CURTAINS BEING HUNG
It is announced this week by the
Woman's club that the curtain and
drapes are being hung on the
stage of the Centennial building.

Mr. and Mrs. D. C. Smith, Mrs.
W. J. Belin, Mrs. J. M. Smith and
Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Smith viewed
"Gone With the Wind" in Panama
City last Saturday.

Mr. and Mrs. E. C, Pridigeon
and sons, Ed and Anthony, visited
Sunday in Wewahitchka with Mr.
and Mrs. Harlan Pridgeon.

.Mrs. Frank Thomas of Washi~in
ton, D. C., who visited here witi
her sister and another, left last
week for Orlando to visit; before
returning to Washington.


SChurches


BAPTIST CIRCLES IN MEET
AT CHURCH MONDAY
n The members of the circles of
f the Baptist Missionary society held
o their regular business meeting ot
, the month at the church Monday
afternoon with Mrs. A. E. McCas-
tkey in charge.
S.Mrs. L. R. Holliday presented
Sthe devotional, Psalm 27, which
n was followed with prayer. Reports
e were heard from chairmen and
plans made for attending the di-
visional meeting in Bonifay. Duffy
e Lewis was appointed as councellor
Sfor the Royal Ambassadors and
Sthe meeting dismissed.
Next Monday's meeting will be
Sa Bible study at the church.

MRS. J. M. SMITH HOSTESS TO
THURSDAY BRIDGE-CLUB
The members of the Thursday
Bridge club were entertained last
week by Mrs. J. M. Smith at her
home on )Monument avenue. Two
tables were in progress and at thy
conclusion of play, prizes were
awarded Mrs. B. C. Lewis, high,
and Mrs. ,Fred Curtis, cut.
The hostess served delicious re-
freshmen to Mesdames E. Ram-
seyI Lewis, Curtis, C. Edwards, M.
P. Tomlinjon and George Gore and
invited guests Mrs. H. Soule, and
Miss Martha Belin.

REV. DANIEL PREACHES
POWERFUL SERMON
'Communion was observed at the
Presbyterian church last Sunday
morning, at which able assistance
was rendered by A. R. Holt of
Wisconsin, who has been an elder
for 22 years. He was passing thru
the city and stopped to observe
Sunday.
At the evening service, Rev. W.
A. Daniel delivered a powerful ser-
mon on. the text, "What Is God's
Last Name?" Following this serv-
ice, E. H. Horton-and T. W. Wil-
son were ordained as, deacons.
Interest and attendance are in-
creasing at a rapid pace in this
church of late.

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT
Mr. and Mrs. Johnny; Mueller of
Mobile are announcing the arrival
of a daughter on February 28. The
young lady has been named Mar-
garet Adele. Mr. Mueller is a
former employee of the Gulf Hard-
ware & Supply company.

Those attending the divisional
meeting, of the Baptist Missionary
society in Bonifay Wednesday were
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Sisemore, Mrs.
A. E. McCaskey, Mrs. Vaughn and
Mrs. J. O. Baggett.


FLOWERS AND

CORSAGES


WOOD FIBRE FLOWERS
that cannot be told from the
best product of Mother Nature.
*. .And they keep indefi-
nitely. If they become droopy
you merely place them in the
refrigerator and in. a brief time
they are as good as new.
SEE

Mrs. W. S. Smith
STAR OFFICE PHONE 51
|


PRESBYTERIAN SUNDAY
SCHOOL DRIVE TO START
A meeting of the Sunday school
teachers and officials of the Pres-
byterian church, together with the
church session, was held Tuesday
evening at the home of Mr. and
Mrs. Howard McKinnon, at whicn
time plans: were discussed for a
complete reorganization of the
school, and a .drive will be made
to interest new pupils of all ages.

Mrs. W. E. Gordon left Satur-
day for her home in Angola, Ina.,
after a visit of two weeks here
as the guest of her son-in-law and
daughter, Mr. and Mrs. W. A.
Smith. Mrs. Smith and Mrs. O. F.
Powell accompanied her to Mont-
gomery where they visited rela-
tives, returning Tuesday.

Joe Kennedy has returned to
his. home in Gordon, Ala., after
spending the past week here as
the guest of Mr. and Mrs. J. E.
Rollins.

Mrs. Belle Land Bateman of
Wewahitchka was a visitor in the
city Wednesday in the interest, o
her campaign for supervisor ot
registration.


Your Cold Cough Is Toug


On Your Friends, Too!

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I


2 SATURDAY ONLY APRIL 6

NEW SMASH HITS! S


- SUNDAY MONDAY APRIL 7 AND 8

aI.er Bror p.een
The tITIG t* Also -
Fightin' 'FreAh Fish'
Irish! Latest News


2 -TUESDAY ONLY APRIL 9-
NEW SMASH HITS!I


Hall muqq. i T EX RITTER

I ,h"The Man

^^> From Texas'


l"Filming the Fleet"


- WEDNESDAY


Action
Thrills
Aplenty!


ONLY APRIL 9 -
Added Joy

Our Gang
Comedy

Sportligit


Mrs. B. A. Pridgeon and son,
Bernard, returned Sunday after
spending several days in Way-
cross, Ga., and 'Orlando.

Mrs. Basil E. Kenney was a
business, visitor Monday in Wewa-
hitchka.
Q 4. a
Charles Parker spent Sunday
and Monday in, Ozark, Ala., visit.
ing his wife and baby daughter.



ROOM AND

BOARD
BY THE $A-0
WEEK V

Dining Room

Open to the Public
Club Breakfast, 6 to 9.... 25j
Lunch, 12 to 2 ...........35c
Dinner, 6 to 8 ..........35c


SMRS. M. O. FREEMAN
Corner Reid Ave. and 3rd St.
Griffin Grocery Building


I


F-lr


I


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY APRIL 5 1940


I







THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


9


James H. R. Cromwell, United States minister to Canada (right)
and Mrs. Cromwell as they were welcomed to Toronto by H. >G.
Hengstler, U. S. consul-general, on the occasion of Cromwell's visit
when he addressed the Empire and Canadian clubs and drew a storm
of criticism from the.folks back home. Climax of the storm was an
official "spanking" from Secretary of State Cordell Hull, who in-
formed Minister Cromwell that he had "contravened instructinst'
In lauding the war aims of the allies


ADDITIONAL
SOCIETY


MR. AND MRS. BOB KINGREY
HONORED WITH SHOWER
Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Alsip were
hosts Wednesday evening at theii
homeon hunter's Circle when Mr
and Mrs. Bob Kingrey were hon
ored with a miscellaneous shower.
A profusion of spring flowers dec
orated the home. Bingo and other
games were enjoyed and following
presentation of gifts to the hon-
orees, prizes were awarded'.
Refreshments were served to
Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Soule, Mr. and
Mrs. E. C, Lewis, Mr. and Mrs. R.
Seville, Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Horton,
Mr. and. Mrs. W. S. Quarles, Mr.
and Mrs. Basil Kenney, Mr. and
Mrs. Basil Kenney, Jr., Mrs. B. H.
Dickens, Miss Della Ward, Dr. and
Mrs. A. L. Ward, Miss Mary Lee
Hayles, Miss Estelle Dickens, Miss
Emeline Belin, Miss Lillie. Pearl
Watkins, Miss Lillian Ferrell, Miss
Peggy Charles, Miss Soledad Hi-
dalgo, Miss Nell Morgan, Miss
Margaret Kitler and Willard Gil-
bert.

PRE-NUPTIAL DINNER
FOR YOUNG COUPLE
Miss Louise Wilson and Toni
Coldewey complimented Miss Mae
Jones and D. B. Lay with a pre-
nuptial dinner at Mattle's Tavern
in St. Andrews Thursday evening
of last week. The centerpiece for
the dinner table was a miniature
bride and groom, balanced by at-
tractive bowls of beautiful spring
flowers. Place cards aided in carry-
ing out the wedding theme.
Those "enjoying this affair with
the, honorees were Miss Emeline
Belin, Miss Margaret Conant, Mr.
and Mrs. Earl Lupfer, Mr. and
Mrs. Pat Patterson, Bill Ebersole,
Bill Sherwood and Tom Mosely.

Mrs. W. M. Howell has returned
from Mobile, where she was the
guest of Mr. and Mrs. T. V. West-
brook for several days.

Mrs. Tom Owens and son, Tom-
mie, returned Sunday from Gaines-
ville, where they spent several
days visiting Mrs. Owens' parents.

Mrs. Opal Ogden and baby ot
Jacksonville are guests this weeK
of her parents, Mr.and Mrs.T. H.
Stone.

Mrs. A. D. Thompson (nee Rosa.
lie Strong) of Savannah, Ga., is
visiting her aunt, Mrs. A. M. Jones.

Robert Nediley of Apalachicola
was a business visitor in the city
yesterday. I i.

Mrs. Richard Miller and daugh-
ter, Peggy, have returned, from
Plant City where they spent sev-
eral days.

Miss Sara VanHorn is spending
this week in Pensacola visiting
relatives.


ST. JOSEPH'S ALTAR SOCIETY
MEETS WITH MRS. DARCEY
The St. Joseph's Altar society of
the Catholic church met Monday
at the home of Mrs. J. J. Darcey.
Following the usual routine of
business, plans were Imade to raisb
funds for the- treasury. A motion
was made and carried for the, so-
ciety to buy necessary equipment
to care for the church yard. Mrs.
Charles Mahon was welcomed as a
new member at tnis time.
During the social hour sand-
wiches, cake and lemonade were
served by the hostess, assisted by
her daughter, Miss Betty Darcey.
t WEST VIRGINIA VISITOR IS
COMPLIMENTED MONDAY
Mrs. Basil E. Kenney and Mrs.
Basil E. Kenney, Jr., were co-hos-
tesses Monday afternoon when they
complimented Mrs. Maude Mahan
of Whittesville, W. "Va., with a
cocktail ,party at the home of the
former. The honoree, the hostesses
and Mrs. D. C. Mahon greeted the
thirty guests upon their arrival.
Cocktails, sandwiches and potato
chips were served.
B *
SUPPER CLUB MEETS
Messrs. S. L. Barke and M. J.
Toffalete entertained the Saturday
Night Supper club last week at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Ken
ney. Gladioli and Easter lilies
were used for decorations. Eigh-
teen members enjoyed a delectable
buffet supper.

MRS. SOULE ENTERTAINS
THURSDAY BRIDGE CLUB
Mrs. Horace, Soule entertained
the members of the Thursday
Bridge club at her home on Ninth
street yesterday. Spring flowers
were used in the living room where
tables were placed for play. After
several progressions, prizes were
presented and delicious refresh-
ments served.


Mrs. Lena Christman of Wilson,
N. C., arrived Thursday of last
week and is the guest of Mr. and
Mrs. W. J. Belin.
f *
Robert Bellows spent yesterday
in Marianna on business.


IF ANYBODY HAS-
Eloped
Married
Divorced
Had a Fire
Sold a Farm
Been Arrested'
Been Your Guest
Started in Business
Left You a Fortune
Bought, a New Home
Swiped Your Chickens
Met With An Accident
Had a Visit From the Stork

THAT'S NEWS
TELL THE EDITOR

Phone 51-The Star
* s** *s* *e**4 *S4


"IT ISN'T LOADED" /
Our old friend Jo Serra, down
Willis Swamp way, is languishing
in the dog house these days and
depending on the generosity of his
neighbors for rations. Jo, we learn,
brought home, as a family pet and
gift, a .skunk which had been rep-
resented to him as having been
"disarmed" and shorn of all au-
thority. We are very sorry to hear
of the results of this misplaced
confidence, Jo, and would remind
you that an "unloaded" gun, skunk
or other object, Is always very
dangerous.

Mr. and. Mrs. Victor Anderson
attended the Sirmon-Anderson wed-
ding in Apalachicola last Friday,

Mr. and Mrs. Johnny Hewitt and
Mr. and Mrs. Alex Young and chil-
dren and Mrs. Yarborough spent
Sunday at Wakulla Springs.
--Save by reading the ads!
Save by reading the ads!


Read the record below. See
for yourself how Fred Cone
has reduced State expenrs
and increased State and
County income in the de-
partments under his super-
viison how he has put
Florida head and shoulders
above the otner Southeastern
States in aid for the aged and
blind HOW RE HAS CUT
THE EXPENSE OF THE
GOVERNOR'S OFFICE
BY 64 PER CENT!
)


HEADS GULF CONE CAMPAIGN PORT ST. JOE GETS PREMIERE

(Continued from Page 1)
the upper brackets of playing the
most up-to-date pictures ahead, or
surrounding cities of larger popu-
lation. 4
SParamount Pictures and the city
of Albany are staging a world pre-
miere at Albany next Thursday,
the picture having been made in
and around the Georgia city. The
program will be broadcast and sev-
eral leading movie stars, including
SBilly Lee, the star of the picture,
will be present. 'The story is a
~ true story of the South as we
know and love it.
IHrold B. Smith of Port St. Joe'
was a member of Sammy Sashom's
orchestra which furnished music
or the picture. Harold has ap-
peared with several big name
bands and at present is in Colum-
W. S. Smith, publisher of The bia, S. C., appearing with Bill
Star, who is heading the Cone. Farmer.
for-Senator drive in Gulf county. Sr
Send The Star to a friend.


For SENATOR


VOTE FOR



FRED CONE


One of the best "Watch-

dogs of the People's

Money" Florida

has ever had

Let's send a man to Washington who knows HOW TO
SAVE. Let's send a man who knows not only the
SCIENCE, OF GOVERNMENT but also the BUSINESS
OF GOVERNMENT a man whose RECORD
proves that he knows how to combine GOOD GOVERN-
MENT with SOUND ECONOMY.

Let's send a man to the U. S.- Senate who has "Horse-
Sense." A man whose rich store of plain, down-to-earth
straight-forwardness and honesty will win added re-
spect for the State that sent him there.


Read the RECORD of STATE DEPARTMENTAL
INCOME and EXPENSES Under the

Governor's Supervision


STATE BEVERAGE DEPARTMENT in-
creased collections from $3,121,514 for the
year 1936 to $4,278,507 for the year 1939.
Decreased operating expenses from $270,-
847 in 1936 to $177,050 for the year 1939
-or from 8.68 per cent to 4.14 per cent.
This kind of management has meant more
money for OLD AGE ASSISTANCE which
is sustained by this department.

STATE RACING COMMISSION increased
collections from $1,430,977 for the season
of 1935-36 to $2,000,989 for the last sea-
son. Decreased expenses from $315,359
for the season of 1935-36 to $187,289 for
last year. INCREASED REVENUE PAID
EACH COUNTY from $16,794 for season
of 1935-36 to $26,863 for the season of
1938-39.

MOTOR VEHICLE DEPARTMENT in-
creased collections from $5,447,907 in 1936
to $6,776,007 in 1939. Decreased expenses
from $425,253 in 1936 to $338,508 in 1939.
TOTAL INCREASE in revenue for 1937-
38-39 amounts to $2,848,280. TOTAL DE-


CREDSE in expenses for these three years
;otals $259,730. Total of INCREASE IN
REVENUE AND DECREASE IN EX-
PENSES under CONE amount to a GAIN
of $3,105,010 FOR THE BENEFIT OF
THE SCHOOLS, which receive the reve-
nue collected by this department.

FLORIDA LEADS ALL-7SUTHAST-
ERN STATES IN OLD AGE ASSIST-
ANCE, paying an average of $11.71 per
month as compared to $9.50 in Alabama;
$8.09 in Georgia; $7.49 in Mississippi, and
$8.15 in South Carolina. FLORIDA LEADS
ALL SOUTHEASTERN STATES IN AID
TO BLIND, paying $12.38 as compared to
$8.86 in Alabama; $10.02 in Georgia; $7.33
in Mississippi, and $10.75 in South Carolina.


During Fred P. Cone's administration
of the Governor's office of the State
of Florida, the expenses of that of-
fice have been reduced 64 per cent.


ON THIS RECORD AS GOVERNOR,

FRED P. CONE Offers His Candidacy

to the People of Florida for

UNITED STATES SENATOR
(Paid Political Announcement-Paid for by Friends of Fred P. Cone)


P11~19a I


FRIDAY, APRIL 5, 1940O


PAGE FIVP,





i


LIM









P F FRIfAV ADlI A 0 I On


POLITICAL


ANNOUNCEMENTS
Paid Advertising


COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT NO. 1 (Wewahitchka)
Having received much encour
agement, I hereby announce m)
candidacy for County Commis
sioner, District No. 1, subject to
the Democratic primaries in May
I will appreciate the vote and in
fluence of the people of Gull
county, and if elected I promise tc
faithfully perform the duties of
the office, and as far asgone o0
the members of the five-member
board can possibly do so, I prom.
ise a progressive and economical
administration.
C. F. HANLON

FOR SHERIFF
I hereby place my candidacy be-
fore the voters of Gulf county for
re-election as sheriff, subject to
your action in the coming primary
in May. If you consider voting for
me, I promise that I will give a
fair and square deal to all, as I
have in the past. Your vote
and influence will be appreciated.
Thank You
: BYRD E. PARKER

FOR STATE SENATOR
To the Voters of Gulf County:
I hereby announce my candidacy
for State S.enator from the Twenty-
fifth Senatorial District (compris-
Ing. Gulf, Bay, Washington and
Calhoun counties) subject to the
Democratic primaries to be held
next May, and solicit your vote
and support.
If elected I will represent you
conscientiously and to the very
best of my ability.
Sincerely,
J. I. HENTZ


FOR COUNTY JUDGE
I hereby announce my candidacy
for the. office of County Judge of
Gulf County subject to the action
of the Democratic Primary. If I
am honored by nomination, I pledge
myself to the same impartial, eco.
nomical and honest administration
I am now endeavoring to give. I
Shop that I may merit the support
of Gulf County Democrats.
THOSE. R. L. CARTER
County Judge

FOR REPRESENTATIVE
I hereby announce my candidacy
for renomination as your Repre-
sentative in the Legislature. Any
elaborate promises which I might
make at this time would be wholly
out of place and would mislead nu
one. The people will and should
judge me on my record as a citi-
zen and as a Legislator. If that
record is such that I merit your
;, continued confidence and support,
Then I will appreciate your vote
and support and will, if elected,
Represent -you to the. very best of
my ability.
Respectfully yours,
E. CLAY LEWIS, JR.

COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT NO. 3
I hereby announce my candidacy
for County Commissioner, District
No. 3, subject to the Democratic
Primary in May. If elected, I
promise to give fair and impartial
administration in all matters com-
ing before the Board to the best
'of my ability and the interest of
the general public. Your vote and
influence will be greatly appreci-
ated.
ROY B. WHITFIELD

FOR COUNTY JUDGE
I hereby announce my candidacy
for the office of County Judge of
Gulf County, subject to the will of
the.voters at the May primary. Re-
alizing the importance of this of-
fice as a potent factor in the life
of the county and its interests, I
feel that I am well qualified for the
position. If I am honored as your
preference, I promise to give fair,
Impartial administration and will
conduct the duties of the office to
the best interests of all the people.
D. H. "Hamp" BYNUM

CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
I hereby announce my candidacy
for re-election as Clerk of the Cir-
cult Court, Gulf County, subjectto
the Democratic Primary in May.
If elected, I pledge fairness and
Impartiality in all the services con-
nected with third, office. Your vote
and support will be deeply appre-
iRatd.Uat .
J. R. HUNTER


Paid Political- Advertising

FOR COUNTY JUDGE
I hereby announce my candidacy
for the office of County Judge of
Gulf County, subject to the will of
the voters at the Democratic Pri-
Smary. I feel that my 10 years'
service in county office. fully qual-
ifies me for this position. Your
vote and support will be greatly
appreciated.
J. E. PRIDGEON


For Superintendent of Publ
Instruction
I hereby announce my candlda
for Superintendent of. Public
struction of Gulf County, subji
to the Dsmocratic Primary May
If elected I pledge myself to ke
abreast of the changing trends a
methods of education, so that c
schools will also progress as o
county grows. I earnestly soli
your support and your vote
May 7,
TOMMY OWENS


FOR TAX COLLECTOR
I hereby announce my candida
for re-election to the office of T
Collector of Gulf County, subje
to the Democratic Primary of M
7th. If elected again, I promise
conduct the office as in the past
fair, honest and impartially *
each and every one. Your vo
and influence will be greatly a
preciated.
EDD. C. PRIDGEON

Superintendent of Public
Instruction
I hereby announce my candldac
for re-election to the office
County Superintendent of Publ
Instruction of Gulf County, subje
to the Democratic prihtary May
If elected I promise to discharge
the duties of County Superinte
dent in an efficient and progre
sive manner, as I have endeavored
to do during the past seven year
that I have served you in this. c
pacity. Your vote and support wi
be appreciated.
CHAUNCEY L. COSTIN
,County Superintendent

FOR REPRESENTATIVE
To the Voters of Gulf County:
I hereby announce my candidacy
for Representative in the Legisl
ture, subject to the Democrati
Primaries in May. Having lived i
Port St. Joe for the past 23 year
I believe no one knows the wishe
of ke citizenry better than I. Ha'
ing had much to do with the court
ty's development and active in it
civic affairs, Including school an
industrial development, I feel tha
as your Representative I can cor
tinue to serve the best interests o
Gulf county. Your support an
vote will be appreciated.
B. W. EELLS


ic


Paid Political Advertising

SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER
District No. 3
I herewith announce my candidacy
for member of the Gulf County
School Board from District No. 3,
subject to the will of the voters
at the May primary. I feel that my
three years' experience as school
trustee qualifies me for the posi-
tion, as I am well acquainted with
the needs of our scfiool system.
Your vote and support will be
appreciated.
JESSIE M. SMITH


Cone Not Backing

Any Candidate for

Governor of State


Has Not Indicated Preference In
Race and Does Not In-
tend to Do So

Reports have been received at
Cone-for-Senator headquarters in
Tallahassee that the names of vari-
oii edid te~ fnrvrn r


,'
)

f
>
l


ge
5-
s-
ed
rs
a-
II






:y
a-
ic
n
s,
Bs
S
v-
n-
:s
d
it
n-

d


COUNTY COMMISSIONER
I hereby announce my candidacy
for re-election for County Commis-
s'oner in Gulf County, District 4,
subject to the action of the Demo-
cratic primary. During my past
term of office it has been my en-
deayor to temper the necessary
progress of the county by economy
and I pledge myself to be progress.
sive but always-keping in mind
the prepared budget. I respect-
fully soclicit investigation of my
record and the vote and support of
Gulf County Democrats.
Respectfully,
JESSE GASKIN

Supervisor of Registration
I heregy announce my candidacy
for re-election to the office of
Supervisor of Registration of Gulf
County, subject to the action of
the Democratic Primary. I have
endeavored,fo give efficient service
during my present term and if re-
elected I will continue to serve in
the future as in the past. I will
appreciate your influence and sup-
port.
Respectfully yours for service,
C. G. RISH
Supervisor of Registration

COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 5 (Port St. Joe)
I hereby announce my candidacy
for the office of County Com-
missioner, District Five, subject
to the Democratic Primary.
I respectfully solicit your vote
and support.
GEORGE G. TAPPER

COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 5 (Port St. Joe)
I hereby announce my candidacy
for the office of County Commis-
sioner, District Five, subject to
the Democratic primary.
I respectfully solicit your vote
and support.
NICK COMFORTERS


i iereI y a iinnounce I- lmly .;clilucy
for the nomination as your Com-
missioner from this district, sub-
ject to the will of. the electorate
in the Democratic Primary May 7.
If you choose to elect, me to this
position I will devote my greatest
efforts toward the progress of the
county and assist in an economical
government. I will .appreciate your
vote and support.
BUD BROCKETTE


To My Gulf County Friends:
;I respectfully announce my candi-
dacy for re-election as your Tax
Assessor. I will thank you for your
vote and support. I deeply appre-
ciate the confidence that has been
placed in me in the past and I will
endeavor in the future, as I have
done in the 'past, to render to
every citizen fair, courteous and
faithful service.
Respectfully yours
SAMMY PATRICK


COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT NO. 1 (Wewapitchka)
I hereby announce my candidacy
to serve the. people again as
County Commissioner. The experi-
ence that I have gained during the
nine years that I have served in
this capacity will enable me to
serve the best interests of Gulf
County in the future. Your vote
and support will be appreciated.
,W. ROY CONNELL


COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT NO. 2 (WETAPPO)
I hereby announce my candidacy
for re-election as County Com-
missioner from District No. 2,
Wetappo, and will appreciate
your vote and support.

Floyd C. Lister

COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT NO. 4 (Dalkeith)
I hereby announce my candidacy
for County Commissioner, District
No. 4, subject to the Democratic
Primary in May. If elected, I
promise to take a personal inter-
est in all the affairs of the county
and will earnestly strive for a
clean and unbiased government.
My platform is: Conservativeness
and Economy with Fairness to
All. I want to serve you and do
solicit your support.
THOSE. E. GRINSLADE







Bartow people are well
aware of the exceptional
qualifications of Spessard
Holland. POLK COUNTY
DEMOCRAT.
Paid Political Advt.


wins.
"My supporters in the senatorial
campaign are free to support any
gubernatorial candidate they pre-
fer. I have not indicate-d any pref-
erence in that race and do not in-
tend to. The first, last and 'only
concern I have in this campaign
is to be: elected U. S. senator, in
which office I can serve all of
Florida and do some real good for
my native state :
GULF COUNTY RECEIVING
GULF COUNTY RECEIVING


At the Churches

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. J. W. Sisemore, Minister
9:45 a. m.-Sunday School.
4:00 p. m.-Radio Service.
7:00 p. m.-Training Union.
7:45 p. m.-Preaching Service.
Teachers' meeting at 7:30 Wed-
nesday evenings.

ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Rev. E. T. Corbin, Pastor
10:00.a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.-Preaching service.
6 p. m.-Christ's Ambassadors.
7:30 p. m.-Evening Service.
Ladies' Auxiliary meets Tuesday
afternoons. Prayermeeting every
Wednesday evening.

METHODIST CHURCH
Rev. D. E. Marietta, Minister
9:45 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.-Morning worship.
7:45 p. m.-Evening worship.
Missionary society meets Monday
afternoons, 3 o'clock.

ST. JOSEPH'S CATHOLIC
Fr. Thomas J. Massey
First Sunday, 8:00 a. m.-Early
Mass. Second, third and fourth
Sunday at 10:15 a. m.
SAltar society meets 3:30.p. m,
on first Monday in month.

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Rev. W. A. Daniel, Pastor
10:00 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.-Preaching service.
8:00 p. m.-Evening service.

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL
Rev. Frank Dearing, Rector
10 a. m.-Church School.
8:00 p. m.-Evening services.
Holy Communion services on the
third Sunday at 9:30 a. m.
-------c---
LESS THAN MONTH
LEFT TO REGISTER

Books Now In Office Of C. G. Rish
At Wewahitchka

Gulf county voters have less
than a month to register and qual-
ify for the Democratic primary
elections in May.'
The county registration books
are now open, and will remain


Open in the office of Supervisor Of
$22,224 ANNUALLY FROM. Ris at the
Registration C. G. Rish at thi


STATE WELFARE BOARD

One of Gulf county's large pa,
'rolls' is derived from the granting
of public assistance to the aged,
the blind, and dependent children
and from allotments made to de-
pendents at home by enrollees'in
the Civilian Conservation Corps.
Based on March figures, Gult
county is receiving $22,224 annual-
ly from the four sources. During
March the county received $1,153
in old age assistance; $48 in aid
to the blind; $141 in aid to de-
pendent children, and $510 was


paid as. compensation to the 17
young men from the county en-
rolled in the CCC.
_-K --
A rustless, non-corrosive electric
conduit has been perfected, from
wood, pulp.

Paid Political Advertising

SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER
I wish to announce my candidacy
to succeed myself as a member of
the Gulf County School Board. My
record as a member of the board
entitles me to honest consideration.
I promise continued support for all
progressive school measures for
our county. I will appreciate your
vote and support,
WILBUR WELLS

SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER
DISTRICT NO. 3
I herewith announce my candidacy
for member of the County School
Board from District No. 3, subject
to the will of the voters in the
Democratic Primary May 7. If I am
elected, I promise to give my time
and attention to the office. Your
vote and support will be sincerely
appreciated.
CLYDE W. JONES

COUNTY COMMISSIONER
I herewith announce my candidacy
for County Commissioner from Dis-
trict No. 4, Dalkeith, subject to
the Democratic Primary in May.
If elected. I promise a fair, impar-
tial and economic administration.
In addition I promise to work for
redistricting the county. Your vote
and support will be appreciated.
W. C, WHALEY


courthouse in Wewahitchka until
April 20.
If you want to vote you must
register. Don't put it off-do It
today. Gulf county should turn In
an overwhelming majority for Gov-
ernor Fred P. Cone in his race for
the United States senate.

State Suited to Plane
Making, Senator Says

Efforts Have Been Made to Get
Manufacturing Plant Here

Senator Claude Pepper recently
emphasized Florida's attractions
for aircraft manufacture.
"By, every right," said Pepper,
"Florida should be one of the
great plane producing areas of the
country. It has every advantage,
and moreover, Florida is the cross-
roads between the America's. In-
ter-American human contacts are
increasing by air travel, and air-
craft manufacturers would do well
to look to Florida for new and ad-
ditional plant facilities."
Contacts for establishment of an
aircraft plant in Port St. Joe have
been made by the local chamber
of commerce, but to date nothing
definite -has been arrived at, al-
though manufacturers have ex-
pressed interest.

Andrews Certain Winner
Is Opinion of Educators

Poll Taken at Orlando Among
Teachers Shows Senator Favorite

Senator Charles O. Andrews is
a certain winner in his race for re-
election, it was predicted in Or-
lando in a poll conducted by the
Orlando Morning Sentinel among
5000 delegates to the convention
of the FEA.
The reporter worked haphazard-
ly among the teachers and the ma-
jority of those questioned favored
Andrews, amplifying their opinion
with the statement that he will be
renominated in the first primary.


1


PAGE SIX


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY APRIL 5 1940


il


Icy U UV -l.JUJ" wf V
In- FOR STATE DEMOCRATIC being liked with that of Governor
ect COMMITTEEWOMAN Cone in several sections of the
7. I hereby announce my candidacy state.
ep for State Democratic Committee-
nd woman for Gulf County. Having "Of course I am highly compli-
'ur served in this capacity from Wash- mented," Governor Cone said when
'ur ington and Jackson counties, I can these reports were called to his
cit bring to this office experience and attention. "The fact that the sup-
on a broad understanding of county
affairs as related to the state or- porters of certain candidates have
ganization, which.should make me thought they could help their can-
able to be of greater service to didates by linking my name witi
Gulf County. theirs on placards and other po-
cy MRS. BASIL E. KENNEY litical advertising, is a tribute to
ax
ct FOR COUNTY JUDGE the political strength they think I
ay I hereby announce my candidacy have.
to for County Judge, subject to the "However, in fairness to the few
- Democratic primary in May, 1940. candidates for governor who have
to I, have served the county in the
te past as Chairman of the Board of not been named-in this manner, I
ip- County Commissioners; carried: on.feel that the public is entitled to
a turpentine business, and if elect, know that I am not supporting
ed will give fairness and justice to any candidate for governor. I am
ill alike and you will find mej on so busy running m own campaign
'tH'e job every,'da'y of the year. so by running my own campaign
Your vote and support will be ap- for the United States senatorship
preciated., that I haven't paid much attention
cy SAM P., HUSBAND; to the race for governor. I know
of Uall the candidates in that race and
UNT CMMISSIONE they are all fine fellows. All I can
DI.STRICT NO. 1, ,ewshitchka
7., 1 .;, ... .... ,, ... say is that I hope the best man


e
17







RIDY API 5, 1940 TH STR POTS.JE UFCUTFOIAPG EE


HE POCKETBOOK C

/ KNOWLEDGE T4
Cos

I a ,. | L,


F
djido
stat
hav
stat
T
cilec
sec(
and


candidates Must June 7. Failure to file the state- or promising a voter money or
ments with the proper officials anything of value for his support.

Re orti Expenses disqualifies a candidate. One candidate in Tampa, upon
Limits are placed on expendi- advice of his lawyer, is getting
tures in the various races, andf a around this last regulation by
st of Campaigns Must Be Listed candidate who exceeds the cam- "loaning" cigars to voters. "Can I
Between April 7 and 12, Ac- paign expense limit is subject to help it it they don't return 'em?"
cording to State Law disqualification. he says.
The law says campaign money Statements are kept by the sec-
lorida's scores of political can- may be spent for traveling ex- retary of state and the clerk of
rates must file three expense pens.s, qualifying, hiring clerks the circuit court for three years,
tements telling how much they and campaign workers, sending and they are admissible as evi-
e spent in campaigning, under out literature, advertising, postage, dence in court.
e law. printing, renting of halls, and pui- -
he first statement must be chase of campaign equipment and Sponge divers sometimes go
d between April 7 and 12, the supplies. Expenditures for other down more than 125 feet to gather
ond between April 25 and 29, purposes are prohibited. A candi- sponges from the floor of the Gulf
the third between May 29 and date also is prohibited from givingqof Mexico.


Seed Box in Sunny Window

Gives Plants Head Start


TOP LAYER Of
OARDIN LOAM AND
SAND FINELY
SlTVFD.
HALF SNAPP SAND
AND GAUDFN LOAM
WELL MIXOD.
LAYFR Of CINURS.


SET SEED BOX IN
SSHALLOW PAN OF
WV.TER.


Premium Perfo,


SkD BOX CAUFULLY.

SPROUTS APPEAR,
R DMO~L PAPOZ AND


GLASS Al
-=NOT DIR
DO NOT
COVrED 6OX WITH GLASS DpY OU
AND HEAVY PAPER 'TO FROM b
EXCLUDE LIGHT. KEEP EXCESSIVE
IN COOL LOCATION. CAUSES D
A small box in a sunny window
will give the seeds of a few favor-
ite varieties of flowers or vege-
tables several weeks' head-start this
spring.
If you have no cold frame or hot-
bed, yet do not want to be limited
to the selection of plants usually in
the market, the seed box offers a
way to grow your own.
The name '*at" is usually ap-
plied to the seed box. It may be of
any convenient size, from a cigar
box to the standard florist's flat,
which is usually 14 by 20 inches, 4
inches deep. Holes may be bored
in the bottom of the box to assist,
drainage, though if the boxes are
net watertight, excess water has no
difficulty in escaping through the
cracks. A cigar box should be re-
inforced by wire to keep it from
failing apart.
Soil used in a seed box should
always be put through a sieve. The
coarse soil may be used in the bot-
tom, the fine on top. Florists' pot-
ting soil is the best, or a fine gar-
den loam, about half sand.
Seed may be broadcast one va-
riety to a flat; or sown in rows,
which allows several varieties to be
grown in the same box, each row
beirg labeled. The broadcast meth-
od has some advantage with tiny
sek.ds like petunias.
Sa'ds which are broadcast are
usually less crowded than those in
rcv.3. If you sow in rows, use the
ed-e of a ruler to make shallow
cbucntations in the soil; sow thinly,
cover lightly, and firm the soil with
a block of wood.
By lowering the box in a tub of

FEA Calls On State to
Meet Its Obligations
Teachers Want Payments Due Un-
der Existing Appropriations

The Florida Education associa-
tion, at its convention in Orlando,
,put its membership of 10,500 teach-
ers squarely behind a program
calling upon the 3tate to meet


To LIG"T.
RECT SUN-
ALLOW TO7
T. WATE.
1 WATERING
AMPING O.
I water, the soil may now be thor-
oughly soaked without danger of
washing the seeds from their places.
A wet blanket of newspaper may be
placed over the soil to keep it from.
drying, and the box set in a warm,
dark place until the seeds sprout.
- Immediately sprouts appear re-
move this blanket, and place the
box in the sunniest window you own.
A kitchen window is good, because
humidity is always greater there.
If a pane of glass is kept over the
box at night, moisture will be con-
served; but always lift an edge
of this cover during the day, for
ventilation; wipe off moisture which
condenses on it, and remove it en-
tirely when the plants grow high
enough to touch it.
Watering must be thorough; soak
the soil whenever it grows dry; and
do this without washing the soil.
Seed boxes handled this way sel-
dom suffer from "damping off,"
which is a fungous disease that
kills little plants. But if you do
have this trouble, then disinfectants
can be obtained which will mini-
mize it.
Being constantly under observa-
tion the seed box enables the ama-
teur to learn at first hand the way
seedlings grow, and the conditions
which encourage healthy progress.
The temperature of the home is
usually satisfactory to the plants,
provided it is not too hot. A day
temperature not over 70 degrees and
a night temperature not below 55
degrees is satisfactory for most sub-
jects. Watering must be done care-
fully at all stages, being careful
to let excess water drain away, and
not to allow the soil to become dry.

fully its obligations to schools and
instructors.
The 1939 legislature 'appropri-
ated $800 per teacher unit for
schools.-and $200,000 a year as the
treasury's contribution to the new
teacher retirement program. Pay-
ments on the school appropriation
have fallen behind,, nd but $2000
a month has been released from
the retirement fund appropriated. ,


WHY pay more? Money cannot buy a
safer tire.

Why accept less? Firestone gives you
extra safety, extra value and extra
mileage at no extra cost!
And here's how: J


51n 10 11'e 010. 1 F INN20 ncat U.Mrar e
i,.d ihe FAret ,',,e 5.,y pho.,. O. rhC-fi rra. 1.nicr sthe recO n of .\.led.
w ulcnrr.n -1n, 1I : n L.., oe Ru...,,. rB RCed N-rfuo-






SLJeTxacSeviceSatio
St, Joe Texaco Service Station


PHONE 100


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


.. .. -


PAGE SEVEN


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF. COUNTY, FLO)RIDA


FRIDAY, APRIL 5-, 1940







PR .


FLORIDA HIGHLIGHTS


A /200 ACRE
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\4'/GHIAwP 5mUwoceCK447TA PARA&
NMFAR .Scd/NW IV,9 r'm123'0' r4'lWk0"O
~. I'Lt/G;L' MiCAY~A'/VA' 7*A45 AND RU47/C
Aii'lc .f e4r wp rs oonvm
~ ~4~tr;,j~,~.AoWW ~rWZA~i c SarS,*000 10Q OWY'-


Band Concert At

School Toniget

Presented to Arouse Local Inter-
est In Annual Music Festival
At DeFuniak Springs

The Port St. Joe high school
band will present a free concert
in the high school auditorium this
evening at 8 o'clock. for the put-
pose of arousing local interest in
the annual Music Festival which
is to be held at DeFuniak Springs
April 11 and 12.
The following program will be
presented, which includes numbers
to be played at the festival:
March, "Washington Post.'*
March, "Orange- Bowl."
March, "Independentia."
Overture, "Mantilla. ',
March, "On the Mall.'"
March, "El Capitan."
March, 'Gloria."
Novelty, "The Old Grey Mare."
"Th Band Played On."
"She'll Be Comin' 'Round the
Mountain."
"Home On the Range."
"Nobody Knows the Trouble I've
Seen."
March, "Symbol of Honor."
"Deep River."
"I've Been Working on the Rail-
road."
"I'll Take You Home Again,
Kathleen."
Foxtrot; "Careless."
"Londonderry Air."
March, "The Rocket."
March, "Father of Victory."
Overture, "Hero."
"The Marching Band."
"The Star Spangled Banner.'"
A cordial invitation to attend is
extended the public.

Miss Cleo Lovett Is Social
Work Chairman of County

Miss Cleo Lovett of Wewa-
hitchka has been named chairman
for Gulf county by the Florida
State Conference of Social Work.
She is also in charge of Franklin
and Wakulla counties.
Local members of her commit-
tee include Mrs. Ouida Perritt of
this city and Miss Margaret Mac-
Intyre of Crawfordville.
The conference will be held in
Jacksonville from April 21 to 24.
---------ve money by reading the ads.
Save money by reading the ads.


PERSONALS

Dr. and Mrs. A. L. Ward and
Massey Ward were week-end visi-
tors in New Orleans.

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Pridgeon and
Mr. and Mrs. Charles McClellah
visited Wednesday in Dothan.

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Kirkland
and Mr. and Mrs. S. C. Pridgeon
spent Sunday in Wewahitchka.
A
Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Drake were
week-end visitors in Marianna, the
guests of, Mr; and Mrs. T. Yancey.
*
Mrs. W. H. Howell visited Mon-
day with relatives in Phattahoo-
chee.

The Misses Mercedes and Idell


Murphy of Sneads and
were guests Sunday of
Mrs. Nick Comforter.

Bishop Frank Juhan of
ville sent Monday in this
iting friends.


Madison
Mr. and


Jackson"
city vis-


Mrs. J. A. Connell attended the
birthday celebration of her mother,
Mrs. H. J. Rowell, at Rowell's
Landing Sunday.

Mrs. J. M. Smith and Mrs. Hil-
ton Lewis were business visitors
Monday in Apalachicola.

Mr. and Mrs. Aubrey Marks ot
Apalachicola visited in this city
Thursday' of last week en route to
Panama City.

Among those from this city at-
tending the showing of "Gonb
With the Wind" in Panama City
on Thursday .of last week were
Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Drake, Mr. and
Mrs. R. R. Minus and daughter,
Mrf andl vltr-I 0 W H. .


Andrews Speaks

To Voters of City

Tells of Duties and Work As a
Member ( Important Sen-
ate Committees


Tossing aside promise making
as a means, of conducting a politi-
cal campaign, United States Sena
tor Charles O. Andrews presented
his candidacy for re-election to a
full term before the voters of Port
St. Joe yesterday.
Florida's senior senator told of
his work for old age security, for
the fishing industry, and described
his duties as a member of such
important senate committees as
naval affairs, immigration, public
buildings and grounds, interstate
commerce, rules, and public land's
and surveys.
He said he had been glad to
gain passage of;an amendment to
the appropriations bill last sum-
mer which provided for the pur-
chase of surplus seafood's as a
means of stabilizing the fishing in-
dustry in this state.
Discussing old, age security, the
senator reported he had gained
approval in the senate's judiciary
committee of his proposed consti-
tutional amendment on the old age
assistance question.
"That is the first flag of victory
the aged persons of this nation
have been able to raise in our na-
tional capital," he emphasized.
--------4------
Political Rally to Be Held
At County Seat Saturday
The Wewahitohka baseball club
is sponsoring a political rally at
Wewahltchka tomorrow at 5:30 p.
m., on the lot between the two
drug stores.
All candidates for office are in-
vited to be present at that time
and address the voters of the
county seat city.


r. V. anrrl lld d- LW.oon and
daughter, Mrs. J. L. Temple and LOCAL ITEMS ON FLORIDA
daughter Betty Jo, Miss Alice Gib- NAVIGATION PROGRAM BILL
son, Miss Murnice Taunton, A. E.. Among a number of Florida
Conklin, Mrs. B. B. Conklin and items on the waterway improve-
Mrs. Sammy Davis. ment program okehed by the sen-
t ate commerce committee at Wash-
Rev. and Mrs. Frank Dearing of ington Tuesday were the following:
Panama City visited in this city Apalachicola, Chattahoochee and
Sunday. Flint rivers, $6,500,000; intracoas-
r f t tal waterway from Apalachicola
Mrs. John Kramer is visiting Bay to St. Marks river," $32,500;
her mother in Apalachicola this channel from Apalachicola river
week. to St. Andrews Bay,. $81,000.


City Will Aid In

Fixing Ball Park

Hope Expressed for Construction
Of Diamond at Centennial
Park Next Year

A delegation of local baseball
boosters, headed' by Toimmy Owens
as spokesman, appeared before the
city commissioners Tuesday eve-
ning to request aid of the city in
repairing the ball park and grancd-
stand preparatory to entry of a St.
Joe team in the Northwest Florida
Baseball League.
The commissioners stated they
would be glad to do what they
could, and! Commissioners B. W.
Eells and J. E. Bounds were ap-
pointed to look into the cost of re-
pairing the fence and grandstand.
Owens stated that it was the plan
to reimburse the city from the
gate receipts.
It is also planned to set aside
a portion of the gate receipts for
construction of a ball diamond and
grandstand at Centennial Park
next year.

HOSPITAL GETS $2500

A local delegation consisting of
Mrs. Basil E. Kenney, Jim Bounds
and B. L. Kelly, went before the
board of county commissioners at
their meeting Tuesday with a re-
quest for $2500 toward constru.-
tion of a hospital in this city. The
commissioners unanimously vote'
the money, feeling that such ali
institution is for the benefit of
the entire county.


CLASSIFIED ADS

RATES- Five cents per line for
first insertion, minimum 25c for 20
words or less;' 2 insertions, 40c;
3 insertions, 50c. Special monthly
rates. All classified ads must be
paid in advance to eliminate book-
keeping charges.
CARS FOR SALE
Chevrolet truck, dual wheels, good
tires, good condition; cattle body.
Cheap for cash. Underwood type-
writer; good practice machine, in
A-l condition. See Mrs. H. C.
Whitaker. 4-5tf
REAL ESTATE FR .SALE
FOR SALE-Two lots in Bay Ridge
Subdivision in block adjoining
new high school. If interested,
write Mrs. E. G. Power, 1120
10th Place South, Birmingham,
Alabama. 2-16tf
POULTRY


FOR SALE-Setting hens with
chicks; $1 per hen and 10 centb
per chick. Leave orders at The
Star office. 3-8tf


WHITEHAIR FAILS TO
SPEAK IN PORT ST. JOE
Due to the sudden death of his
personal friend, State Senator Lu-
cas Black of Gainesville, who died
Thursday night of last week of a
heart attack, Francis P. White-
hair, candidate for governor, can-
celed his speaking engagement
here last Saturday. He acted as an
honorary pallbearer at the funeral
of Senator Black Saturday.

As a healthful, delectable, nour-
ishing food, oysters have no, su-
perior in food elements or mineral
content.
Paid Political Advertising


RE-ELECT 9


AND&EWS













U.S. SENATOR
DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY MAY 1940



FOR CONGRESS


I hereby announce my candidacy
for the office of
MEMBER OF CONGRESS
from the Third Congressional Dis-
triet and respectfully solicit the
vote and support of all voters.

D. STUART GILLIS


J--I


-U


if


there is one enterprise


upon earth that the quitter should never

attempt, it is advertising. Advertising

does not jerk it pulls. It begins

gently, at first, but the pull is steady;

and it increases, day by day and year by

year, until it exerts an irresistible power.

-John Wanamaker.


allis9 I r


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE. GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE EIG 'T


FRIDAY, APRIL 5, 1940


r