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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00068
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: January 26, 1940
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00068

Full Text




The Star-Florida's fastest grow-
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St Joe.


T HE


::STAR


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center

VOLUME I!1 PORT ST. JOE, GULF COU'NTYs FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 1940 NUMBER 15


Pipeline Firm

Ordered From

R. R. Property

Eno;ned from Invasion of Right-
of-Way and Held In Contempt
Of Court By Orlando Judge

An injunction against the South-
eastern Pipeline company and the
Williams Brothers Corp., construct-
ing a gasoline pipe line from Port
St. Joe to Atlanta, was issued Sat-
urday in Orlando by Federal Judge
Alexander Akerman restraining
them from invading the rliglt-of-
way of the Seaboard Airline rail-
way. Hearing -.on the injunction
was' set for today.'
SJudge Akermili alto held the
two firms in contempt of court for
,making a crossing bvver the: objec-.
,tion' of. railroad officials a. mile
south of Bainbridge, Ga. They
were ordered to remove the pipe.
"Whenryou take that pipe off
'the property, we'll be. in a posi-,
'tion to talk," Judge Akerman told
attorneys for the two firms, "but as
'long as this' particular judge is con-
cerned, you're not going. to cross
"this property until I have. thor-
oughly examined and investigated
the evidence."
The railroad's petition charged
'that "on January 6, 1940, the Wil-
.liams Brothers company, with a
.force of 70 men, invaded the prop-
erty and right-of-way in possession
'of this court, and under cover or
'darkness 'drove a casing through
the roadbed of the railroad. Since
the invasion, the Williams com-
pany has maintained one or more
guards at the point of crossing."
(.Since the Seaboard has been in
receivership, jurisdiction over the
receivers has. been vested in the
federal court.)
Nearly a score of witnesses were
placed on the stand by both sides,
the pipe line company attempting
'to prove that they were not usurp-
ing the right-of-way. Testimony in-
troduced showed thkt the South-
eastern Pipe Line company had
uaid the Seaboard more than $20,-
000 to haul pipe to various desti-
nations in Georgia and Florida.
This matter is of vital interest
to Port St. Joe, the Gulf terminal
of the pipe line, and at present
there are a considerable number
of employes of the Williams com-
pany idle in the city, waiting for
work to begin on the line.
-K-

Right of- way Is

Given Pipeline Co.


Lines Will Be Laid Along
Street from Docks to
Park Avenue


First


At a meeting of the board of
city commissioners held yesterday,
which was postponed Tuesday
evening, the city granted to the
Gulf Oil corporation a right-of-way
along the city's streets for the
laying of three 10-inch lines and
one 12-inch line for the transpor-
tation of gasoline and other pe-
troleum products.
The lines' will .start at the west-
ern terminus of First street at the
dock and extend easterly along
First street to the intersection of
First street,.and Park avenue.
Use of the streets for the laying
of the lines will not'become effec-
tive until plans and specifications
have been filed with and approved
by the city commission.
Use of the streets for such pur-
poses extends over a period of 40
years.


I


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s


IN SENATE RACE


Q~vernor Fred P. Cone who last
Thursday formally, entered the
United States; senatorial race.


Bynum Announces

For County Judge

Old-Time Resident of Port St. Joe
Feels Himself Well-Quali-
fied for Office

D. H. "Hamp" Bynum is the first
to announce for the office of Gulf
county judge, his announcement
appearing in this issue of The
Star. The office is 'now held by
Judge Thos. R. L. Carter,. who
was appointed to the office last
June.
Mr. Bynum is well known to the
older resident of Port St. Joe, hav-
ing come here with the railroad
28 years ago as locomotive engi-
neer and later served as master
mechanic for 16 years, being
forced to resign from this. position
in 1937 due to an injury to his left
foot, which member was removed
recently on that account. For the
past two year Mr. Bynum and his
wife have been living at Wewa-
hitchka.
"Hamp," as he is familiarly
known, was very active in the
creation and organization of Gulf
county, and served as chairman of
the board of county commissioners
two terms, foreman of the first
Gulf county grand jury, city com-
missioner (mayor) of Port St. Joe
for six years, and also served for
several years as a member of the
board of school trustees. He is a
union man and is seeking nomina-
tion by the people.

Bank to Open

February First

New Institution Will Fill Long-
Felt Need In This Com-
munnity

According to word received this
week from the office of W. T. Ed-
wards at Jacksonville, the n'ew
Florida Bank at Port St. Joe will
be open for business next Thurs-
lay, February 1.
The modern two-story structure
ias been under construction for
more than a year and its comple-
ion and opening will fill a long-
elt need in this city, which has
been without convenient banking
facilities, doing business with in-
stitutions in:Panama City, Wewa-
litchka, Apalachicola and other
cities.
The banking quarters, will be on
he lower floor with offices and
he telephone exchange on the
second floor.


S.MAY


ANNOUNCE


Wood Considerinp

Announcement for

Congressional Seat

Former Speaker of-the House anc
Executive for DuPont Interests.
Here May Seek Caldwell's Job

With the announcement this
week by Congressman Millard
Caldwell of Milton that he will not
seek re-election, G. Pierce Wood,
speaker of the 1939 house of rep-
resentatives. and, former executive
for tho DuPont interests in Port
St. Joe, state'l that he is seriously
considering entering the race for
the seat vacated by Mr. Caldwell
in the Third Florida Congressional
district. He said Sunday that he
expected to know definitely within
a .week or ten days whether he
will toss his hat into the ring.
"I have had the finest pledges
of support from all' parts of the
district said Wood, "and I am
giving serious consideration to the
piroosal." He had been promi-
nently considered over the state
as a potential candidate for gover-
nor and it was thought that he
would announce for that office at
the celebration here last Decem-
ber in observance of the 101st an-
niversary of the forming of the
state's first constitution. However,
Mr. Wood indicated that he had
discarded any idea he might have
had of entering that race.
"I can see, as. mylnany friends
who are urging me' to make the
race for congress see, that I might
be of great 'service to Florida as
a member of congress," said Wood.
"It is my sincere desire to aid
Florida in any way that it is pos-
sible, and it occurs to me that this
outlet for my ambitions to assist
our state may be the best."

City to Ask Aid for

Softening PIlant

Application Will Be Made for
Federal Grant to Improve
Water System

The matter of securing federal
aid for the construction of a wa-
ter softening plant for the city of
Port St. Joe was brought up at
the meeting of the city commis-
sioners yesterday by Commissioner
B. A. Pridgeon and he was author-
ized by the board to proceed with
the filing of an application for the
purpose.
This is badly needed here, as
our water, while pure, contains
iron and sulphur and to those not
accustomed to it is, sometimes un-
palatable.


How About a Congressman?



With -the resignation of Congressman Millard Caldwell
from political life, leaving the post of representative from
the Third congressional district open, the thought pops
into our mind: "Why not a congressman from Port St.
Joe?" Why not, indeed?
We have a man here whom we feel is well qualified
for the position, who has always worked for the good
of the people of this and other sections of Northwest
Florida, and who knows his way around in Washington.
We see no reason why we shouldn't be able to elect a
candidatefrom Gulf county, particularly the one we have
in mind, in spite of the fact that announcements for the
post are coming thick and fast.
We ask you-what's the matter with Joe Sharit for
congress?, He has all the necessary qualifications.-
- .. o*


Placed on Canal

Found Necessary By County Com-
missioners In Order To
Lighten Taxes

At a called meeting of the board
of county commissioners Monaay,
a toll was ordered placed on all
traffic passing through the canal
link connecting this city with the
intracoastal waterway, to go into
effect March 1.
This action was considered to
be necessary by the board to lift
the tax burden from the shoulders
of the taxpayers who would be re-
quired to pay the $200,000 worth of
(Continued on Page 6)


Contributions Are

Urged In Infantile

Paralysis D r ive

Boxes Placed for Receiving Small
Change; Cards to Be Mailed
Out; Dance Tickets on Sale

The committee for the celebra-
tion of the President's Birthday
have distributed and placed in all
business establishments of the city
coin collecting boxes for the pur-
pose of raising funds in the fight
against infantile paralysis. It is
the hope that the people will drop
their pennies, nickels, dimes, or
other coins in these boxes at fre-
quent intervals. Anything will be
appreciated, for every penny do-
nated will .strike a blow against
this terrible disease. The boxes are
lettered "Won't You Please Drop
a Coin for Us?" with the picture
of a crippled boy and girl.
Birthday greeting cards, ad-
dressed to the president, to be
signed by the individual who sends
them in, will be distributed within
a few days. These cards have
places for the insertion of ten
dimes, which will go direct to the
president. It is hoped that many of
these cards will be mailed to Mr.
Roosevelt, with anything from a
dime on up. It is not necessary
that the card be completely filled
with dimes, but if you or' your
friends will take a card and put
as many dimes Jn J4 as possible ,
all of this will help.
The local chapter of the Na-
tional Foundation for Infantile
Paralysis will receive 50 per cent
of all funds dropped in the coin
boxes and also 50 per cent of the
dimes mailed directly to the presi-
dent. All of this, along with the
dance to be given next Tuesday
night, will place the local chapter
in funds to carry on their work in
Gulf county.
The Birthday Ball is attracting
a great deal of attention, and all
indications point to a large crowd.
Each person purchasing a ticket
for the dance at $1.50 will auto-
matically become a member of the
Gulf County Chapter of the Na-
tional Foundation for Infantild
Paralysis.
Local No. 379, International
Brotherhood of Papermakers, is
sponsoring the dance and have se-
cured the Curtis Davidson orches-
tra of Quincy to furnish music for
the affair, which begins at 10 p.
m. This orchestra has appeared
in this section on many occasions
and has always been favorably
commented upon. It is hoped that
everyone will purchase a ticket to
the ball, whether they expect to
attend or not, and they will know
that their $1.50 contribution will
be money well spent.


Toll Rates to Be


G. Pierce Wood, former execu-
tive for the DuPont interests
here, may run for congress.


First River Boat

Arrives Tuesday

Test Run Inaugurates Weekly
Service to Columbus By
Water

Inaugurating a new transporta-
tion service to Port St. Joe from
Columbus, Ga., the "George W.
Miller," stern-wheel, river boat of
the Chattahoochee S? Gulf Navi-
gation company, came through the
canal Tuesday from the Apalachrt
cola river and tied up at the docit
of the St. Joe Paper company to
take on oil.
The 168-foot vessel carried no
cargo on the trip, it being merely
an experimental run in antioipa-
tion of providing weekly, service
to and from this port. The vessel
was due to arrive Sunday, but was
held up at several points awaiting
opening of draw spans in railroad
bridges.

PHILADELPHIA WOMAN
DIES OF HEART ATTACK

Mrs. Lydia Gutekunst, 63, died
at Money Bayou Tuesday of a
heart attack. She, her husband ana
two other relatives were gathering
shells on the beach when they no-
ticed a squall approaching and
hurried to their car, Mrs. Gute-
kunst being stricken at that time
and dying within a few minutes.
The body was brought to the T.
H. Stone home in this city and a
Panama City undertaking estab-
lishment called to care for the
body, which was, shipped to Phil-
adelphia for interment.


Port St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
est growing little city. .. In
the heart of the'pine belt.







A TH T O


THE TATTLER
f THE STAFF
Editor-in-Chief. Florence Facione
Asst. Editor......Al Schneider"
Society Editor..Martha HinSh
Joke Editors ......... Glenn
Grimsley and .P. K. Johnson
Reporters .............. Opal
Chavers and Levetta Wilson
Sees All, Knows All, Tells All About Port.St. Joe High.School
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = === = = = = = = = = = = = === = = = = = = = = = = = = =


BRISTOL IS DECLARED
CONFERENCE CHAMPION
Bristol high school, with six vic-
tories and no defeats within the
conference, was declared champion
of the Northwest Florida Six-Man
Football Conference. Florida High
of Tallahassee, with eight wins,
one loss and one tie, was declared
runner-up.
The all-conference team has
been selected and we were not at
all surprised to see the name of
Max Maddox on the first team.
And we can say that he really de-
served the honor. This, team was
not only chosen for its athletic
ability, but for its sportsmanship
on and off the playing field. Max
is the first boy from Port St. Joe
to achieve this honor. Following
is the all-conference teams as se-
lected by coaches of the various
schools:
First Team-James Sledge, Mon-
ticello; Max Maddox, Port St. Joe;
Durwood Vause, Crawfordville; An-
gus Gholson and David Howell,
Chattahoochee; Austin Sanders,
Bristol.
Second Team-Fred Shuler, Bris-
tol; Noah Lewis, Altha; R. D. Se-
gree and James Wathen, Carra-
belle; Rufus Keel and, Millard
Hancock, Florida High.

STUDENTS HEAR TALK ON
"CRIME DOESN'T PAY"
Wed'ne day of last week the stu-
dents of the high school were
given a talk by Mr. Ditmore, U. S.
inspector of police departments, on
"Crime Doesn't Pay."
Mr. Ditmore was a racketeer for
eight years,, served nine years in
prison and has been an officer for
18 years. He, being a former con-
vict, brought out the fact that it
doesn't pay to be crooked, as one
never accomplishes anything by
it. He wasn't allowed' to tell how
convicts are punished, but he gave
some hints that should make
everyone fear the inside of prison
walls.
Mr. Ditmore said that lots of
our crime is due to the "shoot 'em
up" western pictures, gangster
movies and magazines along the
same lines. He predicted that two
out of our school were headed for
prison at some time in the future.
So students, let's prove his pre-
diction false and live the lives of
honest and, clean-cut Americans.
Remember always-crime doesn't
pay!

HIGH SCORING
A woman walking past a butcher
shop saw the .following painted on
the window:
Weiners-30, Hambergers4-27.
"My land," she exclaimed, "what
a game-"

Florida tourist centers report
the greatest tourist invasion in the
state's history. At the present rate
of arrivals, Miami Beach alone
will be host to 270,000.


WELFARE LEAGUE CALLS
FOR VOLUNTEER ACTORS
The Port St. Joe Welfare League
is planning the presentation of
three one-act comedies, one of
them a mystery comedy, in the
near future for the purpose of
raising funds for continuing the
good work of the organization.
This evening at 7:30 o'clock
try-outs, for parts in the play will
be held at the county health of-
fice on Sixth street, and all those
adults interested in amateur dra-
matics are extended an invitation
to be present for the casting.


EXCELLENT LIST FOR
THE SECOND QUARTER
The following pupils, listed by
grades, have an excellent rating.
(75 honor points or more) for the
quarter:
Grade 12 Earl Brown, Opal
Chavers, Margie Kirkland, AI
Schneider, Lavetta Wilson, Paul.
Johnson.
Grade 11-Emily Boyette, Billy.
Roberts, Vilura Straus.
Grade 10-Margaret Colemahn,
Alma Collingsworth, Belva Hull,
Verna Mahon, Melba Nedley, Su-
san- Saunders, Marigene Smith,
Arthur Soderberg, Marguerite Wil-
liams.
Grade 9-Henry ,Beard, Doroth>
Costin, Edward .Eells, Juliane Hin-
son, Imogene Manasco, Jack Shl-
ver, Madeline Soderberg, Charles
Stevens, W. D. Young.
Grade 8-Carolyn Baggett, Jull-
ette Darcey, Albert Gangneiux,
Amelia Gibson, Betty Jo Lane, On-
nie LeHardy, Virginia Pridgeon,
Coleman Schneider, .Tommy Kelly.
Grade 7-Lois Brown, Mary L.
Davis, Margaret Harrison, Alma J.
Hinson, Mary K. Knight, D. B.
Lewis, Don Marietta, Charles Mc-
Leod, Calvin Smith.

SATISFACTORY LIST
FOR FIRST SEMESTER
The following pupils have a to-
tal of 65 or more honor points for
the second quarter, with no "F's'"
for the semester:
Grade 12-Lillian Chandler, Flor-
ence Facione, Mary Guertin, Ma-
tha Hinson.
Grade 11 Willie Lee Beard,
Mabel Blount, Joyce Chatham,
Betty Darcey, Arthur Forehand,
Elaine Gore, Lunnette Hammock,
Elsie Nichols, Murnice Taunton.
Grade 10-Wilbur Darcey, John
Lane, Eugenie LeHardy, Wimberth
Monasco, Billy Montgomery, Ber-
nice Schneider, Pauline Smith.
Grade 9-Cordlia Arrant, Betty
Roberts.
Grade 8-Peggy Allen, Robert
Bellows, Jimmy Ruilford, Billy
Hammock, Robert Logan, Dorothy
Ernest, Harry Lee Trawick, Ann
Treadwell, Jim Windham.
Grade 7-Olivia Carter, Luther
Fuller, Mary Helen Gangneiux,
Jimmy Palmer, Otha Powell, Ellis
Stevens, Evelyn Strange, Sally
Trawick, George Wimberly.

GOSSIP
Who was M. T. at the show
with Sunday night?
What sophomore girl voted foi
herself as being the cutest girl in
school?
What girl is conceited enough
to believe that she will get the
most votes for being the most con-
ceited girl in school?
What senior girl told a certain
boy to tell another certain boy
that she was just c-r-a-z-y about
him?
What senior is known as "Worry
Wart" in the senior study hall?


APPROPRIATION ORDINANCE
IS PASSED BY CITY BOARD
The board of city commissioners
yesterday passed the appropriation
ordinance providing for salaries
and. other operating expenses of
the city for the year. Details of
appropriations were carried in the
January 12 Issue of The Star.
------- --------
GIVE AID TO FINNS
The United Brotherhood of Car-
penters and Joiners of America,
with headquarters in Lakeland,
this week made a contribution of
$2000 to the. Finnish relief fund.


Caldwell to Retire

From Political Life


Will Not Run for Re-election
Congress; Many Mentioned
For Vacancy


to


SAt exercises held in connection
with dedication of. a new postof-
fice at Pensacola last Tuesday,
Representative Millard Caldwell
of the Third congressional dis-
trict announced that he would not


seek re-election, stating that he
found it necessary to return to the
practice of law.
A number of prominent men in
the district have already been men-
tioned as prospective candidates,
and two have announced. Included
on the list are Stuart Gillis of De-
Funiak Springs, Philip Beall of
Pensacola, Otis Padgett of Mari-
anna andC G. Pierce Wood of
Quincy. Those announcing yester
day were Robert Sikes of Crest-
view and Parkhill Mays of Jeffer-
son county.



Lodge Notices

Order of Eastern Star
Meets op second and fourth.
Tuesday of each month in the
Masonic ,hall, over postoffice. Visi
tors who are' members are cor-
dially invited to be present.
American Legion
Gulf County Post 116 meets the
first and third Mondays of each
month at the Legion Hut.
Masonic Lodge
St. Joe Lodge 111 meets second
and fourth Friday nights at 8:30
o'clock in Masonic hall.


Griffin Grocery
and Market


# CANDIDATES

hve a big sized job
ahead of you between now and
May 7 if you are to land a place
on the -general' election ballot. You
must get your message out to the great-
est number of people it -is possible to
reach in the short time left before the
primary election.

TO AID IN THIS TASK, THE STAR
OFFERS YOU ITS FACILITIES FOR
REACHING A GREAT MANY GULF
COUNTY PEOPLE QUICKLY.


A Prional [Visit Is Best

If you have the time and the money to conudct a per-
sonal canvass of the county, this means is by far the
best way of rmeting people. If you haven't this much
time nor this much money to spend, then The Star is
your next best bet. Talk to the voters through
The Star the same as you would talk to them while sit-
ting out under a tree in the yard. Lay all your cards on
the table. Tell them why you feel you deserve their vote.
SIf you are fairly sure of the number of votes you will
Receive, a bare announcement of your candidacy will
probably be sufficient. But if you are not sure that you
have enough votes and to spare, better start using The
Star as soon as you can to convince the voters of Gulf
county that they should mark an "X" opposite your name
on the ballot. In no other way can you get your message
before so many people for so little money.



g Campaign Printing

TTLe S-tar ir amply equipped to handle all of your cam-
paign printing rapidly and at a price no higher than you
w.l2 pay elsewhere.
When you have your campaign cards, placards or circular
letters printed at The Star office you know that the work
will be dcne RIGHT. You will receive the kind of print-
ing you need not apologize for when you pass it out.
We rhAll be glad to lay out cards, placards or circular
letters. Bring your campaign printing problems to us
and ik us help you in any manner within our power.
Remember, the BEST printing costs no more than poor
printing.
WE CAN ALSO FURNISH YOU WITH BUMPER
SIGNS IN A VARIETY OF SIZES, ASBES-
G5O MATS AND OTHER NOVELTIES



THE STAR
"Your Home Town Newspaper"

Progressively Serving the People of Port St. Joe
and Gulf County


BUILDS8, HOME
Paty Postonries BUILDS HOME
t O P C. H, Johnson. who came here
Shaking Here recently from Norib Carolina,.has
-n: ea purchased a tract of land at Four-
--Mile Point, east of this city, and
Cold Weather Interrupts Schedule; is building himself a modern resl-
SWill Return to City In dence among the palm and oak
About Two Weeks trees.

Cold weather forced a postpone- SCL ASS IFIED A S
ment of the political rally sched- L AD
uled for this city Monday in be- ROO'S-.RENT '
half of B. F. Paty, candidate for
governor, but arrangements were FOR RENT-3 furnished rooms;
made during Mr. Paty's visit for lights, water and heat; $5 week.
a meeting .in the Centennial audi- W. L. Bragg, Oak Grove. 1-19
torium in about two weeks.
Mayor Joe Sharit, following a IF YOU have a room for rent,
conference with Mr. Paty, said he why not place a classified adver-
tisemnent'in The Star. The cost is
would be glad to handle .plans for low and returns ard gratifying. .
the meeting and is expected to in- Try it today. tf
troduce the candidate.
During his visit in this city Mr. FO REN
Paty distributed copies of his 24- FOR RENT-Large trailer with
point platform for the development built-on room and porch; lights
of Florida's natural resources. as and water; $4 week unfurnish-
well as his stand on all major is- ed; $$5 week furnisred. W. L.
sues of the campaign. Bragg, Oak Grove. 1-19tf
-'_ . t[ --_ _


THE STAR, PORT ST. JGE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


.FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 194()


PAGE TWO








RA J 4 E S R R S. JE U


STATE RANKS FIRST
While Florida is usually thought
of as a tourist state, it ranks high
in agriculture. Florida stands first
in the value of crops per acre, the
average being $285. Florida also
ranks first in the production of
Sumatra tobacco, winter grown
tomatoes, snap beans, egg plants,
peppers, Irish potatoes, celery, let-
tuce, melons and strawberries.


MAC'S TAXI
Day and Night Service
Standard Service PHONE
Station 1011
Reid Ave. at 2nd
I


HAVE YOU TRIED
LeHARDY'S PINK TIP
COLD CAPSULES
Hundreds have tried them and
recommend them highly
Unconditionally Guaranteed


DR.: J. C. COE
DENTIST --
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday. By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St., Joe


SOLOMON'S

Pasteurized

MILK
Pasteurized for Your Protectior












BEST FOR PURITY,
QUALITY and TASTE


SOLOMON'S

DAIRY
Distributors for
BRUCE'S JUICES
IVEY VANLANDINGHAM t
Local Representative
S^,----:.--I---..


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There is no substitute for the
value of REAL Ice.
THE WELL-INFORMED
USE ICE
Deliveries by Phone
or Regular Route

PHONE 47
1 0-
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ST. JOE ICE

COMPANY
MAX KILBOURN, Prop


'Cat and Canary' Alive

With Chills and Chuckles
w __ _


CONE TO RUN FOR
U. S. SENATE SEAT
Governor Fred P. Cone last
Thursday announced his candidacy
for the United States senate, the
office now held by Charles O. An-
drews.
"In taking this step I am
prompted by the fact that a na
tional emergency exists,' said the
governor, "and many people over
the state feel that my long experi-
ence in state affairs and more re-
cently as governor, qualify me to
give the people able andi fearless
representation in the senate."
----r-----
MARTIN NOT TO ENTER
GUBERNATORIAL RACE
Former Governor John W. Mar-
tin, frequently mentioned' as a
prospective candidate for gover-
nor, said he would not enter the
race either for governor or United
States senator.
"I have built up a business in
Jacksonville and I am not.pre*
pared to sacrifice that to re-enter
politics," said Martin. "I shall al-
ways be ready to serve my peo-
ple but I shall leave the fur-
ther seeking of high office to
others."
LEGAL ADVERTISING


NOTICE OF REGULAR
MUNICIPAL ELECTION
Notice is hereby given that the
regular municipal election for the
election of one City Commissioner
for the full term of three years
for the City of Port Saint Joe will
be held in the City Hall in the
City of Port Saint Joe on Tuesday,
February 20th, 1940.
The polls will open at 8 o'clock
A. M, and close at 7 o'clock P. M.
Eastern Standard Time.
Signed,
M. P. TOMLINSON,
2-16 City Auditor and Clerk.
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA,
IN PROBATE.
GUARDIAN'S NOTICE TO SELL
REAL ESTATE
Notice is hereby given to all
whom it may concern that Cliffora
J. Varnadore, as Guardian of Clar-
ice Viola Varnadore and Cary
Lawson Whitfield, minors, will on
the 10th day of February A. D.,
1940, apply to the Honorable Thos.
R. L. Carter, County Judge in and
for said county, at 10 o'clock A. M.
or as soon thereafter as the mat-
ter may be heard, for authority to
sell at private sale the following
described real estate in said coun-
ty, to-wit:
A right-of-way over the land
hereinafter described, and the
right to construct, maintain and
operate thereon pipe lines for
the conveyance or transportation
of petroleum and petroleum prod-
ucts and benzol, or any other
material or substance which can
be conveyed through a pipe line,
or any one or more of said sub-
stances; said right-of-way being
through and upon that certain
tract of land situated, in Gulf
County, State of Florida, de-
scribed as follows:
East half of Northeast quarter
(E% of NE%) Section 3, Town-
ship 4 South, Range 10 West.
West half of Northwest quar-
ter (W%/ of NW%) .Section 2,
Township 4 South, Range 10
West.
which application will be based
upon petition for such sale now
on file in said Court.
Dated this 15th day of January
A. D., 1940.
CLIFFORD J. VARNADORE,
1-19 2-9 Guardian.
NOTICE OF REGISTRATION
Notice is hereby given that the
registration books of the City of
Port St. Joe, Florida, will be open
for the purpose of registration of
all qualified electors who are quali-
fied, under Ordinance No. 35X and
70X and Chapter 18816 Laws of
Florida, Acts of 1937.
'Said books will be opened on
January 31st, 1940, and will remain
open for registration purposes un-
til February 9, 1940, between the
hours of 9 o'clock A. M. and 12 M.,
and 2 o'clock P. M. until 5 o'clock
P. M. each day except Sundays
and holidays. All persons desiring
to reg-ister shall call at the City
Hall for such pur-ose.
Signed,
M. P. TOMLINSON,
City Auditor and Clerk as
Registration Officer, City
of Port Saint Joe. 3t


Plays at Port Theater Wednesday;
Greta Garbo In New Role Sun-
day; Double Feature Tuesday

"The Cat and the Canary," com-
ing to the Port theater Wednes-
day only, is a rare combination of
fine acting and of consummate
handling of sliding panels, secret
passageways, fearsome, clutching
hands and of all the devices ever
conceived for striking terror.
Before "The Cat" appears on the
scenee, Bob Hope, Paulette Goddard
and four others of the cast pro-
ceed to a deserted mansion in the
Louisiana bayous to hear a read-
ing of the will of the deceased
owner. Miss Goddard, named as
the heiress, is terrified to learn
that a second heir will be named
if she is insane or dead in a
month's time. Then "The Cat" ap-
pears.
The story goes forward with
"The Cat" murdering the lawyer
in charge of the estate by grasp-
ing him from a hidden panel in
the library. And: then "The Cat"
terrifies Miss Goddard, despite all
Hope dan do to gag away her fears.
But telling more -of the plot would
spoil it. The identity of "The Cat"
will amaze moviegoers, and it is
virtually impossible to identity
before it admits who it is.
Garbo Laughs
"Ninotchka," Greta Garbo's first
venture into romantic comedy, is
the attraction at the Port theater
Sunday and, Monday. She plays the
part of a girl reared in the stern
code of Soviet Russia, who is sent
to Paris on a government mission.
She falls in love with a debonair
French count, played by Melvyn
Douglas, and fails in' negotiations
to sell some confiscated jewels of
a Russian grand -duchess. The
duchess, also in love with, the
count, trades the jewels on condi-
tion that Ninotchka return to Rus-
sia at once. But the wily count
maneuvers until Ninotchka is sent
on another mission to Constanti-
nople, where he induces her to
marry him.
A hilarious new comedy team Is
introduced in Felix Bressart, Sig


Rumann and Alexander GGranach,
playing three Russian commisars.
Ina Claire plays the duchess and
Bela Lugosl the chief commissar.
"Henry Goes Arizona"
Outdoor romance and breathless
thrills are combined with comedy
to present an enjoyable treat in
"Henry Goes Arizona," screening
at the Port theater Tuesday and
starring Frank Morgan.
The picture unfolds an amusing
story of a Broadway vaudeville ac-

Join President Roosevelt
In His Fight Against In-
fantile Paralysis by-


Attending the
Birthday Ball

Tuesday Night
--- at the --
Centennial Auditorium
TICKETS $1.50

HAUSER'S
DEPARTMENT STORE


tor who goes to an Arizona ranch
to claim his heritage. When he ar-
rives to discover that a bowler hat
and spats are. not appreciated in
the west, and that outlaws con-
trol the district, things begin to
happen.
Virginia Weidler, as a young-
ster wise in the ways of the west,
finally shows Henry how to solve
his. problems. Others in the cast
are Slim Summerville and, Guy
Kibbee adding many laughs, and
Douglas Fowley as. tue villa:n.
The second feature Tuesday Is
Johnny Mack Brown in "Desperate
Trails.'


EYES EXAMINED




Glasses fitted when needed
Made In Our Own Laboratory
All Work Unconditionally
Guaranteed
Office Hours: 9 a.m. to 6 p. m.

DR. G. T. NEWBERRY
OPTOMETRIST
PANAMA CITY, FLA.


MOVING?

We have the sub-agency for the

MAYFLOWER VAN LINES
and can move your furniture any place in the
United States, Canada or Mexico.
Full Insurance Carried At All Times


'Red' Horton's Transfer


PHONE 70


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


Notice to Electors of Gulf County

You are hereby notified that according to House Bill No. *
1630 all Voters must Register or Re-register to be ^
eligible to vote in the May Primaries.
This is to notify that the Registration Books will be open
from February 5th to March 4th, inclusive in the various *
Precincts, as follows:
WEWAHITCHKA, Precinct No. 1, at Court House, C. *
G. Rish, Supervisor.
EWING'S STILL, Precinct No. 2, at Father Kemp's *
Minnie Kemp, Deputy Supervisor.
WHITE CITY, Precinct No. 3, at Carter Ward's, Mrs. *
: Della Spotts, Deputy Supervisor.
KENNEY MILL, Precinct No. 4, at Doctor's Office, Mrs. 0
J. B. Trawick, Deputy Supervisor. '
DALKEITH, Precinct No. 5, at Edgar Laner Store, Mi y
D. E. Prescott, Deputy Supervisor.
OVERSTREET, Precinct No. 6, at Kinard Home, Mr.
T. J. Kinard, Deputy Supervisor.
PORT ST. JOE, Precinct No. 7, next City Barbershop,
Mrs. Cary Taunton, Deputy Supervisor.
HIGHLAND VIEW, Precinct No. 8, at Forehand Gar-
age, Mr. W. C. Forehand, Deputy Supervisor.
Respectfully yours,

C. G. RISH,
Supervisor of Registration.
O* $** SO4**0 '0 0 St*S 0S0eSOSOS


^L- 'jI / /"y J
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dull, logy, headache and irritable.
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temper try

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Your druggist will be glad to sell you Dr. Miles
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and be prepared when over-taxed nerves threaten to
interfere with your work or spoil your pleasure.
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-------------


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 1940


PAGE THREE








PAGE~~~~~~- FORTESAPR T OGL OJTFOIAFIAJNAY2,14


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
undel- Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year........$2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months..........65c

-48 Telephone 51 j-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken' word
is lost; the printed word remains.

QUIET CONGRESSIONAL SESSION?
The administration has been hoping that
the present session of congress will be brief,
quiet and harmonious. But the chance of that
hope being realized seems dark indeed. For
the Republicans, along with that.influential
bloc of the.Democratic party which is cool to
the New .Deal, are apparently determined to.,
make a showing. They have plenty of bones
to pick, and it looks as if they intend to pick
them clean.
First and foremost issue is the budget. We
do not believe that congress, in an election
year, will reduce appropriations to any great'
extent. If congress finally approves another
big spending budget it will-have to either levy
new taxes to raise the money or raise the
present legal debt limit of $45,000,000,000. At
the moment the odds seem to favor the lat-
ter course-new taxes to produce sufficient
revenue are politically dangerous.
Second on the list of unsolved problems is
national defense. There is general agreement
that our defense facilities must be strength-
ened. At; the same time, opinion on the ad-
minisfiafion's two billion dollar military pro-
gram is far from unanimous.
Third leading issue is the reciprocal trade
laws, which must be again renewed if Sec-.
retary of State Hull is to continue to make
trade deals with other countries. It will be
proposed that all trade agreements must be
approved individually by congress, and Mr..
Hull is against this on the grounds that it
would defeat the purpose of the act. This
promises to be quite a fight and odds now
seem to narrowly favor Mr. Hull coming out
on top.
There will be another hot time on Capitol
Hill when Secretary Edison's proposal to give
the president sweeping emergency powers,
unprecedented in our history, comes to the
floor. The conservative group will fight this
to the last ditch, and both business and or-
ganized labor have lined up together in op-
position.
This doesn't exhaust the list of big issues
by a long shot-it just touches the high spots.
Most of the lawmakers of both parties will
be playing politics to the limit-congress is
simply alive with potential presidential and
vice-presidential candidates. And all of them,
as convention time nears, are going to do
everything possible to put themselves in the
limelight. So the chance of this being a quiet
session seems about as poor as that of the
proverbial snowball in Hades.

POWER FROM ATOM IS "OUT'
Robert Millaken of the California Institute
of Technology, states that we already know
how to make fuel from coal, so that when
our oil supply is depleted we can fall back
upon that for a substitute, and when that is
gone we shall get power indirectly from the
sun, from the wind and tidal machines and by
growing and burning plants for just that pur-
pose. But, says he, "So far as tapping the
energy locked up in the atom is concerned,
we can count that out."
And here we were looking forward to the
day when we could drop a handful of sand
into our motor car and make a complete tour
of the United States without replenishing our
fuel supply.


WHAT WILL SPRING BRING FORTH?
The war, the authorities say, will remain
fairly quiet until spring-no one is expected
to start a major offensive while the bad
weather holds. And in the spring, it is fore-
cast in some quarters, Hitler will make his
bid for victory. Time works with the allies
and against the reich. The military men
mainly think that Hitler must win this year,
or lose.
The Russo-Finnish controversy still holds
the spotlight. To quote the military authori-
ties once more, it is felt that the Red army
has been bad-but not as bad as it has ap-
peared to most laymen. The arctic weather
has helped the Finns, who know the terrain
and are masters of guerrilla tactics. And the
Russian troops, at the start at least, com-
prised third class, not first class divisions.
Stalin apparently woefully underestimated
the spirit of Russia's little neighbor.
There is considerable speculation as to what
will happen once the Finnish business is
settled. A Russian drive against India would
not startle the experts. And if that should
happen, England would be in a tough spot.
.It would mean that she must divert great'
quantities of troops, equipment and supplies
frori the continent,.and thus weaken her sup-
port of France on the western front. England.
would have to give every effort to beating-
the Soviet-a successful Russian drive to the
east would mean the shattering of the great
empire's lifeline.
There is still talk of the possibility of a
"peace offensive" this year, with the pope,
President Roosevelt and Mussolini taking the
leading roles, although it is hard to visualize'
the latter in the role of peace-maker after
his two recent territorial conquests. At the
moment, the outlook for peace seems black.
indeed-but change can take place fast.

THE GOLDEN EGG
The United States government right now is:
a goose that's laying golden eggs for Euro- i
pean countries.
Some five years ago, congress gave Presi-
dent Roosevelt the power to call in all gold
and set a price on it. It was then selling for
$20.67 an ounce and he boosted the price to
$35 an ounce, with the hope that commodity
prices would go up proportionately. But the' '
other prices didn't-and the price of gold re-
mains the same because it was fixed by law
at the urgent request of the president.
Now anybody or any country outside the
United States can buy 69 per cent more in
this country with each ounce of gold than we
can. In other words, if you were in Canada b
and had an ounce of gold you could buy $15
more worth of goods than if you had the same s
ounce 6f gold within the borders of the United
States.
This gives foreign nations with gold an op- 3
portunity to buy materials atjess than halt
their value. For instance, a foreign power or-
ders airplanes worth a million dollars from
an American manufacturing company. It pays
for these by selling the United States govern-
ment a million dollars' worth of gold, but at
the increased price our government in reality
gets but $310,000 worth-where it used to get
48,374 ounces for a million dollars it now gets
but 28,571 ounces.
And right now there doesn't seem to be
much that can be done to prevent us from
-ontinuing to finance the European war.
Looks like old Uncle Sam was the goat
during the World War and is also the goat
-or jackass, if you prefer-for this war.-
t
Governor Fred Cone has announced that
he will be a candidate for the U. S. senate.
He doesn't seem to realize that there is some
sort of precedent that will not allow a man
to step from the governor's chair to the sen-
ate. A lot of governor's in the past have tried
it, but only one made the grade-Hardee- .
and circumstances were unusual at that time.

"' Port St. Joe's tomorrow bids fair to achieve
a brilliance not visioned by the pioneers of
her yesterday.


The -Low Down
from
Willis Swamp

Editor The Star:
You don't pick up a paper, or
meet somebody on the street with-
out the first thing you see or hear
is "What's wrong with the coun-
;ry?" But you don't need a crystal
ball or be a Sherlock Holmes to
reduce the answer.
In the early days when this here
country was growing' up and getting'
its feet on terra firma-and was
going' to bed at 9 p. m. versus 4
a. m.-and, our eye was clear, we
were a pretty sensible outfit. Ana
our grandpappys built up .quite a
U. S. A. for us.
To get a railroad into a new
country, or to get a bank opened
up .so the foaks would alye a safe
place for their money, was quite a
problem, and when somebody could
be found to take the risk, the old-
timers' gave 'em a welcome.
But today it's open season on
anybody with more than two
bucks. So money has lit out for
the tall timber, and it won't be,
back 'till the atmosphere clears
up. In fact, down here in the
swamp there's a banker hiding be-
lind every other cypress tree.
Brothers and sister, it's as
plain as the handwriting in Bal-
3hazzar's time there in Babylon.
Yours with the low down,
JO SERRA.
----

Six-Day Wild West

Card At State Fair

Top Notch Performers of Nation
Will Be On Hand to
Compete

Florida, third among the nation's
great cattle states, will resound to
the cry of "ride 'em cowboy" for
six days, at the Florida State Fair.
It won't be just another rodeo
show. To make sure that the na-
tion's top notch performers will be
on hand to compete, contracts
have been closed with the Mid-
West Rodeo corporation with Joc
and Harry Greer, the rough riding
Wisconsin sheriffs, to roth~i up
:he hands. The same stellar per-
formers contesting in the Detroit
rodeo this month will come to
Tampa.
Not only will the Greers bring
;he leading cowboys of the country
mut they have also contracted foi.
:he appearance of many cowgirls
who will not only give riding dem-
onstrations, but will also ride the


bucking broncs and steers.
The entire rodeo will be pre-
sented in front of the grandstand
each afternoon of .the six days.
More than 100 head of stock will
be shipped in and as many more
wild cattle from the Florida range
will be rounded up to augment the
western broncs. It will be the big-
gest rodeo ever presented in
Tampa.

KAY PREDICTS DARK HORSE
ENTRY IN GOVERNOR RACE
Russell Kay, in his "Too Late to
Classify" column this week, pre-
dicts a dark:horse entry in. the
gubernatorial race. Says Kay:
"He ;is .a young man with an
enviable .business record, possess-
ing a sound knowledge of law, an
able speaker .with a most pleasing
personality who will have ample
financial backing and strong sup-
port.
"While fairly known in fraternal
circles and his own section, he will
need to be sold to the average
voter, but he plans a vigorous
campaign andi will "get around"to
appear in every town before elec-
tion day.
"Who?? Well, yod guess!"


Celebrate With

Him Tuesday

Night
./ ," .


At the
Birthday Ball
Sponsored by the St. Joe
Papermakers' Union
Compliments of the

St. Joe Furniture

Company


NOT A NEW BELT BUT A DIET,


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, ,FLORIDA


--FR,PAY, JANUARY 26, 1940


J







FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 1940

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, IN
AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA. IN CHANCERY.
WALTER CLIFFORD,Y Plaintiff,
vs. KATHARINE C. CLIFFORD,
Defendant.
THE STATE OF FLORIDA:
TO: Katharine C.' Clifford, 1303
North Seventh Street, Tacoma,
Washington.
It is hereby ordered that you are
required to appear oh the 5th day
of February, A. D. 1940, before the
above entitled Court to the Bill of
Complaint filed against you in the
above entitled cause, and "The
Star" is hereby designated as the
newspaper in which this Order
shall be published once a week for
four consecutive weeks.
Witness my hand and the seal
of said Court, this 25th day of
January, 1940, at Wewahitchka, in
the State and County aforesaid.
J. R. HUNTER,
(Court Clerk Circuit Court
Seal) Gulf County, Flqrida.
E. CLAY. LEWIS, JR., 1-26
Solicitor for Plaintiff. 2-23









SATURDAY, JANUARY 27

Double Feature

CHARLES

STARRETT
--in --

"The Man from

Sundown".
NO. 2


Also "KIT CARSON"


SUNDAY MONDAY
JANUARY 28 29

Garbo Laughs
In Her First Comedy Role!
GRETA GARBO

MELVYN" DOUGLAS

Don't Pronounce-See It!


News


Popeye Cartoon


TUESDAY, JANUARY 30

Double Feature
POPGUN MORGAN!


- THRILL NO. 2



I-d



LATEST NEWS


WEDNESDAY, JAN. 31

THRILLS-CHILLS
A Human Cat-Stalking
Human Lives at Night!



-- *.- M Pu. l


THE TARPOR ST.JOE.GUL COUTY, LORDA PGE I'


Society


MISSIONARY CIRCLES
IN MEETINGS MONDAY
Circle one of the Methodist Mis-
sionary society was entertained
Monday afternoon at the home of
Mrs. M. L. Fuller. Following regu-
lar opening ceremonies, "How to
Pray" was given by Mrs. George
Patton, and a poem, "I'm Thank-
ful, Lord, for Thee," was given by
Mrs. A. M. Jones. A short business
session followed, at which time
plans were made for circle one to
entertain the other circles at the
home of Mrs. Jones. The next reg-
ular meeting will be at the home
of Mrs. B. H. Smith. Delicious re-
freshments were served by the
hostess.
Circle two met Monday after-
noon with Mrs. George Suber and
elected the following officers for
the year: Chairman, Mrs. Charles
Brown; secretary-treasurer, Mrs.
R. H. Brinson; publicity, Mrs. Eva
Lovett. Other officers will be ap-
pointedi by the chairman. The de-
votional was led by Mrs. Ralphi
Swatts after which a social hour
was enjoyed.
Circle three. was entertained
Monday afternoon by Mrs. Frank-
lin Jones. Officers were elected as
follows: Chairman, Mrs. E. Ram-
sey; secretary-treasurer, Mrs-. ~.
Jones; program chairman, Mrs.
Jesse Bradbury. Plans were dis-
cussed for increasing the member-
ship, after which the hostess
served sandwiches, cookies ane
hot chocolate to members present
and a guest, Mrs. B. W. Eells.

BAPTIST MISSIONARY
SOCIETY MEETS
The regular Royal Service pro-
gram for the month was held at
the church Monday afternoon by
the circles of the Baptist Missioh-
ary society. The Lydia circle was
in charge of the program, with
Mrs. W. C. Pridgeon as leader. In-
teresting talks were given by Mes-
dames A.' E. MoCaskey, Slater
Cox, C. Palmer, A. L. Ezell and
Charles McClellan. Plans were
made for a delegation to attend
the quarterly meeting of the North-
west Coast W. :M. U. association
at Panama City, after which the
meeting was dismissed.

Robert Logan left the latter part
of last week to accept a position
in Birmingham, Ala. Mrs. Logan
and children will move to McClel-
lan avenue until the end of the
school term.

Miss Claudia Houstoun was a
week-end visitor in Tallahassee.
f
Mrs. J. J. Brown and Miss Er-
line Brown of Apalachicola were
guests Friday of Mrs. Mary Lovett
and Mr. and Mrs. Philip Lovett.

Miss Martha Belin will spent
the week-end in Tallahassee visit-
ing friends.

Marc Fleishal, Sr., and Marc, Jr.,
of Shamrock, were guests last
week of Mr. and Mrs. Basil E.
Kenney.

Mrs. M. L. Johnson of Pensacola
is visiting her brother-in-law and
sister, Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Gloeklier.

Mr. and Mrs. M. K. Hurlbut re-
turned Saturday from Donaldson-
ville, where they spent part of
last week.

Mr. and Mrs: Benny Grace vis-
ited Sunday in Florala, Ala., with
relatives.
fr *&*


Personals

LANETA DAVIS, Editor


At the Churches

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL
Rev. Frank Dearing, Rector
Services at St. James Episcopal
church every Sunday evening at
7:45 o'clock.
Church school every Sunday at
10 o'clock.
Holy Communion services on the
third Sunday at 9:30 a. m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. J. W. Sisemore, Minister
9:45 a. m.--Sunday School.
11;00 a. m.-Morning Worship.
7:00 p. m.-B. Y. P. U.
8:00-p. m.-Preaching service.
W. M. U., Monday, 3:00 p. m.
Prayermeeting Wednesday, 7:30 p.
m. Teachers meeting, Thursday,
7:30 p. m.

ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Rev. E. T. Corbin, Pastor
Full-time services
10:15 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.-Preaching Service.
7:'30 p. m.-Evangelistic service.
Pra-yermeeting 'every Wednesday
night.
METHODIST CHURCH
D. E. Marietta, Minister
Services Every Sunday
10:00 a. m.-Church School.
11:00 a. m.-Morning worship.
7:30 p. m.-Evening worship.

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
10:00 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.-Preaching service.
8:00 p. m.. second and fourth
Sundays-Evening services.
_____j(_____,
GIRL SCOUTS MEET
The regular meeting of the Girl
Scouts was held Monday afternoon
with Miss Claudia Houstoun in
charge. Troop leaders were elected
at this time. After the meeting
a lunch was enjoyed on the beach:
after which "Taps" was sung.

Mr. and Mrs. Basil E. Kenney
expect to spend the week-end in
Montgomery. They will be accom-
panied home by Mrs. Thomas E.
Kenney of Franklin, Ky., who will
spend& the remainder of the winter
here as their guest.

Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Paty of Mi-
ami and Mr. and Mrs. Ossie
Powell, Charles Hartley and Mau-
rice Tripp of Palm Beach visited
in the city Monday and Tuesday.

Mrs. J. E. Rollins and daughter,
Peggy, expect to spend the week.
end in Gordon, Ala., visiting with
relatives.

Join President Roosevelt
In His Fight Against In-
fantile Paralvsis by-


=mC iT Mr. and Mrs. D. H. Bynum of
Wewahitchka were guests Monday
SAdded Joy of Mr. and Mrs. Philip Lovett.
Hoagy Carmichael Musical *
Comedy Rev. Frank Dearing of Panama
City was the guest Saturday of
l l^^Wl ^Mr. .and Mrs. Fred Curtis.


M1s'. Louise' Maddox and son,
George lfave returned to their
home in Slocomb, Ala. While in
the city they were guests of Mrs.
Nora Howard.


BE GAY!
for a Great Cause


PRESBYTERIAN AUXILIARY
ELECTS OFFICERS FOR YEAR
The members .,of the Presby-
terian Auxiliary met Monday af-
ternoon at the home of Mrs. Basil
Kenney to elect new officers for
the ensuing year, as follows:
Mrs. Thos. R. L. Carter, presi-
dent; Mrs. E, H. Horton, vice-
president; Mrs. H. McKinnon, sec.
retary-treasurer.
Mrs. Robert Logan and Mrs.
Kenney were in charge of the pro-
gram for the afternoon. Topic was
"Foreign Missions."
After the business, a social hour
was enjoyed at which time the
hostess served sandwiches and
coffee.
A prayer hour will be held next
Monday afternoon at 3 o'clock at
the home of Mrs. Kenney.

MRS. W. A. WOODS
HOSTESS TO BRIDGE CLUB
Mrs. W. A. Wood was hostess to
the Tuesday Bridge club this week.
Two tables were in progress and
at the conclusion of play, prizes
were presented to Mrs. George
Hudson, high, and Mrs. Billy Al-
len, second high. A salad plate and
soft drinks were served by the
hostess to those present.


REDDY KILOWATT Says






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for 1940 and enjoy the advantages of more con-
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THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE. GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE FlIV


Buy Your Tickets NOW
for the
Birthday Ball

Tuesday Night


Danley Furniture

Company
Gulf County's Oldest and
'Largest Home Furnishers
s. '







PAG SIX TH STR OTS.JE UL CUT. LRD RIAJNAY2,1


Florida's shoreline is.about.4400
mi:'es long-greater than that or
any other coastal state.

One hundred million pounds of
food fish were produced commei-
cially in Florida in 1938.


Most every man's pursuit inlife.
tS Joe In Path


is a hobby. And most 'every wom-
an's pursuit dn life is -a hubby.

Concrete mixing is controlled at
a signal board for the Grand Cou-
lee dam in Washington.


I VOTE FOR I






f= s



City Commissioner



experience in the newspa- =
per field, my interest in
Sthe development of Port
SSt. Joe and my complete
knowledge of the affairs
I--
of the city well qualify
I me for the position.


If elected, I pledge my-
self to fulfill the duties
of the office faithfully,
fairly and ,efficiently for
the benefit of the people.


I Will Greatly Appreciate Your

Support In My Behalf
(Political Advertisement)
I ,,,,,., ,,, i,, aII,, I11,, l I, |I,,IIt !I | 11UII III I11m Im m II| m m III IIInm m m mII I P -


jTOAY'S CROWN IS HW

,HIGHER OCTANE
(IMPROVED ANTI.KNOCK)


* CONTROLLED VOLATILITY
(OUICK START, FAST PICK-UP)

L BALANCED POWER
(FROM IDLING TO HEAVY PULLS)


a SOLVENT PROPERTIES
(REDUCING CARBON DEPOSITS)

,POWER FRACTIONS
(MORE MILES PER GALLON)


--- ---- -----P


GROWN GASOLINE


IS GIVEN HIGHEST


ANTI-KNOCK RATING


IN ITS LONG HISTORY.


STANDARD OIL STATIONS

AND DEALERS NOW


of Sun Eclipse

Moon to Blot Out Old Sol In An-
nular "Blackout" Visible
Here April 7

Port St. Joe will join the capi-
tals of Europe in a "blackout" on
April 7, but it will not be for the
reason of air raids. On that date
an annular, or ring, eclipse of the
sun will sweep over this section.
An annular eclipse is so named
because the rim of the sun will
show in a narrow ring of light all
around the dark moon. This is due
to the fact that the moon is a bit
too far away for its bulk to cover
the sun completely.
This spectacle is something that
comes to most persons only once
in a lifetime, and many never see
it. The eclipse will have a dura-
tion of six minutes, which is much
longer than most total eclipses.
During that time the moon will
cover 93 per cent of the sun's sur-
face.
Port St. Joe will be near the
southern edge of the ring shadow,
the path entering southern Califor-
nia from the Pacific ocean about
1 p. m., passing over Chihauhua,
Mexico, San Antonio, Texas, New
Orleans, La., and passing into the
Atlantic Ocean at Brunswick, Ga.
It will be visible in this city be-
tween 4:30 and 5 p. m., eastern
standard time.
C-------
AMEND ORDINANCE

The city commissioners yester-
day passed an ordinance amending
the present election ordinance
providing that city elections be
held yearly on the third Tuesday
in February. The previous ordin-
ance provided that elections be
held every two years.
k-
GASPARILLA FEB. 5

Tampa will stage her great Gas-
parilla carnival on Monday, Febru-
ary 5, a feature, event in connec-
tion with the Florida State Fair,
which opens January 30 and con-
tinues through February 10.

Mosquitoes are found as high ab
5000 feet by flying entomologist
studying the travel habits of in-
sect pests.

Alligator lizards have an appe-
tite for black widow spiders and
also enjoy cockroaches, grasshop.
pers and centipedes.
k-------
A Pennsylvania dentist has in-
vented a giant forceps for use by
mail planes, in picking up airma:.
on the wing.


YOU CAN HELP

















Attend the
Birthday Ball

Tuesday Night
Sponsored by Local No. 379
International Brotherhood
of Papermakers
TUESDAY NIGHT

ZIM'S
Men's Wear
FOR BETTER WEAR


Standard Putting

Out New Gasoline

Crown Gasoline is Given Highest
Octane Rating In Its
Long History

Standard oil stations and dealers
in Port St. Joe are today offering
their customers the new, improved
Crown Gasoline-a popular priced
gasoline that meets specifications
for premium anti-ltock perform-
ance.
Road tests have proved that
this new gasoline gives motorists
quicker starting, faster pick-up,
smoother operation, more mileage
and a new high in knockless
power. It also contains a unique
solvent action, which helps to re-
duce the tendency of carbon for-
mation.
Today's purchasers of popular
price gasoline, demand the per-
`ormance heretofore obtainable
only in premium grade at premium
ricec, and the development of this
new gasoline was to meet this de-
mand.
The new motor fuel is on sale
in Port St. Joe at J. Lamar Miller's
Standard Service, Central Standard
Service station and M. G. Lewis &
Sons Garage.
------- ------
TOLL RATES TO BE
PLACED ON CANAL

(Continued from Page 1)
bonds voted for the project. Ai
the time the bonds were voted, the
people were given to understand
that the canal would be taken over
by the federal government, bus
such has not been done.
The commissioners have not yet
decided what method will be used
in levying the toll-whether by the
ton, by the mile or by craft-and
will study traffic through the
caial during the next 30 days be-
fore reaching a decision.

HAUSER NAMED PRESIDENT
OF BUSINESS MEN'S ASSN.
At a called meeting of the Port
St. Joe Business Men's association
last week, Joe Hauser was elected
president of the organization, fill-
ing the vacancy caused by the re-
cent death of C. A. LeHardy.
----.--.4--------
RESOLUTION OF RESPECT
The Port St. Joe Business Men's
association in regular session Jan-
uary 18, and meeting for the first
time since the death of our beloved
president, C. A. LeHardy, and
electing one of our members to
succeed him, do hereby
Resolve, That the death of Mr.
LeHardy has taken from us one
of our most worthy and devoted
members, one who held the re-
spect and confidence of his fellow
T.embers. and fellow' workers for
the betterment of the city of Port
St. Joe. H'e was an indefatigable
worker for what he considered, to
be right, and a wise counsellor on
many civic matters. It was owing
to his indomitable will that the as-
sociation was formed, and to him
may be attributed many successful
projects tending toward, the good
of the city. A genial and kindly
character, a helpful friend in time
of adversity, his absence will be
felt by all, and the cessation of
his labors is a great loss to this
organization which he helped to
build, and his place a hard one to
fill.
It is the will of this body to pay
tribute to our former president by
placing this resolution on the min-
utes of the association, and to fur-
ther express our respect by a mes-
sage of condolence to his widow
and family, to whom we extend our
utmost sympathy.
Joe Hauser, president.

ANDERSON BACK ON JOB
Otto Anderson was back at his
desk in the St. Joe Motor company
Wednesday after a siege of illness
lasting six weeks. Otto lost a little
weight, but otherwise is looking
good.


POLITICAL

ANNOUNCEMENTS
Paid Advertising


For County Judge
I hereby announce my candidacy
for the office of County Judge of
Gulf County, subject to the will of
the voters at the May primary.
Realizing the importance of this
office as a potent factor in the life
of the county and its interests, I
feel that I am well qualified for
the position. If I am honored as
your preference, I promise to give
fair, impartial administration and
will conduct the duties of the of-
fice to the best interests of all the
people.

D. H. "Hamp" BYNUM

FOR CITY

COMMISSIONER
PORT ST. JOE
I hereby announce my candidacy
for re-election to the office 61
City Commissioner, subject to,
the will;of the voters at the city
election February 20. If elected
I promise to carry on the affairs
of the city of Port St. Joe in
the same manner as heretofore,
working always for the best in-
teres.ts of the people. I will ap-
preciate your vote and support.
B. A. PRIDGEON

FOR CITY

COMMISSIONER
PORT, ST. JOE
I hereby announce my candi-
dacy for City Commissioner of
Port St. Joe in the city election,
February 20, 1940. If elected I
can assure the citizens of Port
St. Joe that I will lend every
effort possible to the needs of
"A City of Opportunity" in arv
efficient and economical man-
ner. Your vote and support will
be appreciated.
JIM BOUNDS

FOR CITY

COMMISSIONER
PORT ST. JOE
I herewith announce my candi-
dacy for the office of City Com-
missioner of Port St. Joe, sub-
ject to the will of the voters at'
the city election February 20.
I respectfully solicit the sup-
port and vote of every elector
who has the future of Port St.
Joe at heart, and if elected, I
will perform my duties to the
Iest of my ability and assure
everyone their equal rights.
W. S. SMITH

FOR COUNTY

COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 5 (Port St. Joe)
I hereby announce my candidacy
for the office of County Com-
missioner, District Five, subject
to the Democratic Primary.
I respectfully solicit your vote
and support.

GEORGE G. TAPPER


THE STAR,.PORT ST. JOE, GULF -COUNTY,. FLORIDA


.PAGE SIX


.FRIDAY, J.ANJUARY: 26, 1940