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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00065
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: January 5, 1940
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00065

Full Text





The Star-F"orida's fartest grow- -. Joeg-Site of O ,O 0
ing- little newspaper--dedicated t6 .... DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast.
the betterment -a-id up~ullding of et growing little. .bi .;l
the City of Port St Joe. the heart of the pine belt.

The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center

VOLUME Ill PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, T40 NUMBER 12


COLD WEATHER Plans are Underway FULLER I


FINALLY COMES For Birthday Ball


TO PORT ST. JOE

WEEK SEES FIRST FREEZE OF
DELAYED WINTER IN
THIS SECTION

Up to about ten days ago Port
St. Joe had not had what might
be called winter weather, but this
week saw three cold nights which
ideally broke the balmy hold of
autumn on this section.
_Unofficial readings gave a low
of 34 last Friday night-just above
freezing-31 Monday night and 32
Wednesday night. A slight rain,
followed by increased cold yester-
cay gave promise of a lower read-
ing last night.
According to the weather bu-
reau, little damage,, if any, is re-
ported in the fruit and vegetable
growing areas of the state. Flow-
ers and plants in the northern
portion of the state were killed
or nipped by the frost. The cola
wave is scheduled to end today or
tomorrow.


New Fire Truck

For City On Way

Expected to Arrive Next Week;
Cut In Insurance Rate Is
Anticipated

Chief Troy Jones stated yester-
day that he had received word
from the American-LaFrance Foam-
ite corporation at Elmira, N. 1.,
that the new fire truck ordered
recently by the city had been
shipped December 29 and that it
should arrive here January 10 or
12.
The truck, mounted on a Ford
chassis, has a pumping capacity of
500 gallons per minute with a 100-
gallon booster tank. It is modern
in every respect and it is thought
that acquisition of 'this new fire-
fighting equipment will be instru-
mental in securing a cut in the
present fire insurance rate.
A field engineer of the LaFrance
company will arrive here from At-
lanta to take charge of unloading
the truck.

DEMOCRATIC COMMITTEE
TO MEET HERE MONDA~
L. W. Owens, chairman of the
county Democratic committee, an-
nounced yesterday that a meeting
of the body will be held at the
c'ty hall Monday afternoon at 3
o'clock for the purpose of decid-
ing whether or not to send a mem-
ber of the county committee to
the state Democratic executive
committee meeting at St. Peters-
burg on January 12, and to discuss
other matters of importance.
An invitation is extended any-
one interested to be present at
this meeting.

MAYO ISSUES BOOKLET
A handsome booklet in color
presenting the industrial and ag-
ricultural opportunities of Florida a
was received yesterday from Na- I
than Mayo, commissioner of agri- I
culture. It is illustrated in color h
and is the most elaborate publica- s
tion of its kind yet put out by f,
Mayo's' office.
-REV. SISEMORE BACK
REV. SISEMORE BACK


Gulf County Chairman Lewis An-
ticipates Setting New High In
Infantile Paralysis Drive

E. Clay Lewis, Jr., Gulf county
chairman for the forthcoming
events in honor of President
Roosevelt's birthday, stated yester-
day that he has not yet -named
his assistants, but that the big an.
aual Birthday Ball is shaping up.
"We anticipate setting a new
high in Gulf county this year in
the drive for funds for the infan.
tile paralysis foundation," stated
Mr. Lewis, "and we are calling on
everyonee to aid, as the whole
county will benefit through these
funds and aid the national foun-
dation in carrying on a great
work.
"Of interest locally," he added,
"fifty per cent of all proceeds de-
rived from the ball and other
methods of raising funds arranged
in honor of the president's birth-
day, remain in Gulf county, and
this program is the same as it
was last year."
The foundation, sponsored by
President Roosevelt, is now -a na-
tional institution and will be ca,
ried on in the years to come by
influential surgeons, doctors, bust-
ness leaders and philanthropists.
The national organization is non-
profit'and last year the foundation
grossed $1,613,985 of which half ot
this amount remained in the coun-
ties where the events tiginated.


Quiet New Year

Week-End Here


Sunrise Ball At Centennial Build-
ing Ushers In 1940; Business
Houses Closed Monday

The new year of 1940 was
ushered in to Port St. Joe without
fanfare or bell-ringing, the only
noise heard being a couple of shots
from a gun at the midnight hour
and the blowing of a whistle at
the St. Joe Lumber & Export com-
pany mill.
The sunrise ball at the Centen-
nial auditorium was the main fea-
ture of New Year's Eve, dancing
beginning at 12:01 following the
singing- of "Auld Lang Syne" by
the assemblage. Music for the af-
fair was furnished by Bill Farm-
er's orchestra and specialties pre-
sented by the Hawaiian Trouba-
dors from DeFunlak Springs. The
dance was sponsored by the Volun-
teer Fire Department and the
Lions club.
Stores. were closed: Monday and
the city had all the aspects of a
deserted village, as practically
everyone was at home listening to
the "bowl" football games over
:heir radios or catching up on
heir sleep after attending the
lance, which lasted until 6 a. m. o
------- t,
BAND WILL GO TO FESTIVAL A
Plans are underway by the Port w
it. Joe high school band for the I
annuall music festival to be held at f
DeFuniak Springs March 27 to 30. t
directorr Dan Farmer states that c
he is preparing a number of new
elections for presentation at the $
estival.

SHIP ENGINEER IS VISITOR


Brinson Coody, engineer on the


Rev. and Mis. J. W. Sisemore USS Yaka, visited last Wednes-
and son and Miss Margie Costin day with his sister, Miss Myrttic
returned Sunday from Amarillo, Coody. Mr. Coody has just re-
Texas, where they spent the holl- turned from LeHavre, France. He
days with Rev. Sisemore's parents, sailed Thursday for Australia.


Fuller Warren, J-
torney, born at
who yesterday a
candidacy for the
ernor of Florida.
served two terms
tive in the legislate
Calhcun county a
Duval county. He
in Port St. Joe an


N RACE Unemployed May

i.. File New Claims


I Mut Be Eligible By. Registering
For Work and Reporting At
Employment Office

I J ilnary marks the beginning of
i a nr 'w calendar quarter for all
1 -t anants under the state unem
.l., nient compensation law, and
S many claimants who drew compen-
sation during the early part of
I: may be eligible to file a new
c laimnt according to Fred Brad-
Sshaw. director of the unemploy-
en compensation division of the

Tallahassee.
T loida Industrial Commission at

These claimants, if totally unem-
ployed two weeks before the be.
ginning of their new benefit year,
may file claims, for any benefits
accumulated during the past year
aand serve the required two weeks
acksonville at waiting period for the new benefit
Blountdtown, year, before it actually begins. The
announced his "benefit year" is the 52-week pe.
office of o- riod beginning on the day the
a warren has claimant files a valid claim.
as represent- fro Benefits first became payable in
ure, once from Florida in January, 1939, and if
nd once from
is well known the workers whose benefit year is
l on expiring are again unemployed;
d Gulf county. .......... ... .. ...
ht______ m i t d th


J~m e y iJ
-- ----4-, L~~
waiting
Methodist Ladies their s
Clain
Are In Charge of iity.
qualify
Subscription Drive must r
and av
report.
The publisher of The Star has Florida
never been a believer in waging regular
campaigns for subscriptions of-
fering prizes to those piling up
the largest number of "votes," Ignd
and with the opening of'the new
year is inaugurating a subscrip- T
tion drive with a "prize" that
will be of considerable benefit
to the "winners.0 Constit
The members of the Woman's Be
Missionary society of the Metho-
dist church this week will start
a drive to contact every resident Flori
of Port St. Joe and vicinity and tion
request that If they are not al- industry
ready subscribers to The Star 1949.
that they become subscribers. again
against
Fifty per cent of all money re- listed
ceived for new subscriptions primari
secured by the ladies and 25 s
per cent of all renewal subscrip- fabcs
tions secured will be turned
per, pa
over to the society for use in per, p
paying off indebtedness on the tomo
Methodist manse and other in- .cra,
debtedness incurred by the finig
church. fining
church.
eluding
Everyone who is approached ncident
and who is not already a sub- Incde
scriber to The Star, is urged to 0xes
Exem]
sign up for at least a year, as atn
the money realized by the mis- tion I
tion picl
sionary society will be utilized all
all raw
in a most worthy manner, finished
------------
.FIRE DAMAGES RESIDENCE as well
or films
The fire department was called aply
out about 2 o'clock Saturday night th t
o extinguish a blaze in the T. G.
or studi
lsobrook house on Hunter's Circle oAll o
which is occupied by W. G. AIsip. the end
The fire had started from a de- these
ect in the fireplace and burned whee
through the floor and into a linen tablish
loset. Damage from the fire and these ir
rater was estimated to be about of s
of sugaa
150. motion

QUINCY BANKER DIES
Mark W. Munroe, president of TO AT
he Quincy State Bank and one of M. P.
he wealthiest men in West. Flo- Sammie
da, died Tuesday of pneumonia and Byri
t the age of 80 years. He played to Pensa
prominent part in the develop- meeting
lent of West Florida, where he Coast (
as known to all as "Mr. Pat." America.


lay Iregslter anl serve L-Geir1
period before the start of
second benefit year.
ants must fulfill all elig!-
requirements in order to
for benefits in 1940. He
register for work, be able
ailable for work, and must
for work at. a office of the
State Employment Service
ly as instructed.
------+-------

ustries Given

'ax Concessions


utional Provision Should
Put to Work to Bring
Industries to St. Joe

la, by virtue of a constitu-
provision, exempts certain
.es from all taxation until
Taxes are not assessed
industrial plants estab-
subsequent to 1929, engaged
ly in the manufacture of
vessels, automobile tires,
and textiles, wood! pulp, pa-
per bags, fibre board, au-
es, automobile parts, alr-
aircraft parts, glass and
y manufactures and the re-
of oils and sugar, and in-
by-products or derivatives
to the manufacture of any
Products.
option from ad valorem tax-
granted until 1943 to mo-
ture studios and plants and
materials going into the
products of the studios,
as the finished products
These exemptions do not
o real estate other than
ed actually by the plants
los.
which should work toward
of bringing one or more
industries to Port St. Joe
everything is ideal for es-
lent of practically all of
dustries with the exception
glass and crockery and
pictures.

TEND SCOUT MEETING
Tomlinson, B. B. Conklin,
McCall, Dwight Marshall
on Eells, Jr., expect to go
acola Monday to attend a
and banquet of the Gulf
Council, Boy Scouts of


CARVE TWO NEW


DISTRICTS FR0 M


ST. JOE PRECINCT

BIG INCREASE IN POPULATION
NECESSITATES ACTION
S BY COUNTY BOARD

The board of county commis-
Ssioners at their regular meeting
Tuesday at the courthouse in We-
wahitchka carved two new voting
precincts from District 7-Port St.
Joe precinct.
This action was found necessary
by the commissioners due to the
rapid increase in population here
during the past two years ana
gives the county eight polling
places.
The new-precincts will be No.
4, with polling place at the doc-
tor's office at the St. Joe Lumber
& Export company, and No. 8, at
Highland View, the polling place
to be determined later.
Polling places are now located
at Wewahitchka, Wetapo, White
City, Kenney's Mill, Overtstreet,
Dalkeith, Highland View and Port
St. Joe.
----

Local Chamber to

Meet With County

Seat Organization

Business of Year Cloed aVt DQrec-
tors' Meeting Wednesday
Evening

The Port St. Joe Chamber of
Commerce will hold a joint meet-
ing with the Business Men's club
of Wewahitchka at the Port Inn
Tuesday night at 8 o'clock. Many
matters of importance to the
county at large will be discussed,
especially the subject of coloniza-
tion.
The board of directors of the
chamber held a meeting Wednes-
day evening at the Port Inn at
which routine matters were taken
up and the business for the year
closed. Many plans were made
and discussed for the future and
a special committee composed of
H. A. Kidd, Dwight Marshal and
T. M. Schneider was appointed to
devise sounder ways and means
for financing the chamber.

APALACHICOLA MAN SAID
TO HAVE SHOT HIMSELF
Philip Brown, 32, of Apalachi-
cola was found dead Sunday in the
washroom at the Apalachicola
postoffice. Sheriff Charles Robbins
stated that Brown had shot him-
self. He was a borther of Charles
Brown of this city.
It is reported that Brown was
despondent due to ill health. Fu-
neral services were held Tuesday
in Apalachicola.
------
OUT-OF-STATE VISITORS
Mr. and Mrs. W. K. Donaldson
of McVeigh, Ky., Mrs. T. B. Smith
of Montgomery, Ala., and J. T.
Graves of Headland, Ala., were
guests Monday of Mrs. M. B.
Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Sammie Da-
vis and Mr. and Mrs. D. C. Smith.
Mrs. M. B.. Smith returned to
Headland with Mr. Graves Mon-
day night for a several weeks'
visit.
---------
BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT
Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Smith are
announcing the arrival of a 71a-
pound son on January 1, 1940, at
their home in Oak Grove.








PAGETWOTI~i STR, ORT T. OE, ULFCOUTY, LORDA FIDA, JNUAR 5,194


Hair Raising

Exploits Feature

Carson Serial

Combining the vivid grandeur of
the old west with the tense at-
mosphere of an action melodrama,
Columbia has produced what prom-
ises to be a thrill-packed chapter
play in "Overland With Kit Cal-
son." Unfolding a colorful plot
which touches upon the adven-
tures of one of the greatest of
America's pioneer heroes, the first


Bill Elliott in a scene from
"Overland With Kit Carson,"
starting January 13 at the Port
of the 15 exciting episodes which
will be a weekly Saturday feature
at the Port theater, starting Janu-
ary 13, is crammed full of hair-
raising exploits and strong chai-
acterizations. The last chapter of
"Dick Tracy Returns" will also be.
seen at 'that tine.
The film opens with Kit Carson
being asked by the government to
aid in putting an end to the dep-
redations of Pegleg, a notorious
outlaw, and his henchmen, known
as the Black Raiders. In a prelimi-
nr-.ry skirmish Carson saves the
li'e of a young lieutenant. In re-
taliation, Pegleg enlists the sui~
port of hostile Indians and the
war between law and order and
outlawry gets under way.
Well maintained suspense, spec-
tacular feats of horsemanship ane
athletic prowess and -a breath-
taking climax make this a serial
of exceptional force and vigor.
Bill Elliott plays the role of Kit
Carson and endows it with a quat-
ity that stamps his portrayal as
different. Iris Meredith provides
grace and charm as his leading
lady, and Richard Fiske gives a
good account of himself as the
young army officer.


FLOWERS AND

CORSAGES


A K A. '?
.. -...: ., ,


i-.- a *?-* -* ^K









S And they keep indefi-
nitely. If they become droopy
you merely place them in the
refrigerator and in a brief time
they are as good as new.
SEE

Mrs. W. S. Smith
STAR OFFICE PHONE 51


Society Personals Churches

LANETA DAVIS, Editor


METHODIST MISSIONARY
SOCIETY IN MEETING
The Methodist Missionary so-
ciety held its regular meeting ii.
the church Monday afternoon with
the new president, Mrs. J. L.
Temple, in the chair.
Plans were made for the new
year and the following appoint-
ments made: Mrs. J. C. Bradbura,
program chairman; Mrs. J. T. Mc-
Neill, mission study chairman,
Mrs. Edwin Ramsey, recording sep-
retary; Mrs. M. L. Fuller, socia-
service chairman; Mrs. W. E.
Boyd, spiritual life leader.
Mrs. G. A. Patton will be hostess
to the Susannah Wesley circle
n'axt Monday at her home in Oak
Grove and the meeting place fo,
the Marie Jones circle will be an.
nounced at church Sunday morn-
ing.
r f. r
MRS. EDWARDS ENTERTAINS
THURSDAY BRIDGE CLUB
Mrs. M. C. Edwards entertained
the Thursday Bridge club yestem
day at her home on Long avenue.
Tables were placed for play and
after several progressions prizes
were awarded. Delicious refresh-
ments were served to members
present.

Mr. and Mrs. B. W. Eells and
son, Edward, returned Tuesday
after spending several days :in
New Orleans, La., and Houston,
Texas, visiting relatives.

Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Haygooa
left Sunday for Montgomery, Ala.,
to spend several days before r'-
turning to their home in Bogalusa,
La.

Mrs. J. W. West returned to the
city last week from Dawson, Ga.,
where she spent several days with
her brother, W. W. Kelly.

The Misses Juanita Gunn and
Louise Solomon returned Sunday
after spending the holiday vaca-
tion with their parents in Perry.

Mr. and Mrs. D. -H. Bynum and
Mr. and Mrs. W. Rowell of Wewa-
hitchka were guests Monday of
Mr. and Mrs. Philip Lovett.

Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Smith spent
last Saturday in Cottondale and
Marianna.

Miss Alice Ruth Gibson left
Tuesday for Tallahassee to re-
sume her studies following the
holidays spent here with her pai-
ents.

The Misses Maxie Ferrell and
Alma Daughtry left Sunday for
Camp Roosevelt, Ocala, following
a two weeks' visit here with their.
parents.

Mrs. M. Larkin of Bristol was
the guest of her sons, M. B. and
Hoke Larkin, on New Year's Day.

Mrs. Hoke Larkin returned Mon.
day to Bristol to resume her work
as teacher following the holiday
vacation spent in this city.

Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Rollins. an5
daughter, Peggy. returned to the
city Sunday after spending the
holidays in Gordon, Ala., visiting
relatives. Mr. Rollins left Tuesday
for Fort Myers, where he is em-
ployed.

Ben Ferrell was a business vis,-
tor Sunday in Tallahassee.

Miss Katherine Hickey and Al-
hplrt Hickey left Thursday foi
their home in Orlando. While in
the city they were guests of Mr.
and Mrs. Jack Samford.

Miss TTeanor Sloyrl of Apalachl-
cola visited' In the city Saturday.


At the Churches

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL
Rev. Frank Dearing, Rector
Services at St. James Episcopal
church every Sunday evening at
7:45 o'clock.
Church school every Sunday at
10 o'clock.
Holy Communion services on the
third Sunday at 9:30 a. m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. J. W. Sisemore, Minister
9:45 a. m.-Sanday School.
11:00 a. m.--Morning Worship.
7:00 p. m.-B. Y. P. U.
8:00: p. m.-Preaching service.
W. M. U., Monday, 3:00 p. m.
Prayermeeting Wednesday, 7:30 p.
in. Teachers meeting, 'Thursday,
7:30 p. m.

ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Rev. E. T. Corbin, Pastor
Fuil-t;me services
10:15 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.-Preacblog Service.
7:30 p. m.-Ev;ang-ilallc service.
Prayermeeting every Wednesday
night.

METHODIST CHURCH
D. E. Marietta, Minister
Services Every Sunday
10:00 a. m.-Churcn SchooL..
11:00 a. m.-Morning worship.
7:30 p. a.-lEvening worship.

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
10:00 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.-Preaching service.
8:00 p. m.. second and fourth
Sundays-Evening services.
.____-^-----.
BAPTIST SOCIETY HOLDS
REGULAR BUSINESS SESSION
The Baptist Missionary society
'eld its, regular bhisness meeting
for the month at the church Mon-
lay afternoon, with Mrs. E. A.
McCaskey, president, presiding.
Following a short business dis-
cussion the devotional was led by
Mirs. J. F. Miller. The treasurer's
report was given by Mrs. Charles
McClellan. Other reports were
presented by various chairman, at-
ter which the meeting was dis-
missed by Mrs. J. W. Sisemore.

B. A. Cogdill returned to the
city Monday from Gainesville,
where he spent the week-end with
his family.

Roselle Stone has returned to
Gainesville to resume his studies
at the university after spending
the holidays here with his parents,
Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Stone.

Mrs. Elizabeth Cooper of Apa-
lachicola was a business visitor
in the city Tuesday.

Mrs. Stanford Bragdon of Ai-
alachicola was the guest last week
of her sister, Mrs. P. J. Farmei.

Miss Malzie Waters spent Mon-
day in Panama City with her par-
ents.

Mr. and Mrs. T. W. Davis spent
Sunday in Blountstown visiting
relatives. Their children, Frank
ind Faye, who had been visiting
for a week in the neighboring city,
returned with them.

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Gibson, Jr.,
and son, Tommy III, have returned
.o their home in Atlanta follow-
ing several days spent here as the
guests of Mrs. R. A. Costin and
Mr. and Mrs. Tom Gibson.

The friends of Mrs. E. H. Hor.
ton are glad to know that she is
much improved and hope that she
will soon be completely .recovered
from her recent illness.

Miss Ruth Moore Connell left
Tuesday for Ocala to complete a
course in secretarial work in the I
Marion county vocational school.


The Star gives Gold Stamps
on subscription payments.
08 wa c ... ..b


LOTTIE MOON GIRLS IN
MEETING TUESDAY
The regular meeting of the Lot-
tie Moon Girls' Auxiliary was helt
at the Baptist church Tuesday at-
ternoon with the leader, Mrs. E. LAST TIMES TODAY!
C. Cason, in charge of the follow- .
ing program: SONJIA HLENIE

Life," Lord's Prayer repeated in.O 'MIR Tf *
unison and the devotional, taken ILI IIIll
from the. 10th chapter of St. John; I PENS IT IH
Minutes were read and plans made IL N i l
for personal service work for th "T
month. "SET'EM UP" NEWS#
The next meeting of the girls *40 044-0-
will be held at the home of Hazel 0 DOUBLE FEATURE!
Cason. F
SA .* SATURDAY, JAN. 6
MRS. TALLEY HOSTESS TO HIT NO. 1 -
TUESDAY BRIDGE CLUB
The members of the Tuesday E '~ -
Night Bridge club were entertained F
this week at the home of Mrs, Y l
Woodrow Talley on Sixth street.. i* '' "*i .
Two tables were in progress and WILLIAM BOYD W
at the conclusion of play Mrs. HIT NO. 2
Rush Chism received, high prize *
and. Mrs. John Sowers second high. Richard Arlen
Refreshments were served to .
MesAames Chism, Sowers, W. A., Andy Devine
Wood, Roy Williams, George Hud- *
son, B. J. Hull and Ralph Carter. "M uti y on the

LIONS CLUB MEETS
The regular meeting and lun- Blackhawk
cheon of the Lions club was held "Dick Tracy Returns"
Wednesday at the Port Inn with ...
President B. B. Conklin presiding. S*'* W 8
During the luncheon hour the SUNDAY ONLY
regular business was discussed. A RY 7
Due to the illness of some mem- *
hers, plans that were to have been Remember "Cisco Kid Re-
brought up at this ineeting were turns"? Thrills Galore!
carried over to the next session, *
two weeks hence. CESAR ROMERO in

Mrs. Frank Lanier and daugh- The Cisco Kid
Ser, Sally, have returned to their d
home in Savannah, Ga., after a the Lady
spending the holidays here as the
guests of Mrs. R. A. Costin. "Porky's Hotel" News

Miss Mimi Schneider, student at I.
F. S. C. W., Tallahassee, return''d 0
this -week to resume her studies i
after spending the holiday vaca-


tion with her parents, Mr. and
Mrs. T. M. Schneider.

Mrs. Basil Kenney, Jr., ann
children. and Mrs. Robert Logai-
have returned from Pensacola
where they visited relatives.


Lodge Notices

Order of Eastern Star


oe ts on

Wanonic hiall,


second and fourth
each month in the
over postoffice. Visi-


tors who are members are cor-
,lially invited to be present.
American Legion
Gulf County Post 116 meets the
first and third Mondays of each
month at the Legion Hut.
Masonic Lodge
St. Joe Lodge 111 meets second
and fourth Friday nights at 8:30
o'clock in Masonic hall.
P^.A.A.A.A.. A AAA AM4 A


v v ~-vv-v ~a- -y y --vv v v


IF ANYBODY HAS-
Eloped
Married
Divorced
Had a Fire
Sold a Farm
Been Arrested
Been Your Guest
Started in Business
Left You a Fortune
Bought a New Home
Swiped- Your Chickens
Met With An Accident
Had a Visit From the Stork
THAT'S NEWS

TELL THE EDITOR
Phone 51-The Star

(^^*^*^*^**^+~


*ON THE STAGE!


: Hollywood

SSweethearts

o SIZZLEATING--
S SWINGSATIONAL- i
MODERN SWING!

SM-U-S-I-C!

: G-I-R-L-S!!

* ALL-GIRL BAND


MONDAY, JAN. 8 ONLY



o , AYORiARS L- I
9 M

"ANDY CLYDE GETS SPRINGg
CHICKENS" 4


* DOUBLE FEATURE
TUESDAY, JAN. 9 e

' "Charlie Chan In:

4 City of Darkness'*
Sei
8 ALSO -
* CHARLES STARRETT
* in -,.
: "OUTPOST of 0

:the COUNTIES"'
84'* 4


ru


THE STAR, I PORT ST. jGE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, 'JANUARY 5, 1940


PAGE TWO


~~rvvrvrvr~vvv









FRiDA JAUR 5, 1940-L THE STAR POR ST.I. JO, GULF CONY LRDAP HE


SHEPPARD WILL BE
ON FRASER'S STAFF


ST. AUGUSTINE, Jan. 4 (Spe-
cial to The Star)-Campaign Man-
ager Rex Saffer announced today
that Emmett G. Sheppard, Mari-
anna and Tallahassee newspaper-
man, will be associated with state
headquarters for Walter B. Fraser,
candidate for governor.
Sheppard formerly was editor of
the Marianna Daily Times-Courier
and for the past two years has
been with newspapers in Tallahas-
see. He covered- the 1939 legisla-
ture for the Florida State News.
Sheppard announced in 1937
that he would be a candidate fo.
governor in 1940 and received wide
-publicity in that regard. Appar-
ently he has reconsidered'.

A Port St. Joe man who patron-
izes a certain restaurant complains
the place is all right except for
the fact that they serve sausage
witlihThe ends too close together.


HAVE YOU TRIED
LeHARDY'S PINK TIP
COLD CAPSULES
Hundreds have tried them and
recommend them highly
Unconditionally Guaranteed



DR. J C. COE
--DENTIST -
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe

------------------------
WE GIVE

GOLD STAMPS
When You Pay Your
Subscripttion
-.- ASK FOR THEM >-


THE STAR
"Your Home Town Paper"



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BRUCE'S JUICES
IVEY VANLANDINGHAM
Local Representative
--------------


qIThere are real jitterbugs in Af-
All-Girl Orchestra on Stage at Port Theater Sunday rica. They sip the fermented
juice of a certain flower and, do
.. .' all sorts of funny capers.


L MAC'S TAXI
Day and Night Service
Standard Service PHONE
Station I 0 1
S,'Reid Ave. at 2nd

1.I -Aid c


The "Hollywood Sweethearts' all-
girl swing band which comes to
the Port theater next Sunday, Jan-


Taylor and GarsoE

Are Exciting Team

Coming to' Port Theater Monday'
Charlie Chan Will Be Seen
Tuesday In Thriller

Robert Taylor and Greer Gar
son with Lew Ayres in "Remem
her?" come to the Port theater
next Monday in a gay comedy ol
married' life today.
Brightly modern, with New
York as its background, it is high-
lighted with sparkling dialogue
and amusing comedy situations and
has a serious and warmly human
theme running through it. Briefly,
it deals with two young people
who fall in love "at sight." Mar-
ried in haste, their romance is
threatened by misunderstandings.
Too proud' to admit that they are
still in love, they are divorced.
Then, 'by a surprising twist of the
plot, they get a second chance and
this time make the most of it.
"City of Darkness"
As timely in its exciting theme
as that last radio bulletin inter-
rupting your favorite program,
"Charlie Chan In City of Dark-
ness" comes Tuesday to the Port
theater with Sidney Toler again in
the role of the -famous Oriental.
The scene is Paris, during a ter-
rifying crisis when the once-gay
capital lived in dread fear of
bombing by air and instituted the
blackout drills. Chan is there, at-
tending a reunion. The celebration
is interrupted by the air raid siren
and the blackout that follows is
the signal that plunges Chan into
a tense mystery of deadly intrigue.
Because the Paris chief of police
is completely occupied by the im-
mense task of guarding the dark-
ened city against crime and sabot-
age, his son, played by Harold
Huber, works ,with Chan in his
strange case.
___-*----k
SNOW IN PORT ST. JOE
During the regular Sunday eve-
ning services at the Baptist
church, Rev. J. C. Sisemore had
a surprise for many in the congre-
gation. This was an exhibition or
snow.
Rev. Sisemore spent Christmas
with his parents in Amarillo,
Texas, and for the first time since
1926 there was snow in that city.
When Rev. Sisemore left Thursday
of last week he filled a gallon
thermos jug with the flakes and
when he arrived in this city, put
the snow in the refrigerator. But
in spite of all precautions, there
remained only .a quantity about
the size of a baseball. It had hard-
ened into ice, but to many people
who had never seen snow it was a
novelty.
The title of the sermon Sunday
evening was "Whiter Than Snow,"
and was aptly illustrated by the
Texas snowball.

As one gay blade says: Anatomy
is the study of the limbs.


uary 7 only, at no increase in ad- swing music, and they can play
mission. These girls are said to it sweet or hot! The theater will
be a sensation with their modern open one hour earlier than usual.


BOY SCOUT EXECUTIVE

^ ------:


Harley E. Erb, who will speak
at the annual council meeting
and banquet of the Gulf Coast
Council, Boy Scouts of America,
which is to be held next Tues-
day at the San Carlos hotel in
Pensacola. Mr. Erb is regional
Scout executive of Region 5,
comprising Alabama, Arkansas,
Northwest Florida, Mississippi
and Tennessee.


The Low Down
from
Willis Swamp

Editor The Star:
Here we are goin' into 1940, ana
the thought entered my mind that
it's been a long time since Chriso-
pher Columbus discovered' this
here neck o' the woods, an' things
have changed a lot in some re-
spects, and in others they ain't.
When Chris came over the
money here was wampum. Mr.
Indian wore a string of it around
his neck. And if Mr. Indian rolled
his own cigarets same as we he-
men do down here in Willis, and
his better half d-idn't hang out too
much at the beauty tepee, he
would maybe accumulate an extra
string or so, now and then. And
when he did so, he would hide 'em
in a bee-tree or under a log, for
safe-keepin'-and a rainy day.
And I got to thinking' about this
wampum on account I see where
the government is buyin' all the
gold- it can get its hand on and
buryin' it up in Kentucky.
In Columbus' time, if you dug
up a string' of wampum, it was
coin of the realm, and you could
go into any store or saloon or
whatever they haa in them days
and spend it. But if you dig up
a five-dollar gold piece today
you're on a limb. It's useless-also
you land in the calaboose unless
you got an air-tight alibi as to
just where you got it.
Something is squeegee some
place. Our Doctors of Finance up
there at Headquarters on the olive
Potomac they should maybe call


Speed Demons to

Compete at Fair

Twenty Nationally Known Drivers
In Two-Day Exhibition; Lucky
Teter Will Also Be on Hand

In thrill-packed open competi-
tion, America's mightiest dirt
track speed demons will clash in
two automobile racing programs
during the Florida State Fair at
STampa, January 30 and February
10.
Contracts for the promotion or
the national gasoline classics have
been awarded, to the Racing Cor-
poration of America, -sponsors of
speed events sanctioned by the
International Motor Contest asso-
ciation. At least 20 nationally
known drivers, the seasoned cam-
paigners who have been providing
thrills at northern fairs for the
last several years, will figure in
the speed battles.
Two sensational auto thrill days
have also been carded for January
31 and February 7, when Lucky
Teter and his famous troupe of
Hell Drivers present their 1940
version of suicidal exploits. New
sedan stock cars will be cata-
pulted through the air over a
dozen other parked machines,
crashed head-on at terrific speed,
rolled over side-over-side and end-
over-end, smashed through flaming
board walls and put through many
other thrill feats while the drivers
remain steadfast at the wheel.

Senate Race Looks "Very
Inviting" to Jerry Carter

While making a tour of the state
Jerry Carter, chairman of the
state railroad commission, re-
marked at Orlando that the United
States senatorial r a c e looked
"very inviting" to him and that
"I don't believe anybody could
persuade me not to run."
While Jerry's remark seemed
equivalent to announcement of his
candidacy for the office now held
by Senator Charles O. Andrews,
he went on to say that "I am not
ready to make an official an-
nouncement as to whether I will
run for any office.'

in a couple Indian medicine men
-for consultation.
Yours with the low down,
JO SERRA.


For Your

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PHONE 70


PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


-~-~''''`''''''--~- ~~------1--~-~~~-L- --~--


T.HE STAR, PORT ST. IOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 1M4


PAGE THREE









- .. -, ";.- "'-FR-IDJr I JAn.lNUUA- NUA Y .0, i14U


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla.,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, Decemiber 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
unde- Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year........$2.00 Six Months......$1O00
Three Months..........65c

-4 Telephone 51 i-

The spoken word is given scant attention;;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.'
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the' printed word remains.

INTO THE PORTALS OF 1940
Well, here we are, five days into the new
year. And what are we going to do about it?
Shall we go through the year in drabiess of
spirit, or shall it be a great landmark in each
individuals 'life and the city of'Port St. Joe?
Let's make' it a big year, not only for our-
selves, but'for our city. Let's cultivate confi-
dence and courage-look to the coming twelve
months with faith, strong and sublime, for
there is every good reason to anticipate 1940
with faith. Port St. Joe is coming rapidly .to
the fore, is making a place for itself in the
world. It takes leadership, enterprise, -indus-
try to make and hold that place and to ad-
vance. And therein is a thought for 1940.
We have strong leaders, but we can have
more of them. Our paper mill, our lumber
mill and other smaller industries are hum-
:ming, but they can hum with a new speed.
There is room for'new industries, more labor,
more money in circulation, and this is com-
ing with work starting on the new pipe line
to Atlanta, our bank opening soon and othei
industries in the offing. We are enjoying
prosperity and are advancing, but we can
enjoy more prosperity and step to a higher
place in the world of industry.
We have the climate, the people, the po-
tentialities for greater achievements than
have been ours. The foundations have been
laid for new prosperity and increased happi-
piness and business. Look at it from this
point of view: That everything is in readi-
less for a year of progress in Port St. Joe
and Gulf county.
The. Star has already extended good wishes
for the new year; and now pledges itself
anew to labor throughout the coming twelve
months for the promotion of all that will
make Port St. Joe and Gulf county a better
and more prosperous place in which to live.

The fellow who reported that absolute zero
was to be found at a point 400 degrees below
zero should try stepping out of bed some
crisp winter morning upon a linoleum rug.-
Titusville Star-Advocate.

President Roosevelt has- set the 1940
Thanksgiving date for Thursday, November
21. That gives nearly a whole year to argue
about it.-Clermont Press.

Are you one of those men who never took
much interest in parades until the bands
started being led by girls who beat time with
their knees?-Sarrford Herald.

SMen make cities-but when we look about
us here in Port St. Joe we figure it takes a
lot of brick and mortar, too.

Now that they are making dinner dresses
our of glass, we can expect better cutups at
our parties than ever.-Sanford Herald.

Chewing tobacco may be a dirty habit, but
it never started a woods fire.-Macclenny
Press.

We made the remark that the days are
getting shorter, and Belinda saucily replied
that so are the skirts.


DEFINING A SMALL TOWN
We ran across the following definition of a
small town in the Stuart News, and while
Po.rt St. Joe is rapidly getting out of the
"'.trmll town" class, we still retain that neigh-
.borliness and spirit that goes to make the
snWll town what it is-a place where every-
bL,':, knows everybody else and is ready to
Iriare the joys, the sorrows, the trials and
trib.ul:aiii._-S of everyone else. Yes, Port St.
Joe is still in the small town class, thank the
Lord:
A smniall town is a place where we don't


brag about our faiths, hopes or our charities
..here reputation and character mean the
ime tlhing, where concrete backing is more
-esteemed than -front, where we stand up for
ouir rights rather than sit down for them,
'. here,a :ieigll..,rlio,:,d. is 100 miles long and
neighborliness 100 miles deep, where a-friend
doesn't wait for your need, where we like
r Judge Billy's boy who went to the city .
Snot because he made a million dollars, but
f because he came back Judge Billy's boy;
Where the telephone directory is "Who's
SWho," the U. S. census the social register, a
man's financial rating is based upon iot what
' he takes in but what he puts out arid we
have a 400 because the population is .just
that; where the mayor and the town burm
',-know each other by their first name; where
they don't carve anything on your tombstone
that ,they wouldn't say to your face; where
we go out with our own wives and like it;
where a stranger's a stranger only because
he wants to be; where a ham is something
you serve with chicken and Broadway is
where the high school play came from 20
years ago; where the sheriff inquires- about
your wife's sciatica as he takes you to jail,
the judge will loan you the ten dollars to
pay your fine and the neighbors are glad to
see you back when you've served your time;
where you don't tip the barber because he's
a member of your bridge club, and you don't
cheat your opponent at poker because he at-
tends your Sunday school class; and where
a newspaper man can make a living writing
what everyone already knows. '* !

Here's one of the blest squibs of the week,
taken from Walter Winchell's column: A
man says to another man that he had a
strange dream last night. He dreamed Hitler
died. And he went to the funeral. It
was the darndest thing, he said. .... "They
let the coffin down into the grave, poured
earth on it, patted it down and then pulled
it up again! They raised it and lowered it at
least a half dozen times-going through the
same business each time." .' "But why?"
asks the other guy, "did they do it so many
times.?" "On'account of the applause," is
the retort.

Junior wants to know why they dig gold
out of the ground in Georgia and bury it
again in Kentucky. That's the trouble
with' the younger generation. They want to
know more than their elders.-St. Petersburg
Independent.

AThat gentle moaning one hears in the cool
of the evening isn't the north wind-it's the
beginning of the campaign blast that will
soon sweep over us all.-Jasper News.

Florida highways are now becoming inter-
national highways, if one is to judge by the
number of "foreign" cars about.-Plant City
Courier.

That clatter and clash you have been hear-
ing the past few days is caused by all the
New Year's resolutions being broken.

Used to spell it bu$ine$$. Now we spell it
bu ?ine ??.-Leesburg Commercial.

Have you bought your new black and white
automobile tag?

Send The Star to a friend-only $2 a year.


WELL, WELL, LOOK WHO'S HERE!
myry; g^^B w^ ,-,,^^,ys /,*,


I.


In a seemingly mad world where
crazed men, drunk with the lust
for power, curse God, setting them-
selves up as dictators to crusn
helpless fellow-beings beneath an
iron heel .
In a world where MIGHT takes
supercedure ove r RIGHT and
false doctrines of GREED' and
HATE are set before whole na-
tions as desired virtues .
In a world where crime and, cor-
ruption take a fearful toll and
honest men look askance to the
future and strive to keep' their
reason and faith .
The story of Harry Steenbeck,
as told recently in' the Rotarian
Magazine, is one that all mankind
should hear, for like the Star or
Bethlehem its message shines
forth to rekindle our dying hope
and give new faith for man in fel-
low man.
In his laboratory at the Univer-
sity of wisconsin, Harry Steen-
beck, a baldish, soft spoken pro-
fessor, seeking only the advance-
merit of knowledge, worked tire-
lssly to discover scientific facts
that would aid mankind in its
fight against disease and death.
Seventeen years ago Steenbeck
proved, that the ultra-violet rays
in sunlight are closely related to
the bone-building Vitamin D. Ex-
perimenting with' young rats, he
fPund that those afflicted with
rickets would, grow to normal
health when exposed to such rays.
Continuing his studies and ex-
periments, he later discovered that
,these. same' health-giving rays
would mysteriously concentrate
Vitamin D in foodstuffs directly.
He successfully concentrated the
precious vitamin in fresh milk, in
eggs and in many other foods.
Big business, manufacturers ot
nationally distributed food prod-
ucts, were quick to realize that
here was a secret to be coveted.
Controlled and exploited, it was
worth millions.
Steenbeck, however, had pat-
ented his process. It was his dis-
covery and he controlled it. Big
business began beating a path to
his door. Offer pyramided' offer
until a mere scratch of his pen
and the relinquishing of his secret
would have given him well over
a million dollars in cash.
A million dollars in any man's
language is a lot of money, and
Steenbeck was just a pogr college
professor. But in the heart of this
mild, soft-spoken man there was
no greed, no great lust for power,
only love for all mankind and a
conscientious desire to share the


benefits of his priceless discovery
with *the sick and suffering of a
war-torn and weary world.
A million dollars and all it could
offei him in comfort, luxury and
ease .was. dangled bebfre his eyes,
but Steenbeck said "No." Scorn-
ing all offers, he gathered together
a few trusted friends from the,
alumni of his university to foune
a corporation that would adminis-
ter his patent rights, all profits
from which would go to provide
funds for further research. To
date over $1,200,000 has been re-
ceived.
To protect the public, Steenbeck
in leasing the use of his process
requires that it be used only on
"essential foods, regularly used."
His research foundation further,
demands the right to censor any
advertisements mentioning th e
Steenbeck process or Vitamin D,
and all products on which it ih
used are regularly tested by him
to insure that Vitamin" D is in
the product as advertised.
Today 400 dairies serving 40,-
000,000 people pay royalties to fi-
nance research under Steenbeck's
plan. Other large sums come from
pharmaceuticals, cereal and acces-
sory food products.
As fast as royalties are received
the money is used; to finance such
promising work as paying fellow-
ships to brilliant young scientists
brought to the university from all
over the nation, to finance the fur-
ther study 'and experimentation
about Vitamin D, to work for the
control and cure of a variety of
dread diseases, and otherwise
serve the welfare of mankind the
world over.
Many other scientists like Steen-
beck have refused to capitalize on
their discoveries and plod through
life in modest circumstances, con-
tent with the reward that floods
with happiness and joy the hearts
of only those who have learned
the secret of "Service Above
Self."
While men may cower and
"heil" Hit!er, countless millions
yet unborn will live to bless the
name of Steenbeck.

EXPECT 500,000 AT FAIR
If the Florida State Fair hold
its position as the third largest
fair in the United States, the at-
tendance record must pass the
500,000 mark during the 11-day pe-
riod, January 30 to February 10.
Minnesota. Iowa, Texas and Illr-
nois are challenging Tampa for
the top positions in-national stand-
ing.

The scalping Indians had noth-
ing on the barber who gives you a
shampoo and scratches your scalp
off instead of.taking it off with a
knife.


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULFF COUNTYY. FLORIDA


IAMITA Di~,f r 4C~n


Too Late toClassify
By RUSSELL KAY






-L


PAGE Flvl2


The Yetrs of the LObcst


ONE of the most eventful dec-
ades in modern history has
ended. And this nation enters. a
new decade during which, unless
all signs are wrong, its people
must face and' grapple with prob-
lems, issues and responsibilities of
the most far-reaching character.
The 1930's will be known to the
historians of the future as the
years of one of the greatest and
longest depressions this or any
other nation ever experience.
They will be known as years or
experiment, of trial and error, of
the weighing of our old values and
our old traditions. And they will
be known too as years in which
the democratic process was con-
sistently attacked by some of
those who called themselves its
friends, as well as by those who
were its frankly avowed enemies.
From the international point of
view, the tragic '30's 'came to .a
cynically fitting end in that most
ghastly and unnecessary of events
-a war which embraces much of
the world. In nation after nation
the arts of peace have of neces
sity been put aside, to the end thas
war may be prosecuted to the ut-
most. And war destroys- mort.
than men and materials and ma-
chines and economies and states.
It destroys: 'those essential liber-
ties for which meui h 'ave ought
and died in holy causes ever sinc4
the world we- knMw began. It db-
stroys those Spiritual values which
are at the root of all artistic, cul-
tural arid humanitarian achieve-
ments. It has been truly said that
in modern war there can be no
victors-there are only the van-
quished. It is an ironic commen-
tary on the times in which we liv-
that those nations which are fight-
ing this war in the nine of threat-
ened democracy, have been forced
to use the methods of the dict:-.
tors 1in order to meet the enemy
on its own totalitarian terms.
The greatest blessing which
this nation possesses today is its
physical remoteness from the con-
flict abroad. That is a position en-
joyed by no. otlier of the' 'w.6rldc
major powers. There'.is profoutna
wisdom in the attitude of the
great majority of the American
people ,who say, in 'effect: "We'


party in this country-no respon-
sible statesman urges our partlci-
pation. We can, all feel a deep ana
abiding thankfulness that this is
so..Never before was it so import-
ant that we Americans keep our
heads, in order that we may also
keep our liberties. For should thib
country become involved in wai,
democracy would vanish here, as
swiftly and as surely as it has
vanished abroad.
Turning to our own internal
problems, our task is great. The
gratifying improvement that has
taken place throughout our eco-
nomic structure must not be al-
lowed to blind us to the unpleas-
ant truth that not one of those
issues which we were forced to
face at the start of the depression
has been solved. Most of them
have become more complicated
and difficult. The national debt,
despite the. heaviest tax load in
our peace-time history, has nearly
trebled in the past decade,, and
will soon reach the present legal
limit of $45,000,000,000. The im-
mense expenditures for relief con
tinue, even though business h.
much improvedd and unemployment
has consequently been reduced.
The agricultural situation, in spite
of a long series of extremely eo-
pensive "'farm relief" measures,
remains 'tanglead and unsatisfac-
tory.
Sumniing'up, ;e have plenty to
do a.t home'during the years that
stretch ahead. The current con-
gress and those which follow have
their work cut out for them-bpt
satisfactory results will be secure
only if the people as a whole ar,.
awake and watchful, are conscious
of their needs, are deeply aware
of their American heritage 'anm
way of life. For in spite of the un-
proven claims of extremists, our
only, real progress has come from
nroductive, employing industry,
working under the American sys-
tem of free enterprise whihh
brought us from a minor power to
- world power in a century and" a
half.
Here in.,America we have bal
that is needed, to bring a greate.-
prosperity than we have eve-
known-the industries, the men,
'the resources. But unless we main-


can keep out of war-anti we will tain our basic liberties, material
keep out of war." There is no war blessings mean nothing.


THE P OCKETBOOK

oV/ NOWLEDGE s


Cecil Costin, Jr., has returned to
Gulfport Military Academy follow.
ing the holidays spent here wilt
his parents Mr. and Mrs. .C. 0.
Costin.
Mrs. F. L. Carroll of Jackson-
ville is the guest of her son-in-law
and daughter, Mr. and Mrs.. H. O.
Spence.
** *
Roy Gibson, Jr., left Monday for
the Gordon Military Academy af-
ter spending the holidays here
with his parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Roy Gibson.
Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Minus vis-
ited Saturday in Panama City.


CLASSIFIED ADS
FEMALE HELP WANTED
GIRL WANTED Combination
saleslady and bookkeeper. Leave
applications at The Star office
for forwarding. 1
ROOMS FOR RENT
IF YOU have a room for rent,
why not place a classified adver-
tisement in The Star. The cost is
low .and returns are gratifying. .
Try it today. tt


Askingfor Trade

The other day a Port St. Joe merchant saw
a local man get a package at the postoffice
from a mail order house. The goods were *
in his line, and the same he had carried in
his store for years. He approached the local
resident and said:
"I could have sold you those articles for less
money than you paid that Chicago house, and
saved you the postage besides."
"Then why on earth didn't you say so?" re- 4
plied the citizen, "I have been taking The
Star for two years and have never seen a
line about your selling these goods. The mail 4
order house sent advertising matter to me,
asking for my trade--and they got it."



THE STAR i
"Your Home Town Newspaper"
Progressively Serving the People in Port St. Joe
and Surrounding Community
s *ee *** **** 4 e 44 te #4 # S S **


Make QUALITY Your New

Year Resolution!
We Wish to Thank Our Many Customers for Their Patronage Through the Year of
1939. Our First Consideration is Our Customers: To See They Get QUALITY Mer-
chandise at the Lowest Possible Cost, and to Serve Them With a Smile. Our En-
tire Force Wish You All a Prosperous 1940.
""" ""''"'k


All Western Beef


Chuck Roast
Clod Roast


lb. ,20c


lb.


24c


Riump Roast lb. 25c
Chuck Steak lb. 22c


Clodf Steak


Round Steak lb.


Loin Steak
T-Bone Steak

Pork Loins


lb.


25e
Mee
35C
40c

18C


Fresh
CARROTS
Large Head
LETTUCE


Onion's .3bs. Igo


iD O'luis No. 1
i r is- l ;7 Efllr-TA T 0 IE S


(ALL-E i1'IS FRESH VEGETABLES)


3 Pounds WATER MAID


10 Pounds
BULK SUGAR


No. 2 SLICED
Pineapple 13C


2 Packages
POST TOASTIES


lb.
lb.


Western
Per Pound


Lakeview LB.

Sliced BaconL 20
Wilson's Certified V or Whole c28
CURED HAM lb.


CHEESE


lb.


22c


4-Pound Carton


CPlrlf L ARD ^g a No. 2V2 CALIFORNIA A
Cloiverleaf Fruit for Salad I
Butter lb. DO 2 Boxes 15c
Red Top Matches
FRYERS AND HENS SALAD DRESSING-Quart Jar

3 22-oz. Cans Armour's i Miracle Whip 3C
TOMATO JUICE 3 Packages JUSTICE 0 c
131/-oz. Can VAL VITA MACARONI
ORANGE JUCE 3 Tall Cans ARMOUR'S
3 Tall Cans ARMOUR'S A


3 Cans IDEAL
DOG FOOD


25 CREAM CW

Iyr~


PRICES


RIGHT


d


land MARKET


Bunch


Sc


10c


23C


190

52C


15c


CLERKS
POLITE


J : f
'-HE~ STAR,' PORT ST. JOE-G.ULF COUNTY, FLORIDA.


FRIDAY. JkNUARY"61 046'94









.....SIX. TH..STAR.PO.T..T...... .UIDA JA UAR 5,


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V;


..George Maddox.is...expected to Tbh..many,.friends of Hugh Mc-
eturn tomorrow from points in Phersbn regret to learn of his ill-
Alabama where he .has visited relt ness and wih.. for him a speedy
.atives this -w-e. recover y. '
: '-A. .


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aeOr Oo g- 771 eSAf-.


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Or S'e/rn PLQ/DYa O~eAIV 6','
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'~BJ~~il~/


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MAle/ME' CA47/1&RES .,
ca4FA5 L POZYPS- ~
VFAC.&A7AD M -
WAY65 /SLAADS
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.... .. .. . .-
.... .: : ...... : .,.,: :, .... .: .,_,


Strange as it may seem, denizens of land foundation. Coral polyps are small
he ocean dci.ths, immediately respond to marine animals-tiny tubular creatures
he huge bell at Marine Studios. Twice a that bud and bloom like flowers upon
ay when it is lowered and rung under- the petrified family tree of their ancestors.
,ater announcing "luncheon" at Marine- From minute food particles taken in through
nd they lose no time in arriving for the flower-like tentacles they deposit carbonate
v;ist. It as, of course, not the sound, but of lime upon the parent stem. As each
s3 accompanying vibrations, which cause individual polyp dies its offspring con-
'e various inmates of the great tanks.to tinues the process, developing additional
-a:lize food is about to be served. Marine branches until the bottom of the ocean
ladios are unique in the fact that here is becomes a vast jungle or reef of gaily
;-* oriy place in the world where fish, colored cbral soniewhat resembling dead
M:,nm;.is and turtles are called to dinner trees. Into this extensive network of petri-
:', inner bell. ... fied fossil remains is deposited a conglo-
o'ii'unds of years ago, where you erated mass of drifting sand, debris, coral.
S,;e islands around the southern tip line algae and other materials by the chang-
? l'lIrida, was nothing more than a rolling ing currents of the sea, the whole being
.i.plmse of lapping waves. Down below the firmly cemented together. Thus, in time, as
,;an depths, innumerable colonies of little the network of coral extends upward ar
t.:krs-coral polyps-were laying the is- island appears above the surface.


FLORIDA WILL GET APPRECIATION
FEDERAL ROAD FUNDS The holidays have come and
gone and our city presented a gala
The Federal Works agency last appearance with the strings of col-
week allocated $156,000,000 to 48 ored lights across the streets at
states, the District of Columbia, various points. This is a start for
Puerto Rico and Hawaii for high- fuller decorating as the years go
way improvement and elimination along
of grade crossings. The funds will The street lighting was spou-
be available on July 1. scored by the Port St. Joe Business
The new allocations will finance Men's association. The community
the improvement of approximately Christmas tree was not a part of
9,736 miles on rural portions of the ths. nrora,.m chain hPn st.rted


federal aid system; 2,971 miles of
secondary or "farm -to market"
roads; 725 miles of highway thru
municipalities, and improvement
or elimination of 468 grade cross-
ings.
Florida's. portion of the alloca-
tion comes to $2,167,287.

BLESSED EVENT TAKES
PLACE AT MARINELAND
A blessed event of no mean con-
sequence occurred at Marine Stu-
dios, St. Augistine, last week when
the first porpoise ever to be born
in captivity arrived at Marineland.
Scientists and attendants watched
the amazing spectacle which is
believed to be the first time that
the eyes of man have ever wit-
nessed such an event.
The baby mammal died, how-
ever. five minutes after birth. It
weighed eight pounds and ten
ounces at birth and was two feet
in length.
While keenly disappointed at
the loss of the newcomer, officials
of the studios are gratified that
such an event could occur and be-
lieve that eventually porpoises'
born in captivity may be raised to
maturity at Marineland.


last year by a few people who felt
that a community tree would be
appropriate. At that time dona-
tions were made by church organi-
zations, the P.-T. A., the Woman's
club, merchants, citizens and the
city commissioners. Additional do-
nations we're made this year by
Carl Soderberg of the St. Joe
Lumber company. Current for the
lighting was donated' by the Flor-
ida Power corporation.
I wish to extend thanks to alt
of these for their kind assistance,
and also to the WPA management
for use of truck in bringing in the
tree, to the city commissioners
again for assistance, to Charles I1.
Brammar for his assistance in wir-
ing the tree -and preparing the
floodlights, to the St. Joe high
school for loan of the stage light
frames, and to all who in any way
gave assistance, and sincerely
trust that the tree added in somu
measure to the enjoyment of tht
holiday season. I also wish to ex-
press regret that a program which
had. been arranged had to be
omitted owing to sickness of sev-
eral. T. W. Wilson.
It pays to advertise-try it!


Pleasure Cars Roll Into State
At Rate of Twelve a Minute

Asher Frank, director of the
Florida Safety Council, states that
a traffic survey on four main high-
way gateways into Florida showed
an average of 12 pleasure automo-
biles were coming into the state
every minute during the daylight
hours. He said! a count showed
5,760 southbound cars in an eight
hour period. The cars were carr-
ing an average of three passen-
gers.
Frank estimated that in a 90-day
period there will be more than
500,000 visiting automobiles in the
state which, with a total of 475,-
000 Florida cars, would .put nearly
a million automobiles on Florida 2
7500 miles of state highways.
"This," Frank said, "will pro-
vide an average of 133 automo-
biles to every mile of state high-
way In Florida."

TONS OF HONEY AT FAIR
Honey-tons of it-20 in fact,
and representing 12 varieties, will
uphold Florida's claim of being
the nation's greatest honey-produc-
ing state at the Florida State Fair
to open January 30 at Tampa, when
an entire building will be dedi-
cated to the nectarious delicacy.

Miss Clara Maddox left this
week for Charleston, S. C., after
spending several days in the city
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
John Maddox.

Mr. and Mrs. Philip Lovett vis-
ited Sunday in Apalachicola.


Added Attraction

STARS OF SCREEN AND RADIO


'The


Hollywood


Sweethearts"

'THE SWEETEST ALL-GIRL BAND IN
THE COUNTRY"



Sunday Only, Jan. 7

ON THE SCREEN


ADMISSION
Adults 25c
Children 10c
(Plus Tax)


Theatre
Opens
SUNDAY
12:45 P. M.


- Plus -


CURRENT NEWS




"PORKY'S HOTEL"




PORT,


THEATREE


T! It'.VORTH~ i; [ I N[IMIIE (TO


I4


TRAVELING

SALESMEN ...


When you order printing from a travel-
ing salesman, you are never sure when
you will get it or what it will look like.
We can show you proofs and deliver the
job the same day. No letter to
write, no packages to cart from the
postoffice-just a telephone call to our
office and we do the rest.






THE STAR

"Your Home Town Newspaper"
PHONE 51 PORT ST. JOE


' FLORIDA HIGHLIGHTS


t


ci










I';


77".


------------ I- --


PAtSE "081,.i


,THE STAR,,,-,PRTC ST. JOE,,GULF 9-CM, N7 FLORIDA


,RIDAY,.-JANUARY 5, 1940


NE