<%BANNER%>

UFPKY NEH LSTA



The star
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00058
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: November 17, 1939
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00058

Full Text




The Star-Florida's fa.stst grow-
ing little newspaper 'f.ic'ed to
"the betterment indf/Uptullding of
the City of Pont St'Je.


S P,atSt. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
es.t growing little city. .. In-
the heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial


Center


VOLUME III PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1939 NUMBER 5


IW. E. Murdock,

Old Resident, Is

Called By Death

Stricken With Heart Attaci
'Tuesday Morning; Funera
'Services Held Wednesday
Interment At Apalachicola

Another pioneer resident of Por
*St. Joe was taken by the Grin
-Reeper early Tuesday morning
-when W. E. "Billy" Murdock wa:
.stricken with a heart attack ant
passed away at his home ol
Seventh street.
'Mr. Murdock had apparently
been in good health and had been
at the Owens & Murdock store<
Monday attending to his regular:
duties, though he had remarked ol
a slight ailment. In the early
hours of Tuesday he awakened
This wife, who rushed' across the
street to arouse L. W. Owens, who
arrived just a few minutes before
Mr. Murdock passed away.
Willis Eldridge Murdock was
born in Cuthbert, Georgia, Marce
18, '1888 and came to Florida in
1896. He moved to Port St. Joe in
1909 where he was employed on
the Apalachicola Northern railroad
as a fireman. After about a year
he was promoted to engineer ano
served in that capacity for ten
years.
On October 14, 1916, Mr. Mur-
dock entered into the mercantile
business with L. W. Owens in this
_ity, establishing., the firm. or
Owens & Murdock, the oldest ew-
'tablishment in the city. Their firsa
-store was located in the building
now occupied by J. L. Kerr on
TReid avenue.
Mr. Murdock was united in mar-
riage with Pauline Owens of Loyd,
'Fla., in 1931, and one son, War-
-ren was born to the union. He
'was a member of the Brotherhood
'of Locomotive Engineers for many
-years. He took an active part in
all civic affairs and last week was
re-elected as a member of the lo-
cal school board, of which he had
been a member for six years.
Mr. Murdock was a firm be-
liever in the future of Port St.
Joe and -had visioned growth ov
-the city through the years unt:
it was one of the largest me-
tropolises of Northwest Florida.
He did not live to see this dream
materialize, but his son will see
the vision come true.
Funeral services were held at
the Baptist church Wednesday af-
ternoon with the Rev. J. W. Sise-
more officiating, assisted by the
Rev. D. E. Marietta, pastor of the
Methodist church.
Pallbearers were C. G. Costin,
B. L. Kelly, D. C. Mahon, Byrd. E.
Parker, Nick Comforter, Robert
Tapper, G. R. Maddox and C. A.
LeHardy. Honorary pallbearers
were B. A. Pridgeon, T. H. Stone,
D. G. McPherson, J. M. Smith, T.
Owens, J. Perritt, S. C. Parker, o.
Owens, R. Swatts, C. C. Williams,
J. L. Sharit and E. B. Deudy. ia--
terment was in Magnolia cemetery
at Apalachicola.
The many beautiful floral offer-
(Continued on Page 6)


Old Material of

Ancient City

Is Being Used


Shades of the ancient city of
k St. Joseph, founded more than a
! hundred years ago, are being
dug up with the use of stones
Used by the sailing ships of
those days and brick from the
business houses and homes that
t made up the old city.
n Horace Soule has in his new
g home, now nearing completion,
s a massive fireplace constructed
' of stones dredged out of St.
n Joseph's Bay which were used
as ballast by the ships of the
Y seven seas that put In here
When old St. Joseph was the
Largest city in Florida. .The
r stones make a unique fireplace
f and the varied colors add dis-
tinctiveness.
Brick dug out of their yard
under from two to three feet or
earth, have been used by Mr.
and Mrs. L. R. Holliday for the-
construction of a 12-foot chimney
at their home. The bricks, rem-
nants of the once-flourishing
city, in some instances bear
the manufacturer's name and
city of their origin.


Business Houses to

Close November 30

Merchants Back Governor Cone In
Selecting Lasi., hutsday ot
Month As Thanksgiving

President Roosevelt may pro-
claim November 23 as Thanksgiv-
ing Day, but the business men of
Port St. Joe will stick to tradition
and at a meeting of the Port St.
Joe Business Men's association at
the Legion hut Monday night they
voted to back Governor Cone in
setting November 30 as Turkey
Day. Mayor J. L. Sharit will be
asked to issue a proclamation so
stating.
The matter of door-to-door sales-
men also came up for discussion
and the majority of members were
of the opinion that since they own:
property here, are in business here i
and pay local taxes that they
should be protected from this
type of competition. W. C. Rochai
and Gus Creech appeared before c
the city commissioners Wednesday f
night with the problem, but it was
laid over for further discussion. i
It was brought out at the meet-
ing.that during construction of the a
new bridge over the canal at i
White City, traffic will be dl- N
averted by way of Overstreet. This,
it was pointed out, will mean loss a
of considerable business to local
concerns, and a letter will be sent a
the state highway department T
requesting that a temporary bridge A
be constructed at the canal and a n


Red Cross Roll

Call Is Opened


In Gulf County

Membership Passes 500 Mari
With 1250 Set As Goal; St
Joe Lumber & Export Co
Heads List With 369.

Forty-five volunteer workers
were present at the breakfast
Monday morning at Kelly Carver's
cafe which preceded tre Red Cross
membership drive for 1939.
Canvar,-ers were urged by Rob
ert. Bellows and Mrs. Basil Ken
ney, at the final "pep" meeting
to leave no stone unturned in theii
efforts to enroll every adult, bott
man and woman, in Gulf count)
in order to go over the top of 1253
members set as the goal. Due to
war conditions in Europe, Chair-
man Bellows pointed out, national
headquarters is asking for a 1,000,.
000 membership increase.
Floyd Hunt of the St. Joe Lum.
her & Export company, reported
that all of the employees of the
company, with the exception of
the woods crew, which he had not
had the opportunity to contact at
that time, had joined the Red
Cross 100 per cent, giving a totai
for this concern of 369 members.
Partial reports had been made
up to yesterday by house-to-house
canvassers and special,committees
covering industries and business
firms, but roll call officials were
unable at this time to announce
the number already joined, though
they believed it to be well past
the 500 mark.

Mrs. DuPont Heads

List of Subscribers

To Welfare League

Nice Start Made In Effort to Es-
tablish Hospitalization
Fund for County

Much interest is being expressed,
in the recently-formed Port St. Joe
Welfare League and its effort to
establish a hospitalization fund
n Gulf county for the care
of those who are unable to raise
funds in an emergency.
It is the hope of the committee
n charge of the league that the
men and women of Port St. Joe
Ind surrounding territory who
have been contacted, and those
who have not been approached,
will send their contributions in at
In early date.
First subscribers to the fund
Ire listed herewith: Mrs. Alfred
. DuPont, $30; Mr. and Mrs. H.
A. Kidd, $20 ($10 of this was do-
nated to general welfare fund);


detour on other repair work tit Mr. and Mrs. B. W. Eells, $1 per
made. month for one year; Mr. and Mrs.
Several other matters of minor W. C. Pridgeon, $1 per month for
import were taken up before the one year; Mr. and Mrs. L. G. Bef-
meeting adjourned. nal, $2; Georgo Tapper, $1: Mrs.
------v-- obi Tanper. $1: Mrs. J. T. Mc-


-- ---- O BUILDING PERMITS Neill, Indian Pa's. S1: S. A. Pat-
NEW REGISTRATION BOOK Building permit for $400 for ri;rc, Wtewahitchka. $2; Byrd E.
The city commissioners, at theli construction of a garage apart- Parker, Wewahitchka, $5; J. R.
meeting Wednesday night, decid'e- ment was issued Monday to the Hunter, Wewahitchka, $2; Stanl-ey
that since the present registration Harlow & Miller Construction Co. S. Sheip, Apalachicola, $5; T. H.
book has been in use since 1913 A building permit for construe- Stone. S5.
and is considerably battered anu tion of a $4400 dwelling, 55 by 30 The league also expresses its
marked up, that a new book will feet, at the corner of Sixteenth appreciation to those who have
be compiled for the forthcoming street and Constitution Drive, was contributed old clothing and other
city election. All voters will be issued Wednesday to J. L. Sharit. articles for its general welfare
required to register anew. IB. A. Cogdill is the contractor, work.


Gulf Corporation To



Build Pipe Line From



This City to Atlanta


ANOTHER ONE


Francis P. Whitehair of Deland
who Tuesday officially made his
announcement as a candidate
for the office of governor of
Florida at a gathering in the
Deland city park.


Lions and Scouts to

Stage Toy Matinee

Admission Will Be One Toy Or
Clothing To Be Given to the
Underprivileged Children

Manager Roy Williams of the
Port theater announces he has se-
cured a Jane Withers picture for
Saturday morning, December 2,
which is being given under spon-
sorship of th'e Lion's club and the
local Boy Scout troop. Admission
to this show will be a toy, either
new or used, and the Lions and
the Scouts will repair and repaint
the old toys. These toys so gath-
ered will be given to the under-
privileged children for Christmas.
This shoy will start at 9:31 a
nm., Saturday, December 2. Every
man, woman and child should at-
tend and help these needy chil-
dren enjoy Christmas. Your act
of giving a toy will spread a lot
of joy for the kiddies Christmas
morning. Do your part-bring dis-
carded toys and clothing.
---------)(--------*
FOR COMPTROLLER
Frank Brown, banker of Jack-
sonville, announced this week as
a candidate for state comptroile--
in the Democratic primaries next
spring.


Shop Early-There MIGHT
Be Two Christmas Days!


Four Hundred and Fifty Mile
Seamless Tube To Be
Constructed

100 ACRES FOR TANKS

Gasoline Will Be Shipped To
Our Unrivalled Port By
Boat From Texas

Another great forward step for
Port *St. Joe is contained, in an
Associated Press dispatch from
Pittsburgh, Pa., which states that
the Gulf Oil corporation has con-
firmed reports that the company
will .construct a 450-mile seamless
pipeline from this city to Atlanta,
Georgia, for the transportation of
.gasoline.
Corroboration is contained in
the Daily Construction Bulletin of
the Manufacturers Record of Bal-
timore, Md., which states that the
Gulf corporation had let the con-
tract for construction of the line.
Order for approximately 25,000
tons of 8% and 6% inch pipe has
been given to the National Tube
company for the line. Both these
sizes of pipe are larger than is
generally used in ga~sline lines,
which 'seems to indicate that the
movement of gasoline from this
port will be large or that future
extensions are planned at the
northern terminus.
It is understood that approxi.
mately 100 acres of land have
been secured here for the locating
of the huge storage tariks and
buildings necessary for carrying
out the project. In addition to the
main pumping station in this city,
booster pumping stations will be
constructed at points along the
line, which will be laid over a 50-
foot right-of-way.
A crew of surveyors has been
working in this city for some time
past laying out the site for the
tanks and surveying thte right-of-
way, and a crew is also working
out of Wewahitchka. The line. t
is understood, will follow closely
Highway No. 6 to Wewahitchka,
and from there near the highway
to Blountstown. It will cross the
state line into Alabama below Do.
than and continue in practically a
straight line from there to At-
lanta.
The gasoline will be brought to
this port by tankers from Texas
where it will be placed in storage
(Continued on Page 6)
--I--
MAC'S TAXI SERVICE
CHANGES LOCATION

Mac's DeLuxe Taxi Service, es-
tablished recently by J. C. McDan-
iel, has transferred its taxi stand
from the Midget sandwich shop to
the Standard service station at
Reid avenue and Second street,
and the phone number now is 101,
'.Ir. McDaniel has built up a
repnuation for prompt, dependable
service all 24 hours of the days,
Only experienced drivers are em-
ployed and the cars kept In per-
fct mechanical condition, as Mr.
TMcDaniel realizes that users or
axicabs want instant service they
can depend upon, and he en-
leavors to render such service.









Tr- STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


Society


METHODIST W, M. S. NAMES
NOMINATING COMMITTEE
The regular meeting of th
circles of the Methodist Missiot
ary society was held Monday a
ternoon in the church with Mr
George Patton presiding in ti
absence of the president, Mrs. W
E. Boyd.
"America" was sung and fo
lowed with prayer by Mrs. T.
Gibson, with a responsive scrl:
ture concluding the devotion
Minutes were read, followed b
appointment of a nominating con
mittee consisting of. Mrs.. J. I
Sharit, Mrs. J. T. McNeill, Mr,
H. Taunton and Mrs. R. Swatts t
nominate officers for the ensuin
year. A committee was also a]
pointed to visit the sick and shu
ins.. 'i -
.Mrs. J. :L.Temple and Mrs. Ro
Gibson. presented the last tw
chapters of -the: mission stud
book, "Triumph Through Tragedy
by-Basil- .Matthewsi At. ,the.'.coi
clusion.-ot song,.,?'In Christ Ther
Is;No -East :or West," Rev. D. E
Marietta dismissed with ibenedic
tion.

MT~1IONARY CIRCLES
MEET FOR BIBLE STUDY
,The regular..Bible study for thi
month was held at the .Baptis
church Monday afternoon by ti
circles: of .the, missionary society
with Mrs. J. F. Miller as leader
At the conclusion of study, seatl
were presented to Mesdames A
L. Ezell, W. C. Pridgeon, O. P
Powell, M. J. Fillingim, A. E. Mc
Caskey, J. 0. Baggett, 3. W. Slse
more and Kate Harrell.
The meeting was dismissed with
prayer following the offering. The
next'-meeting will be of the circles
at homes of members.

MRS. JOHN BLOUNT
HOSTESS AT BRIDGE
Mrs. John Blount was hostess to
two tables of bridge at her hornm
Thursday afternoon of last week
At the conclusion of play, prizes
were presented to Mrs. J. .
Bounds, high, Mrs. Joe Morrow
second high, and Mrs. Roy Wu'
liams, traveling.
A delicious salad course wa<
served to Mesdames Bounds, Wil-
liams, Morrow, M. K. Hurlbut, W.
M. Howell, C. J. Sullivan and MAa
sey Ward.

The Misses Lunnette Hammock
and Marigene Smith, Cornelius
VanHorn and Carlyle Matthews
visited Tuesday in Panama City.

Rev. and Mrs. V. G. Lowrie of
Marianna visited in the city Sun-
day.


FLOWERS AND

CORSAGES



i-




( :, .f .- J :':
S. '--
q,

i .

WOOD FIBRE FLOWERS
that cannot be told from the
best product of Mother Nature.
S And they keep indefi-
nitely. If they become droopy
you merely place them in the
refrigerator and in, a brief time
they are as good as new.
SEE

Mrs. W. S. Smith
STAR OFFICE PHONE 51


S Personals C

LANETA DAVIS, Editor


At the Ciurctes
-e A

f- ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL
s. Rev. Frank Dearing, Rector
ie Services at St. James Episcopal
V. church every Sunday evening at
7:45 o'clock.
1- Church school every Sunday at
S. 10 o'clock.
p- Holy Communion services on the
1. third Sunday at 9:30 a. m.
)y
it FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
L. Rev. J. W. Sisemore, Minister
9:45 a. m.-Sunday School.
o 11:00 a. m.--Morning Worship.
S 7:00 p, mB.-B Y. P;-U.
g 8:00 p. .m.-Preaching' service.
p" W. _M, 'U:.i Mbnday, 3.00 p.: m;
t- Prayermeeting Wednesday, 7:30 p.
in. Teachers meeting, Thursday,
y 7:30 p. m.

O :. ASSEMBLY: OF GOD
S Rev. E; , Corbin, Pastor
-:' Full-time services
10:15 a. m.-Sunday School.
e 11:00 a; Im.-:-Preachlng Service.
!. tW30-p. m.-Evangelistoi service.
c. PV'ayermeeting every Wednesday
night. : : "

MET THIOSTI8 CHURCH
B-Bst -Marietta, Miteter
S Services Bvery Sunday
e 1I0:00 a. n..---Churcl School.
S li:e00 a. m.-Morning worship.
7:30 p. m.-Evening -worship.

S PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Rev. H. F. Beaty Minister
10:00 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.-Preaching service.
8:00 p. m., second and fourth
SSundays--Evening services.
SRev. Beaty will preach in We-
wahitchka the first Sunday night
Sat 7:30 o'clock, and in Liberty
e county the third Sunday night.
s __
\ ------------
MRS. W. A. WOOD IS
HOSTESS TO CLUB
Mrs. W. A. Wood was hostess to
her bridge club Tuesday evening
at her home on Eighth street. The
tables were attractively decorate
with vari-colored flowers. Follow-
ing the tallying of scores, Mrs.
George Hudson was presented wit;i
'high prize, second high going to
Mrs. B. J. Hull.
The hostess served chicken salai,
sandwiches, cream cheese sani-
wiches, cookies, potato chips, and
hot chocolate to Mesdames Hud-
son, Hull, R. Carter, J. Sowers, W.
Talley, B. Allen and RI. Chism.

MRS. PAUL FARMER
COMPLIMENTS DAUGHTER
Complimenting her small daugh-
ter, Ruby Lee, who celebrated her
fourth birthday Monday,. Mrs. Pauw
Farmed. entertained at her home in
Oak Grove. Games were enjoyed
during the afternoon, after which
the little guests were served Ic..
cream and cake. The honoree was
the recipient of many lovely gifts
and birthday wishes from her
guests.

B. Y. P. U. IN MEETING
LAST THURSDAY
The members of the Baptis,
Young People's class met at the
home of the Misses Alice anti
Alma Baggett Thursday of lasi
week for a combined business an
social session. Duties were a. o
signed and explained to each of-
ficer, after which the hostesses
served delectable refreshments.

WOMAN'S CLUB TO MEET
NEXT WEDNESDAY


The regular scheduled meeting
of the Port St. Joe Woman's cluh
for Wednesday was postponed on
account of the death of W. B.
Murdock, and next Wednesday,
November 22, set as date for the
meeting, which will be held at 3
p. m. in the Centennial building.
fr *
W. W. Kelly of Dawson, Ga:, is
the guest this week of Mr. and
Mrs. J. M. Smith.


t
(1
t



t
r


S

o


HAROLD PALMER AND
VIOLA COLE MARRIED
Announcement has been made
of the marriage of Miss Viola Cole
of Arcadia to Harold Palmer of
this city on October 22, at the
home of the Rev. Robert Anderson
n Tallahassee.
Mr. Palmer is connected with
the St. Joe Paper company anw
ias rn-un friends in the city who
will wish him and his bride much
happiness. They will be at home
on Seventh street after Dec. 1.

P.-T. A. MEETS MONDAY
The Port St. Joe Parent-Teacni-
-rs association will meet Monday
light 'at 7:30 in the school aindl-
torium instead of next Thursday.
Change was made due to the fact
.hat some may desire to observe
Thanksgiving on November 23.

Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Larkin spent
the week-end in Bristol visiting
relatives.

W. G. Alsip returned to the city
Sunday following a two weeks'
business trip to New York and
their eastern cities.


L


':PAGF- TWO .;,1,


CONKLINS ENTERTAINS
MEMBERS OF PARISH
Concluding their final plans for
the every:member canvass for the
support of the church's work for
1940, the committee members of
St. James parish were entertained
Sunday afternoon at the home of
Mr. and Mrs. B. B. Conklin. Teams
were appointed for the work by
the Rev. Frank Dearing and final
plans made for the parish supper
to be held at the Legion hut for
the parish members and their
families on December 2.
Refreshments of coffee and
cake were served to Mr. and Mrs.
Robert Bellows, Mr. and Mrs. Tec
Frary, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Ourtis,
Mr. and. Mrs. Tom Owens; Mrs. W.
A. Smith and Mrs. Sammie Davis.
... .; .. t..,.tr- f .,-. .
JUDGE CARTER SPEAKS
BEFORE LIONS CLUB
,.The regular luncheon of toe
Lions club- was held Wednesday
noon at the Port 'Inn with Judge
a. ,R. I. -.Carter making the .ah.
dress.', -Pres&dent B. B. Conklin
was.lin .the.-chalr.
The matter of the toy matinCe.
at the Port theater on December
2, was -worked out; -and Henry
Lilius, Red Cross chairman, re-
ported that the club had enrolled
100 per -cent.- It was also reported
that work was under way to aid
underprivileged children in secur-
ing glasses or care for their eyes
where necessary.

MRS. DARCEY IS
HOSTESS AT BRIDGE
Mrs. J. J. Darcey entertained
with three tables of bridge last
Friday afternoon at her home on
Hunter's Circle. An arrangement
of potted plants and' fall flowers
were used for decorating the liv-
ing room where the players gath-
ered. Scores were tallied and
prizes awarded to Mrs. Robert
Tapper, high, and Mrs. E. H. Hor-
ton, traveling. For refreshments,
sandwiches and hot chocolate were
served to the guests.
S* ,*
MRS. LOGAN ENTERTAINS
PRESBYTERIAN AUXILIARY
Mrs. Robert Logan entertained
the Woman's Auxrnary of the
Presbyterian church at her home
Monday afternoon, with Mrs. J. E.
Taylor presiding in absence "f the
president, Mrs. B. E. Kebney, Sr.
The meeting opened with prayer, 4
followed by roll call. Mrs. E. i1..
Horton led the Bible study, take
from the Book of John. Mrs. D. B.
Lewis was received as a new
member. Following the study hour
the hostess served cookies anc
tea to the members present.


SUNDAY MONDAY NOVEMBER 19 20

DARRYL F. ZANUCK'S
Greatest Hit of the Year
Added Joy
Current News Fashions

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 21

TURKEY NITE 9:30

S FREE TURKEYS FOR THANKSGIVING
I On the Screen


FIELD JOHN HOWARD

"WHAT A LIFE"
News "Football Thrills of 1938"

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 22 THURS., FRI., NOV. 23-24
WAR HORRORS! FRED MacMURRAY
FREDRIC MARCH MADELINE CARROLL
LIONEL BARRYMORE HERBERT BRODERICK
WARNER BAXTER "HONEYMOON
JUNE LANG In

"Road to Glory" IN BALI"

"Life Begins for Andy Panda"
"SAND HOGS' Current War News,

DOUBLE FEATURE SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 25

me,,,.-., I


r HIT NO. 1

GENE AUTREY
in -
"Roving Tumbleweeds"
With Smiley Burnette

"DICK TRACY RETURNS"


Uitf HIT NO. 2
BONITA GRANVILLE
FRANKIE THOMAS
JOHN LITEL in
"NANCY DREW and the
HIDDEN STAIRCASE"

"Hamateur Nite"


~stsBi.-aa ~IP


EPISCOPAL AUXILIARY
MEETS WITH MRS. BELLOWS
Mrs. Robert Bellows entertainsW
the members of the Episcopai
Auxiliary Monday afternoon at her
home on .Monument avenue. Mrs.
W. A. Smith, president, was In
charge of the meeting and final
plans were' made for the "hot dog'-
and pie sale downtown Saturday
night. Following the business, de-
licious refreshments were served
by the hostess to the ten members
present.


U U ~ U


i


Fe


BAPTIST REVIVAL d,/ ^
BEGINS SUNDAY
Rev. J. W. Sisemore, pastor ot
the First Baptist church, states -
that the regular mid-winter re- .'oi
vival will open at the church next
Sunday, with Rev. C. L. Watten-
barger, state evangelist preaching .....
during the two weeks' session.
Singing will be in charge of the
choir leader, A. E. McCaskey, who
states that special numbers have '
been arranged for the revival.

J. A.M.CLUB ENTERTAINED
BY MRS. B. A. PRIDGEON
;.Mrs. B. A. Pridgeon entertained e the
the members df the J. A. M. club
at her home .Monday night. An MA.GIC S ATE
hour of sewing'~ tid chatting was G N .A ''
enjoyed, after which the hostess :GREETING CARDS
served delicious refreshments to- ngsethilnou tof' r-, o.
members present. inarry at .Will be kept
an41,:use.d months. after
SMr: and Mrs. W. SImith spent the holiday season is past
Armistice Day In DeFuniak and
visited over- the week-end in Tat- -. :-
lahassee with 'Mr. and Mrs.M.. CAL i :we will
Sheppard and family.' -Incidentally, gad to brng samples
ye ed caught some nifty fish of g to ngshow couples
the new bridge at Panacea Springs to sow you
and expects to try his luck again
shortly.

Mr. and Mrs. F. Larkin of Bris- "Your Home Town Paper"
tol moved to., Port St. Joe this
week. Mr. Larkin will be em- -
ployed by the St. Joe Paper Co.


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 17,, 193!


1





I









RIniAV. NOVEMBER 17. 1939


AT THE PORT SUNDAY


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLO'RIDA


FLORIDA HIGHLIGHTS


PAGE THREE

Boats sailing ovr dangerous
Diamond Shoals, at Cape Hatteras,
N. C., pass over dozens of old
wrecks which can be seen plainly
by those above.

The Star gives Gold Stamps
on subscription payments.


Myrna Ley as she appears in
"The Rains Came," Darryl P.
Zanuck's greatest hit of the
year, whih playss Sunday and
Monday at the Port theater.
others taking leading parts are
Tyrone Power and George Brent
LEGAL ADVERTISING
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, IN
.AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLOR-
.IDA. IN CHANCERY.
HORACE W, SOULE, Plaintiff,
vs, CHARLES H. DOLD, et al, De-
.endants.
.NO T I C E
The State of Florida;
TO: Charles H. Dold, if alive, and,
if dead, to his unknown heirs, de-
visees, legatees, or grantees;
AND to all persons having, or
claiming, an interest in the fol-
lowing described lands: "Lots six
(6) and eight (8) in Block fifty-
one (51) of the City of Port St.
Joe, according to the official map
-on file in the office of the Clerk
-of the Circuit Court of Gulf Coun-
ty, Florida, said map showing said
lots to be lying in and a part of
that part of Section 1, Township
8 South, Range 11 West, lying
South of the right-of-way of the
Apalachicola Northern Railroad
Company."
GREETINGS:
Horace W. Soule, having filed In
this Court his sworn bill of com-
plaint in this suit, the nature and
purpose of which is to determine
the .title of the plaintiff to the
land hereinabove described to be
a -good and sufficient absolute fee
simple title, to have all claims and
interests of the defendants, and
each of them, in and to said land
passed upon and determined; to
remove clouds upon the plaintiff's
title to said land; to quiet and
confirm the plaintiff's title there-
to, and in which bill of complaint,
-the plaintiff states mat he believes
tnere are persons interested in the
land herein involved and herein-
above described whose names are
unknown to him, and having fur-
ther named' therein certain per-
sons as known by name to him,
the said plaintiff, but as not known
by him, the said plaintiff, whether
they or any of them are dead or
alive, and as believed by him, the
said plaintiff, if living to be inter-
ested in the property and prem-
ises herein involved and herein-
above described, and if dead to
have been interested therein;
AND having made all persons
having or claiming any interest
upon the above described land
party defendant to the said bill
of complaint;
AND having demanded from the
Clerk of the Circuit Court. in and.
for Gulf County, Florida, the mak-
ing of an Order requiring such
persons and parties to appear to
his said bill of complaint upon a
day not less thail twenty-eight
days, nor more than sixty days
from the date of the making or
said Order;
IT IS, THEREFORE, ORDERED,
That each and every th'e defend-
ants above named, designated an~t
specified, are hereby required to
appear herein to the plaintiff's
bill of complaint herein filed on
the 4th day of December, 1939.
and that this Order be published
in "The Star." a newspaper pub-
lished in Gulf County, Florida,
once a wee~ ifor four consecutive
wve'eks.
WITNESS my hand as Clerk and
the seal of said Court, this 2nd
dflv of November. 1939, at Wewa-
Shitchka in the County and State
aforesaid.
J. R. HUNTER,
Clerk of Circuit Court
Gulf Ccunty. Florida
(CIRCUIT COURT SEAL)
E. CLAY LEWIS. Jr.,
Solicitor for Plaintiff,' 12-1


The Low Down
from
Willis Swamp


Editor The Star:
With the war crowdin':even the
divorces and murders out of tne
news, its not so hard to savvy wny
we don't pay too much attention
to Uncle Samuel when he borrows
another 10 or 20 million just to
pay interest on money which he
borrowed, before.
Borrowin' money to pay interest
on other borrowed money, brother
that IS borrowin'.
How Uncle Samuel manages to
keep outa the calaboose while the
SEC puts other guys in for too
high financing it is kinda mysti-
fyin' to me.
But most of us, I reckon, are
kinda like the young duci when
he graduated from the University
of Florida. On the day he gradu-
ated the professor said to him,
young feller, you are now finishing.
here and there is just one thing
you don't know-you don't know
yet that you don't know anything.
I guess maybe one of the things
that professor had in mind must
been politics.
Yours with the low-down,
JO SERRA.


Labor To Form

Political Group


To Take Active Part In Approach-
ing State and National
Election Campaigns

The Florida Federation of Labor
planned Saturday the formation
within the next few months of a
statewide political committee to
take an active part in approaching
state and national election cam-
paigns.
The step, directed at placing
the labor movement in the state's
political field as a unit, was taken
at Daytona Beach by the federa-
tion's executive board.
The group will be composed ot
"union members and those who
are in active sympathy with ana
support the objectives of organized
labor."


Teacher Fund To

Start Next Month


Teachers and State Will
tribute To Build Up
Pension Fund


Florida's teacher retirement pro-
gram will get off to a belated
start next month. The legislature
provided for the program to be-
gin July 1, but Attorney General
G. C. Gibbs ruled that a start In
December is legal because the du-
ties imposed on the trustees are
continuing.
Teachers and principals will
contribute a part of their salaries
each month, beginning in Decem-
ber, and state appropriations will
help build up a pension fund..
Retirement benefits will not be
available to those who immedi-
ately become eligible until the
state pays its share. Governor
Cone states the treasury is in no
position now to take care of the
$200,000 a year appropriated by
the 1939 legislature, which finally
adopted the program.
Maximum retirement compensa-
tion would be about $600 a year,
for a teacher of at least 35 years
service and an average income or
$1200 a year. No credit is given
for salaries in excess of $1200.
Teachers may retire any time
after they are '- years of age ana
receive benefits based upon their
years of service and average sal-
ary during the last 10 years of
their tenures.
Disability benefits of nine-
tenths of retirement payments are
allowed for a teacher with as
much as 15 years' service who be-
comes mentally or physically in-
capacitated.


Rice growing is being extended
in the Soviet Union, and machin-
ery adapted to rice cultivation is
gaining in use.


Because drug addicts, try to
keep their habit a secret, it has
never been possible to take an
accurate census of addiction in
the United States.
-------4------
Trade:at home-your local mer-
chants have just what you want.


REAL ICE
IS HEALTHY and

SAFE














,III,,





REAL ICE
IS MORE
Economical


Low cost and guaranteed
purity make REAL Ice more
economical and serviceable.
Dally deliveries give you the
best guarantee of satisfaction
PHONE 47

ST. JOE ICE

COMPANY
MAX KILBOURN, Prop.


MOVING?

We have the sub-agency for the

MAYFLOWER VAN LINES
and can move your furniture any place in the
United States, Canada or Mexico.
Full Insurance Carried At All Times


'Red' Horton's Transfer
PHONE 70 PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
.4- l ^*--<


Do the members of YOUR family say this?
If not, perhaps it is because you have never given Alka-Seltzer
a thorough trial.
All over the world people who have used Alka-Seltzer are
enthusiastic in its praise.
If Alka-Seltzer is as good as we say it is, you want it in your med-
icine cabinet; if it is not, it won't cost you a penny. We will refund
the purchase price to any new user who is not entirely satisfied.
Your family may need Alka-Seltzer sooner and more often than
you think. Our guarantee of satisfaction or money refunded
covers its use in all conditions listed be-
'. '- low.


X-MLOM71 MV-T-M







PAGE FOUR



THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
undet- Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year........$2.00 Six Months...... $1.00
Three Months..........65c

-4( Telephone 51 f--

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

WHAT KIND OF A WAR IS THIS?
What is probably the most curious war in
the world's history is now being waged by
three of the earth's mightiest nations-a war
that has been going on for some ten weeks
and the most peculiar thing of which is
that there is little if any fighting.
When France and England first declared
war against Germany, the nation first named,
. emerging from her Maginot line, late assisted
by a few British soldiers, drove the Germans
back from German territory behind their own
Seigfried line, and this with no particular ob-
jection on the part of Germany.
When Germany finished with her rape of
Polanid-to which nation- both England and
France had given the most solemn pledges
of assistance-pledges which they had not
the slightest idea of redeeming-she, emerg-
ing from her own fortifications, easily drove
the French troops back onto their own terri-
tory, and there the situation rests today-
presenting the unusual spectacle, unique in
the world's history, of a major war carried
on without fighting. One' day recently, on a
hundred mile front, casualties of both armies,
with hundreds of thousands of men presum-
ably engaged, amounted to one man injured.
As a matter of fact, none of the three na-
tions want war; any one of the trio would
be glad to call the whole thing off, if it
could be done without "losing face."
The question naturally comes up: "What
kind of a war is this, anyway?"-DeFuniak
Springs Herald.

THE LOW DOWN
bur old friend Jo Serra from out Willis
Swamp way dropped into the office yester-
day and said that he had looked over the list
of announced candidates for governor and he
didn't seen a danged one that impressed him
as sound timber.
"You know," said Jo, "we've got a lot of
big, fine looking' cypress trees out our way
that look like they oughta make good tim-
ber, but when you hit a lot of 'em with the
broad side of your ax, durned if they ain't
hollow-soundin'. Well, that's what seems to
be wrong with most of these here candidates
-their platforms are all hollow-soundin'."
We asked him what he thought of Pierce
Wood's chances if he entered the race, but
.he parried this with the remark "I see Har-
old Colee ain't gonna make the race-he's a
wise hombre," and immediately launched into
a story about a big bass that got away from
him while he was fishing with Pogie Bill.
We gathered from his story that politics
is like fishing-the big one that we would
like to land always gets away, and if he
doesn't, when you haul him into the boat he
never is as big as when he was splashing-
about in the water and raising a whale of a
ruckus.

Bankers always were considered lucky in-
dividuals, and now it is proven a fact, for
they will celebrate two Thanksgivings this
vear.

A couple of women were fussing in front
of the postoffice yesterday, and a bystander
remarked: "Now we'll hear a lot of truth
about both of 'em."


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


THEME OF THE CHRISTMAS SEAL
Just to remind you that Christmas Seals
will go on sale Thanksgiving Day in the
thirty-third annual drive against tuberculosis
in the United States, we want to present a
brief history of the double-barred cross-the
insignia of the 79th Division of the A. E. F.
in the World War-which is the badge of the
fight against the dread disease.
Rockwell Kent, American artisf, writer and
lecturer, is the designer of this year's seal,
which shows an angel with outstretched
arm against a brilliant blue background and
the double-barred cross prominently dis-
played.
The Lorraine cross was taken by Godfrey
de Bouillon, duke of Lorraine, the first Chris-
tian ruler of Jerusalem, as the insignia of his
house. It had previously been used by tIre
leaders of the first crusade as their standard
and to them meant a symbol of peace and
hope.
The first international conference on tu-
berculosis adopted the cross as its insignia
in 1902. Dr. Gilbert Serioron of Paris made
a plea for its use as an emblem. He called
it an emblem of peace, hope and of fraternal
*understanding to spread the message through-
out the world and hold out hope to sufferers
from tuberculosis.

We hear some talk occasionally about "do-
ing something" to perpetuate the anniversary
of the drawing up of Florida's first consti-
tution here in 1838, but nobody seems to
know exactly what should be done. The date
is drawing nigh and we put forth the sug-
gestion that it be observed in a small way
each year until it can be developed into some-
thing.really big. This event is the only thing
that Port St. Joe has of its very own-no
Qther spot in the state has anything like it-
and even though we observe it with a public
address and a band concert, that will be
something. But let's not pass it by without
some sort of ceremony.

The familiar process of "mending the po-
litical fences" is in operation again now that
debate on neutrality has given way to de-
,cision and senators and representatives are
back home again. The instigators of our na-
tional legislation are anxiously trying to find
out what their public, so many of whom are
farmers who spend part of their own time
"mending fence," think about national affairs
and whether or not they consider their pres-
ent legislators good enough to go back to
Washington for another term.

American policy toward the war has
finally been legally established. We are theo-
retically neutral-but from the practical
standpoint we are holding out a helping hand
to the allies. It is significant that the con-
trolled German press played down the em-
bargo repeal, and continued in its relatively
friendly attitude to this country. Apparently
Hitler doesn't want to repeat Kaiser Bill's
mistake of unnecessarily antagonizing us.

We learn that Wauchula has been selected
as the 1940 spring training camp of the Mem-
phis club of the Southern League. Perhaps
if our ball park were placed in good condi-
tion Port St. Joe might be able to line up one
of these minor league teams for their spring
training.

German subs have been active in sinking
Danish ships. That was all right, but when
the Danes handed the City of Flint back to
the Americans, well, that brought a howl
from Hitler.-Florida Advocate.

Along with not smoking or hitting the
bottle, the Axis twins are no fishermen. The
true angler would have thrown Albania back.
--Atlanta Constitution.

,They can fool all of the people all of the
time in Germany because the government
controls the press and the radio.

Send The Star to a friend-only $2 a year,


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1939


THE WITCH'S BREW


MEWIS i1~ W4M:- ~e ORDERS'COMPAW lb J4IRS ANDJ PAY
VPACK- WAO lb 1.rSOSC WilO* JE.VER W0 VD UrOR -ie COr'PANY..


Game May Attract

Hunters Up River

Franklin County Game Warden
Reports Turkeys, Squirrels
And- Coons-Plentiful,

The biggest winter sport in
Franklin county is hunting, and
rom all reports the immediate
section around Apalachicola ana
Crooked rivers is marked with a
circle on the holiday chart of
hunting and fishing addicts, says
the Apalachicola Times. This
week I. G. W., Melvin, local game
warden, reported that wild turkeys
were at least three times more
plentiful than last year, with
squirrels and 'coons topping last
year's quantity by a wide margin.
Wild game under the protection
of an alert conservation depart-
ment, with most sportsmen co'
operating with the law, is not
likely to diminish, in the opinion
of observers.
Bream fishing should be good
for several months because there
is no high water in sight. Early
high water this year also was a
contributing factor in the wild
turkey increase. Last year the wa-
ter came up late and drowned out
most of the nests and younk tur-
eys. De'er and bear are also on
the list to be hunted, with the
season opening November 20.
----------

Sportsman's Code

1-I will never allow the muzzle
of my gun to point at anything
which I do not intend to shoot.
2-I will never load my gun
)- -- tnlV U t iq f o inted


Mullet a r e Bigger

and More Plentiful

Reason Attributed to Enforcing of
Closed Season. During Spawn-
ing Time Last Year

Florida's great mullet season is
on, and .fishermen around Port St.
Joe as well as other points on the
west and east coasts of the state
are reporting bigger and better
catches than they have had in
many years.
Veteran fishermen attribute the
increase in mullet this season to
the fact that for the first time
the state conservation department
enforced the closed season during
spawning. time last year.
Mullet, described as being "the
lamb of the sea' because it is
peaceful in its habits and feeds
on microscopic plant and animal
life of the sea instead of devour-
ing other fish or seafood, is Flor-
ida's greatest staple food, fish.
Mullet production in Florida ex-
ceeds 24,000,000 pounds a year and
is the "old reliable" of commercial
fishermen in 41 of the 42 countless
which touch salt water. Two spe-
cjie are common In Florida warers
-the black mullet and the silver
mullet. Black mullet is the favor-
ite of thousands of local residents
and visitors, and no fish market
is without them in season.
The food content of mullet is or
th e finest quality and contains
more iodine than any other Flor-
ida food fish. Its flesh Is easily
cooked. readily digestible, and its
price is lower than that asked for
any other meat in any of the food
stores.
"Mullet should be protected and


ciart of my body or any person; and the supply built up." says R.
nor stand in front of anyone who L. Dowling, state :supervisor of
's loading a gun. conservation. "On the other hand,
Swill never cock my there should be a determined et-
3--I will never coek my gun
and pull the trigger "for fun. fort on the part of the fishing In-
ad ll the triggerdustry to advertise and publicize
4-I will never shoot directly at its fine qualities as a food fish
a flat, hard surface, a bottle or that the demand will be greatly
similar object, as the bullet is cer- increased."
tain to ricochet (glance) from it. __.___ _
5-I will never handle a gun QUALIFY AT APALACHICOLA
without first opening the breech Qualifying for the city election
"o be sure the gun is empty ana ,t Apalachicola to be held Novem-
looking through th'e bore to see her 31 are J. TT. Hodges for mayor.
ihai. it is clean, and nvwi2ht Marshall and J. P.
C-I will never carry my gun Coombs for commissioners.


Ionrted ex:c-,pt when hunting, ana
will then be sure that it is locket
in the "safe" position.
7-I will never shoot at a song
bird or harmless animal ror spor"
and will always he sure that no
wounded game be left to suffer.
8-I will remember that a .22
caliber bullet will travel three-
quarters of a mile or go through
nine inches of ordinary board, and
will ricochet a jong way across


-^--*--------
Read the ads-it payss!

water.
9-I will always put my gun
muzzle-first through a fence befoi
I climb the fence; I will clinT
over between the next two fern
posts.
10-I will always give my gun a
thorough cleaning as soon as I am
through firing.










FRDY NOEBR1,j H TR OTS~ OGL ONY LRD AEF"


Poultrymen say young turkeys
require about the same amount of
vitamin G as baby chicks, but
need considerable more vitamins
A and D in their feed.


CLASSIFIED ADS

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
FOR SALE-5-acre tracts of good
farm land near Port St. Joe; $1l
down, $10 month. No interest
charged If monthly payments are
made promptly. Address Box AM
c/o The .Star. 11-17-3t
CHEAP FOR QUICK SALE-55 by
140 ft. lot, Gaulding Subdivision,
2nd St.. Improved, fenced, well
water, garage: Write or see Mrs.
W. W. VanDergrift, Highland
View. P. O. Box 843, Port St: Joe

TWO COTTAGES FOR SALE
Waterfront
Five rooms (two bedrooms) and
batht (complete). Front and back
porches screened. Electric lights
annd water.
$1450 EACH
TERMS-$200 down and balance
at $20 month. Interest at 5%
$1350 CASH
Lot Size 50 by 90 feet

FOR SALE-First 10 lots in Ben-
der Addition at 20% reduction.
Investigate this before buying!
J. L. KERR, Realtor
Port St. Joe, Florida
FOR RENT
UNFURNISHED 9 by 18-foot cab-
ins; ceiled overhead and sides;
good water; $4 month. Apply St.
Joe Lumber Co. 1212|tf


MACS TAXI
Day and Night Service
Standard Service PHONE
Station 1 0 1
Reid Ave. at 2nd


S HAVE YOU TRIED
LeHARDY'S PINK TIP
COLD CAPSULES
Hundreds have tried them and
recommend them highly
Unconditionally Guaranteed



DR. J, C. COE
-DENTIST -
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe


WE GIVE

GOLD STAMPS
When You Pay Your
Subscripttion
-~ ASK FOR THEM }>-


THE STAR
"Your Home Town Paper"



EYES EXAMINED




Glasses fitted when needed
Made In Our Own Laboratory
All Work Unconditionally
Guaranteed
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 6 p. m.

DR. G. T. NEWBERRY
OPTOMETRIST
PANAMA CITY, FLA.


* ., v v w T vs *, v v Yv v v v* v v' v *'

.THE TATTLER
t THE STAFF F
Editor-in-Chief.Margie Kirkland
Asst. Editor....,David Maddox
SSociety Editor.. .Evelyn Tharpe
Joke Editor........Earl Brown :
Reporters ............ Paul
Johnson and Lillian Chandler
Sees All, Knows All, Tells All About Port St. Joe High School
" '. .


Sharks Lose To

Bristol, 29 to 18


Locals ,to Play Florida. Hi Team
On Field Here Today

The Sharks lost the football
game to Bristol last Friday by a
score of 29 to 18, but it was a
game lost in fact, not in spirit.
The game was lost in the first


Senior Class is

Given Privileges

Committee Draws Up Perogative,
For Graduating Class

At the request of Principal D.
G. McPherson, Al Schneider, pres-
ident of the senior class, name
a committee to act upon and ap-
prove the senior privileges, with


few minutes when Bristol scores the following results:
two touchdowns. The Shraks put 1. The..senigrs, will be allowed


up a valiant battle, -but the lead
of the invaders -was too mucn.
They firmly believe -they-will win
thei-r:iext game with them.
* Lineup -for Friday's game was
Al Schneider, left end; -Grimslei,
center; .Gilbert, right end; John
Lane, quarterback; Hammock, lefti
half, and Max Maddox, right halt
Substitutions wete Smith, center;
Dave Maddox, left end;- Ed Hufft
and Gaskin, backfield. Touchdowns
were made by the Maddox boys-
two by Max and one by Dave. :;
The Sharks meet Florida Hignr
on the local fiele this afternoon
at 3:30 o'clock, and everyone is
urged to turn out for the encoun-
ter. Florida Hi came out victorious
when the locals invaded Tallahas-
see, but it will be different today.

PROBLEM OF RAINY DAY
SESSIONS UP TO FACULTY'
.The student council went into
session Thursday of last week af-
ter being postponed from Tuesday.
The vice-president, Jimmy Wea-
ther, was absent and his place
was filled by Margie Kirkland, the
senior representative, for that
session. Jewell Lewis was wel-
comed as junior representative,
taking the place of Howard Maa-
Donald.
The matter of rainy day sessions
was discussed and unanimously
endorsed by the council. It has
been taken to Principal McPher-
son, and the matter is now up to
him and the teachers.
A bill was passed for a fire
drill once a month to prepare tile
students for fire.
The question of students playing
on the basketball court with hard-
heeled shoes was discussed and ;t
was decided to assess a fine or
two demerits for such occurrence-
in future.

WE MOURN
The Port St. Joe high school
mourns the death of one of its
trustees, W. E. Murdock, wlho
passed away Tuesday. He had
been a trustee for a number of
years and an excellent one. The
periods were shortened Wednes-
lay so that the whole school
could attend the services.

JUNIORS TO SPONSOR DANCE
The junior class has arrange
to give a dance tonight in the
Centennial auditorium. Music wi
be furnished by "Nick Lodian."
Admission will be 25 cents. Let's
everyone go and join the fun. The
entire student body is invited.

NEW PIANO
A much-needed piano has bee%
purchased by the P.-T. A. and the
school board. It arrived last week
from Bonifay. It has a beautiful
tone and we're sure it will be of
great benefit to the school.

WANTED!
One basketball coach for the
athletically-inclined girls of the
Port St. Joe high school.


to,.take the fourth quarter tests
over if necessary to pass for tun.
year.
2. Seniors. willbe permitted to
march from chapel .when the stu-,
dent body is seated. .
3. Seniors will be allowed t'4
take fourth quarter test one weeK
before the rest take theirs.
4. Seniors may go ,to the senior
study hall at any period they de-
sire, if they are eligible.
Those present at the meeting In
addition to President Schneider,
were Paul Johnson, Ed HuffU,
Opal Greene-Chavers and Margie
Kirkland.

CHAPEL PROGRAM
A different schedule was fo:-
lowed in chapel last Friday. Thti
grammar school attended immeit-
ately after school took up and the
high school followed at 10 o'clock.
The same program was given in
both chapels.
The band played several new
numbers and the national anthem.
Mr. McPherson introduced Larry
Evans as the speaker, and he gave
a very interesting talk on "De-
mocracy."
The cheer leaders took charg:-
and we gave a few cheers ano
sang school songs. Mr. Farmer
gave several selections on our new
piano, in one of which he accom-
panied himself with a cornet.

WE FOUND OUT
Who E. M.'s new boy friend is-
or is he new?
That things said to a tempera-
mental sophomore girl make her
mad.
That M. S., M. C. and E. D. are
planning on a big week-end.
That M. S. is mad with J. L.
again.
That R. H. Smith blushes.
That M. T. double-crossed G. C(.
Sunday night.
That M. M. was happy over the
week-end. Hint: Alice Ruth was
in town.
That Mrs. Pridgeon went fish-
ing.

SHELTER FOR WALK
An arcade is being built from
the new building to the old one
due to the fact that when it rains
quite a few students get wet in
going to and from classes. The
students will appreciate this new
addition very much.
--------"------
DEDICATE MARKER
A marker, weighing four tons
and made of key rock, was dedi-
cated Armistice Day on the an-
-ient battle ground of the famou-
Battle of Okeechobee, which was
fought on Christmas Day of 1837.
The marker is two feet thick, four
feet wide and six feet high, and
was purchased by funds donated
by the descendants of Col. Richard
Gentry and the Daughters of the
American Revolution.
-- -
The Star gives Gold Stamps
on subscription payments.


Andrews Will Not home, to reaffirm my heretofore
announced position."..;_--
Ac c pt Judgeship He then stated that before he
ep geleft Orlando for the special ses-
.- sion he had said he would not be-
Senator Puts End to Rumors At come an applicant for the federal
Press Ass n judgeship but would run to suc-
SA ceed himself as U. S. senator.
In St. Augustine "In the hope of putting an end
to the rumors,'" he-.said, "I now
The political rumor of ABC and reaffirm, not only that I am not
"triple plays" of Andrews to Cone an applicant for. the judgeship,
to Butler which, have been keep- "but that I could not and would not
ing politicians and newspapers in accept it even if it were tendered
a. dither for the past several me."
weeks, blew up with a loud bang Andrews gave no indication as
ast Friday night when U. S. Sen. to whom he favored for appoint-
.tor Charles O. Andrews kicked ment as federal judge, but sals
it out of the window of the spa- that he, hoped, that he and Sena-
cious dining room at Marineland, tor Claude Pepper will.agree on a
St. Augustine. suitable, person to. recommend for
Senator Andrews chose the clo-- the position in order that the ap-
ing. moments of the entetainme:" pointment, may be .made soon af-
program which followed the bau ter congress convenes in January.
quet given to newspapermen at- ;:, '------- --
tending the 60th annual conve,- RE,V. BEATY RETURNS
tion of the Florida State Press.ac- Rev. H. F. Beaty returned Wed-
sociation to make his. dramatic nesday from a .trip covering four
statement that he. could not anu states, ,with all expenses paid.
would not. accept the federal Mrs,. PBaty is still unwell and was
jqldeeship even if it were tendered .not able top return-to. Port St. Joe.
hiif e wll stay, in. Tallahassee about
" oUp to the time.. of, leaving ten days more with her daughters
Washington last Wednesday," hl .at .503. East Call. street. Rev
said, "I have _considered. that It Beaty announces that -regular set-
would be very presumptions in me vices .willb-be heWd .Sunday at the
o,. announce that I would either Presbyterian church.
accept or decline the U. S. dis- .-
trct judgeship. The many rumors Dr. A. L. Ward-.and George Tap-
circulated In. Florida .make .t per were week-end visitors In New
necessary for me, upon my return, Orleans..= -..- .:- -





GOOD LIGHTING




Now




Costs I




:I j




AT THE LOWER ELECTRIC RATES
L ,



E. i
ti light for better sight. And at the lower "j
I electric rates you may enjoy fuller use of .
,I\- proper lighting in your home more eco- :;



:I I


See These New, Modern Aids to

LIGHT CONDITIONING

Modern Hangdown Unit with 150-Watt Bulb.
No-Wire Kitchen Unit with 150-Watt Bulb.
Plaskon Bowl Ceiling Unit with 150-Watt Bulb.
o Bridge Lamp Baffle with a Silver Bowl Bulb.
Modern Styles of Pin-It-Up Lamps.
S. E. S. Conversion Units with 3-Lite Bulb.

New Styles of I. E. S. Table and Floor Lamps.



SSee Your LIGHTING DEALER Today


FLORIDA POWER


CORPORA


TION


THE, STAR, -VORT r. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 17, 1039


PAGE Flv!







PAGE SIX


Miss Bee Haven to

Again Play Here

At Fireman's Ball November 24;
Mrs. E. Clay Lewis Is
Named As Queen

Again the swing music of Miss
Bee Haven and her Rhythm Boys
from Fort Walton will permenate
the air at the Centennial audi-
torium when they play a return
engagement for the firemen's ball
to be held next Friday night, No-
vember 24.
Queen for the affair will be
Mrs. E. C. Lewis, Jr., and her
ladies-in-waiting will be Miss Doris
Davis and Miss Myrtle Whitaker
of Wewahitchka-a smart move on
the part of the fire laddies, as It
should bring in some out-of-town
customers from the county seat.
Tickets for the dance may be
obtained from any of the firemen
and everyone is urged to attend
as the funds so raised will go to-
ward the new fire truck.
----k----
Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Wellington
attended the Florida-Georgia foot-
ball game in Jacksonville over the
week-end.


v v v^ v T T v ., v v v *v v v v V

SOLOMON'S

Pasteurized

MILK
Pasteurized for Your Protection













BEST FOR PURITY,
QUALITY and TASTE


SOLOMON'S


DAIRY
Distributors for
BRUCE'S JUICES
IVEY VANLANDINGHAM4
Local Representative




Save Half
THE PRICE THAT YOU
EXPECTED TO PAY!


1939 BOH81
NEW AIR-CONDITIONED
FIN-GRID REFRIGERATOR

SPay much less than you'd
planned-get much more! The
smart new BOHN gives you
the benefit of ICE refrigera-
tion! Plenty oi crystal-clear
ice cubes-foods keep fresher,
juicier, flavorful--little need
for usina covered dishes!


ST. JOE ICE

COMPANY
~4~RR~Clll~b- --~..- ____


Claims Allow


The following claims against the
city were passed and ordered paid
by the city commissioners at their
meeting Wednesday night:


Water and Sewer Fund
H. L. Crockett ........... $
H. A. Hall ................
W. D. Dare ...............
Gulf Oil Corporation ......
Florida Power Corp. ...... 2
St. Joe Texaco Station ....
Gulf Hardware Co. ........
H. & W. B. Drew Co......
City Service Garage ........
City Treasury ............
M. P. Tomlinson ..........
General Fund
J. L. Sharit ............. .$
Standard Oil Company ....
Sunny State Oil Co. .......
Black Cat Cafe ...........
St. Joe Telephone Co......
Florida Power Corp. ......
City Port St. Joe ..........
St. Joe .Texaco Station ....
St. Joe Hardware Co......
St. Joe Ice Delivery Co....
St. Joe Telephone Co......
St. Joe .Motor Co. ........ '


F. A. Black..............
The Star .................
LeHardy's Pharmacy ......
W. D. Dare ..............
City Treasury ............
Dr. A. L. Ward ..........
Dixie Culvert Co. ........
Eureka Fire Hose Co .....


12

7!
7(


28.04
31.40
6.4s
57.78
2.05
2.33
38.23
80.37

46.00
23.57
79.67
28.25
9.90
57.91
11.88
88.3w
2.48
15.50
2.95
72.48
20.00
23.33
2.00
4.25
21.97
5.011
56.59
10.00


PORT NEWS
S.S. Jean of the Bull Line sailed
Tuesday for Baltimore via Tampa
with cargo of lumber. The Jean
brought in a cargo of salt cake
and other supplies for the St. Joe
Paper company.
S.S. Henry M. Dawes discharged
cargo of fuel oil for the St. Joe
Paper company and sailed Thurs-
day.
Bull Line ships at this time are
not carrying paper to the east
coast due to the longshoremen's
strike. Paper from the mill of the
St. Joe Paper company is being
shipped by rail.
-------H------
NEW HEALTH NURSE
Miss Claudia B. Houston, gradu-
ate of Leon high school at Talla-
hassee and former supervisor of
nurses at Johnston's sanitarium in
Tallahassee, has been named to
succeed Miss Enid Mathison a%.
health nurse for Gulf county. Miss
Mathison will be in charge of tilt
Gulf-Franklin health unit.
Miss Houston comes to thif
county from Murfreesboro, Tenn.,
where she obtained her field work.

TOUCHTON COMMITTEE
A Touchton-for-Governor state-
wide committee has been formed
with Lester F. O'Quinn of Miami
as chairman. Headquarters have
been opened in Dade City and 33
workers are now active in the
field.




Lodge Notices

Order of Eastern Star
Meets on second and fourth'
Tuesday of each month in the
Masonic hall, over postoffice. Visi
tors who are members are cor-
lially invited to be present.
American Legion
Gulf County Post 116 meets the
first Monday of each month at
the Legion Hut.
Mas,onic Lodge
St. Joe Lodge 111 meets second
and fourth Friday nights at S:30
o'clock in Masonic hall.


~40r


rat Dowling Issues -_


Data On Mullet

Gives Informatilon In Regard to
Size of Fish, Nets and
Other Regulations


.87 In reply to a query from a Port
1.50 St. Joe fisherman, R. L. Dowling,


supervisor of conservation, has is-
sued primary information on mul-
let fishing in Gulf county.
Mr. Dowling states that the
new book of laws has not yet been
published, but that in Gulf county
the legal size of mullet is eight
inches (minimum), nets must be
not less than two inches, stretched
mesh, except for bait and shrimp
fishing, and must be not over 350
yards in length.
There is no closed season on
mullet. The closed season on salt
water trout is from June 15 to
July 15, and the minimum size of
these fish is 12 inches.
The above regulations have ap-
plied since 1937. The 1939 legisla-
ture made no changes, except in
Bay county, our western neighbor.
Certain waters heretofore con-
sidered salt and open to nets were
closed to this method of fishing
by being placed under the fresh
water fish and game commission.
Location of these waters may be
secured by writing the fresh wa-
ter fish and game commission and
asking for a copy of Senate Bill
421 by Sharit, which is Chapter
19695, Acts of 1939.
Assistance and co-operation may
be secured by fishermen by con-
nfcting Conservation Agents H.
J. McCormick at Lynn Haven or
George L. Warren at Carrabelle.


PERSONALS


Band Director Dan Farmer is in
a Dothan, Ala., hospital under the
care of physicians, who state that
he is in need of a complete rest
to avoid a nervous breakdown.

B. J. Grace, employee of the St.
Joe Furniture company, was taken
to a Florala, Ala., hospital Wed-
nesday suffering from an attack
of acute appendicitis.

The many friends of Mrs. Emma
(Grandmother) Farr regret to
learn of her illness and wish for
her a speedy recovery.

Miss Erline Brown of Apalachi-
cola was the guest over the week-
end of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Brown.

The Misses Alice Ruth Gibson
and Sara VanHorn, students at. F.
S. C. W., Tallahassee, were guests
of their parents during the weekR-
end.
*& *
Mrs. G. Campbell of Wewa-
hitchka was a business visitor in
this city Monday.

Mrs. Frank Dearing and chil-
dren. Mike and Pat, and Mrs.
Fred Galtney and small daughter
of Panama City, visited Tuesday
in Port St. Joe.

Rev. Frank Dearing was in the
city Tuesday en route to Tampa
to attend the Episcopal synod. He
was chosen as one of five speakers
to address the synod.

Mr. and Mrs. Hoke Larkin re-
turned to the city Wednesday
from Pensacola, where Mrs. Lar-
Iin had been under treatment In
,t hospital.

Mrs. J. B. Gloeckler and daugn-
ter. Virginia. were the week-end
guests of -Mr. and Mrs. Dewitt
Marks and Miss Jean Theobald in
Apalachicola.

Colorado was admitted to the
Union in 1876, an even century a!-
ter the signing of the Declaration
of Independence.


FRIDAY. NnNFMVEFB 17 1000


:" n -


v vu


G


SURE


# 0 #


You'd Give


Any


Youngster


A Chance!


THAT'S WHY WE ASK YOU TO LET
THE STAR BID ON YOUR NEXT



Printing Order

The Star, when compared with most of the other pa-
pers of Florida, is still in its swaddling clothes and still
needs the same chance you would give any youngster
trying to get a start. We're trying to keep a
good newspaper in Port St. Joe. The Star is a Port St.
Joe organization-HOME OWNED AND HOME OPER-
ATED-and the money you spend with The Star stays
in Port St. Joe with Port St. Joe merchants. When you
let that printing order get out of town, your money is
gone forever. Help a youngster along and give
The Star a chance to fill that next printing order.

WE CAN GIVE YOU GOOD PRINTING
AT REASONABLE PRICES
TRY US FOR LETTERHEAD, ENVELOPES,
STATEMENTS, CIRCULARS, CARDS, SHIP-
PING TAGS, INVOICES AND SPECIAL FORMS

IF WE'RE TOO HIGH, OKEH-BUT CALL US
AND GIVE US THE CHANCE TO BID ON IT!


CHRISTMAS CARDS AND CALENDARS
We have an exceptionally beautiful line of Christmas
Cards this year, and suggest that you place your or-
der now so that we will have plenty of time to print
I them for you. Don't wait until the last minute!
And you business men who haven't already
placed your orders for Calendars-just call us and
we will gladly bring our samples around to show you.
!- ___ -


uL-.


THE STAR
"Your Home Town Newspaper"
Progressively Serving the People in Port St. Joe
and Surrounding Community


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


.Uii INGIG-LICENSES .....
ARE NOW ON SALE

The hunting season opens Mon-
day and 1939-40 licenses can be
secured by nimrods. To familiarize
hunters with the opening and
closing of the season on various
game, we quote the state and fed-
eral regulations printed on the
back of the licenses:
Deer (buck only), November 20-
December 31.
Wild turkey, November 20-Feb-
ruary 15.
Quail and squirrel, November
20-February 15.
Duck, geese, coot and snipe, No-
vember 15-December 29.
Dove, November 20-January 31.
-----^------
W. E. MURDOCK

(Continued from Page 1r)
wings indicated the high esteem itf
which Mr. Murdock was held in
this section. His friends were I~-
glon and many a hearth has been
saddened by his passing.
Mr. Murdock is survived by his
widow, Mrs. Pauline Murdock, a
son, Waring; his mother, Mrs. '\.
A. Roach; a sister, Mrs. R. Ed-
wards-of Atlanta, Ga., and one
brother, Albert Murdock of It-
than, Ala.


Kk* x


v


!
j.


GULF. C 6iORATibN.

(C6ntinued from Page 1)
before being pumped to the north-
ern city.. This' means that further
improvements will be made along
the waterfront on St. Joseph's Bay,
and that a large amount of ready
cash will be turned loose locally
during the construction .work. In
addition, a maintenance crew will
be necessary, which will add an-
other payroll to the city's income,
Construction work, it is antici-
pated, will begin either the latter
part of January or the first part
of February.
Again Port St. Joe will be the
focus of all eyes in this part of the
Southland, for this is the first
large gasoline pipe line to be
constructed in the southeastern
states, and undoubtedly other big
oil companies will take advantage
of our unsurpassed harbor and
the direct line north to make this
city the terminus for other lines.
of a similar nature.

TALKS ON HOOKWORM
The adult education class was
addressed Tuesday afternoon Wy
Selwyn Chalker, Gulf county sani-
tary officer, who took as his topic
"Hookworm," telling of the causit,
symptoms and cure for the dis-
ease.