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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00057
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: November 10, 1939
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00057

Full Text







The Star-Florida's fastest grow.
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St Joe.


THE


Port St. Joe-Site cf the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
est growing little city. In
^T A R ^the heart of the pine belt.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center

VOLUME III PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1939 NUMBER 4


Red Cross Roll

Call Will Start

Next Monday


National Drive To Be Opened
Tomorrow Night By Presi-
dent Roosevelt; Stage and
>3Screen Stars on Program

Monday, Nobember 13, will be-
,fi the greatest drive of the Red
*Crosb-4n Gulf county. The mem-
bership goal has been set at 12590
and it is evident that this, goal
will be reached and passed, for a
'great many already have sub-
scribed.
The entire county has been or-
ganized for the Roll Call and the
public made conscious of the
greatest of all humanitarian 01-
ganizations, the American Red
Cross.
In every district chairmen and
committees have been appointed,
and all are invited to attend the
breakfast at Kelly Carver's cafe
Monday morning at 8:30, from
where the drive will be launched.
Pep talks will be given and B. B.
Conklin, supply chairman, will be
on hand to present to each worker
necessary materials for their work.
The following chairmen and
committees in the Port St. Joe
district have been named by Rob-
ert: Bellows, local chairman; and
Mrs. Basil E. Kenney. RPL,.Call
chairman:
Paper Mill-E. H. Horton, chalr-
man; Harold Palmer, vice-chair-
nian; Paul Farmer, vice-dhairmaa.
Machine room and jordan room,
Capt. Shannon and three workers,
machine shop, J. L. Temple; fin-
(Continued on Page 6)


Tomorrow's Poppy

Day In Port St. Joe

.morial Poppies Will Be Sold
On Streets By Members of
Legion Auxiliary

Tomorrow, Armistice Day, has
," been designated as "Poppy Day"
in Port St. Joe by a proclamation
isa-ed by Mayor J. L. Sharit and.
on that day the ladies of the Amer-
ican Legion Auxiliary, assisted bp
'the Sons of the Legion and Girls'
Auxiliary will be on the streets
selling the little red flowers.
These poppies are made.by dis-
abled veterans in hospitals ana
the funds raised by their sale
goes to help them, so, when you
are approached and asked to "buy
a poppy," do so-and give all you
can for this little memorial flower,
reminder of the flowers that
bloomed in No-Man's Land.

MEETING OF BUSINESS
MEN'S ASSN. IS MONDAY

A meeting of the Port St. Joc
Business Men's association has
been called for 7:30 Monday eve-
ning at the Legion hut. All mem-
hers are urged to be present as a
number of .important matters are
to be brought up for discussion.
X----_--d---
.POSTOFFICE TO4CLOSE
In observance of Armistice Day,
the postoffice will be closed all
Isy tomorrow, according to Post-
er H. A. Drake, and there
be no delivery service except
ial delivery articles. Mail ad-
sed to lock-boxes will be dis-
ited and the regular mail dis-
ies will be made.


'Pop' Harkins 'Speaks' On Armistice Day


(Editor's Note: The following
article was written by A. D.
"Pop" Harkins of Greenwood,
past commander of the De-
partment of Florida, American
Legion, who was recently
killed in an automobile acci-
dent, and may well be termed
"a message from beyond the
grave," and considered well
by all who read it.)

Twenty-two years ago last April
o7, this nation of ours was drawn
into the World War, which for the
number of nations engaged, for
the number of men under arms,
and the casualties involved, was
the greatest war in the history of
the world..
To persecute this war, the gov-
ernment called upon the young
manhood of the country to per-
form the highest duty of citizen-
ship. Answering this call, some
five million men between the ages
of 18 and 45, a few younger and
some older, left their jobs, their
professions, their businesses, their
homes and loved ones, and took
up arms in the fulfillment of a
citizen's duty-to defend his na-
tion in time of war.
The success of their efforts
needs no telling here. Of these
five million men, approximately
two million saw service overseas,
Many thousands of them died on
the battlefield. :More thousands
died of disease and exposure, both
on this side of the water and "over
there." But, fortunately, the great


majority lived to return and take
up their civilian pursuits. For the
sake of the young people who
may at some future date be called
upon to take up arms for their
country, I want to denounce th'e
fallacy of two viewpoints that
have been expressed, and that are
being expressed about this great
war, and about the men Who took
part in it.
Little Heroic Feeling
Today, throughoutt. .,this ,lana,
there .are many,' h'lho,e, the
heroic servtie of"'the "'World '
veteran, of the noble and heroic
sacrifice of the World War dead.
Bui'I t'ell-: ou there was little to
any,'heroic feeling among the men
who'served fI the great' war, arnd
there were no heroic deaths, be-
cause death came horribly, whe-
ther by bullet, exploding shell,
poisonous gas, or cold steel, And
while the excitement of battle


war. It is hard, dirty, suffering
work, and while it may be noble
to die for one's country, death on
the battlefield, to the man who suf-
fers it, is no more desirable, and
in many instances much more
painful than death in one's home
or a hospital, surrounded by one's
loved ones and with the benefit
of the rights of our religion.
No, the soldiers of the World
War were not heroes, as are not
the soldiers of any war. We de-
serve no special praise, except
that we stand out as men who
were willing, and who did, perform.
the highest duty of citizenship by
taking up arms for our country.
Many Teaching 'Isms' Today
Today, and increasingly every
day, there are insidious persons,
and groups of persons, going
among'our young folks, the col-
leges, the schools, the churches,
teaching and arguing not only the


may have kept us from showing evils of war but teaching the


our fear, there was no anesthesia
to the pain of death and wounds.
And lying in the mud, sleet and
snow, eating cold rations, if eat-
ing at all, scratching lice, digging
trenches, and doing the thousand
and one other menial tasks that
are a part of making war, both on
the battlefield and behind the
lines, has no kinship to the popu-
lar idea of heroic deeds.
No, I beg of you, let no man
fool you, talking about the glories
of war and how noble it is to die
for one's country, because there
is no glory in being a soldier in


young people that they should not,
under any circumstances, agree to
take up arms in defense of their
country.
They have even gone so far as
to teach the young people that
it is their duty to practice. sabot-
age should their country ever be-
come engaged in war. -fThey preach
that war is solely the tool of the
militarist and the bloated capital-
ist, and that war is so horrible
and unnecessary that -no nation
has the right to demand' of its
citizens that they bear arms for
(Continued on Page 3)


Three Hundred At HighSchool Is Now
First "Play Night" Too Late to Classify UnderNew
FistPlay NightBy RUSSELL KAY Under New Systemt
By RUSSELL KAY

Children From All Parts of County No Final Examinations; Stress Be-
Enjoy First of Monthly Af- One by one the gubernatorial ing Placed On the Honor
fairs at Centennial Building aspirants are beginning to stick Point System
their little pink necks out and
Approximately 300 children from probably will continue to do so for Principal D. G. McPherson an-
all parts of Gulf county were in the next month or so.nouncd yesterday that a new
attendance at the first of a series First to dive into the murky wa- s h b
of monthly "play nights" held Fri- ters of the political pool was Han,sbeen the
day night at the Centennial build- Walker of Ocala, who evidently Port St. Joe high school.
ing under the direction of Mrs. J. was influenced by thte fable of The school term has been dl-
A. Whitfield of Wewahitchka, the Early Bird and the Worm. But vided into four quarters- of two
county home demonstration agent, the splash he made was hardly! months each and henceforth no


and Dan Farmer, band director of noticeable and the ripple nothing
the Port St. Joe schools. Miss to speak of.
Betty Caudle, Holmes countydem-j Next came a chap named Rod-
onstration agent, was present to gers from St. Petersburg, whose
aid in putting over the affair. nose-dive was even less spectaca--
Folk dances, plays and music lar than Walker's-and the two
made up the evening's fun which of them have been floating about
was enjoyed by the youngsters as practically unnoticed for some
well as a large number of parents. time.
Music for the occasion was fur- Then came Burton Schoepf, who
nished by a band under the direc- put a little bit more showmanship
tion of Mr. Farmer. in his performance by climbing
A similar program will be held clear up to Chicago on the higi
next month, date to be announced, platform to stand poised for a mo-
and each of the events will be ment with a glass of orange juice
under direction of various county in one hand and a Townsend ban-
leaders. ner in the other. He hit the water
----- with a splash that could be heard
STAR OFFICE TO BE all over the state, developing
LSED TO ORRO waves rather than ripples.
____ Mayor Walter Fraser of St. At-
e Sr wl c i d a gustine, a more or less experienced
The Star will close its doors all swimmer, did a running broad
Sf' swimmer, did a running broad
day tomorrow in observance of;nd i the middle of the..
Armistice Day and the editor will on where the midle of the
pond where three opponents al-
take the day off in order to go ready were cavorting.
fishing or otherwise observe the d te oti
day in fitting manner. With the political pool begin-
S_____ m ning to fill, a lot of other boys
are now eyeing it as they hur-
FIRST DRIVERS' LICENSE FINE ,ieiv stip, preparatory to get-
M. C. Manning, colored girl, was ting in the swim themselves.
the first victim of the new drivers' This week in Jacksonville, Fur-
license law. She was arrested byler Warren is expected to take the
Deputy Sheriff Homer Coe on a plunge. He can be depended upon
reckless driving charge and when to do plenty of thrashing and
found to be without a drivers' splashing about, and he'll con-
license, was assessed a fine of $25 stantly entertain both those in the
by Judge Thos. R. L. Carter. (Continued on Page .4)


final examinations, which usuall-
require three days preceded. by a
week's review each semester, will
be given. Instead, on the last day
of each quarter a 45-minute test
will be given on the work covereoa
during the quarter. At the end or
the year the average for the four
quarters will make the yearly'av-
erage. If a pupil has an average oi
75 or better he will be given credit
for a year's work.
Mr. McPherson states also that
much stress is being placed on the
honor point system in the school.
Honor points are given on three
main classifications, as follows:
Scholarship (40 honor points
possible)-Each A, 10 points; each
B, 6 points; each C, 4 points; D
and F, no honor points.
Conduct (410 honor points ai-
;)ttcd ench pupil) On' honor
aoint deducted for each demerit
piven for misconduct, etc.
Punctuality (20 honor points al-
litted)-One honor point deducted
for each time tardy.
The total number of honor
points received sums up the pu-
pil's standing for the quarter as
follows: 75 honor points with no
F's. excellent pupil; 65 to 75
honor points with no F's, satisfac-
tory; below 65 honor points, un-
satisfactory.


Youth Dies When

Car Is Wrecked

At Crawfordville


Henry M. Stevens, Home On
Furlough from Army, Killed
As Aftermath to Local Boy
And Girl Mixup; One Jailed

Henry M. Stevens, 24, Port St.
Joe soldier home on furlough, died
Tuesday afternoon in a Tallahas-
see hospital from injuries received
when the car he was driving over-
turned Tuesday morning near
Crawfordville.
Stevens' death was the result of
a boy-and-girl mixup occurring
here Monday night involving Mel-
vin Sherman' and Margil Benton.
Sherman and Miss Benton decided
to leave for Tallahassee and took
a taxicab belonging to Lester
Guest, for whom Sherman 'was a'
driver. They carried Stevens with'
them to bring the car .back to:this .
city.
When Stevens' death occurred,
Sherman was arrested by Talla-
hassee officers and he was re-
turned to the county jail at We-
wahitchka, on an alleged charge
of taking the car of Guest with-
out permission.
Army officials were in this city
yesterday investigating the death
of: Stevens and questioning al!.
concerned 'in the affair.
SStevens, regular army private in
the Panama Canal Zone, is sur-
vived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Leonard Stevens, four brothers and
three sisters, all of Port St. Joe.
Funeral services were held yes-
terday in Wewahitchka for Mr.
Stevens.


Millage Hiked In

School Election

B. A. Pridgeon, Jesse Smith and
W. E. Murdock Elected
As Trustees

Millage in the Port St. Joe
school district was raised from
five to ten mills in the election
held Tuesday. Of the 100 ballots
cast, 58 were favorable to raising
the millage to ten, while six were
against the proposition.
In the election for trustees B.
A. Pridgeon, Jesse Smith and W.
E. Murdock were elected, with the
following totals:
Jesse Smith ...............85
B. A. Pridgeon ............70
W. E. Murdock ............ 53
B. B. Conklin .............46
W A. Smith ..............34
George Tapper ............ 6
Tapper's six votes were re-
ceived via the write-in route.

ASKS THAT FLAGS BE
FLOWN ARMISTICE DAY

Commander T. M. Schneider of
Gulf County Post 116, American
Legion, requests that all business
houses display their flags tomor-
row, Armistice Day.

MOTOR COMPANY ALREADY
100% IN RED CROSS DRIVE
It was announced yesterday by
Red Cross Chairman Robert Bei-
ows that the St. Joe Motor com-
pany was the first organization In
the county to go 100 per cent In
the Roll Call drive. Fourteen mem-
bers of the Ford place have al-
ready secured memberships.











I


MRS. MIRA HOSTESS TO
THURSDAY BRIDGE CLUB
Mrs. Joe Mira was hostess t
the Thursday Bridge club las
evening at her home. Vases c
beautiful chrysanthemums wer
used for decorations in the room
where three tables were in pro
gress. Following the awarding c
high and cut prizes, the hostes
served delicious refreshments t
the following members: Mesdame
J. M. Smith, B. A. Pridgeon, J. E
Gloeckler, George Gore, M. C. Ed
wards, M. P. Tomlinson, E. Cla
Lewis, R. V. Coburn and Edwil
Ramsey, and invited guests, Mrs
J. L. Miller, Mrs. B. C. Gaillard
and Mrs. Charles Brown.

BAPTIST MISSION STUDY
HELD TUESDAY AT CHURCH
The regular mission study wa
held at the church Tuesday in an
all-day session by members of thi
Baptist Missionary society. The
study book, "Constrained Love,
was taught by Mrs. O. F. Powell
assisted by Mrs. A. L. Ezell ane
Mrs. A. E. McCaskey. Following
the study of the morning, a pot
luck lunch was served at the nooi
bour and the study resumed in
the afternoon. A good attendance
was reported.

SARA JEAN HARRELL
OBSERVES BIRTHDAY
Honoring her little daughter
Sara Jean, who celebrated hei
third birthday Tuesday afternoon
Mrs. Brooks Harrell entertained a
number of little friends. Game
were enjoyed and refreshments
served. Enjoying this affair with
the honoree were Ruth Lynn, Don
ald Ramsey, Arleen Hull, Frances
Jones. Tommy Hull, Peggy Miller,
Billy Quarles, Paul Edwin Ramsey
and Danny Curtis.

ATTEND TEACHERS' MEET
D. G. McPherson, Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Parker, T. Owens, Mrs
B. A. Pridgeon, Mrs. Gus Creech,
l' lss Eva Meserve, Miss Louise
Lee, Mrs. Gebrge McLabon, Mrs.
Leroy Gainous, Miss Eileen Arn-
old, Mrs. Joe Ferrell, Miss Louise
Solomon, Mrs. Earl Rollins, Mrs.
Jim Perritt, Miss Avaryee Collier,
Miss Juanita Gunn, Mrs. Pervis
Howell and Mrs. Thomas McPhaul
attended the meeting of the North-
west Teachers association held in
Blountstown last Friday.

Mrs. Philip Lovett, Mrs. C. a.
Leardy and Miss Myrtice Coody
spent Thursday in Cottondale.

Mr. and Mrs. T. W. Davis were
week-end visitors in Blountstown.



FLOWERS AND

CORSAGES


WOOD FIBRE FLOWERS
that cannot be told from the
best product of Mother Nature.
S And they keep indefi-
nitely. If they become droopy
you merely place them in the
refrigerator and in a brief time
they are as good as new.
SEE

Mrs. W. S, Smith
STAR OFFICE PHONE 51


BAPTIST CIRCLES IN
BUSINESS MEETING
o The circles of the Baptist Mis-
it sionary society held their regular
if monthly business meeting at tge
e church Monday afternoon wlLh
s Mrs. A. E. McCaskey presiding.
)- Following regular opening, circle
f reports were given by Mrs. C. G.
s Costin, Martha; Mrs. Geo. Cooper,
o Mary, and Mrs. W. C. Pridgeon,
s Lydia. Mrs. E. C. Cason, young
i. peoples leader, gave an interest-
d- ing report on her work. Mrs. J.
y W. Sisemore and .Mrs. A. L. Ezell
a also presented splendid reports
s. from the Intermediate Girls' Auxili-
d ary and Royal Ambassadors. Per-
sonal service and social report
were given by Mrs. Costin and
Mrs. Cooper. All coupon chairmen
were urged to turn in coupons to
s Mrs. H. M. Hammock.
n Following a short business dis-
e cussion the meeting was dismissed
e with prayer by Mrs. Fred Maddox.
, r
, GIRLS' AUXILIARY OF
d LEGION IN MEETING
g A meeting of the Girls' Auxill-
- ary of the American Legion was
n held at the Legion hut yesterday
n afternoon. Following opening of
e the meeting a nominating commit-
tee was appointed consisting or
Bernice Schneider, Virginia Prid-
geon and Amelia Gibson. Discus-
sion and plans were made for
Poppy Day and the meeting ad-
r ourned. The girls of the auxiliary
nd Sons of the Legion will sell
poppies on the streets tomorrow,
which has been proclaimed as
SPoppy Day in this city by Mayor
Sharit.
*r r
MR. AND MRS. T. OWENS
,ENTERTAIN AT HOME
Mr. and Mrs. T. Owens enter-
tained the St. James church par-
'sh committee Sunday afternoon at
their home. Following a discussion
if church work and plans for the
coming year, coffee and cake were
served to Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Bellows, Mr. and. Mrs. Ted Frar-,
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Curtis, Mrs. C.
L. Fuller, Mrs. Nick Comforter,
Mrs. Sammie Davis, B. B. Conklin
and Rev. Frank Dearing.

ST. JOSEPH'S ALTAR
SOCIETY MEETS
The regular monthly meeting of
the St. Joseph's Altar society was
held in the church Monday after-
noon with Mrs. A. J. Navarre pre-
siding. During the business ses-
i'on a report was given by Mrs.
W. L. Bragg, chairman for tickets
for the benefit bridge party spon-
sored by the society October 11.

Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Wellington
'nd Mrs. B. B. Conklin visited
Wednesday in Panama City.

Rev. Frank Dearing of Panama
"!ty was the guest Wednesday or
Mr. and Mrs. Sammie Davis.

Walter C. Sherman of Panama
City was the guest Tuesday of Mr.
and Mrs. Basil E. Kenney.

Mrs. George Hudson and small
,daughter returned Sunday from
Pensacola where they spent sev- c
-ral days with relatives.

Miss Frances Palmer, student at
F. S. C. W., Tallahassee, was the
week-end guest of her parents, Mr.
and Mrs. Curtis Palmer.

Mr. and Mrs. Basil E. Kenney,
Sr., attended the golf tournament
in Valpariso last week-end. 9

E. C. Lewis and Roy Evans were
business visitors in Milton last (
Thursday. t
**
Mrs. V. M. Hoffman of Apalachi-
cola was the guest Sunday of Mr.
and Mrs. C. L. Fuller.,


Society Personals

SLANETA DAVIS, Editor


Miss Kathleen Saunders returned
Sunday to Dothan to resume her
studies after spending several
lays here with her parents.

H. H. Saunders returned to the
city this week following a two
reeks' business trip to New York
nd other eastern cities.
'r hr C-f
Mrs. W. A. Smith spent Friday
if last week in Chipley.

Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Kenney, Sr.,
expect to spend the week-end in
racksonville attending the football
:ame while there.

Mrs. W. S. Smith and Mrs. J. A.
Christmas spent Monday in Cot-
ondale and Marianna.
----Sc-----
There is no moss in a moss
agate-simply stains of iron or


manganese.


THURSDAY FRIDAY NOVEMBER 16 17
*-Bs with
S CHESTER MORRIS
and
S. VIRGINIA GREY

.Z CURRENT NEWS
"BOLAMOLA LAND"

DOUBLE FEATURE SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 18


"GHOST
TOWN

J "RIDERS"

Also DICK TRACY


BORIS KARLOFF
GRANT WITHERS
in -
"MR. WONG IN
CHINATOWN"
"G-MAN JITTERS"


Fpp I __ __ _


METHODIST CIRCLE IN
S: JOINT MEETING

churches Missionary society met Monday at- Have Your
ternoon at the church for a joint
business and study program with Greeting Cards
Mrs. Roy Gibson presiding. Two
EPISCOPAL AUXILIARY chapters of the mission study boot0
WILL HOLD SUPPER were given by Mrs. R. W. Smith .'
A meeting of the Ladies' Auxilti and Mrs. J. T. McNeill.
ary of the Episcopal church was Tuesday the annual week of ,__
'called Monday afternoon to cot- prayer was observed with an all-
plete plans for the parish supper day meet at the church with Mrs.
and Saturday night's supper to be J. T. McNeill presenting the morn-
held in the business district to ing study. Mrs. J. C. Bradbury
raise money for the church, presented the afternoon topic. Dur-
The parish supper will be held ing the afternoon session a collec- /
in the basement of the PresDy- tion was taken for missions.
terlan church on December 2, and
all members of the St. James par- MRS. B. J. HULL IS
ish are urged to attend. The Sat- HOSTESS AT BRIDGE
urday night supper will be held Mrs. B. J. Hull entertained with
uptown in a vacant building and two tables of bridge Tuesday eve.
proceeds will go to the fund to ning. At the conclusion of several
help clear the church of its in- progressions, prizes were awarded
debtedness. Mrs. W. A. Wood, high, and Mrs.
Rush Chism, second high. The aS
LOTTIE MOON GIRLS MEET hostess served a delicious salad.
WITH WANDA MAE SPENCER course to Mesdames George Hud-
Wanda Mae Spencer was hos- son, Ralph Carter, Rush Chism,
tess Tuesday afternoon to the Lot- Woodrow Talley, Billy Allen, John See the
tie Moon Girls' Auxiliary of the Sowers'and W. A. Wood.
Baptist Missionary society. Topic MAGIC SLA 1TE
for the afternoon was "Going ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL
South In November" or "Going to Rev. Frank Dearing, Rector GREETING CARDS
Africa." The meeting opened with Services at St. James Episcopal Something out of the or-
song service, followed by the de- church every Sunday evening at dinary that will be kept
votional and prayer by Mrs. W. C. 7:45 o'clock. and used months after
Pridgeon. Church school every Sunday at the holiday season is past
Interesting talks were given by 10 o'clock.
the members, bringing out differ- Holy Communion services on the
ent phases of the topic. Following third Sunday at 9:30 a. m. CALL 51 and we will be
sentence prayers, a song was sung, --- glad to bring sample s
concluding the program. WOMEN'S CLUB TO MEET ladto samples
The next meeting will be held The Port St. Joe Women's club to ow y
at the home of Louise Wooden. will meet in regular session at 3
o'clock next Wednesday afternoon THE STAR
PRESBYTERIAN AUXILIARY at the Centennial building. All
MEETS WITH MRS. HORTON members are urged to be present. "Your Home Town Paper"
Members of the Presbyterian ---.-- ---
Auxiliary were entertained Mon- Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Hodges of
day at the home of Mrs. E. H. Marianna visited here Tuesday.
Horton on Hunter's Circle. The
meeting was a spend-the-day party
and an outfit was made durln T
the day for a member of the Pres- THEATRE THEATRE
byterian orphanage. The following OPENS OPENS
members were present: Mrs. P. D. DAILY
Prows, Mrs. Claude Adams, Mrs. 2:45 Saturday 1:15
H. McKinnon, Mrs. D. B. Lewis, Continuously SSunday 1:45
Mrs. J. Taylor, Mrs. O. Jervis and
Mrs. Basil Kenney.
Sa ~ SUNDAY MONDAY NOVEMBER 12 13
MRS. WELLS HOSTESS P ri Dra o t P
AT BIRTHDAY PARTY Exciting, Pulse-Fiing Drama of the Philippines with
Mrs. Wilbur Wells entertained Gary Cooper at His Best
Monday evening, celebrating he,
birthday. Three tables of bridge
were in progress in the living room *O
which was decorated with fa.
flowers.
Refreshments were served to
Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Roche, Mr. anQ fh DAVID NIVEN ANDREA LEEDS
Mrs. C. J. Sullivan, Mr. and Mrs. REGINALD OWEN
Roy Williams, Mr. and Mrs. M. R. L BRODERICK CRAW.FORD KAY JOHNSON
Hurlbut, Miss Louise Lee, Harry Latest War News "Fresh Vegetable Mystery" in Technicolor-
Brewton and Wilbur Wells.
TUESDAY, NOV. 14 WEDNESDAY, NOV. 15
Mr. and Mrs. John Hewitt re.
Mr. and Mrs. John Hewitt re* Fiction's Amazing Sleuth! Football as only Joe E. Brown
turned Tuesday from WestvllIe can pl it
where they visited Mrs. Hewitt's JOE E.
family. I 1 I L JOE E. BROWN
y 0I 1 1i MARTHA RAYE
Ellis Crosby, Marc Fleishel, Jr., ALN E OVERN Eric Blore, Susan Hayward
VIRGINIA DALE PaBe n y
and Clarence Brown of Shamrock JOSEPH ALLEN, Ir. "$1000 A TOUCHDOWN"
were guests Wednesday of Mr. and
Mrs. B. E. Kenney, Sr. NEWS "SWING HOTEL" "Winter Styles" Comedy


PAGE TWO


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 193


s



c








e





1
C










F1S,


COMING TO PORT THEATER




-I -- -F- U w\ *


Bob Baker, who will be seen at
the Port theater Saturday, Novem-
ber 18, in "Ghost Town Riders."

AMERICAN EDUCATION WEEK
Governor Cone last Friday pro-
claimed American Education Weea
in Florida from November 5 to
15, and urged people to become
"better acquainted with the schools
during these days."

The oldest iron meteorite which
was actually seen falling ann
which has been preserved, is the
Tamentiti iron, which *fell In the
Sahara Desert in the 14th century.

LEGAL ADVERTISING
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, IN
AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA. IN CHANCERY.
HORACE W. SOULE, Plaintiff,
vs, CHARLES H. DOLD, et al, De-
fendants.
NOTICE
'The State of Florida;
TO: Charles H. Dold, if alive, and,
if dead, to his unknown heirs, de-
visees, legatees, or grantees;
AND to all persons having, or
-claiming, :an interest in the fol-
lowing described lands: "Lots six
(6) and eight (8) in Block fifty-
one (51) of the City of Port St.
-Joe, according to the official map
on file in the office of the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Gulf Coun-
ty, Florida, said map showing said
lots to be lying in and a part of
that .part of Section 1, Township
8 .South, Range 11 West, lying
'South of the right-of-way of the
Apalachicola Northern Railroad
:Company."
GREETINGS:
Horace W. Soule, having filed in
'this Court his sworn bill of com-
-plaint in -this suit, the nature and
purpose of which is to determine
'the title of the plaintiff to the
land hereinabove described to be
.a -good and .sufficient absolute fee
simple title, to have all claims and
interests 'of the defendants, and
each of them, in and to said land
passed upon and determined; to
-remove clouds upon the plaintiff's
title to said land; to quiet and
confirm the plaintiff's title there-
to, and in which bill of complaint,
-the plaintiff state mat he believes
ttere are persons interested in the
land herein involved and herein-
above described whose names are
'unknown to him, and having fur-
ther named therein certain per-
.sons as known by name to him,
the said plaintiff, but as not known
by him, the said plaintiff, whether
"they or any of them are dead or
alive, and as believed by him, the
said plaintiff, if living to be inter-
ested in the property and prem-
ises herein involved and herein-
above described, and if dead to
have been interested therein;
AND having made all persons
having or claiming any interest
upon the above described land
party defendant to the said bill
of complaint;
AND having demanded from the
Clerk of the Circuit Court, in and
for Gulf County, Florida, the mak-
ing of an Order requiring such
persons and parties to appear to
his said bill of complaint upon a
day not less than twenty-eight
days, nor more than sixty days
from the date of the making or
said Order;
IT IS, THEREFORE, ORDERED,
That each and every the defend-
ants above named, designated anB
specified, are hereby required to
appear herein to the plaintiff's
bill of complaint herein filed onr
the 4th day of December, 1939.
and that this Order be published
in "The Star," a newspaper pub-
lished in Gulf County, Florida,
once a weel- f6or four consecutive
weeks.
WITNESS my hand as Clerk and
the seal of said Court, this 2nd
dai of November, 1939. at Wew-a-
hitchka in the County and State
aforesaid.
J. R. HUNTER,
Clerk of Circuit Court
Gulf Ccunty. Florida
(CIRCUIT COURT SEAL)
E. CLAY LEWIS, Jr.,
Solicitor for Plaintiff. 12-1


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that it finally settled no differ-
ences between nations, neverthe- The r
less it was a never-to-be-forgotten The Low .own
relief, from
Some of us mistakenly thought Willis Swamp
that the signing of the armistice
would be the end of war, but the -
events of the last few years, and Editor The Star:
especially the last few months, One thing ydu can say about
have served to disallusion any or this melee in Europe, it is gonna
us who felt that way and demom get some moths out of our geog-
strated to every sensible person raphies. And as she drifts over
that the only security against war toward Turkey and Asia, it is
is armed force. gonna bring in maybe some Bible
It seems prophetic now that names also. And when it does so,
from its very inception back in there will be even more dustin'
1919, the American Legion has off to do. :~-
preached the necessity for an ade- This Turkey country, if you
quate national defense. Too long haven't studied up since you were
have the peace-loving people or in high school, it's goin' -to sur-
this nation delayed listening to prise you. And if you went to
the voice of the Legion. But to- school around 25 years ago, you
day, with the rape of Poland fresh will maybe think the capital of
in their minds, the people are be- Turkey is Constantinople-like I
ginning to realize that the integ- did.
rity and honor of nations can only There ain't no Constantinople
be preserved through the ability any more-it's now Istanbul. And
and the readiness to fight. in the second place the capital of
National Defense Necessary Turkey ain't in Europe, in the first
For years we have called our- place-it's in Asia, and it's at An-
selves safe because of tne vast kara or Angora-whichever you
waters that bound our nation on want to call it. I sure bne:,
the east and west, and the kinship brushing' up.
of our neighbors on the north, A Turk. he is also known as an
and our much-talked-of but little Ottoman. Also, he has Tartar
thought of, Monroe Doctrine on the blood-his forefathers were scrap-
south. But with the so-called to- pers-and poison with a shootln.
talitarian nations assuming the iron. There weren't no sissy Tar-
dominant leadership of Europe, tars.
with the modern machines of war It's easy to see why Stalin ani
at their command, and with their Herr Adolph are hesitatin'. They
ruthless economic and political been reading' up on Tartars, also.
policies, we find ourselves in a Yours, with the low down,
'position where national defense ;' JO SERRA.
means preparing ourselves to pro-
tect not only our channels or Lack of iron in the diet is the
trade, but our coastline and even most common cause of anemia,
our inland cities from possible among Florida's school children,
enemy attacks. For if these n&- two research scientists report.
:ions with a political and eco- ---- -----
nomic philosophy so different from Read the ads and save!


'Pop' Harkins


(Continued from Page 1)
their country. Some of the people
in these groups are representa-
tives of foreign "isms," but many
of them are American citizens,


teachers and ministers of the gos-
pel, no doubt sincere, but with a


warped and unbalanced attitude
toward the duties of citizenship.
Every human being has some-
thing in his heart which causes
him to look to some form of su-
preme being for assistance and
consolation. And every man who
is worthy to be called a man has
something in his heart that makes
him proud of his name, of his
family, of his community, and his
country, and if there comes an oc-
casion when the honor and integ-
rity of these things are at stake,
then every worthwhile man will
fight to preserve them. Therefore,
I repeat to the young people:
Let no one delude you into be-
lieving that war is a glorious and
exciting affair. But on the other
hand, let no man, whatever his
outward appearance indicate him
to be, lead you into the path of
the pacifist who is not willing to
fight when his country calls. For
a man who has no pride or belief
in the honor and integrity of his
country is in the same low scale
as that sorry being who has no
pride of ancestry or hope of pos-
terity.
Pay Tribute On Armistice Day
But, despite the fact that the
World War was not glorious, anC
that we who served in it were not
heroes, it is fit and proper thac
on the anniversary of the signing
of the armistice, which ended the
fighting, we should pay tribute not
only to the men who made the su-
preme sacrifice of citizenship, but
to those also who, though. living,
but for the fates of war might
also be lying in a soldier's grave.
Those citizens among you who
served in this war and who today
go quietly about your daily tasks,
twenty-one years ago stood ready'
to face death on the battlefield.
To these men and to their fam-
ilies, and to all the citizens of this
nation and all the other nations
'engaged in this war, the signing
of the armistice was a great mo-
ment. It marked the end, for a
time at least, of strife and blood-
shed, and though now we know,


ours can succeed In establishing
a foothold to the south of us, ana
don't think for a minute they are
'ot trying to do so, then the in-
security and constant fear of war
-'it has plagued Europe since the
beginning of history is knocking
at our doors, and we will find that
iur so-called Monroe Doctrine
which we have relied upon is just'
another "scrap of paper" unless
we have the trained men and mod-
ern armaments of war and the na-
tional pride and willingness to
make this doctrine a vigorous and
positive force.


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THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLOBPtl;DA


PAGE THREI


FRIDAY, -NOVEMBER 10, 1939










AO


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, IDecember 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
undel- Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year........$2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months..........65c

-*f Telephone 51 ]'-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

THE CAUSE THEY SERVED
Tomorrow is Armistice Day and attention
should be called to the Americans who gave
up their lives in the service of their country
during the World War.
It is well that the people of Gulf county
should place some emphasis on the sacrifice
of those brave young men who surrendered'
their lives. Surely we should honor the
memory of those who offered their lives on
the altar of patriotism.
The men who went to their death during
the World War fell asleep with a dream of
world peace in their hearts-a dream which
has not been realized. Rightly or wrongly,
they were convinced that the suffering they
endured and the blood they shed would be
part of the price that mankind must pay for
world peace. .
Fulsome oratory on Armistice Day makes
no impression upon the dead. If happily
they exist in the land beyond and are able
to keep in touch with the world they loved,
it should be a source of supreme joy to them
to see that the people for whom they died are
at least loyal to the ideals that cost them
their all. Our only fitting tribute to the dead
soldiers, sailors, marines and other connected
with war-time service is sincere attachment
to the ends they sought and a courageous de-
termination to secure the goal for which they
struggled.
The Star salutes all the soldier dead of
this country. So far as it is concerned, it
pledges allegiance to the high ideals that
nerved them to superhuman endeavor. We
trust that the people of Gulf county, along
with vast millions of others in these Unitea
States, will always remember those who died
and be loyal to the cause they served.

There is something decidedly wrong in
Port St. Joe if figures quoted Sunday night
by Rev. D. E. Marietta are correct, and we
have no reason to doubt their authenticity.
The Rev. Marietta stated that the total
membership of all churches in Port St. Joe
amounted to approximately 750 or about 20
per cent of the 3500 population of our city.
He went on further to state that the average
for the United States is more than 50 per
cent. ;

The editor was in Panama City.the other
day and while passing by the offices of Dr.
G. T. Newberry observed two young men
staring at the sign on the window and heard
one of them say: "'Optometrist.' What is
that?" To which the other replied: "That's
a guy who still thinks the Republicans will
win in 1940."

An ornithologist says that geese, swans
and crows have a life span of 100 years or
more. That goose we had last Christmas
must have just about reached the end of his
allotted span.

-"-We will now sing that old classic: "Before
They Wed I-Ie Praised Her Eyes-Now He
Tries to Black Them."

Our worst troubles are those that we never
meet up with.


GIVE THANKS
Thanksgiving approaches again this year,
and on this occasion the presence of war
abroad makes more important than ever our
American habit of pausing for a day and
counting our blessings. Even the difference
of opinion between Governor Fred Cone and
President Roosevelt this year concerning the
date on which the event will be celebrated
in Florida points to something American for
counting our blessings. Even the difference
cratic right to disagree about matters involv-
ing us solely as individuals.
What, in 1939, are some of the things for
which we ought to be thankuf? Surely it is
worth while to pause in whatever we are do-
ing at the moment and list some of the rea-
sons we are glad that we are Americans.
We should be thankful, most of all, for two
precious heritages our forefathers gave us,
heritages that it is worth everything in the
world for us to preserve. These two funda-
mentals are freedom and opportunity. They
are --characteristic of America in a manner
and degree not matched in any other land.
We should be thankful, in a world at war,
that we are at peace with all nations. We
should be grateful for our system of repre-
sentative democracy, which guarantees the
fact that the public will to peace will be
heeded.
We should be thankful for the high stan-
dard of living this country possesses, and we
should be even more thankful that the sys-
tem under which we live is designed to raise
those standards even higher in the future.
While other nations are at war, or remain
precarious neutrals with armies poised on
their borders, we in America look forward to
a future growing before our eyes.
But we must not merely be thankful. This
opportunity is also an obligation. That obli-
gation lies in our making every effort to use
the advantages we have here to the utmost
-not to be fainthearted, not to neglect the
opportunities that exist here, not to abuse the
freedom we are granted.
Thus Thanksgiving this year ought at once
to be a day in which we count our blessings,
and one on which we remember the responsi-
bilities that are ours.

COST OF WAR
In view of the fact that many groups have
come out with strong stands against this
country's participation in war, it is important
at this time to see just what lies behind their
aversion from a realistic point of view.
What were some of the costs of the World
War? It may help to avoid ever entering an-
other one to have these matters brought to
light. Here is at least part of the story:
To pay for our actual participation cost
this country $22,000,000,000. Loans to our al-
lies, largely unpaid, ran to more than $8,000,-
000,000 more. That's a DIRECT COST oi
$30,000,000,000, then, paid mostly in the pro-
ductive wealth of our factories, our retailing,
our farming and the hard work of Ameri-
cans in every branch of productive enterprise.
What's more, it's only the beginning, folks,
only the beginning. It takes no account of de-
mobilization and dozens of other items that
followed the war. Total veterans' expendi-
tures to date, for instance, have come to
nearly $12,000,000,000 more. Whereas back in
1916 the United States was paying about $4,-
000,000 on its veterans' institutions, today it
is spending over $50,000,000.
To make the picture even worse, these di-
rect costs hardly begin to account for the
burden a war imposes. It takes no account,
most of all, of the losses that come directly
to industry, from idle factories, idle men, and
idle investments, the inevitable aftermath o-
war. As one authority well puts it: "In the
calculation of war cost there is literally no
end." :' 5

Most wars are brought about .to '"save
face," as the Chinese say. The leaders of a
nation go so far that they can't back down
without loss of prestige to the nation and
loss of power at home-particularly the latter.


YOUR BOY? PERHAPS

.. .'-
-- ''- .._.:....- .


Observance of Armistic Day tomorrow brings to mind
the World War and all the horrors and heartbreak it entailed.
With the world again in a turmoil and talk going around that
the United States may be drawn into the conflict, we urge
every father and mother in Port St. Joe to stop and consider
the above drawing-would you want this to be your boy lying
in the mud and filth of a trench or hanging on the barb-wire
and calling for water? You, and the millions of other fathers
and mothers of this nation, are the ones who can say whether
or not we shall again become embroiled in a war on foreign
soil-a war that does not concern us.


Too Late to Classify
By RUSSELL KAY


(Continued from Page 1)
pool and those on the bank as he
clowns about In an effort to 'duck'
his playmates, blow like a whale
and stand on his head.
Over in Deland, Francis White-
hair is reported to be on the
verge of making a flying leap. He
is no slouch as an aquatic star,
and whether it is a case of swimn,
dive or float, he'll give a good ac-
count of himself. His financial
'wind' is better than that of most
of his playfellows, and he's not
afraid of "deep water."
Up in Tallahassee, Jerry Carter
and Bill Hodges are trying' to
make up their minds. Both of
them have played around in that
pool before. They know It like a


himself and a guy had better be
plenty fit- before he tries it.
The opl diving platform is a
long way from completion, as the
boys have been stealin' planks
from each other. They've been
jerkin' and pullin' at the Town-
.send plank, tryin' to get it away
from Schoepf, while the Labor
plank is so heavy that none of
them have been able to lift it yet,
and those who have succeeded in
getting foundation posts down are
now finding' that the termites are
getting' into them.
But the fun is really getting' un-
derway at the "old swimming' hole"
and gives every Indication of be-
coming gay and boisterous as
time goes on. The older boys, who
are experienced, are keeping' a
watchful eye on their clothes and
are worryin' about some tough
guy nobody ever hear of before
coming' along and lickin' the tar,
out of all of 'em. Then, too, theri
is always the danger of drowning,


book, and can avoid the rocks, and the mortality rate in this par-
whirlpools a nd quicksand. If ticular pool is exceptionally high.
either or both should decide to _


the frolic, they will lead the
a merry chase that only the
swimmers can hope to join


HUNTING STORY
With the hunting season open-
ing in a few days, the following-


Fred Touchton of Avon Park Snort snort story is quite appro-
has been sitting' by the side of me private at this time:
pool, playing' in the sand for some First Hunter: "Hey, Bill!"
time, and will probably get his Second Hunter: "Yeah?"
[eet wet before it is over, while First Hunter: "YTut all right?"
3. F. Paty of West Palm Beach Second Hunter: "Yeah."
has been blowing on a pair or First Hunter: "Hurray, I just
has b~een bowing on a pair or
waterwings and may wade il shot a deer!"
later. I
Pat Whitaker of Tampa ana PATROLMEN TO SCHOOL
Harold Colee of Jacksonville have Thirty-eight members of the
!-een playing leap-frog on the ban, n"wly '-appointed state motor pa-
for quite some time and were ex- trol started to school in Braden-
ected to join the party, but they ton this week for a course in how
don't like "cold" water, and prob- to handle traffic and deal with
ably will stay out. motorists. Instructors include MIa-
Jess Parrish annd Spessard HoI- jor H. N. Kirkman, Capt. Mingle
land have been sitting' nearby and Sheriff Hutches.
suckin' oranges and trying' to
-lake up their minds. Both have TAGS TO GO ON SALE
done a bit of plain and fancy Florida's new automobile tags
swimmin' in the old senatoriai'are scheduled to go on sale De-
tank, but they're a little afraid or member 1, officials announce. I
"cramps" and they have had tourists will have until Januar3
enough political experience to to secure their 1940 tag.
know that in a free-for-all dash ---
across the treacherous guberna- The Star gives Gold Stan
trial pool it is every man for on subscription payments.


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, NROVEMB1ER 10J, 1939









THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


;APT..MADDOX TAKES A JAUNT
Capt. J. W. Maddox sailed last
uesday aboard the Dorothy to
ampa where he disembarked to
ake an overland journey to Winter
aven, where he visited his son-
I1-law and daughter. Mr. and Mrs.
E. L. McLean. From there he went
to Orlando, Bartow and. othel
southern ports of call, returnlns
Sunday night all in one piece.
"Nothing like travel to broaden
one," quoth Captain Maddox.


MACS TAXI
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Standard Service PHONE
Station 1 0 1
Reid Ave. at 2nd


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Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 6
Sunday By Appointment
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THE STAR
"Your Home Town Paper",
------------I


EYES EXAMINED




Glasses fitted when needed
Made In Our Own Laboratory
All Work Unconditionally
Guaranteed
Office Hours: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

DR. G. T. NEWBERRY
OPTOMETRIST
PANAMA CITY, FLA.




PORT ST. JOE
BASEBALL PARK
One Night Only

TUES. NOV. -


Featuring the South's Favorite
Black-Face Comedian

COTTON WATTS
The Georgia Cracker
Also
BOB 'GOOFUS' DRISCOLL
The Boy from Nowhere
Just on a Merry-go-Round


THE TATTLER
THE STAFF
Editor-in-Chief. Margie Kirkland
Asst. Editor.....David Maddox
Society Editor... Evelyn Tharpe
Joke Editor........Earl Brown
U L Reporters .............. Paul
Johnson and Lillian Chandler
Sees All, Knows. All, Tells All About Port St. Joe High School


I Sharks In Win


At Altha 28 to 0

Victory Today Over Bristol Would
Put Local Aggregation At
Top of the Heap

The St. Joe Sharks went to Al-
tha last Friday and defeated them
28 to 0. Previously the Sharks
had downed Altha 49-0, but that
was Altha's first game and Friday
they found a much better team
opposing them.
Max Maddox was back in the
game and made two touchdowns.
Al Schneider covered a fumble
back of the goal line for a touch-
iown and kicked one between the
bars for two extra points.
Willard Gilbert received a pass
from John Lane and galloped over
for a score. He also charged
across and tackled an Altha man
)ack of the goal line for a safety.
The Sharks are all keyed up for
the game here today with Bristol.
A win over Bristol will put the
local boys at the head of the con-
'erence again, and if they can win
From Bristol, Florida High, Frink
and Wewahittchka they are as-
sured of the conference champion-
ship.
A large crowd is expected our
to see the game at the ball park
this afternoon at 3:30 o'clock.

FIRST QUARTER OF YEAR
OVER; TESTS ARE GIVEN
We took the quarter tests last
Wednesday and Thursday due to
the fact that there was a teachers'
meeting in Blountstown on Friday.
The quarter tests mean that we
lave completed two months of our
school term.
By this time everyone has .h
,ood idea of whether or not th6e
ire going to pass and whether
they will have to study harder
next quarter to make up for the
past quarter.
Under the new system we ge.
our report cards but four times ,
year, so we should have some
good grades, since we don't get
them so often.

POSTPONE MEETING
OF STUDENT COUNCIL
The regular meeting of the Stu-
dent Council scheduled for Tues-
day during the fourth period, was
postponed until Thursaay due to
the fact that the seniors had to
take that time to select their rings.
The rainy day session bill was to
be taken up at this meeting. Tell
you more about it next week.

CHAPEL PROGRAM
Principal D. G. McPherson as-
sembled the student body Monday
to explain the change in report
cards. This year the report of the
student is placed on a small sheet
of paper. The grades and honor
points are written on one side and
on the other is the place for the
signature of parent or guardian.
There has also been a cRahge
in the system of grading, full de-
tails of which will be found on
page one of this issue of The Star.
Following explanation of the
new system, a plan was presented
for a 40-minute noon period. Mr.
McPherson explained that the new
period would benefit the bus stu-
dents and would not inconvenience
many, if any, of the students who
go home for lunch. It will also en-
able us to get out of school about
30 minutes earlier in the after-
noon.


EXCELLENT LIST FOR
FIRST QUARTER-1939-40
Following is the "Excellent'list
for the first quarter or the year
with the total of honor points:
Twelfth Grade-Opal Green 92,
Lillian Chandler 76, Paul Johnson
88, Levetta Wilson 88.
Eleventh Grade-Emily Boyette,
82, Willie Lee Beard 79, Betty
Darcey 79, Autha Forehand 75,
Elaine Gore 75, Lunnette Ham-
mock 79, Naomi Parker 78, Billie
Roberts 80, Jesse Stone 85, Vllura
Straus 84, Murnice Taunton 80.
Tenth .Grade-Margaret Coleman
.80, Alma Collingsworth 78, Wilbur
Darcey 77, Abel Jenkins 82, John
Lane 77, Verna Mahon 80, Wiim-
berth Manasco 75, Melba Nedley
80, Eugenie LeHardy 78, Susan
Saunders 90, Marguerite William.
80.
Ninth Grade-Henry Beard 75,
Dorothy Costin 80, Juliane Hinson
80, Imogene Manasco 78, Thomas
Smith 89, Madeline Soderburg 87,
Charles Stevens 76.
Eighth Grade Amelia Gibson
82, Tommy Kelly 76, Onnie Le-Y
Hardy 85, Edna Lee Lewis 78,
Robert Logan 77, eggy Allen 78,
Carolyn Baggett 100, Betty Jo
Lane 91, Juliette Darcey 79, Vir-
ginia Pridgeon 80, Ann Treadwell
82, Coleman Schneider 83.
Seventh Grade-Charles McLeot,
92, Calvin Smith 91, Lois Brown
S6, Evelyn Strange 77, Luther
Fuller 77, Mary Gangneiux 82,
Margaret Harrison 78, Alma Hin-
son 91, D. B. Lewis 8y, Bertha
Maddox 82, Tom Parker, Jr., 85
Otha Powell 85, Alfred Rhames 79,
Betty Streetman 79, Mary L. Da-
vis 79. Emma L. Norris 83, Mary
K. Knight 76.

SENIORS SELECT RINGS
AND CAPS AND GOWNS
The representative of the cap
and gown company was at school
Monday and the seniors ordered
their caps, gowns and invitations
from him.
The representative of the ring
company arrived Tuesday and ar-
ter some discussion the seniors se-
lected their rings. Six of the boys
ordered belts and one or two girls
ordered lavaliers.

THE TATTLER
What sophomore girl received
three letters in one week? We
wonder if they were from Jack-
sonville. What about it M. S.?
It seems like everyone is get-
ting married. We wonder who will
be next??
M. S. can't understand St. Joe
boys! She says they're all screwy:
We wonder why E. B. is in such
a deep study all the time? Can
it be a girl?
Do you knqw who J. L. carries
home from the show one Friday
night not so long ago?
We are still wondering how A.
S. got in that ditch!!!!
We wonder when the E. H. and
S. M. case will wear out!
We wonder why a certain group
of sophomore and freshmen girls
were so worried and wearing
frowns since Saturday, especially
M. S. He's not leaving town, girls.
Could it be love between J. S.
and M. A. L.

WE WONDER
Why the letter "K" seemed so
popular at the dance Friday night?
If that certain junior girl is go-
ing to Indiana?
If that junior couple is at It
again?
Why that cerialn junior boy


VVVV


. . . . . . V


21 YEARS AGO--
The veterans of the World War wrote "Finis" to
the greatest struggle ever seen upon the face of
the earth. Let us try to remember Armis-
tice Day as a day that above all else it represents,
speaks of peace.

Bayshore Grocery and Market


Fritz Christiansen, Prop.


Highland View

A a* ~AA**LA.


; FOND MEMORIES

Tomorrow is one that brings fond memories to
all .. .a mingling of the spirit of the old
and the new a day of reverence and
jubilation. Let us pause for
one minute at 11 o'clock and bow
) our heads in silent tribute to
those who made the su-
Spreme sacrifice.








I Honor of Those Who Fell-


Ih1 Honor of Those Who Fell-


Tomorrow, which marks the 21st
anniversary of that peace from war
and strife, let us recall the hero-
ism of those called to the battle-
field, whether they rest in Flan-
ders Fields or be one of us today.


Chavers-Fowhand Furniture Co.


ALL HONOR


To those who passed on
that we may thrive and
democracy service ..
Let us pause one mo-
ment at 11 o'clock to-
morrow in memory of
them .


T- V


went to sleep on the hay ride last
week?
When that senior couple will
spring forth again?
If Max still goes to F. S. C. W.?
Who's D. T.'s latest heart-throb?

STOVES GIVE PLENTY HEAT
Two wood heaters have been
installed in the study hall of the
old building. The heat they pro-
duce makes the room quite com-
fortable and is being thoroughly
enjoyed by those who are In the
room.

JUST CONVERSATION
First Gear: "Hi, gear."
Second Gear: "Lo" gear.''
First Gear: "What do you think
of this new clutch?"
Second Gear: "Looks like we'li
have to shift for ourselves."

THANKS
The senior class wishes to ex-
press its thanks to Mr. Gore for
his donation.

STAFF CHANGED
The staff of The Tattler has
been changed with this issue. Look
at the masthead for the new setup.


CLASSIFIED ADS

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
CHEAP FOR QUICK SALE-55 by
140 ft. lot, Gaulding Subdivision,
2nd St. Improved, fenced, well
water, garage. Write or see Mrs.
W. W. VanDergrift, Highland
View. P. O. Box 843, Port St. Joe

TWO COTTAGES FOR SALE
Waterfront
Five rooms (two bedrooms) and
batht (complete). Front and back
porches screened. Electric lights
annd water.
$1450 EACH
TERMS-$200 down and balance
at $20 month. Interest at 5%
$1350 CASH
Lot Size 50 by 90 feet

FOR SALE-First 10 lots in Ben-
der Addition at 20% reduction.
Investigate this before buying!
J. L. KERR, Realtor
Port St. Joe, Florida
FOR RENT
UNFURNISHED 9 by 18-foot cab-
ins; ceiled overhead and sides;
good water; $4 month. Apply St.
Joe Lumber Co. 12j21tt


r


n o


m


L hd


~~9489~890~~


-~--~~-~----~-~~---~-~~~""""~~-~----


RIDAY, NOVEMBER. 10, 1939


PAGE Flvr


r w r IV V W'W w w "V, r" "VF w VF








PAGE SIX V .bR TT, 1D93


TWO FOR ONE PRICE AT
PORT NEXT TUESDAY
Manager Roy Williams of the
Port theater announces that next



Save Half
THE PRICE THAT YOU
EXPECTED TO PAY1


REMEMBER- I
TOMORROW, twenty-one years after,
let us remember those men whose pa-
triotism carried them onward into the
face of death, and the devotion to their
cause which inspired them to make the
world a safe place in which to live.


Quality Grocery &Market




WE PAUSE IN MEMORY-


TOMORROW, Port St. Joe, with the
rest of America, pauses in memory of
Armistice Day, of the paeon of joy that
arose twenty-one years ago when peace
returned to an embittered, disheartened
and war-torn world.




GULF HARDWARE & SUPPLY CO.


These


Twenty-one


Years


Twenty-one years have passed .... .We have
forgotten much since the days when troop-ships
slipped quietly down New York harbor before dawn.
... e can never forget the legions that marched
into the east singing "Mademoiselle From Armen-
tieres."
"The Boys"-the singing, laughing, swearing, fight-
ing "Boys"-they will remain in our hearts forever.



COSTIN'S Dept. Store


Tuesday, November 14, two per-
sons will be admitted to the thea-
ter with the purchase of one 25
cent ticket.
In addition to the regular pic-
ture, which is "Death of a Cham-
pion," starring Lynne Overman
and Virginia Dale, the Panama
Ramblers dance orchestra will be
seen on the stage in a hit parade
of tunes, songs and dance num.
bers.

----------- --------------------

SOLOMON'S

Pasteurized

MILK
Pasteurized for Your Protection'






-41
I, -I "-'-- "








BEST FOR PURITY,
QUALITY and TASTE

SOLOMON'S


DAIRY
Distributors for
BRUCE'S JUICES
IVEY VANLANDINGHAM4
Local Representative
---s L e-- -


Horn.
Colored District-Damon Peters.
St. Joe Lumber & Export Co.-
Floud Hunt, chairman. Sawmill,
P. H. Windham, Nick Kelley:
shop, Wilbur Gornto; boilers and
engine room, W. F. Farris; tim-
ber deck, Coleman Tharpe; filing
room, M. L. Fuller; pond, Gus
Simpler; lath mill, Cliff Tharpe;
upstairs, J. D. McCombs; handling,
loading and shipping, Grady Mon-
asco, chairman; green sorter, Ii.
E. Griffin, Lee Lauramore; dry
kiln, Sam Dennis; rough shed,
Louis Johnson; miscellaneous, Pat
Bray, Jim Simmons; yard, H. B.
Williams, Roy Wright; planing
mill, A. A. Duke, Bill Trawick;
finish shed, B. F. Hunt; miscel-
laneous plant proper, Bob Logas.,
Charley Tharve; commissary, J.
R. .Hewett; office, C. H. Me-
Knight; logging,. J. D. Lane; log
cutters, Kage Bass, A. W. Thomas,
L. A. Wise; locomotives, E. H.
Vanlandingham; skidders, W. H.
Yarbrough, and Floyd Hightower,
tractors, Tom Byrd; steel gang,
Adam Laudlin, Arnett Gibson; se,
tion crew, Frank Betton; loaders.
A. J. Peterson.
Chairman Bellows announced
yesterday that President Roose-
velt will launch the Red Cross
Roil Call tomorrow over flie radio
beginning at 10:30 p. m. (e.s.t.).
On the program will be such fa-
vorites as Fred Allen, Ben Bernie,
Paul Whiteman and his orchestra.
Don Wilson, Edgar Bergen and
Charlie McCarthy, Major Bowen
and others.
a -n c------
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. J. W. Sisemore, Minister
9:45 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. mi.-Morning Worship.
7:00 p. m.-B. Y. P. U.
8:00 p. m.-Preaching service.
W. M. U., Monday, 3:00 p. m.
Prayermeeting 'Wednesday, 7:30 p.
m. Teachers meeting, Thursday,
7:30 p. m.
Makine ice cream has become a
$232,000,000-a-year industry in the
United States.


RED CROSS ROLL CALL
WILL START MONDAY

(Continued from Page 1)
fishing room, Frank Sisk and three
workers; warehouse, L. Pippin anT
three workers; digester, Richara
Talley and three workers; wash
room, F. A. Adams and threat
workers; recovery plant and evap-
orators, Capt. Bob Chandler, Geo.
Ruiz and three workers; turbine
room, H. L. Echols and three
workers; boiler room, Charles WlI-
.son and three workers; caustic
and lime kiln, Woodrow Talley;
wood room, Tommy Guertin; wood
yard, Tom Coldewey; bull gang,
R. R. Minus; office, A. D. Core;
laboratory, R. Brumley; foreman,
A. J. Navarre.
House-to-house Workers Mrs.
J. L. Miller, chairman; Mrs. E. H.
Horton, Mrs. W. A. Smith, Mrs. E.
Clay Lewis, Mrs. Jim Bounds, Mrs.
Massey Ward, Mrs. Robert Tap-
per, Mrs. Cecil Costin, Mrs. A. J.
Navarre, Mrs. H. C. Spence, Mrs.
Charles Brown, Mrs. J. Fillingim,
Mrs. H. Soule, Mrs. J. L. Temple,
Mrs. E. A. McCaskey, Mrs. C. A.
LeHardy, Mrs. P. D. Prows, Mrs.
D. Mahon, Mrs. B. W. Eells, Mrs.
C. Adams, Mrs. J. L. Sharit, Mrs.
Robert Bellows, Mrs. B. L. Kelly,
Mrs. R. Miller, Mrs. B. Harrell,
Mrs. H. McKinnon, Mrs. J. 0. Bag-
gett, Mrs. D. B. Lewis.
Fifth Street Extension Mrs.
Thos. R. L. Carter.
.Beach-Mrs. John Blount, Mrs.
Robert Bellows, Mrs. J. L. Temple,
Mrs. Basil Kenney, Jr.
Business District-J. L. Sharit,
railroad office; B. H. Smith, rail-
road shops; Howard McKinnon,
telephone office; Miss Lila Carter.
St. Joe Land & Development Co.
Highland View-Mrs. Paul Brig-
ham, Miss Elizabeth Kenn-ngton,
Mrs. Bennett, Willie Cardon.
Oak Grove-Mrs. George Patton
and Mrs. W. L. Bragg.
White City-C. E. Stebel.
Indian Pass-Mrs. J. T. McNeiIl.
Overtstreet-L. M. Denton.
Beacon Hill-Mrs. C. P. Van-


ARMISTICE DAY-
The details of the events which culminated 21 years
ago tomorrow in the stilling of the clamor of battle /
on the western front are losing their sharp out--
lines beneath the erosion of time, and yet the event
that we observe tomorrow bulks even larger and
more imposing with the world again on verge of war

SOLOMON'S DAIRY
Ivey Vanlandingham, Local Representative

ib, l. w


SURE


You'd Give


Any


Youngster


A Chance!


THAT'S WHY WE ASK YOU TO LET
THE STAR BID ON YOUR NEXT


Printing Order

The Star, when compared with most of the other pa-
pers of Florida, is still in its swaddling clothes and still
needs the same chance you would give any youngster
trying to get a start. .. We're trying to keep a
good newspaper in Port St. Joe. The Star is a Port St.
Joe organization-HOME OWNED AND HOME OPER-
ATED-and the money you spend with The Star stays
in Port St. Joe with Port St. Joe merchants. When you
let that printing order get out of town, your money is
gone forever. Help a youngster along and give
The Star a chance to fill that next printing order.
WE CAN GIVE YOU GOOD PRINTING
AT REASONABLE PRICES
TRY US FOR LETTERHEAD, ENVELOPES,
STATEMENTS, CIRCULARS, CARDS, SHIP-.
PING TAGS, INVOICES AND SPECIAL FORMS

IF WE'RE TOO HIGH, OKEH-BUT CALL US
AND GIVE US THE CHANCE TO BID ON IT!


CHRISTMAS CARDS AND CALENDARS
We have an exceptionally beautiful line of Christmas
Cards this year, and suggest that you place your or-
der now so that we will have plenty of time to print
them for you. Don't wait until the last minute!
And you business men who haven't already
placed your orders for Calendars-just call us and
we will gladly bring our samples around to show you.
----- ----- --f fl- -- -.,-


lurn.


THE STAR
"Your Home Town Newspaper"
Progressively Serving the People in Port St. Joe
and Surrounding Community


FISHERMEN ASKED TO I states, also applies to other salt
OBSERVE THE LAW IN water fish such as mackerel, mu;-
TAKING OCEAN TROUT let and red fish. Pompano must
Snot be taken under nine inches In
S a o length and blue fish less than lu
Salt water trout have been run-inches
ning the past week, and the dock ------
at the warehouse has been lined DUCK SEASON TO OPEN
every day from dawn to dusk The duck hunting season in
with fishermen (and fisherwomen) Florida will open November li,
eager to bring home a string of under federal regulations, though
the delicious fish. the general hunting season does
It is understood that state con- not begin until November 20. The
servation officers arrested one or'state has waived the five-day dIr-
two persons this week for having ference in opening day to avoid
in their possession trout under the confusion. Port St. Joe nimrods
legal size of 12 inches. are cleaning up their shotguns In
Judge Thos. R. L. Carter calls anticipation of opening day and a
attention of fellow fishermen to wild duck dinner.
the fact that it is unlawful to take --
trout of less than 12 inches from The Star gives Gold Stamps
tip of nose to fork of tail. This, he on subscription payments.


1939 BOHN
NEW AIR-CONDITIONED
FIN-GRID REFRIGERATOR

*- Pay much less than you'd
planned-get much morel The
smart new BOHN .gives you
the benefit of ICE refrigera-
ionl Plenty of crystal-clear
ice cubes-foods keep fresher,
juicier, lavrful--little need
for usinc covered dishe!l


ST. JOE ICE

COMPANY
;~4 B ....I


LET US


_p__-_ ~_ _, I I


;=-P-4 -4Lll)5l


PAGE SIX


THE STAR, PORT ST. Jl-=- GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


Dlll'F AY NOVEMB 9


9


... ... ..