<%BANNER%>

UFPKY NEH LSTA



The star
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00055
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: October 27, 1939
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00055

Full Text






The Star-Florida's fastest grow-
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and upbuilding of
the City of Port St Joe.


THE


STAR.


P'rt St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
DuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
est growing little city. In
the heart of the pine bett.


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center

OLUME III PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY., FLORIDA, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1939 NIMiBER 2
I


'.-T. A. Hallowe'en

'arnival to Be Held

tomorroww Evening

children In Costume Will Par-
ade From Hotel to Grounds
Led. By School Band

UEEN TO BE CROWNED

amateur Contest Expected to
Bring Out Much Hid-
1 den Talent

Spooks, goblins, witches, imps
4d. black cats will reign supreme
morrow evening when 'the Port
Joe Parent-Teachers assocla-
)n stages its second annual Hal-
we'en carnival on the vacant lot
i Reid avenue between the of-
;es of Dr. Norton and the Su-
annee store.
Great plans are underway and
L evening of fun is promised all
tio attend. Decorated booths will
Pt the ,grounds where may be
en spooky shows and where
,od things to eat may be secured,
eluding home-baked pies and de-
:ious barbecue. The booths will
ien for business at 4 p. m.
A grand march will form at the
)rt Inn and parade to the car-
val grounds. The high school
Ind will head the procession, fol-
wed by the king and queen with
eir court and school children In
,stume. All children are urged to
at the hotel at 5:30 o'clock to-
orrow attternoon to join in the
trade. A prize will be awarded
r the best costume.
Promptly on arrival of their
iyal majesties at the grounds,
Li queen will be crowned, an4
'ter this an amateur hour will be
resented, and anyone desiring to
,ke part in this feature is urged
Contact Rev. J. W. Sisemore,
rs. E. H. Horton or Mrs. Mc-
iwhon. There will be two prizes
warded in this contest-one for
.e best child under 14 years of
e and one for the best adult.
A cordial invitation is extended
.e pulffTc to come out and take
irt in the festivities. Money de-
:red from the affair will be used
r purchase of a piano and li-
ary books for the school.
Irs. W. F. Poehler
/Ir8. W. F. Poehler


FOR TREASURER


H. E. (Eudell) Moore
A "Put Moore In The Treasury
Club" was organized in Moore
Haven this week for the pur-
pose of promoting the candidacy.
of H. E. Moore for the office of
State Treasurer.


Harold Palmer

Announces for

Commissioner

First Candidate Appearing In Field
For City Election To Be
Held Feb. 13, 1940

In this issue of The Star, Har-
old C. Palmer carries an an-
nouncement that he will be a can-
didate for the office for city com-
missioner of the city of Port St.
Joe, subject to the will of the
voters at the election to be held
Tuesday, February 13, 1940. One
commissioner will be elected at
that time, the term of Commis-
sioner B. A. Pridgeon expiring.
Mr. Palmer is 25 years old, un-
married and lives in this city with
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. M.
Palmer. He has been a resident
of the city for two years, coming
here as manager of the Danley
Furniture company when that con-
cern. opened, and later changing
to the employ of the St. Joe Pa-
per company.
,Mr. Palmer states that ever
since his arrival in Port St. Joe ihe
has been interested in the future
of the city and has taken for his
campaign slogan "A Progressive
Commissioner for the City of Op-
portunity."


Is Called By Death Senator Holand
Senator Holland


asses Away Saturday Night As
Result of Cancerous Growth
Of Long Duration

Mrs. Clara Poehler, wife of W.
SPohler, local photographer, was
Llled by death at 11:30 o'clock
iturday night after four years of
offering from cancer. Death came
her home in the Costin build-
Son Monument avenue in which
ie Poehler Studio is located.
Funeral services were held Sun-
ty afternoon at the home with
ev. H. F. Beaty officiating. In-
rment was in the Wewahitchka
'metery with Kenneth Creech, J.
Coburn, Dr. J. C. Coe, W. W.
carrier, Robert Kingry and Jack
'Keefe acting as pall bearers.
Mrs. Pohler was born in Astoria,
re., on Aug 19, 1890, and she haa
ade her home in Florida for a
timber of years, coming to Port
t. Joe in November of last year
Join her husband. She made
any friends here during her
:ief stay who join in extending


Here Tomorrow

Possible Candidate for Governor
Will Talk of Candidacy
With Local Citizens

Senator Spessard L. Holland of
Bartow, unannounced candidate
for the office of governor of Flor-
ida, will be in Port St. Joe to-
morrow afternoon in order to dis-
cuss his candidacy with local citi-
zens.
Senator Holland will be at the
Port Inn, and those desiring to
meet with him are asked to be
present at 3 o'clock.

their sympathy to the bereaved
husband in his loss.
Besides her husband, William F.
Poehler, Mrs. Poehler is suri'.ved
by two sisters, Mrs. Agnes Red-
man of Oakland, Calif., and Mrs.
W. A. Henderson of Marchfield,
Ore., and a brother, C. J. Lidburg
of Portland, Ore.


LISTEN, CHILD

Tire following editorial appear-
ing in the Cocoa (Fla.) Tribune is
particularly apt and applies equal-
ly as well in Port St. Joe as in the
city of Cocoa:

We have recently cautioned
motorists through our pages of
the danger of accidents, now
that schools have opened. Tha
majority of drivers will give
their assistance to curbing this
danger. Will the children who
are attending school heed the
plea :of parent, teacher; mer-
chant, preacher, neighbor andc
editor to use caution while cross-
ing the street, watch for traffic
by looking both ways? The fact
that many schools have safety
instruction and student traffic
patrols, helps ito decrease the
danger. Btht children will be
children, and the lesson to be
learned regarding darting be-
tween parked cars, chasing a
ball or a playmate across the
street, may come too late.
With many students cycling
back and forth to school the
danger is grave, for any motor-
ist knows the weaving and un-
steadiness of an unheeding
cyclist. It might help if the
youngster on the bicycle knew
that last year there was no re-
duction In the boys and girls
killed in bicycle and motor ac-
cidents. Seventy-two per cent
of these were the fault of the
bicyclist. Children of 5 to 14
were in 17,500 accidents and 300
lost their lives, while those
from 15 to 24 years of age were
involved in 13,000 accidents anat
270 lost their lives. These fig-
ures show why we older ones
are concerned. We need the co-
operation of each school child in
order to carry out the safety
campaign.
----------
RESTAURANT UNDER
NEW MANAGEMENT

Kelly Carver last week bought
out Stepp's cafe on Monument
avenue and all this week has been
having the interior redecorated
and new fixtures installed for rt-
opening of the popular cafe next
Monday.
Mr. Carver, who has been in
charge of the lunch counter at the
Carver Drug company, will con-
tinue operation of the cafe along
the lines of Mrs. Stepp, serving
regular meals and short orders,
and will remain open 24 hours a
day.
Mr. and Mrs. Carver made a
trip to Jacksonville this week to
purchase modern and up-oddate
fixtures in order to make the cafe
one of the best in Port St. Joe.
c-------
PAVING REID AVENUE
IS NOW UNDERWAY

Work of laying limerock founda-
tion to receive an oil and slag top
dressing is underway on the shoul-
ders of Reid avenue. Removal of
the sand and dirt, to be replaced
by the paving, will be a boon to
merchants along this street who
have been plagued by dust con-
tinually sifting into their stores
and causing much of their stock
of goods to become soiled.
------r------
LOAN SHARKS 'NUISANCES'
In an attempt to drive "loan
sharks" and "salary buyers" fror,
the city, Pensacola contends they
are a "public nuisance" and is em-
ploying a city ordinance against
nuisances to close such establish-
ments.


Harold T. Garrett, 25-year-old
graduate of the University of
Florida, who has been awarded
the Bailey Finley Williamson
tung oil fellowship at the uni-
versity at Gaineaville.


Further WPA

Paving Projects

To Be Sought

By City Commissioners; Discuss
Matter of Special Licenses
And Other Matt~rs

At the regular meeting of the
board of city commissioners held
Tuesday night at the city hall, it
was brought out that funds in the
present city-wide WPA project
were about exhausted, and the
matter of securing further grants
for paving of a number of streets
was discussed.
A number of streets in the city
are badly in need of some type of
paving, it was brought out, par-
ticularly Tenth street from Long
avenue to Garrison avenue, Sixth
street from Monument avenue to
Long avenue, and the streets in
the colored quarters. It was voted
by the commissioners to see what
can be done toward securing this
work. Two of the main streets
in the colored quarters will come
in for paving if the project goes
through.
It was also thought advisable to


WOMEN'S CLUB

AND FIREMEN

SPONSOR BALL

Hallowe'en Masquerade Tues-
day Night Expected To
Draw Large Crowd

MISS BEE HAVEN TO PLAY

Tickets May Be Secured Now
From Firemen or Mem-
bers of Women's Club

Next Tuesday night, Hallowe'en,
will not olily be a big night for
the kiddies, but also. for those who
enjoy dancing, for Lovett Mahon
says that Mark Tomlinson told
him that he heard Wilbur Wells
say that W. C. Roche told. him that
Mrs. J. L. Miller heard that there
was no doubt that B. W. Eells, Jr.,
thought Mrs. Fred Curtis had told
Sammie Davis that Mrs. H. W.
Soule had declared to Mrs. Edwin
Ramsey that it was generally be-
lieved' #'_ B. T. Taylor said in
plain terms, that he heard Merce
Treadi'wel declare that his friend,
Miles Hurbut had said that Mrs.
George Patton had informed him
confidentially that it was wIIl
known throughout business circles
that John Blount and Willard, Lee
had caught Chief Troy Jones say.
ing that in his opinion the Has-
lowe'e. masquer-.te 4ance to be
held next Tuesday night at the
Centennial auditorium would be
the biggest event of its kind ever
staged in Port St. Joe.
And it is further averred that
Chief Jones said that Miss Bee
Haven and her Rhythm Boys from
Fort Walton, who are to furnish
music for the affair, can't be beat
when it comes to putting out hot
music.
Members of the Volunteer Fire
Department and the ladies of the
Port St. Joe Women's club all are
carrying around tickets, and any-
one who has not yet been ap-
proached to buy a ticket to the
dance is urged to go out right now
and hunt down one of the pur-
veyors of ducats to the ball ana
get one today.
Funds derived from the ticket
sales will be split between the
Women's club and the firemen.


place some type of paving on M r
Fifth street from Monument ave- Business M en


nue to the bay, with a turning
circle at the waterfront similar to
that on Harrison avenue in Pan-
ama City, and later develop a pier
(Continued on Page 6)


Discuss Credit

Membership Dues Set and B. B.
Conklin Named As Secre-
tary of Organization 'I


Frink To Meet
At the special meeting of the

Sharks Today Port St. Joe Business Men's asso-
ciation held Tuesday night at the
Legion hut at the call of President
Invading Team Believed to Be In C. A. LeHardy, the matter of the
Good Shape To Give Local credit business being done in the
Boys Hard Fight city was taken up and the de-
cision reached, that something had
The Port St. Joe Sharks meet to be done about it.
the Frink high football squad on B. B. Conklin was named as see-
the local field this afternoon at retary of the organization and
3:30 o'clock, and from all indica- will handle all delinquent accounts
tions the invading team is in ex- for members of the association.
ceptionally good playing form and In order to meet operating costs
will put up a stiff fight against of the body, it was unanimously
the local aggregation, voted to assess 'dues of 25 cents
While the Sharks lost their per month per member.
game with Florida High at Talla- The matter of uniform closing
hasses last Friday 40-12, that is hours was also taken up, some
not to be held against them. They members suggesting 6 p. m. and
are still in the running and the some 7 p. m., and it was decided
local football fans are urged to that those desiring to close at 8
turn out this afternoon and lend could do so and those wanting to
their support to the boys. stay open until 7 could do so.







WU 0?. IA


EPISCOPAL AUXILIARY
DISTRICT MEETING
The. Episcopal Auxiliary held its
district meeting at the St. Jame*
Episcopal church in this city Wed
nesday. The program for the day
opened with observance of Holy
Communion at 10 o'clock, con
ducted by Bishop Juhan of Jactk.
gonville, and followed by the cal
to order prayer. Mrs. Basil Ken'
ney, Jr., gave the welcome address
and the response was given by
Mrs. V. G. Lowrie of Marianna.
The morning address was give;
by Rev. V. G. Lowrie and was fol-
lowed by a talk from the district
president, Mrs. Ragland of Marl-
anna. Prior to adjournment fol
the lunch hour the noonday prayer
and memorial was given by Rev.
Frank Dearing of Panama City
and reports were heard from vari-
ous committees.
Lunch was served at the Centen-
nial building by the ladia 6Z the
Methodist Missionary society. Pol-
lowing the business meeting for
the afternoon an address was
given by Bishop Juhan, whicl con-
cluded the program for the day.
The ladies of the Episcopa: Aux-
iliary especially want to thank the
ladies of the Methodist Mission-
"ary society and all who aided in
any way to make the day the suc-
cess it was.

DOROTHY MINUS
OBSERVES BIRTHDAY
Dorothy Minus was hostess to
a number of little friends last Sat-
urday when she celebrated her
ninth birthday with a party at the
home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
R. R. Minus, on Monument ave-
nue. The Hallbwe'ei motif pre-
dominated ini the decorations. The
dining table was centered with an
orange cake with chocolate icing
and balanced by a bowl of roses
at each end.
Games and contests were en-
joyed during the afternoon. Favor
of candles and horns were pre-
sente:d each guest during the re-
freshment hour. Between fifteen
and twenty little friends were
present and wished for the young
hostess many more happy birth-
days.

Mrs. J. H. Drumman of St. An-
drews was the guest Wednesday
of Mr. and Mrs. B. B. Conklin.
B. A. Cogdill and T. W. Davis
were business visitors Wednesday
in Pensacola.


FLOWERS AND

CORSAGES

FOR THE P.-T.A. CARNIVAL
and the
HALLOWE'EN MASQUE
DANCE TUESDAY NITE


that cannot be told from the
best product of Mother Nature.
S. And they keep indefi-
nitely. If they become droopy
you merely place them in the
refrigerator and in a brief time
they are as good as new.
SEE

Mrs. W. S, Smith
STAR OFFICE PHONE 51


. Personals Churches

LANETA DAVIS, Editor


WOMEN'S CLUB TO MEET
I NEXT WEDNESDAY
s The Port St. Joe Women's club
will hold its regular meeting in
- the Centennial building next Wed-
nesday afternoon, November 1, at
3 o'clock. All members are urged
Sto be in attendance.

l METHODIST MISSIONARY
SOCIETY IN MEETING
The Susannah Wesley and Ma-
rie Jones circles of the Methodist
Missionary society met Monday
Afternoon at the church. Mrs. J. L.
Sharit presided over the devo-
tional. Following a song, respon-
sive scripture was read and Mrs.
J. T. McNeill concluded the devu-
tional with prayer. Mrs. George
Patton then took charge and helc
the business meeting. The first
and second chapters of the mission
study book, "Through Tragedy to
Triumph," by Basil Mathews, were
given by Mrs. Roy. Gibson ane
Mrs. J. C. Bradbury, after which
the meeting was closed with
prayer.

MRS. PRIDGEON HOSTESS
TO BRIDGE CLUB
The Thursday Bridge club met
Wednesday night at the home of
Mrs. B. A. Pridgeon. Two table--
were in progress and following
tallying of scores, prizes were
presented to Mrs. Edwin Ramsey,
high. and Mrs. J. M. Smith, cut.
Marigolds were used in profusion
by the hostess in decorating the
rooms where play was enjoyed.
Delicious refreshments of shrimp
salad, saltines, banana nut cake,
tea and coffee were served to
Mesdames Ramsey. Smith, George
Gore, Tomn Owens, J. Gloeckler,
M. C. Edwards, M. P. Tomlinso:-
and, E. C. Lewis and invited guest,
Miss Edna Davis.

STUDY COURSE THIS
WEEK AT BAPTIST CHURCH
A study course is being held
this week at the Baptist church
with the following interesting
courses being presented: "Buila-
ing a Standard Sunday School
Course," taught by Rev. J. W.
Sisemore, and "When Do Teachers
Teach," taught by Miss Eva Me-
serve. About twenty are in regular
attendance and everyone is cordi-
ally invited to attend.

PRESBYTERIAN AUXILIARY
IN MEETING AT CHURCH
The program meeting for the
month of the Presbyterian Auxili-
ary was held Monday afternoon in
the church. An interesting pro-
gram on "Missions" was presented
by Mrs. Robert Logan. The next
meeting will be a circle meeting
at the home of Mrs. Logan on
November 20.


Mrs. Earl Fussell
missed from a Panama
pital Tuesday.


was dis-
City hos-


Alton Dendy and George Tap-
per visited friends Sunday in
Panama City.

Friends of Mrs. Philip Lovett
regret to learn of her recent ill-
ness and wish for her a complete
recovery of her health soon.

Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Larkin spent
the week-end in Bristol visiting
relatives.

Robert Nedley and Joe ThomVp-
son of Apalachicola were business
visitors here last Friday.
ft ft f


Mrs.


Hoke Larkin of Bristol


BAPTIST W. M. U. IN
ROYAL SERVICE PROGRAM
The Royal Service program of
the Women's Missionary Union of
the Baptist church was held Mon-
day afternoon at the church with
Mrs. W. C. Pridgeon, program
chairman, in charge. Topic for the
meeting was "The Greaot Commis-
sion and the Chief Aims of the
W. M. U." The 'devotional was led
by Mrs. Charles McClellan, and
was followed with prayer. Various
phases of the program were de-
veloped by the following members:
Mrs. A. L. Ezell, Mrs. S. Cox,
Mrs. A. E. McCaskey, Mrs. J. F.
Miller and Mrs. J. W. Sisemore.
Plans were made for personal ser-
vice week and at the conclusion of
a song the meeting was dismissed
by repeating the Mispah.

EPISCOPAL FISH FRY IS
ENJOYABLE AFFAIR
Last Sunday afternoon mem-
bers of the St. James Parish or
Port St. Joe and St. Andrews Par-
ish of St. Andrews churches gath-
ered at Camp, Weed. Immediately
following arrival of the group, a
baseball game was organized and
a game held on the beach. After
the game a delicious -supper of
fish, hush-puppies, salad, hot cof-
fee and pie was enjoyed. Follow-
ing the fish fry, a twilight service
was held in the Chapel of the
Holy Cross, the Rev. Frank Dear-
ing officiating. About 80 members
of the two churches were in at-
tendance at the meeting.

LOTTIE MOON GIRLS
MEET AT CHURCH
The junior girls of tire Lottie
Moon Auxiliary of the Baptist
Missionary society met Tuesday
afternoon in the church with the
president, Mary Helen Gangneiux,
presiding. The opening song was
followed with prayer by Mrs. E.
C. Cason and the devotional was
given. During the business session
reports were given by committee
heads. Plans were made for a so-
cial to be held, next Tuesday at
the home of Hazel Cason. A mem-
bership drive was launched at
this time after which the meeting
adjourned.

MRS. WELLINGTON HOSTESS
TO TUESDAY SEWING CLUB
Mrs. J. G. Wellington enter-
tained the Tuesday Sewing club
at her home on Hunter's Circle
this week. Following the hour of
sewing, sandwiches and ice-9
drinks were served by the hostess
to the nine members present. The
ladies of this club make garments
for the under-privileged children
and mothers.

Rev. and Mrs. J. G. Lowrie of
Marianna were visitors in the city
Wednesday.

Lewis Weherl of Mobile was in
the city on business Wednesday.

Dr. L. H. Bartee returned last
Friday from a several days' busi-
ness trip to Jacksonville.

Mrs. J. E. Perritt was dis-
missed from a Panama City ho,
pital Tuesday where she had been
or treatment for two days.

Rev. and Mrs. Frank Dearing
and children, Mrs. H. H. Baker,
MIrs. Wills, the Misses Katherine
and. Mary Martin and Mrs. M.
Lingo, all of Panama City, at-
ended the district auxiliary meet-
ng of the Episcopal church here
Wednesday.


was a week-end visitor in this a
city. Mrs. C. J. Sullivan returned
Sunday from a several days' visit
Mrs. Troy Jones and small in Florala, Ala., with her parents.
daughter returned Sunday froy.i Mr. Sullivan and Bennie Grace
Malone after a week's visit with motored to Florala Saturday to
her mother, Mrs. C. M. Everett. bring Mrs. Sullivan home.


I


I


I




1I

I
i
I













.1


i


THEATRE
OPENS
DAILY
2:45
Continuously


Save Half
THE PRICE THAT YOU
EXPECTED TO PAYI


about thirty young people.

MRS. M. K. HURLBUT
HOSTESS AT BRIDGE
Mrs. M. K. Hurlbut entertained
with two tables of bridge at her
home on Eighth street Wednesday
evening. At the conclusion of sev-
eral progressions, ice cream ana
cake were served to Mr. and Mrs.
W. L. Roache, Mr. and Mrs. Wil-
bur Wells, Miss Louise Lee and
Buck Alexander.

IN MEMORY OF MRS. CLARA
POEHLER
By One Who Knew and Loved Her
To know her was to love he-,
for although she suffered greatly
she. was always cheerful and ons
of the sweetest and most patient
Christians whose greatest desire
was to enjoy health and happiness
with her beloved. husband, yet will-
ing and ready to bow to the holy
will of God and follow Jesus intc.
that unknown land where God and
the angels dwell.
So to her husband we can say:
She is not dead, she is just away.
With a cheery smile and wave of
the hand
She wandered into that prom-
ised land;
And in that land, it must be fair,
Since she chooses to linger
there.
So we think of her as the same.
We'll say
She is a dear, sweet pal who
has gone away.
-Mrs. R. A. Costin.


THEATRE
OPENS
Saturday 1:15
Sunday 1:45


SUNDAY MONDAY OCTOBER 29 30
THE SHOW-WORLD WONDER...in Technicolor


GARLAND MORGA
RAY BfERT i=CKI
BOLGER LAHRHALE'
.W, .q., f .' Biflie .aciaret i' ley
SURK' .HAMILION GRAPEWI
4 AND_ I qMUNCHKINS
CURRENT NEWS
^,b, Technicolor Short


TUESDAY-OCT. 31 HALLOWE'EN SPOOK
BOBBY BREEN SALLY SHOW 10:45 P. M. OCT.
BLANE ALAN MOWBRAY REGULAR PRICES

Way Down South
"Mystic Siam" and "The
Kangaroo Kid"

WED., NOV. 1 ONLY THURS., FRI., NOV. 2-
Returned for Last Showing LORETTA YOUNG, DAVIC
By Request NIVEN, HUGH HERBERT
TYRONE POWER, HENRY "EXERN
FONDA, NANCY KELLY in ENALL

"JESSE JAMES" YOURS"
"PARADE OF HITS"
In Technicolor WAR NEWS

DOUBLE FEATURE ALL DAY SATURDAY, NOV.

#1 k-)


Thrills of the Frozen North How Can a Man Escape fr
CHARLES STARRETT Alcatraz? See


"North f Yukon"
the
Serial Thrill
"DICK TRACY RETURNS'"
"Two-Headed Giant" in
Technicolor


BRIAN DONLEVY and
JACQUELINE WELLS ir
BEHINDD PRISON GAT]
Gibbons' True Adventure]
"Treacherous Waters',


- -- -n -- -c-


SSociety


I.


JUNIOR LEGION AUXILIARY Mrs. G. M. B. Harries and Mr
ENTERTAINS SONS OF LEGION Alice Prows of Panama City wei
The Girls' Auxiliary of the business visitors here Wednesda:
American Legion entertained the ft *
Sons of the Legion last evening az The Misses Maxie Ferrell, Rut
the home of Mrs. Sammie Davis Moore Connell and Alma Daugl
with a party. Games, contests, try, students at Camp Roosevel
dancing and proms were enjoyed spent the week-end here with the
after which refreshments of sana- parents.
wiches and punch were served to


i


I


I


j


1939 BOHN
NEW AIR-CONDITIONED
FIN-GRID REFRIGERATOR

APay much less than you'd
planned-get much morel The
smart new BOHN gwres you
the .benefit of ICE refrigera-
tion! Plenty of crystal-clear
ice cubes-foods keep fresher,
juicier, flavorul--little need
for usin covered dishes!


ST. JOE ICE

COMPANY


PAGE TWO


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY OCTOBER 27 5


4








FRIDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1939 THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PAGE THREE


LEGAL ADVERTISING

-NOTICE ELECTION SPECIAL
TAX SCHOOL DISTRICT NO.
1, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Pursuant to Section 438 of the
Florida School Laws of 1939, No-
tice is hereby given that the next
regular biennial election in Spe-
cial Tax School District Number
One is called for Tuesday, the
7th day of November A. D. 1939,
at the County Court House in We-
wahitchka, Florida for the said
District to determine the rate of
village to be assessed and col-
lected on the property therein
for th'e next ensuing two years,
and to elect three trustees for the
District for the next ensuing two
years. All qualified electors, resi-
dent within said District, who pay
a tax on real or personal prop-
erty and are otherwise qualified
according to Law are entitled to
vote a.t said election. It is deter-
mined that ten mills will be
necessary to maintain a uniform
system of free schools within said
District.
"he Inspectors are: Mrs. D. A.
Nichols, Mrs. B. F. Britt and J. A.
Barrington. The Clerk is C. F.
en.
y order of the Board of Pub-
lic Instruction of Gulf County,
Florida, this 3rd day of October
A. D. 1939.
Attest: THOSE. MERIWETHER
C. L. COSTIN Chairman.
County Superintendent. 11-3

NOTICE ELECTION SPECIAL
TAX SCHOOL DISTRICT NO.
11, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Pursuant to Section 438 of the
Florida School Laws of 1939, No-
tice is hereby given that the next
regular biennial election in Spe-
cial Tax School District Numbler
Eleven is called for Tuesday, the
7th day of November A. D. 1939,
at the Overstreet School in Over-
street, Florida, for the said Dis-
trict to determine the rate of
village to be assessed and col-
lected on the property therein
for the next ensuing two years,
and to elect three trustees for the
District for the next ensuing two
years. All qualified electors, resi-
dent within said District, who pay
a tax on real or personal prop-
erty and are otherwise qualified
according to Law are entitled to
vote at said election. It is deter-
mined that ten mills will be
necessary to maintain a uniform
system of free schools within said
District.
The Inspectors are: J. T. Kin-
ard, F. B. Whitfield, F. L. Kemp.
The Clerk Is Mrs. W. G. Hardy.
By order of the Board of Pub-
lic Instruction of Gulf County,
Florida, this 3rd day of October
A. D. 1939.
Attest: THOSE. MERIWETHER
C. L. COSTIN Chairman.
County Superintendent. 11-3

NOTICE ELECTION SPECIAL
TAX SCHOOL DISTRICT NO.
13, GULF 'COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Pursuant to Section 438 of the
Florida School Laws of 1939, No-
tice is hereby given that the next
regular biennial election in Spe-
cial Tax School District Number
Tihrteen is called for Tuesday, the
7th day of November A. D. 1939,
at the Buckhorn School for the said
District to determine the rate of
village to be assessed and col-
lected on the property therein
for the next ensuing two years,
and to elect three trustees for the
District for the next ensuing two
years. All qualified electors, resi-
dent within said District, who pay
a tax on real or personal prop-
erty and are otherwise qualified
according to Law are entitled to
vote at said election. It is deter-
mined that ten mills will be
necessary to maintain a uniform
system of free schools within said
District.
The Inspectors are: Arthur
Jackson, W. T. Rowell, J. A. Bar-
field. The Clerk is C. F. Hanlon.
By order of the Board of Pub-
lic Instruction of Gulf County,
Florida, this 3rd day of October
A. D. 1939.
Attest: THOSE. MERIWETHER
C. L. COSTIN Chairman.
County Superintendent. 11-3
NOTICE ELECTION SPECIAL
TAX SCHOOL DISTRICT NO.
16, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Pursuant to Section 438 of the
Florida School Laws of 1939, No-
tice is hereby given that the next
regular biennial election in Spe-
cial Tax School District Number
Sixteen is called for Tuesday, the
7th day of November A. D. 1939,
at the City Hall, Port St. Joe,
Florida, for the said District to
determine the rate of millage to
be assessed and collected on the
property therein for the next en-
suing two years, and to elect
three trustees for the District for
the next ensuing two years. All
qualified electors, resident within
said District, who pay a tax on
real or personal property and are


: JTHE TATTLER
THE STAFF
/ Editor-in-Chief ... Dick Stepp
Asst. Editor...Max Maddox
Sports Editor..Joe Lilienfeld
Society Editor...........
..........Martha Hinson
SReporters ...... Florence
Ism Facione and Opal Greene
Joke Editors ........Paul
Si,4 Johnson and Al Schneider
Sees All, Knows, All, Tells All About Port St. Joe High School


SHARKS LOSE GAME THINGS THE SENIOR BOYS
WITH TALLAHASSEE WILL BE DOING TEN
The Sharks were on the recel,- YEARS FROM NOW
ing end last Friday when the Flor- Al Schneider-Still the ladles
ida High Demons of Tallahassee man.
gave them a 40 to 12 trouncing. Max Maddox-Hurrying home to
The first team didn't score a "TIupy.-
single point during the game, but Dave Maddox--Still commenc-
the second team made 12 points ing.
with Dave Maddox going over the Earl Brown-President of a
goal line. John Lane tossed both deaf and dumb college.
passes accounting for the scores. Paul Johnson-President of ths
It seems that everyone is down United States.
on the Sharks because they lost Ed Hufft-Trying to find a hat
one game.. But in our opinion the that will fit his head.
people should stand behind them. Glenn Grimeley Still looking
They have proved they are good for a way to Jacksonville.
sports, even when on the small Joe Lilienfeld-Master of Lilien-
end of the score, and we are really field's Revelers.
proud of them. Despite the fact Willard Gilbert-Proud father of
that three of the first string men an eleven-man football team.
lost a week of practice, the
Sharks put up a stubborn fight. GOS
GOSSIP
PERIODS CUT SHORT What senior girl has a new boy
Classes were cut down to 30 friend? Could it be our bashful
minutest each last Friday. We girl student?
had five morning classes and two We wonder why M. K. visits
afternoon classes, which allowed Wewa so often?
school to be dismissed at 1:30 p. What happened to the football
m. The changes were made duo boys last Friday? Could it have
to the football game in Tallahas- been the college girls caused the
see. defeat?
SWho was the "baby" of our
THE JOKE TELLER class riding around Saturday eve-
A man was laughing on a street ning?
car and another man asked him Why does M. G. blush so when
what he was laughing at. "Melting Pot" is mentioned, in his-
He replied, "I have Just been tory class?
telling myself some funny jokes What sophomore girl and junior
and I told myself a joke I had boy have got up a case? You
never heard before." drummers do be careful!
When will S. M. find out that
ANSWERED a certain St. Joe boy is just hand-
"I don't suppose you don't know ing her a line?
of nobody what don't want to hire Will E. H. ever be satisfied
nobody to do nothing, don't you?" with having just one girl and not
"Yes, I don't." Ithree or four?


Lilies Easy to Grow

From Fall Planting


The notion that lilies are hard to
grow has small basis in fact. Quite
the reverse is true in the case of
most varieties. There are many
which can be set out this fall with
almost complete assurance of beau-
tiful blooms next year.
Plant in a well-drained location
which is shaded from the hottest
sun. Shrub or hardy plant borders
are excellent situations, and fur-
nish good backgrounds for the
lilies' beauty.
Most of the lilies need deep plant-
ing. Six inches is about right for
most of them, but the Madonnas
need only 2 or 3 inches of soil above
them.
A balanced plant food is fine, and
some varieties will need additional
spring applications. Use 1 pint
to a bushel of soil. Spade your bed
deeply before setting out the bulbs.
If you think the ground will be
frozen before the bulbs arrive, give
the bed a mulch of leaves or straw
to keep it from freezing until you
can get the bulbs in.
Many lilies blossom in midsum-
mer when there is a natural let-
down in garden color, and the lilies
are more than welcome. We find
ourselves admiring and depending
upon them well into September.
Regal lily, a queen of lilies, should
be in every garden, where its gor-
geous pink striped flowers with
golden throats are unsurpassed for
beauty.
Here is a list of ten easily grown
lilies: L. candidum, the Madonna


otherwise qualified according to
Law are entitled to vote at said
election. It is determined that ten
mills will be necessary to maintain
a uniform system of free schools
within said District.
The Inspectors are: Sam Hus-
band, Mrs. Zola Maddox, Mrs.
Neta Brandon. The Clerk is George
M. Johnson.
By order of the Board of Pub-
lic Instruction of Gulf County,
Florida, this 3rd day of October


Lilium Rubrum, One of the Best
Garden Varieties.

lily, formerly grown by florists as
the Easter lily; L. regale, the royal
lily, white with pink markings; L.
speciosum, a Japanese variety of
which two varieties are common,
rubrum, white marked with rose,
and album, all white; L. henryii,
known as the yellow speciosum;
L. tigrinum, var. splendens, the
tiger lily; L. tenuifolium, the coral
lily of Siberia; L. auratum, the
Japanese gold-banded lily; L. ele-
gans, showy Japanese lily, includ-
ing red and yellow; L. testaceum,
fragrant buff-colored flowers grow-
ing 3 feet high; L. martagon, purple
flowers spotted with black,


A. D. 1939.
Attest: THOSE. MERIWETHER
C. L. COSTIN Chairman.
County Superintendent. 11-3

Prospective Employer: "Do you
think you know enough to be use-
ful in this office?"
Miss Smithers: "Know enough
Why, I left my last place because
the boss said I knew too much!"


The Low Down
from

Willis Swamp


Editor The Star:
Well, Mr. Editor, as long as youI
bigger my letters a re worth
printin' I reckon I can keep right
on writing' 'em.
You know, up to now I been
lettin' someone else but me worry
about these taxes and deficits and
such truck. Never seemed very
much of my business, if any, but
I guess I been asleep at the switch
as you might say.
But I'm sure getting' woke up
with a bang here lately. Mrs. Jo,
she came back from Griffin's gro-
cery store the other day and she
says, looky here, Josephus, you'll
have to pony up .some more change
if the Sunday dinner is to ne mucn
more than a shadow. And say, did
that bring me outa my coma!
Somebody has been toolin' me
about who pays the taxes and ex-
penses of all these things we been
told was gonna make everything
tiptop for everybody. I can see
now that it's been ballyhoo that 2
been listening' to. When they com-
mence to fumble around in the
pockets of my old jeans, I com-
mence to savvy.
Maybe if I get woke up enough
I'll do .something about it, except
just squawk. I guess I'll write *em
a postcard up there in Washing-
ton, and I'll drop 'em a hint that
I'm getting' registered for the 1949
election.
Yours, with the low-down,
JO SERRA.


FAVORITE

RECIPES

VEAL SOUFFLE
4 tblsps. butter 2 tblsp. chopped
5 tblsps. flour celery
1/z cups milk %/ tsp. pepper
1A tsp. salt 2 cups chopped
1 tsp. chopped cooked veal
onions 4 egg yolks
1 tblsp. chopped 4 egg whites,
parsley beaten
Melt the butter, add the flour.
When mixed, pour in milk and
cook until a creamy sauce forms.
Stir constantly. Add the season-
ings, veal (or other meat) and egg
yolks. C6ok 2 minutes and beat
thoroughly. Fold in the whites and
pour into a buttered baking dish
or pan. Bake one hour in a pan or
hot water in a slow oven. Serve
in the dish or unmold.

ROAST DUCK
2 ducks 2 tblsps. flour
1 tsp. salt 1 cup boiling
1/ tsp. paprika water
Carefully clean the ducks. Place
an onion and an apple inside oz
each (they will give flavor while
cooking-discard them when the
ducks are ,served).
Sprinkle with seasonings an4
flour. Place, breast .side up, in a
roaster. Bake 15 minutes, uncover-
ed, in a hot oven. Lower heat.
Add the water and bake 20 min-
utes per pound. Baste often.
During last half hour, baste
three times with half a cup of
orange juice and two tablespoons
lemon juice.
----j^------
Male guinea pigs are known as
bears and females' as sows.


HOPED FOR THE BEST
A darkey was ambling down
Monument avenue the other eve.
ning, hugging a pint of gin in his
inside coat pocket. A car crashed
into him and threw him into the
ditch. Picking himself up, the
darkey appeared unhurt, but a
warm, moist feeling under his
coat, caused a ruerul expression
to cover his face.
"Lawsy me," he said, "Ah shore
hopes dats blood!"
------
American clays can be used for
ceramic wares as attractive and
as sturdy as imported varieties,
judging by government tests.


We have the

EXCLUSIVE

AGENCY

for



Bruce's



Juices

ORANGE
GRAPEFRUIT
TOMATO

We Deliver

On Order



SOLOMON'S


DAIRY

SIVEY VANLANDINGHAM
Local Representative
1- ..,A -- -.-- -A


Do You Lie Awake Nights?
MILLIONS do. The worst of
it is, you never know when
a sleepless night is coming.
Why not be prepared?
DR. MILES
Effervescent Nervine Tablets
help to quiet the nerves and
permit refreshing sleep.
Stop in at the drug store to-
day and get a package.
Try Dr. Miles Nervine Tab-
lets for Nervousness, Sleep-
lessness due to Nervousness,
Nervous Headache, Excita-
bility, Nervous Irritability.
Small Package 35 .
Large Package 750
The large package is
more economical.


MOV ING?

We have the sub-agency for the

MAYFLOWER VAN LINES
and can move your furniture any place in the
United States, Canada or Mexico.
Full Insurance Carried At All Times


'Red' Horton's Transfer
PHONE 70 PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
. "


THE STAR, PORT ST.- JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1939


PAGE THREE









E TE S P T S O


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla.,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered- as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
undel- Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year........$2.00 Six Months......$1.00
Three Months..........65c

--4 Telephone 51 )*.-

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

TODAY IS NAVY DAY
Today is Navy Day, and the European war
has given a deeper significance than ever be-
fore to the observance of the day that honors
the great American fighting fleet and the
great American, Theodore Roosevelt.
Our navy is our -first line of defense, and
on it rests the responsibility in these troubled
times of protecting our shores against in-
vasion, and our rights everywhere against
outrage. '...
Today it falls in a year that will forever
mark in history the beginning of a tragic
cataclysm-a world in arms, the end of which
no man can see. This catastrophe may termi-
nate a way of life for us as well as for all'
belligerents, for it is a holocaust that will af-
fect in one way or another all the citizens
of our country, yet with a world on fire, we
should be truly thankful that we are at peace.
May we remain so with honor.
Throughout the war now in progress, we
hope to maintain this peace. We trust that
belligerents will refrain from restraint of our
legitimate overseas trade. Navy patrol ships
today are on far-flung lines in order tq learn
what is going on in American waters-it is
for that duty our ships are.there. This patrol
is maintained in the interest of strict neu-
trality.
Unfortunately, some nations recognize no,
other argument but force. This compels us'
to face a realistic condition, and that is, that
force must at times be met with force .or
threats of force. This last resort has now
been reached in Europe. The exact outcome
,of the present great war is by no means cer-
tain. There are many dark days ahead. We
must keep our faces straight, our lips closed
and our powder dry, for only thereby will we
preserve a strict neutrality.
We hope to succeed. Should a national
emergency arise, the navy can be depended
upon to carry on in the best traditions of its
proud history and on short notice take its
position on far-flung offensive stations in or-
der to guard our sea frontiers-frontiers that
protect a land that Abraham Lincoln called
"the last great hope on earth."

COE CHANGES TUNE
Speaking before the Belle Glade Rotary
club on September 29, Charles Francis Coe
of Palm Beach, candidate for Senator Charles
O. Andrews' seat in the senate, said: "Of all
the political nit-wits in America, the voters
sifted out the third-rate thinkers and parked
them in the 48 state legislatures." Which
seemed to indicate that Mr. Coe thought very
little of the intelligence of the average citi-
zen.
Last Monday, in speaking before the
Palm Beach County Democratic Women's
club, the gangster story author apparently
endeavored to smooth over his previous rash
remarks by saying: "The highest standard
of intelligence on earth is the standard of the
American citizen. The keenest spiritual ap-
preciation of democracy reposes in the
American citizen. The most truly patriotic
consecration is inherent in the American citi-
zen."

It's easy to fix the blame for an auto acct-
dent, but fixing the car is something else.


HALLOWE'EN
It is difficult for storekeepers in Port St.
Joe, at this time of the year, to remain op-
timistic and say that Hallowe'en encourages
the soap industry. The man who has to wipe
off the smudged panes may be pardoned if
his "sense of humor" is slightly dislocated,
and the one who has to search the neighbor-
hood for missing garden tools, or the prov-
erbial gate, may not be expected to console
himself with thoughts that this occasion
dates back from the ancients and is estab-
lished tradition.
Boys, thinking up mischief Tuesday night,
may hold the idea they are original when, as
a matter of fact, they are harking back to
the traditions established centuries ago. It is
a marvel that the rougher Hallowe'en, with
the police and parental discouragement, has
survived, though in the masking, the candle
lights and the weird games, there may be
that which speaks for perpetuation.
The Druids, who served our Celtic ances-
tors as priests and bards, kept fires burning
during this festival in thanksgiving to the
sun-god for the harvest. October 31, in parts
of Ireland, is still "The Vigil of Saman" or
,Oidhche Shamhna. Saman was the lord of
death during pagan times, and on this oc-
casion called together the souls of transgres-
sors for punishment.
Perhaps the Roman festival of Pomona
had its influence, for that harvest feast was
symbolized by nuts and apples-the fruits of
autumn. Apple ducking, which is still a habit
in the celebration of Hallowe'en, has been
characteristic of the festival since ancient
times.
With the lessening of the celebration of All
Saints Day and in fact its entire obliteration
as a holiday in many places, Hallowe'en has
continued to grow in favor, because children
love the drama of mystery.
In this day and age it is not to be assumed
that police departments consider acts of van-
dalism those of witches or goblins. They
'have a way of looking up the destruction ot
property on Hallowe'en as they regard it as
any other night. Boys and girls of Port St.
Joe, seized by the traditional urge to make
,merry next Tuesday night, are reminded that
'while it is all right to play innocent jokes,
it is dangerous to play havoc.

DON'T MAKE EMERGENCY PERMANENT
Dangerous precedents can be established
in the name of emergency, when steps may
be taken which can never be retraced.
Here in our country we are not at war-
but a "limited emergency" has been declared
by the president. Plans are being made for
extending the powers of government in
many directions, for the purpose of avowedly
protecting our interests. It is essential, if
democracy is to be preserved and we are to
escape the blight of totalitarianism, that the
people thoroughly understand the issues that
confront them, and analyze them in a spirit
of cool logic and not in a spirit of hysterical
emotionalism.
No fiat power should ever be placed in the
hands of a permanent government bureau or
department. If emergency laws must be en-
acted, they should be administered by purely
emergency bureaus, which will automatically
dissolve when the emergency is over. Every
conceivable protection must be established in
advance to make certain that the temporary
be stopped from becoming the permanent.
When it is asked that congress give the
government a tighter check-rein on liberty,
the lawmakers should make haste exceeding
slow.

A new dust storm is sweeping the nation-
war dust. When the cloud lifts and the rains
come, the people who failed to keep the dust
out of their eyes are likely to find some
rather modernistic and startling structures
erected under its cover in the name of na-
tional defense.

It is being asserted in various quarters that
Germany, Russia and Great Britain all sank
the Athenia. Maybe it was the Swiss navy.


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1939


FIRST THINGS FIRST


Too Late to Classify
By RUSSELL KAY


And now It seems that a lot
of folks are all stewed up over
Thanksgivin' and when to observe
it. The football boys are just na-
turally running' round in circle
trying' to determine when to sche-,
ule the Thanksgivln' Day game.
The Army and Navy teams, beln*
more or less federal, will probably
have to play their Thanksgivin'
game November 23, while Florida,
bein' a state Institution, will have
to play theirs November 30.
The banks, to be on the safe
side, will observe both November
23 and 30. The postoffice wll!
close on the 23rd and remain open
on the 30th. Newspapers con-
siderin' a Thanksgiving Day edi-
tion are in a tough spot-no mat-
ter which day they decide on, it
will be wrong to some of their
subscribers.
Farmers, poultrymen and. butch-
ers are bitin' their finger nails
and running' their hands through
their hair wondering' which day to
make plans for and whether folks
are gonna eat turkey two weeks
running' or become so fed up witt
the whole mess that they'll quit
worryin' and mix up a mess or
beef stew.
It has occurred to. some folks
that if we can up and change the
date of Thanksgivln' after all
these years, why most anything
can happen, and they are afraid
o pick up the morning' paper for
fear they'll find that Independence
Day has been changed to Decem-
ber 25, while Christmas will be
celebrated the first Monday in
September.
Uncle Fred Cone told us he was
100 per cent for Roosevelt, but
lust the same the old, boy ain't
lettin' nobody mislead him into
getting' thankful a whole week
ahead of time. Some timid souls
are worried for they are afraid if
they don't observe the 23rd they
will be considered Conservatives
or Republicans, or something At
the same time, in the face of
Brother Fred's Official Proclama-
tion, they can't very well ignore
the 30th. Of course if a guy likes
holidays and turkey he can go
ahead and take two Thursdays
off and give a couple of gobbler
dinners a good home, only it just
don't seem to make sense, and on
top of that is more or less expen-
sive.
Even the preachers are upset. i
asked one the other day what he
proposed to do about his Thanks-
givin' service, and it seems his
congregation is pretty much 'di-
vided on the issue, and he was


downright worried. He said he
guessed the only thing, he- could
do was follow the scriptures in
such a case and render unto
Roosevelt the things that were
Roosevelt's and unto Cone the
things that were Cone's. He just
naturally ain't takin .no chances
and is working' up two Thanks-
givin' sermons.
If you ask me, the whole thing
is screwy. As far as I can see, we
were getting' along very well ob-
servin' the' last Thursday in No-
vember, and if we'd just gone on
doln' it and left well enough alone
everything would have been all
right. But now we've started a
controversy that will get worse
from year to year and -the first
thing we know some screwball
will be finding' fault with a lot of
other holidays and be starting' a
movement to have 'em changed to
suit his own particular fancy.
The wife thinks it would be
grand to have Easter Sunday next
week so she would have a legiti-
mate excuse..to -go hog wild and
buy a mess of new clothes, and a
Legionnaire friend of mine thinks
it would be a good idea if we
would celebrate Armistice Day on
April Fool's Day, which would be
a lot more practical considering'
how "safe for democracy" the
world, wasn't made by the last so-
called "War to End Wars."
One of our local merchants de-
fendin' Mr. Roosevelt, .says -the
reason the date was changed this;
year is because Thanksgivin' can..
too close to Christmas, and i:j
putting' 'em further apart it gavel
folks a chance to kind of have a
breathing' spell in between ans
would make business a lot better
and that all the merchants werb
strong for it.
Well, maybe I'm crazy, but youth
know I always had a foolish no-
tion that the big idea behind the
whole thing was to provide the
people of this nation an opportun-
ity to stop and take stock of their
blessings and sort or count their
change and give honest and sin-
cere thanks to their Creator. But
it seems that this is old-fashionea.
Now it has developed into a hard-
boiled commercial proposition like
Christmas, and there ain't no
sense in stickin' to the last Thurs-
day in November if by movin' it
un a week or so we can give the
old cash register a little more ex-
ercise.
'Well, I don't know about you,
but for my part, I'm gonna be
plenty THANKFUL every day in
the year that I'm an American
and privileged to enjoy all the
blessings and advantages that that
implies.

Trade at home-your local mer-
chants have just what you want.


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE FOUR









FRDY OCOE 27 193 TH STAR, POTS.JE UFCUNY LRD AEF


r Mrs. H. H. Saunders spent FrI-
day in Dothan, Ala. Miss Kath-
leen Saunders, student at a Do-
than business college, returnee
with her to spend the week-end.

The Misses Lila and Brownie
Carter spent the week-end in
Thomasville, Ga.

A dormouse makes three kinds
of nests: One for shelter, one for
a nursery, and one for hiberna-
tion.

HAVE YOU TRIED
LeHARDY'S PINK TIP
COLD CAPSULES
Hundreds have tried them and
recommend them highly
Unconditionally Guaranteed



DR. J. C. COE
DENTIST -
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin Bldg. Port St. Joe


EYES EXAMINED


Glasses fitted when needed
Made In Our Own Laboratory
All Work Unconditionally.,
Guaranteed
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 6 p. m.

DR. G. T. NEWBERRY
OPTOMETRIST
PANAMA CITY, FLA.


ERASE the DOUBT
About Your
FRESH WATER FISHING

MIDWAY PARK
Is In the HEART of the
Dead Lakes Fishing Area
Gulf County's north line cuts
the Dead Lakes at the
waistline
Meet Your Friends At
MIDWAY PARK
FURNISHED CABINS
On the Waterfront
J. H. SHOEMAKER, Prop.
Postoffice Address
WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA


For Your

PROTECTION

Our special filtering process
and quick-freeze method as-
sures you ice that REALLY
is pure! It protects your food
therefore it protects you.
There is no substitute for the
value of REAL Ice.
THE WELL-INFORMED
USE ICE
Deliveries by Phone
or Regular Route

PHONE 47
---o----

ST. JOE ICE

COMPANY
MAX KILBOURN, Prop.


AT PORT SPOOK SHOW


Robert Wilcox and Lorna Gray
are a very frightened pair of
lovers in the new Boris Karloff
horror film, "The Man They
Could Not Hang," playing Tues-
day night at the Port theater's
Hallowe'en "Spook Show.'"


PERSONALS

Mrs. B. P. Meyers has returned
to her home in Brunswick, Ga.,
following a ten-day visit here with
her brother-in-law and sister, Mr.
and Mrs. J. C. Bradbury.

Mrs. L. G. Sutton and children
returned, to the city Sunday from


Tuscaloosa
called by
mother.

Mrs. W.
B. Larkin
tondale.


Ala., where they were
the illness of her


S. Smith and Mrs. M.
spent Monday in Cot-


Mrs. R. Coburn and Mrs. C. A.
LeHardy spent Wednesday in Cot-
tondale.

Mrs. O. L. McCranie of Valdosta,
Ga., was the guest last week or
Mrs. Sally Montgomery.

Mrs. J. L. Temple and daughter,
Betty Jo, and Mrs. T. Thompson
spent Saturday and Sunday in
Mobile.

Miss Erline McClellan and Misa
Avaryee Collier spent Saturday hn
Tallahassee.

Rev. Glion Benson of Apalachi-
cola visited in this city Saturday.

Miss Amelia Schneider, student
at F. S. C. W., was the week-end
guest of her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
T. M. Schneider.

W. E. Smith left last Wednesday-
for Angola, Ind., to return home
with his wife, who has spent thi
past two months in Angola wit'L
her mother. They will arrive the
latter part of this week.

H. H. Saunders left yesterday
for a several days' business trip
to Boston, Mass., and other north-
ern points.

Mrs. Elgin Bayless and sons, El-
gin, Jr., and Tommy, spent the
week-end in this city, guests of
Mrs. Nora Howard.

Mrs. Basil E. Kenney, Sr., spent
last Friday in Tallahassee attend-
ing the state Red Cross meeting.

B. A. Cogdill spent Saturday
and Sunday in Gainesville with
his family.

Mrs. M. B. Smith returned to
her home here Sunday following
a several weeks' visit in Head-
land, Hartford and Eufaula, Ala.
Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Graves anL
Mr. and Mrs. T. Jones and baby
of Headland accompanied her, re-
turning Sunday night to Headland.

Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Gibson ex.
pect to leave this week-end for
Mobile to make their future home.


At the Churches

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev..J. W. Sisemore, Minister
9:45 a. m.-Sanday School.
11:00 a. m.-Morning Worship.
7:00 p. m.-B. Y. P. U.
8:00 p. m.-Preaching service.
W. M. U., Monday, 3:00 p. m.
Prayermeeting Wednesday, 7:30 p.
m. Teachers meeting, Thursday,
7:30 p. m.
ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Rev. E. T. Corbin, Pastor
Full-time services
10:15 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.-Preaching Service.
7:30 p. m.-Evangelistic service.
Prayermeeting every Wednesday
night.

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL
10:00 a. m.-Church School.
Services first and third Sunday
nights at 7:30.
Communion service fourth Sun-
day mornings at 7:30.

METHODIST CHURCH
D. E. Marietta, Minister
Services Every Sunday
10:00 a. m.-Churcn School.
11:00 a. m.-Morning worship.
7:30 p. =n.-Evening worship.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Rev. H. F. Beaty Minister
10:00 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.-Preaching service.
8:00 p. m., second and fourth
Sundays-Evening services.
Rev. Beaty will preach in We-
wahitchka the first Sunday night
at 7:30 o'clock, and in Liberty
county the third Sunday night.


Lodge Notices

Order of Eastern Star
Meets on second and fourth
iuesdays of each month in the
A:asonic hall, over postoffice. Visi-
lors who are members are cor-
dially invited to be present.
American Legion
Gulf County Post 116 meets the
first Monday of each month at
the Legion Hut.
Masonic Lodge
St. Joe Lodge 111 meets second
and fourth'Friday-nights at 8:30
o'clock in Masonic hall.



CLASSIFIED ADS

SITUATIONS WANTED

Situation wanted at once, in
Port St. Joe if possible, by
young man, 30, married, high
school education. Refernces
can be procured from former
employer. D. E. Malone,
P. O. Box 482, City. 3t
REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
SPECIAL PRICES ON LOTS are
being offered until Oct. 15 on
lots in Garden Crest Develop-
ment at White City by Rev. H.
F. Beaty. 9-15 10-6
TWO COTTAGES FOR SALE
Waterfront
Five rooms (two bedrooms) and
batht (complete). Front and back
porches screened. Electric lights
annd water.
$1450 EACH
TERMS-$200 down and balance
at $20 month. Interest at 5%
$1350 CASH
Lot Size 50 by 90 feet
FOR SALE-First 10 lots in Ben-
der Addition at 20% reduction.
Investigate this before buying!
J. L. KERR, Realtor
Port St. Joe, Florida
FOR RENT
"UN>FULNISHED 9'by 18-foet cab-
ins; ceiled overhead and sides;
good water; $4 month. Apply St.
Joe Lumber Co. 12j21tf
ROOMS FOR RENT
IF YOU have a room for rent,
why not place a classified adver-
tisement in i'he Star. The cost is
low and returns are gratifying. .
Try it today, tf


Through the generosity of G. A. has been presented to the library
Zabriskie of OrmondK Beach, a let- of the Florida Historical society.
ter signed by King Ferdinand an& The Spanish letter is perfectly
Queen Isabella of Spain in 1492, preserved and is protected by a
the same year that the expedition beautifully embossed leather case
of Columbus discovered America, lined, with silk.
L


qet /oul TCdap /


CUSTOMERS of Florida Power Corporation
will receive a coupon with their electric bill this
month entitling them to one 100-watt MAZDA
lamp bulb absolutely FREE. Just fill out the
coupon and take it to your Mazda Lamp Dealer or
to our nearest store and get your FREE bulb. We
hope you will use this Better Sight bulb as part
of your Fall Home Light Conditioning program.


LIGHT CONDITION

Your Home with MAZDA

BETTER SIGHT LAMPS

Here's a Suggestion-
1 100-watt lamp 15c
1 75-watt lamp 150
2 60-watt lamps 300
2 40-watt lamps 30e


All Six for Only--------90c

See Your Mazda Lamp Dealer


FLORIDA POWER

CORPORATION


DAY-TO-DAY ADVENTURES OF POPEYE,
JUDGE PUFFLE, ANNIE ROONEY, BLONDIE,
THEY'LL DO IT EVERY TIME, LAUGH-A-DAY


Full Week's Sequence In Addition, to Regular
16-Page Comic Weekly
IN EARLY EDITION ONLY

ATLANTA


SUNDAY AMERICAN


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1939 -


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE FIVr


ot


AW W


womi








PAGE SIX

RESOLUTION PASSED
BY LEGION POST ON
DEATH OF HARKINS

At a special called meeting of
Gulf County Post 116, American
Legion, Monday night, a resolu-
tion was adopted on the death of
A. D. "Pop" Harkins, former state'
commander of the Am'erican Le-
gion, who died in Greenwood as
the result of an automobile crash.
The symapthy of the post wai
extended to Mrs. Harkins and the
workof Mr. Harkins on behalf of
the Legion was mentioned.

DOUBLE FEATURES TO
BE SHOWN AT PORT

Introducing a new policy at the
Port theater and doing away with
the 10:30 Owl Show, Manager Roy
Williams announced yesterday
that until further notice the tNwo
feature pictures scheduled for Sat-
urdays will be shown all day at
the usual admission price.
,----,--(--------.
CARD OF THANKS
I wish to thank the many kind
friends for their aid and comfort
during the illness and passing of
my beloved wife, Clara. I know
that she joins me in these thanks
from her new home above.
Wm. F. Poehlew.


LET E~


CREECH


BROTHERS
REFRESH YOUR


WINTER


CLOTHING

A closet full of clothes is of
no value to you unless they
sae ready for instant use.
"To get the fullest enjoyment
out of the coming Fall and
Winter months and the full-
est use of 'your Fall and
-Winter clothes, have them
,cleaned today. .We have
t O e equipment and the ex-
perience to do a real job on
all items.... We treat each
fabric according to its own
special requirements and re-
turn it to you clean, fresh
and ready for instant wear.

S.. Look through you.
clothes today, then call us
for quick pickup and prompt
delivery. i i




Creech Brothers
TAILORS and CLEANERS

Phone 102 Monument Ave.
Port St. Joe, Fla.


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORiDA FRIDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1939


SGrapefruit Dons Hallowe'en Guise


HALLOWE'EN is the time for
high jinks, and Harlequin Salad
is the fairest of the fare at the
party. It's our old friend, grape-
fruit, In colorful masquerade at-
tired in a lemon gelatin domino
dotted with diced celery-a colorful
creation you make with the recipe
that follows.' ... tow ,
HAVE HARLEQUIN SALAD
:- ON HALLOWE'EN
As colorful as tae cosumes at
the party, Harlequin Salad is gay
refreshment for Hallowe'en. It's
grapefruit garbed in holiday style
and.rou unmask it with this recipe.


Harlequin Salad"
1 pkg. lemon fla- % teaspoon salt
vored gelatin 1%1 cups Florida
1 cup hot water grapefruit
Scup cold water sections
Scup grapefruit % cup dnely diced
juice celery
3 pimientos cut in diamond shape
Dissolve gelatin in hot water.
Add cold water, grapefruit juice and
sait, C.ill until it begis tg thick-
en; mix in the grapefruit sections
and celery,. -INace' We- diamond
shaped pimento in the bottom of
the i7old or arrange around' the
side. Put into six individual molds,
or into a one quart mold. Chill un-
til firm; unmold and garnish with
additional grapefruit sections, if de
sired. Serves 6.


FURTHER WPA PAVING ECLIPSE OF MOON
PROJECTS ARE SOUGHT' VISIBLE TONIGHT
,----- ,.1 ,- 6, -
(Continued from Page 1) If the skies are clear tonight, a
partial eclipse of the moon will
that would be open at all times be visible to residents of this se,
to the public for recreational pur- tion between 11:55 p. m. and 3:18
poses. a.m.
The matter of drug stores serv- Only one degree of the southern
Ing sandwiches and lunches with- extremity of the lunar body will
out securing a restaurant license glow with its usual brilliance at
also came up for discussion ana 1:35 a. m., the moment of maxi-
.as the city charter did. not In- mum eclipse.
clude the status of such establish- _mum eclipse.
ments, City Clerk M. P. Tomlln-
son was instructed to write the Father of Mrs. LeHardy
state hotel commission in regard Died Sunday In Georgia
to the matter.
A bill for something over $4000 W. A. Lindsey, father of Mrs.
from the Florida Housing corpora- C. A. LeHardy of this city, died
tion was presented to the board Sunday morning at his home In
for services rendered the city, and Valdosta, Ga. Funeral services
after considerable discussion it were held Monday afternoon in
was decided the bill was out of Adele, Ga. Mrs. LeHardy attended
line, as it was generally under- the funeral services, returning to
stood that services rendered, by her home here Tuesday.
the corporation to the city were 'Besides his daughter, Mrs. Le-
gratis and that the board had been Hardy of this city, Mr. Lindsey Is
so assured numerous times by of- survived by his widow and a son,
ficials of the corporation. The H. K. Lindsey of Lakeland, FIa.
clerk was instructed to so write --
the head of the corporation. C. A. LeHardy Takes Over
The matter of laying sewer lines Princess Beauty Shoppe
by the city in certain instances C. A. LeHardy, owner of Le-
was brought up, and it was the yesterday pur-
Hardy's Pharmacy, yesterday pur-
general opinion of the board that chased the Princess Beatuy Shop,
all such Hlnes and connections
located on Reid avenue, from Mrs.
should be paid for by the prop- J. R. Giibson, and will continue
erty owners, as has been the cus- its operation at the same location
tom, as the city was not able to Mr. LeHardy has many plans for
afford such expense, particularly improvement of the beauty shop,
where the property was unde- including installation of another
veloped. chair and new equipment, include,
g--
ing a water softener.
Success in turning helium gas _____
into a liquid was first announced CHICKEN SUPPER AT
in 1908 by a Dutch scientist. MONDAY LEGION MEE1


Harold C. Palmer

for CITY COMMISSIONER
A PROGRESSIVE COMMISSIONER FOR A CITY
OF OPPORTUNITY
If elected I promise to give a fair and impartial ad-
ministration and will conduct the duties of the office
to the best interests of ALL the people.
Your Vote and Influence Will Be Greatly Appreciated
SPORT ST. JOE CITY ELECTION 'TUES., FEB. 13


A chicken supper with all the
trimmin's will be served Monday
night at the regular meeting of
Gulf County Post 116, American
Legion, at the hut. Guests will be
members of the Auxiliary and the
School Boy Patrol. All members
are urged to be present.
______-Ic
SAVE SCHOONER CREW
The Cuban schooner Postera
Ballon, waterlogged and sinking
about 40 miles northwest of Dry
Tortugas, was sighted last week
by the steamer Hastings out of
Pensacola. Eleven half- starved
sailors were taken from the ship


State Highway

Patrol Will Be

Well Trained

Major Henry Kirkman Is Captain
In Charge of Operations
Of the Patrol

When Florida's new highway
patrol goes into active service the
first part of December, the state
will have a small but well trainee
group of men protecting public
safety under the leadership of ef-
ficient and capable officers.
The cream of about 4000 appi-
cants for the patrol will comprise
the force of 30 to be sent to
Bradenton for a month's intensive
training under instructors assigned
by the national Red Cross, federal
bureau of investigation, national
safety council, state department
of education, attorney general's or-
fice and other agencies.
The sound business training of
W. F. Reid of Lakeland, appointed
director of the safety department ,
assures the public that the busi-
ness policies insisted upon by Gov-
ernor Cone in all departments di-
rectly under his control will be
carried out.
The appointment of Major Henry


Neil Kirkman as captain in charge
of the highway operations of the
patrol is one which will inspire'
confidence of the public in the e:-
ficiency of the patrol and will
give the patrolmen a leadership
which will command their respect.
Major Kirkman is an engineer
of wide experience. His military
career began with enlistment in
the U. S. army in 1917, and he
was relivede from active duty in
1936.
On July 1, 1936, Major Kirkmaa
was appointed head of the Flor-
ida state highway patrol and has
served in this capacity until the
ores'ent date. He spent the sum-
mer of 1938 with the New Yort
state police, studying the system
used by this organization in prep-
aration for organization of the
Florida patrol.

FSA TO FINANCE LOANS
At the request of Senators{
Claude Pepper and Charles O. An-
drews, and Representative Millardi
Caldwell, the Farm Securities Ad-
ministration has agreed to finance,
seed and fertilizer loans for tarm-
ers in the seven westernmost
Florida counties which suffered!
severe crop damage by summer
rains.
Read the ads--it pays!
R t a a
Read the ads--it pays!


BUY IT IN


PORT ST. JOE



The Things You Need

for Your Family, Home

S. '. and Comfort!

Your purchasing power spent with Port St. Joe
merchants can be of real service to this community.

Business is coming back. Gains in retail sales are be-
ing reported in Port St. Joe and all Florida. Figures
show that sales increased 20.6 per cent in Florida during
the first six months of 1939 over the same period in 1938.
There are many men and women in Port St. Joe re-
ceiving a fair income who can be of tremendous help in
boosting business in Port St. Joe. All they need to do
is to buy the things they need and can afford. This does
not mean that they have to be extravagant, wasteful or
reckless. It simply means buying in a normal and na-
tural way.
Perhaps you have hesitated to buy the things you^
need. You are doing a real service to this community:
when you purchase the things you can afford to buy,
large or small, right here in Port St. Joe.
Buy a new dress, a new pair of shoes, a new suit, a
radio, a new refrigerator, furniture for the home, or a
new car. Your action helps to give work and wages to
others. Plan now to have the house repainted,
rooms papered, roof fixed. You will directly assist de-
serving workmen and dealers in this community.
Read the columns of The Star and you will find splen-
did opportunities to make advantageous purchases. It
pays to buy standard merchandise 'from your reliable
home town merchants. Don't send your money away tu
the mail order houses. Business revival will be speeded
up if persons right here in Port St. Joe will buy useful
necessary things from local business houses and spend aI
part of their money on home improvements.






THE STAR

"Your Home Town Newspaper"
Progressively Serving the People in Port St. Joe
and Surrounding Community

jg2p-


. and brought to Tampa.


T.HE STAR, PORT, ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1939