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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00054
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: October 20, 1939
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00054

Full Text





The Star-Florida's fastest grow-
ing little newspaper-dedicated to
the betterment and uptuilding of
the City of Port St Joe.


TAR


The Home Newspaper of Northwest Florida's Future Industrial Center


VOLUME III


PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY., FLORIDA, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1939


TH-I


_ ~-1


Coast Baptist St. Augustine
A j* 1Mayor Enters
Association In Mayor Enter
Governor Race

Annual Meet


-Lacal.Church Is Host to Represen
tatives From Three Counties
Making Up Association

Delegates from Biptist churches
in" Bay. Franklin and Gulf coun-
ties gathered at the local Baptist
church here Wednesday for the
fifth annual session of the North-
West Coast Baptist association.
The session was called- to order
at 10 o'clock Wednesday morning
by Rev. E. D. McDaniel, .modela-
tor, following which the de o-
S-tional was conducted by Rev.
Harvey Wages.
At this time .the program for
the conclave was outlined ana
new pastors and denominationall
-agents recognized.
Rev. J. W. Sisemore, pastor of
the local church, delivered the ad-
,dress of welcome,'which was rs-
sponded' to by Moderator McDan-
'iel, after which reports ol tne ex-
ecutive board and treasurer were
-received, committees appointed
-and an address delivered by the
i moderator.
Following the luncheon hour,
during which lunch was served in
the basement of the church by
the Woman's Missionary society,
-the afternoon session was opened
with the devotional by i;.V r. R
Garrott. Rev. J. W. Sisemort spoke
on "Present Day Evils"; B. T.
Brooks gave a report on the Bap-
tist children's home; T. M. Johns,
-manager of the home, delivered a
short talk; Rev. G. C. Williams
gave a report on "Christian Edu-
cation''; Ltrry Evans delivered a
short address, as did Rev. C. L
Wittenbarger; Mrs. H. A. Whit-
'ton. gave a report on literature,
and Dr. E. D. Solomon delivered
San address.
Wednesday evening was de-
.voted to the annual meeting of
(Continued on Page 6)


businesss Men's

_lAssn. In Meeting

'Many Matters Brought Up For
Bettering Business Condi-
tions In This City

Many matters of importance in
regard to bettering business con-
ditions in the city were brought
up for discussion at the meeting
of -the Port St. Joe Business Men's
association held Wednesday night
in the Legion hut.
The main point taken up was
the matter of ,extending credit
and collecting past due accounts.
These two matters will be gone
into further at a meeting called
by President C. A. LeHardy for
next Monday evening.
It is the general opinion o0
members of this recently-formed
organization that much has al-
ready been achieved through the
meetings and that much more can
and will be achieved at future
meetings.
".-.-C----
CONTRIBUTORS TO FUND
The following contributors havw.
been added to the rapidly-growing
fund for the purchase of a new fire
truck: Harlow & Miller, Hosford,
'25; Bull Steamshfp Line. $25; J.
SBright, Jacksonville, $25; Nick
o. -. $10: W. Soule, $10;
highland View,


Fraser Is First to Qualify as Car
didate; Issues Statement
Of Platform

W-alter B. Fraser, five time:
mayor of St. Augustine, announced
last Saturday that he would be a
candidate for governor, subject tc
the Democratic primaries nex
May, and qualified for the race b:
paying the, $375 qualifying fee t<
Secretary of State R. A. Gray a.
Tallahassee.
In announcing his candidacy ant
the planks of his platform, Frasev
said that "Florida is a land o
neglected opportunity," and I
elected he would exert every el
fort toward development of the
state's natural resources.
"I believe we should advertise
our attractions and opportunities,'
he added, "and I am confident the
solution to virtually all our cur
rent ills can be accomplished by
bringing more people, new bus!
-less and more money to the state
"This would be the.answer, not
only to the state's fiscal problem
but also to the individual's eco
nomic situation, and progress is
not necessarily expensive.
"In the course of my cam
paign," he concluded, "I will leave
no doubts in the minds of the peo
JPl pRf Florida as to the specific
means by which 1, propose toim-
prove our road system, health con
editions, better our educational fa
cilities and other parts of nmy pro


gram."


Sharks Are Now


Contenders for

Championship

Local Grid Team Continues Steam
Roller Tactics By Defeating
Carrabelle 16 to 7

Coach Tommy Owens' St Joe
Sharks went on the field last Frt-
day with the firm determination
to continue their unbeaten path to
a conference championship. Their
opponents, the Carrabelle Mullets,
also had some such hopes before
the game, but it didn't take th
local aggregation long to dispell
any such notions.
In the first quarter the Sharks
carried the ball to the 30-yard lini.
on a series of end runs, and then
Max Maddox made a beautiful run
for the first touchdown. Al Schnei-
der was called back to try for tht
extra points. His try for goal was
good, and the score was St. Joe
8, Carrabelle 0.
A few minutes later Carrabelle
fumbledon the kickoff and.Schnel-
der charged down the field and
covered the ball on Carrabelle's
(Continued on Page 6)
---------
LEGION POST SPONSORS
SHOW ON NOVEMBER 7
Co-operating with the Port the-
ater, Gulf County Post 11a, Ameri-
can Legion, is sponsoring a prc-
ture, "Tihe Eagle and the Hawk,"
on November 7, starring Carole
Lombard and Fredric March.
The Legion will derive a per-
centage on all tickets sold in ad-
vance of showing of the feature,
and the public is urged to pur-
chase their tickets from Legion-
naires and members of the Auxili-
P Y- 'a i i --.; .ai -s4iil.-


DISTRICT PRESIDENT


SHarold W. Gills, Mirianna, is
president of District 14 of the
e University of Florida Alumni as-
sociation. He represents the
e association in alumni, affairs in
Gulf, Holmes, Jackson, Wash-
ington, Calhoun and Bay coun-
-ties. He has the state's most
Y outstanding club in the Jackson
- county organization, but he is
Anxious to develop active alumni
9 clubs in the five other counties
Sof his district.
--


CITIZENS VISIT


STATE HOSPITAL

SGo Through Chattahoocee Insti-
tution After Attending State
C. of C. Directors Meet

A party of Port St. Joe citizens
consisting of Jack O'Keefe, C. A.
Tovey, "Doc" Corbin and J. L.
Kerr, attended the regular quar-
terly meeting of the Florida State
Chamber of Commerce board of
directors, of which Mr. Kerr is a
member, held Friday of last week
at the state hospital in Chatta-
hoochee.
Preceding the meeting tf the
directors a trip was made through
the hospital grounds, with the
place of honor in the motorcade
being given Port St. Joe. Dr. J.
H.,Therrell, superintendent of the
hospital, acted as guide to direc-
tors and guests on their tour of
the grounds and buildings.
The grounds are very extensive,
being three miles wide and flve
miles long, with a major portion
occupied by the many buildings or
which the hospital is composed.
It is very gratifying to learn that,
with nearly 5000 patients, no dis-
tinction in treatment is made be-
tween the charity inmates and
those whose care is paid for by
other than the state.
There are over 16,000 meals
served daily at the hospital, and
in serving this number of meals
there are over 48,000 pieces or
tableware used. The food required
is 1400 pounds of steak, 1000
pounds of bacon, 550 pounds of
black-eyed peas, 2500 pounds ot
potatoes, 125 pounds of coffee, 650
dozen eggs, 35 bushels of fresh
apples, 600 pounds of prunes,
4000 pounds of fresh turnips, 2000
pounds of fresh tomatoes, 800
pounds of cake, 15,000 light rolls
or biscuits and 200 gallons or
canned fruit for pies.
A special building is provides
for 26 desperate inmates, each
having killed one or more persons
before commitment to the hos-
pital.
The old fort built by General
Andrew Jackson. known as Fort
(Continued on Page 4)


Motorists Sub j e c t

To Arrest If Caught

Without License

County Judges Noti/ied to Issue
Cards Without Examination
Until Further Notice

Governor Fred Cone last weet;


notified Sheriff Byrd Parker, that


October 15 was the deadline for
motorists to secure drivers' li-
censes, stating that the people
have had ample time to purchase
licenses and that he did not in-
'end to extend the time.further.
The governor requested Sheriff
Parker to co-operate with County
Judge Thos. R. L. Carter and with
the motor vehicle department and
arrest any person found driving
without a license after October 1M.
He said he hated to take this aw-
tion, but due to the fact that funds
from the sale of drivers' licenses
are coming in so slowly, it would
be several months before he would
be able to set up the state road
patrol.
County Judge Carter was notb-
fied by D. W. Finley, motor, vehicle
commissioner, that contrary to re-
ports being circulated, it is not
necessary that an applicant for a
drivers' license be examined mere-
ly because he failed to secure his
license prior to October 1. He in-
structed Judge Carter to issue li-
censes to all *persons applying for
the same until further j~otice.
However, he t4vised the judge-
that persons not having licenses
after October 15 are subject to ar-
rest if apprehended while operat-
ing a motor vehicle on the high-
ways of the state. "..


Governor Sets

November 30 As

Thanksgiving

Disregards Action of President
Roosevedi In Proclaiming No-
vember 23 As Turkey Day

Those who have a hankering for
turkey should be able to get their
fill this year for a short time ago
President Roosevelt set the date
for Thanksgiving Day up a week,
naming November 23 as the date.
Now Governor Fred P. Cone this
week, disregarding the action of
the president, officially proclaimed
November 30 as the date on which
Florida will observe the holiday,
giving us two Thanksgiving Days
if we so desire.
The governor's proclamation fol-
lows:
PROCLA MAT ION
WHEREAS, from the earliest
days of our nation the American
people have set aside one full day
each year to give thanks to Al-
mighty God for the blessings they
have enjoyed; and 1
WHEREAS, we have reason to
(Continued on Page 5)
--_..--- x-----
PORT NEWS
S.S. Henry M. Dawes sailed last
Friday after discharging a cargo
of fuel oil for the St. Joe Paper
company.
S.S. Warrior, of the Waterman
Line, sailed Saturday after dis-
charging cargo of salt cake for the
St. Joe Paper company.
S.S. Florence Luckenbach, Gulf
Steamship company, sailed Wed- I
nesday with cargo of paper.
S.S. Jean of the Bull Line sailed t
Wednesday for Port Newark with e
cargo of paper and lumber. $


Bellows Head of


Red Cross Drive


For Gulf County

Local Chapter Chairman Says
Membership Drive Will Be
Greatest Since World War


Robert Bellows of this city was
elected chairman of the Gulf
County Chapter of the American
Red Cross held last week at the
Legion hut. J. R. Hunter of We-
wahitchka was named first vice-
chairman; E. H. Horton, Port St.
Joe, second vice-chairman; Lillian
Ferrell, Port St. Joe, secretary,
and Mrs. Robert Tapper, Port St.
Joe, treasurer.
Committee chairmen named by
Chairman Bellows were: Roll call,
Mrs. Basil E. Kenney, Sr., and dis-
aster relief chairman, J. L. Sharit.
Mr. Bellows stated that the Red
Cross is faced with a growing de-
mand for assistance to the stricken
populations of Europe's warring
nations and a need for strength-
ening its domestic operations and
that the membership campaign
this year will be the greatest since
the World' War.-'
"Prior to the outbreak of hostil.-
ties in Europe," Bellows said,
"the American Red. Cross planned
to appeal for a million more mem-
bers in an effort to strengthen i-t
services in this country. Wai-,
however, has" Idrat. i(l-..,. rv
,sponsibilities of the Red Cross to
a point where even greater mem-
bership support is needed to meet
the appeals from abroad, tnd I
have set the goal of the Gulf
County chapter at 400 members."
The success of the roll call this
year, which will continue through
November 11, will gauge me
amount of assistance the Amerf-
can Red Cross can give the sick
and injured of war, and the com-
fort that can be brought to refu-
gees and other non-combatants
fleeing the danger zones, Mr. Bel-
lows said.
Mrs. Beatrice Vines, field rep-
resentative of the Red Cross, was
present at the meeting and spoke
interestingly on problems con-
fronting the local chapter.


Vessel Brings

Refugees Here

S.S. Warrior Lands Eleven Pas-
sengers Who Had Fled
From War Zone

When the S.S. Warrior of thb
Waterman Line put in here last
Friday to discharge a cargo of
salt cake for the St. Joe Paper
company, she carried, in addition
to the cargo, eleven Americans
who had booked passage at -Ant-
werp, Belgium, to get away from
the European war zone.
The Warrior took 19 days to
make the Atlantic crossing, and
the passengers were grateful Iq-
deed to place foot on American
soil once more, far from the hor-
rors of 'war.
Among the passengers were sev-
(Continued on Page 6)
------------
CHIEF OF POLICE TO BE AT
CITY HALL TO COLLECT TAX
Chief of Police Troy Jones will
be at the city hall from 1 until .
p. m. each day until October 29,
and from 1 until 5:30 p. m. on Oc-
tober 20 and 27 for the conven;-
once of those desiring to pay their
$2 street tax.


C


SPrt St. Joe-Site of the $7,500,000
SDuPont Paper Mill-Florida's fast-
est growing little city. .. In
the heart of the pine belt.





NUMBER 1












A W TI--E SA, U C LOI I OCTOBER 20. 1 93


LEGION AUXILIARY
LUNCHEON TUESDAY
Mrs. C. P. VanHorn presided at
the luncheon-meeting of the Amer
ican Legion Auxiiliary held Tues
day in the Legion hut from 12 un
til 2 o'clock. The hut and luncheon
table were attractively decorated
with blue vases of marigolds
carrying out the Auxiliary colors
Mrs. Annie Ryan Marks of Apa
lachicola gave an interesting talk
to the ladies on the work of the
Auxiliary. She was presented a
beautiful corsage.
The meeting was called for the
purpose of entertaining the state
president, Mrs. Daisy Whitehead
of Pensacola, and Mrs. Addie Har.
vey, third district vice-president,
but these two ladies were unable
to be present as planned.
Out-of-town guests were Mes-
dames Marks, L. E. Dees, T. E.
Auston, W. Schoelles, Joe Taranto,
C. E. Swank, J. M. McLaren and
Asa Warren, all of Apalachicola.

P..T. A. CARNIVAL FOR
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 28
The Parent-Teachers association
will sponsor a Hallowe'en carnival
on Saturday, October 28, to be
held on the vacant lot between
the Suwannee store and the office
of Dr. J. R. Norton on Reid ave-
nue.
A parade, led by the school band
will open the carnival, following
which the queen: will be crowned:
The contest for king and queen Is
being held at the schools, the boy
and girl receiving the most votes
being the winners.
After crowning of the queen, ai
amateur program will be pre-
seitted, -and anyone wishing tf
participate is asked to notify Mrs.
George McLahon, chairman of the
program committee.

FIREMEN AND WOMEN TO
HOLD HALLOWE'EN BALL
Co-operating with the Volunteer
Fire Department, the Port St. Joe
Woman's club will be joint spon-
sor with the fire ladies In stag-
ing a Hallowe'en masqueraCe ball
at the Centennial .auditorium on
October 31. All are urged to comrn
in costume to add to the festivi-
ties, but it is not compulsory.
Music for the occasion will be fur-
nished by Miss Bee Haven and
her Rhythm Boys of Fort Walton.

Miss Juanita Brock returned
Saturday to her home in Marianna
following a several weeks' visu
here as the guest of Mr. and' Mrs.
T. W. Davis. Mr. and Mrs. Davl
and family accompanied her home,
returning Sunday.


FLOWERS AND

CORSAGES


WOOD FIBRE FLOWERS
that cannot be told from the
best product of Mother Nature.
And they keep indefi-
nitely. If they become droopy
you merely place them in the
refrigerator and in a brief time
they are as good as new.
SEE

Mrs. W. S. Smith
STAR OFFICE PHONE 51


E


c
n


MANY MATTERS TAKEN UP
AT WOMAN'S CLUB MEET-NG
S The Port St. Joe Woman's club
- met Wednesday afternoon for the
Regular meeting in the club room
Sat. the Centennial building, with
i the vice-president, Mrs. Basil E.
I Kenney, Sr., officiating in the
, absence of the president.
SReports of various chairmen
- were given, Mrs. L. H. Bartee of
the citizenship committee stating
That the Ten Commandments and
the Bill of Rights are to be taught
in the public schools of the state
this year. Mrs. Robert Logan of
the welfare committee reported
that in co-operation with the wel-
fare committee of the P.-T. A. it
,had taken measurements of 19
underprivileged children and that
the federal sewing room is mak-
ing the necessary garments for
these children.
Mrs. J. L. Miller, as chairman
of the committee for co-sponsor.
ing 'the Hallowe'en dance witn tuie
firemen, reported on: the fine co-
operation shown by the firemen in
permitting 'the club to share in
this gala affair. Chief Troy Jones
presented plans for the dance to
the club and asked that membeil
be responsible for the selling ofr
tickets for the dance. He also re-
quested that the clul co-operate
with city o0flcials in protecting
the children from speeding motor-
ists by the' club members setting
the example for the public.
Mrs. Miller then appointed a
committee for decorating the cen-
tennial auditorium for the dance,
with Mrs. Fred Curtis as chair-
man, Mesdames J. L. Temple, E.C.
Lewis, H. W. Soule, Edwin Ran-
sey, George Patton, M. C. Ed-
wards, J. L. Sharit, M. K. Hurlbut,
and Basil E. Kenney, Jr., as as-
sistants. It was also voted that the
club sell sandwiches at the dance,
with Mesdames Robert 'Bellows,
B. W. Eells, D. C. Mahon and B.
E. Kenney, Jr., in charge.
Mrs. Kenney, Sr., brought be-
fore the club the benefits derived
from the Federation of Women's
clubs by reminding of the hard-
ships of the pioneer clubs before
they became united.
Mrs. Charles Brown was in
charge of the program on "Eauca-
tion.". Mrs. Fred Maddox gave a
talk on "Adult Education"; Mrs.
I
J. L. Temple presented an article
on "The Schools of Yesterday and
Today"; Mrs. Soule gave an ar- .
ticle on "Institutions of Higher
Learning"; Mrs. E. IH. Horton
spoke on "What the P.-T. A.
Means to Education," and Mrs.
Thomas McPhaul gave an Inter-


testing review of her trip to the
New York World's Fair.
Following adjournment a de-
lightful social hour was en]oyea,
with Mesdames Basil E. Kenney,
Jr., E. C. Lewis and H. W. Soule
as hostesses for the afternoon.

EPISCOPAL AUXILIARY
TO MEET IN THIS CITY
The district meeting of tile No-
man's Auxiliary of the EpIscopal
church will be held in this city
next Wednesday, October 26, at
the St. James parish. Services will
begin at 10 o'clock with B;snop
Frank Juhan of Jacksonville offi-
ciating. Luncheon will be served
at the Port Inn at 12 o'clock by
the Methodist Missionary society.

B. A. Cogdill spent Sunday in
Tallahassee, guest of his daughter,
Miss Ursa Cogdill, student at P.
S. C. W.

The many friends of Mrs. H. P.
3eaty regret to learn of her 111-
ness and wish for her a speedy
recovery.


DEMOCRACY PROGRAM
PLANNED BY P.-T. A.
"Democracy" will be the top
for the next Parent-Teachers a
rociation meeting to be held in th
high school auditorium ne:
Thursday evening, October 26,
8 o'clock. Mrs. E. H. Horton, th
president, is urging all member
to attend. Following is the pr
gram to be presented:
"America," sung by the assem
bly; "Democracy In Our Commui
ity," Mrs. J. J. Darcey; "How D
Schools Help Build and Maintal
Democracy," Mrs. J. L. Temple
"How Do Churches Benefit
Community," Mrs. E. C. Cason
"What Is the Place of the Hom
In Community Life of Our Pei
pie," Mrs. Thomas McPhaul; an
a poem, "My Land," by Katherin
Horton.

METHODIST MISSIONARY
CIRCLES IN MEETING
The Susannab:,Wesley and th
Marie Jones Circles of the Metl
odist Missionary society met Mo
day afternoon in the church witl
Mrs. Roy Gibson presiding. Th
following program was rendered
Song -service, responsive rea'i
ing, devotional, prayer' by Mnr
George Patton, missiooi study. Th
treasurer's report was given b.
Mrs. H.. C. Spence. A rising vole
of thanks was given Mrs. ThomiA
McPhaul for plates given for the
church kitchen.
.Final plans were made for the
luncheon: which' the missionary so
clety will serve for the Episcopa
Auxiliary next Wednesday, :Octo
ber 25, after which the' meeting
was adjourned.
MRS. BOUNDS AND MRS.
WARD ARE CO-HOSTESSES
Honoring Mrs. L. Gary and Mrs.
James Poston of Panama City and
Miss Marcelle Wetzell of Port Ar
thur, Texas, Mrs. Jim Bounds and
Mrs. Massey Ward entertained at
bridge Tuesday afternoon in the
home of Mrs. Ward on Garrison
avenue. Seasonal flowers added to
the attractiveness of the room
where two tables were in probe
press. Following tallying of scores,
prizes were awarded. A salad
course was served to the honorees
and Mesdames Roy Williams, E
Leavett and John Blount.
f -
EPISCOPAL CHURCHES
TO HOLD FISH FRY
The members of the St. James
parish of Port St. Joe and the St.
Andrews parish of St. Andrews
will hold a fish fry next Sunday
afternoon at Camp Weed, Beacon
Beach. There will be games on the
beach followed by the fish fry, and
it 6 o'clock vesper services In the
Chapel of thte Holy Cross. All
members are urged to attend.
There will be no services at the
It. James Episcopal church Sun-
ay evening.

UNIOR LEGION
AUXILIARY MEETS
The Junior Auxiliary of the
kmerican Legion Auxiliary met
ast evening at the home of Mrs.
ammie Davis. Plans were made
or a social to be held October 26
t the home of Mrs. Davis, the
irls inviting the Sons of the Le-
ion. Committees were appointed
nd following a short business dis-
ission the meeting adjourned.
*& *1 *1
USTER OWENS CELEBRATES
IGHTH BIRTHDAY
Honoring his son, Buster, Jr.,
ho celebrated his eighth birth-
ay, Buster Owens, Sr., enter-
.ined a number of little friends


at his home on Seventh street
Wednesday afternoon of last


w week. Ice cream and cake was
Rev. Frank Dearing of Panama served to about twenty youngsters
City was the week-end guest. f ho enjoyed this delightful affair
Mr. and Mrs. T. Owens. wit. i onoree.


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Society Personals Churches

LANETA DAVIS, Editor
V.


JUNIOR GIRLS' AUXILIARY ',T J'I
MEETS WITH SARA COSTIN---
The Junior Girls' Auxiliary of SATURDAY, OCT. 21
Sthe Baptist Missionary society met
STuesday afternoon with Sara to His trigger finger was the law!
Costin. Following an interesting His fists help enforce it
program," Climbing a Mountain,"
presented by the members, sand-
wiches and punch were served by H He stems
the young hostess to those pres- t la Itieness
ent. ..bill not
a r r LOVE'
MRS. A. D. LAWSON
ENTERTAINS J A.M. CLUB
The members of the J. A. Mi.
club were entertained at the St.
Joe Restaurant Monday night with a
Mrs. A. D. Lawson as the:r hos- .., ru.L t y
tess. An hour of sewing was en- oT
joyed, after which the hostess Chapter No. 3 of Serial Thrill
served delicious refreshments to "DICK TRACY RETURNS"
members present.
A p 'The Golden West' Cartoon
LATTIMORE-WILLIAMSON
Miss Marian Williamson of OWL SHOW SATURDAY
Akron, Ohio, and George Latt- 10:30 and 1:15 p. m.
urore of this city were married n and 1:15 m
Marianna ?ast Sunday with Judge RUN FOR YOUR LIVES!!
D. E. Oswald officiating. Mlsa Torchy is loose again with
Williamson arrived in Marianna an explosion of trouble, landing
from the north and was met by on a murderer's lap!
the groom. Immediately following
the ceremony the couple came to S
this city where they will be at ITH ANE ~YM'AN
home at Cogdill cottage on the I- JENKINSY
beach. *,, TOM KENNEDY
Mr. Lattimore has been em- II
oloyed by B. A. Cogdill & Bros., S
Swingsational Musical Comedy
contractors, for the past two years Yankee Doodle Home
"Yankee Doodle Home"
and has made many friends who
wish them much happiness.
Sr SUN.-MON., OCT. 22-23
Miss Avaryee Collier and Miss
Eva Meserve will spend the weec- Ginger Rogers
end in Tallahassee. While there
they will attend the Leon high- James Ellison
Port St. Joe high football game.
a ain -
Miss Louise Solomon and Misz
Juanita Gunn will leave today to FIT AVENUE
spend the week-end at their home F II T U
in Perry.

Mrs. Hoke Larkin of Bristol was
a week-end visitor in the city.


BAPTIST CIRCLES MEET Judge and Mrs. Thos. R. L. Car-
MONDAY AFTERNOON ter returned, to the city last Fri-
The Martha Circle of the Bap- day after several weeks spent in
tist Missionary society met Mon- Dothan, Ala.
day afternoon at the home of Mrs. *
M. J. Fillingim, with Mrs. J. O. Mr. and Mrs. Earl Walao and
Baggett presiding. The devotional son, Earl, Jr., were called to Pen-
was given, after which the rol- sacola Monday due to the illness
lowing officers were elected: Mrs. of Mrs. Waldo's brother.
W. H. Howell, .co-chairman; Mrs. ..",
C. G. Cosin, secretary and treas-
urer; Mrs. M. J. Fillingim, per-
sonal service; Mrs. Roy Williams, Sa
social and publicity; Mrs. W. L.
Durant, White Cross; Mrs. Wilbur THE PRICE THAT YOU
Wells, stewardship; Mrs. Kate EXPECTED TO PAY1
Harrell, coupon. Reports were re-
ceived, after which the meeting
adjourned.
Mrs. E. C. Cason entertained the
Mary Circle Monday afternoon at
her home on Third street. Reading
of the 23rd Psalm opened the
meeting, followed with prayer by
Mrs. O. F. Powell. The following
committees were appointed during
the business session: Mrs. Fre
Maddox, personal service; Mrs. 0.
F. Powell, entertainment. The
meeting was dismissed with
prayer after which the hostess
served refreshments to members
preeseit.
Members of the Lydia Circle Uo
were entertained 'Mrnday after- NEW AIR-CONDITIONED
noon at the home of Mrs. J. F. FIN-GRID REFRIGERATOU
Miller on Seventh street. MMrs.
Charles McClellan presiding arhi
appointed officers for'the coming Pay nuch le. than you'd
year and'the program for' the neKt. planned--e much morel The
meeting planned.: -The hostess :is 'yot
served delicious refreshments 'at :t~ionl b it ofJ ICE Ereigera-
the conclsio' n 6f the neetilng. .Ic! ,Plent: .eads talpfrelsha
S *; '.lo.icser; flafs-lods ete faed
MRS. RAMSEY HOSTESS foru:h covered diswl
TO BRIDGE CLUB ':.
Mrs. Ed'-in Ramsey was hostess
to the: Thursday Night Bridke ST JO E ICE
club last evening at her home on.
Long avenue. Vases of seasonal COM PAN Y
flowers were placed at vantage r
points in the living room whete
tables were placed for play. After .
several progressions, scores weire-
tallied and appropriate prizes
awarded. Delectable refreshments
were served by the hostess.
, *


PAGE TWO


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1939


T14., ITAR, -66`1-F COUNTY, FLORIDA









FRDY COE U 99TESAPR T OGL ONY LRD AE HE


LEGAL ADVERTISING


NOTICE ELECTION SPECIAL
TAX SCHOOL DISTRICT NO.
1, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Pursuant to Section 438 of the
Florida School Laws of 1939, No-
tice is hereby given that the next
regular biennial election in Spe-
cial Tax School District Number
One is called for Tuesday, the
7th day of November A. D. 1939,
at the County Court House in We-
wahitchka, Florida for the said
District to determine the rate of
rmillage to be assessed and col-
lected on the property therein
for the next ensuing two years,
and to elect three trustees for the
District for the next ensuing two
years. All qualified electors, resi-
dent within said District, who pay
a tax on real or personal prop-
erty and are otherwise qualified
according to Law are entitled to
vote at said election. It is deter-
mined that ten mills will be
necessary to maintain a uniform
system of free schools within said
District.
The Inspectors are: Mrs. D. A.
Nichols, Mrs. B. F. Britt'and J. A.
Barrington. The Clerk _is C. F.
Glen.
By order of the Board of Pub-
lic Instruction of Gulf County,
Florida, .this 3rd day of October
A. D. 1939.
Attest: THOSE. MERIWETHER
C. L. COSTIN Chairman.
County Superintendent. 11-3
NOTICE ELECTION SPECIAL
TAX SCHOOL DISTRICT NO.
11, .U'LF C01UNTY, FLORIDA.
Pursuant to Section 438 of the
Florida .School Laws of 1939, No-
tice is hereby given that the next
regular biennial election in Spe-
cial Tax .School District Numb'er
Eleven 'is called for Tuesday, the
7th day .of November A. D. 1939,
at the Overstreet School in Over-
street, Florida, for the said Dis-
trict to determine the rate of
village to 'be assessed and col-
-lected on 'the property therein
for the next ensuing two years,
and to elect three trustees for the
District for the next ensuing two
.years. All qualified electors, resi-
dent within -said District, who pay
:a tax on -real or personal prop-
.erty and are otherwise qualified
.according to Law are entitled to
-. vqte at saidaelectio.nAe, is.:deter-
mined -thait" 'fn-mtTff- -wIr be
-necessary *to maintain a uniform
system of free schools within said
District.
The Inspectors are: J. T. Kin-
-ard, F. B. Whitfield, F. L. Kemp.
The Clerk is Mrs. W. G. Hardy.
,By orler of the Board of Pub-
.lic Instruction of Gulf County,
Florida, this 3rd day of October
A. 'D. -1939.
Attest: THOSE. MERIWETHER
C. L. -COSTIN Chairman.
--Couity Superintendent. 11-3
NOTICE ELECTION SPECIAL
TAX SCHOOL DISTRICT NO.
13, GULF 'COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Pursuant to Section 438 of the
Florida School Laws of 1939, No-
tice is hereby given that the next
-regular biennial election in Spe-
cial Tax School District Number
Tihrteen is called for Tuesday, the
7th day of November A. D. 1939,
at the Buckhorn School for the said
District to, determine the rate of
tlIa ge-to be assessed and col-
lected on the property therein
for the next ensuing two years,
and to elect three trustees for the
District for the next ensuing two
years. All qualified electors, resi-
dent within said District, who pay
a takx on real or personal prop-
erty and are otherwise qualified
according to Law are entitled to
vote at said election. It is deter-
mined that ten mills will be
necessary to maintain a uniform
system of free schools within said
District.
The Inspectors are: Arthur
Jackson, W. T. Rowell, J. A. Bar-
field. The Clerk is C. F. Hanlon.
By order of the Board of Pub-
lic Instruction of Gulf County,
Florida, this 3rd day of October
A. D. 1939.
Attest: THOSE. MERIWETHER
C. L. COSTIN Chairman.
County Superintendent. 11-3


A THE TATTLER
THE STAFF
Editor-in-Chief... Dick Stepp
l,,' Asst. Editor...Max Maddox
Sports Editor..Joe Lilienfeld
Society Editor ...........
.......... Martha Hinson
Reporters ...... Florence
SFacone and Opal Greene
Joke Editors ........Paul
B-t Johnson and Al Schneider
Sees All, Knows, All, Tells All About Port St. Joe High School
""""" ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ "


Sharks Win From

Carrabelle 16 to 7

Players Promised Gainesville Trip
If Studies Up to Par

The St. Joe Sharks took the


Carralvelle Mullets
grid tussle on the
Friday afternoon.


16 to 7 in the
local field last
The invaders


put up a great fight, but is seems
they couldn't cross St. Joe's goal
line but once.
Coach Tom Owens made. only
one change during the whole game
when he substituted Billy Ham-
mock for Ed Hufft. The starting
lineup was: Max Maddox, left
half; Ed Hufft, right half; John
Lane, quarterback; Al Schneider,
left end; Phonzo Gilbert, right
end; Glenn Grimsley, center.
The coach has promised the
boys a trip to the home-coming
game in Gainesville, but he has
a string attached to It-they have
to be passing in all their studies
to go.
The band seemed to be a great
help at Friday's game. It seemed
that every time they started play-
ing, St. Joe would gain ground,
and when they stopped Carrabelle
would gain.
The team goes to Tallahassee
today to take on the highly-touted
Florida High aggregation. A win
today will virtually assure the St.
Joe team the conference cham-
pionship.

ANNOUNCE CANDIDATES
FOR STUDENT BODY
At last Friday's chapel pro-
gram, announcement was made of
candidates chosen for president
and vice-president for the student
body election to be held soon. For
the presidential chair we have Al
Schneider and P. K. Johnson,
while vice-presidential candidates
are Murnice Taunton and Jimmy
Weatherly.
The band concert for chapel
program was opened with "She'll
Be Coming 'Round the Mountain,"
and the second number was
"Home on the Range" with an un-
expected quartet consisting of
Max Maddox, Ed Hufft, Al Schnei-
der and Glenn Grimsley. Following
this the band swung out with
"Hail. Hail, the Gang's All Here."

HEAR TALK ON HOOKWORM
Tuesday morning the students
of the Port St. Joe schools were
honored to listed to Dr. Carter In
an 'interesting talk on the hook-
worm disease. The doctor stressed
the points of how one catches
hookworm, where the hookworms
dwell, and treatment.
It will be advisable for all of us
to keep in mind the lecture which
was brought to us by Dr. Carter.

He: "You know, John Stokow-


ski played irianKue ejuumo '
NOTICE ELECTION SPECIAL four hours."
TAX SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. o h nothing My boy
16, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. She: "That's nothing. y
_fi l. e. rm "T~he Stars and


EDITORIAL
Why Don't They Teach THIS
And THAT?
Some of our citizens in Port St.
Joe cannot seem to realize that
this is a small growing town and
that our schools cannot possibly
be given as many elective sub-
jects as the schools having 700 to
1000 students.
There has been some "kick'
about not teaching this subject ana
that subject, but it must be re-
membered that in order to have a
standard class there has to be at
least 10 pupils to a class, not any
less than that number. The state
doesn't supply teachers enough to
instruct three or four students
alone. So you can readily see why
there are but a few elective sub-
jects being taught.
Another thing that seems to be
bothering some parents is whether
or not this is an accredited high
school. To which we answer that
the high school of Port St. Joe IS
an accredited school, approved by
the state board of education. Ru-
mors that have been circulating
is just misinformation that has
been picked up somewhere.
So, parents, students and all
citizens, instead of spreading all
these untrue things and complaln-
ing about our schools, let's be
loyal and help improve it all we
can. Buck up and be yourselves!

AL SCHNEIDER ELECTED
PRESIDENT OF SENIORS
The senior class met Tuesday
morning for the purpose of elect-
ing class officers, and Al Schnel-
der was elected, as president;
Opal Greene, vice-president; Mary
Guertin, secretary and treasurer,
and Margie Kirkland, class repre-
sentative to student council.
A king and queen were also
selected for the Hallowe'en carni-
vat, being Max Maddox hnd Mar-
tha Hinson.

WE WONDER
Wh took D. T. home from the
dance Friday night?
Who the champion gum chewer
is this year? S. M., we believe.
What certain sophomore girn
was having a BIG time Friday
night?
If Al S. will ever keep his feet
still during third period study
hall?
What sophomore girl was mad
about her name being in The
Tattler?
If the senior class will ever be
granted any privileges?
What senior boy said "that in
order to become a king you have
to know how to sip tea"?
Who the queen of the carnival
will be?
Why Max is so anxious for the
game with Tallahassee today?
Who M. T. and M. H. were with
Sunday night?
If O. G. will ever stop going
with C. B. C.?
What study hall is deaf and
dumb?


Pursuant to Section 438 of the Lu" i.. I. -. 1.
Florida School Laws of 1939, No- Stripes Forever'."
tice is hereby given that the next A man charged with first degree
regular biennial election in Spe- Law are entitled to vote at said murder and who had no funds to
cial Tax School District Number election. It is determined that ten retain counsel had a lawyer ap-
Sixteen is called for Tuesday, the mills will be necessary to maintain the court to defend
7th day of November A. D. 1939, a uniform system of free schools pointed by the court to defend
at the City HIall, Port St. Joe, within said District. him.
Florida, for the said District to The Inspectors are: Sam Hus- "Do you think I'll have justice
determine the rate of millage to band, Mrs. Zola Maddox, Mrs. done me?" he asked.
be assessed and collected on the Neta Brandon. The Clerk is George "I don't think so," replied the
property therein for the next en- M. Johnson.
suing two years, and to elect By order of the Board of Pub- lawyer, "I see two men on the
three trustees for the District for itc Instruction of Gulf County, jury who are opposed to hang-
the next ensuing two years. All Florida, this 3rd day of October ing."
qualified electors, resident within A. D. 1939.
said District, who pay a tax on Attest: THOS. MERIWETHER
realo--r: property and are C. L. COSTIN Chairman. As they say in television, we'll
."'ed according to County Superintendent. 11-3 be seeing you soon.


__I_____~~___~T


4 tbsps. shorten-2 cups flour
ing 3 tsp. baking
2 eggs powder
%/ cup cream 2 tbsps. sugar
% cup raisins 1/ tsp salt
Mix and sift flour, sugar, salt,
and baking powder. Rub or cut in
shortening, add eggs well beaten,
cream and raisins. Pat and roll
one-half inch thick. Cut in rounds
or squares, brush with egg yolks,
sprinkle with granulated sugar anu
bake in hot oven (450 degrees) 12
minutes.
-----K-----
'HEALTH' TO BE MAIN TOPIC
AT REGIONAL P.-T. A. MEET

Health will be one of the main
topics discussed at the annual rb-
gional meeting of Parent-Teachers
associations to" be held in Apala-
chicola on November 2.
Among those expected to talk
on health subjects are Dr. Leigh
Robinson, president of the Florida
Medical association; Dr. A. B.
McCreary, state health officer;
Dr. Frank V. Chappell, director of
local health service and Dr. L. J.
Logie, director of tuberculosis
control, state board of health.., .I


FAVORITE

RECIPES


CHEESE-NOODLE RING
3 cups cooked 1 tsp. salt
noodles 1 cup milk
2 eggs or 4 1/ cup sliced
yolks cheese
1/4 tsp celery salt 1 tbsp. fat,
Y1 tsp. paprika melted
Mix the ingredients and pour
into buttered mold. Bake for 30
minutes in a pan of hot water in
moderately slow oven (325 de-
grees). Carefully unmold and sur-
round with sliced boiled eggs.

RAISIN SCONES


-- ----------- -


MOVING?

We have the sub-agency for the

MAYFLOWER VAN LINES
and can move your furniture any place in the
United States, Canada or Mexico.
Full Insurance Carried At All Times


'Red' Horton's Transfer
PHONE 70 PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
S------------------ ------- ---------- ---------


Prrom I LWua. T Un#
When you feel well. It is misery when you don't.
Have you ever dragged through a day made miserable
by a Headache, Neuralgia, Muscular Pains or Functional
Menstrual Pains-a day when only your sense of duty
kept you on the job?

Dr. Miles AnEi-Pain Pills
usually relieve Headaches. You will find them effective
also in the relief of the other nagging pains mentioned
above. Regular Package
package of these 25 Tablets, 250
A pacageEconomy Package
prompt acting pain re- 125 Tablets, $1.00
lievers may save you ~.'-
hours of suffering. Be
prepared. Have Dr. Miles .'
Anti-Pain Pills in the- U
house.


Tractor tires are being weather-
proofed to prevent rotting.


Got MALARIA?
If you have Malaria, you owe it
to yourself and your family to get
relief. All over the South-and in
21 foreign countries-Wintersmith's
Tonic is known as one of the oldest
and most reliable Malaria medicines
on the market. We believe you
will agree this is proof of quality.
For your own sake-won't you
TRY Wintersmith's-and see for
yourself?

WINTERSMITH'S

TONIC


We have the

EXCLUSIVE

AGENCY

for



Bruce's



Juices

0 ORANGE
GRAPEFRUIT
TOMATO

We Deliver

On Order



SOLOMON'S


DAIRY

IVEY VANLANDINGHAM
Local Representative
4 4


PAGE THREE


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2U, 1939


v-i- nnnale' for







PAGE FOU TJFo


THE STAR
Published Every Friday at Port St. Joe, Fla.,
by The Star Publishing Company
W. S. SMITH, Editor

Entered as Second-class matter, December 10,
1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe, Florida,
under Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription Invariably Payable In Advance
One Year.......ix ..... Six Months. $1.00
Three Months...........65c

-4.{ Telephone 51 3e--

The spoken word is given scant attention;
the printed word is thoughtfully weighed.
The spoken word barely asserts; the printed
word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word
is lost; the printed word remains.

PLANNED DICTATORSHIP


HAVE YOU HAD YOUR OYSTERS?
Oysters came in several weeks ago, to the
great joy of all gourmets-a fact that per-
haps we should have called to your attention
at that time. "In oyster dl.-i:, there is noth-
ing to fear; taste on the first day, you are
good for a year."
But if you have an unsatiable appetite for
the bivalves, don't let it worry you if you
didn't cat an oyster that first day of Septem-
ber, for "By chance the first day puts them
out of your power, eat double the quantity
every hour; the effect will assuredly prove
near the same, and cure every ill that the doc-
tors can name."
Of course, we know that oysters are not a
cure-all for disease-they are a food, and
what a. delectable food!
According to a lot of people around Port
St. Joe, the only way to eat an oyster is
right out of the shell, and that if anything


If anyone is still looking for a sound rea- is done to them it is merely "gilding the lily."
son for rigorously maintaining American neu- But in our opinion the best way to prepare
trality, all he need do is examine the plans oysters is in a stew.
now being made for expanding and changing Take two saucepans and into one put milk
the power and set-up of the federal govern- and the liquor from the oysters, using a cup
ment if we again go to war. and a half of rich milk for each dozen oys-
These plans apparently are about complete..ters. Place over a low flame to get hot, but
According to a review published in the Wasi- never boil. Place the other pan over a higher
ington Times-Herald, four great new di- flame and put in two tablespoons of butter,
visions of government are proposed. The a scant teaspoon of salt, a pinch of red pep-
first, "National Defense," would include all per and a half teaspoon of paprika.
military affairs and counter-espionage. The When this seasoning mixture is hot, pour
second, "Production," would include the ag- in the oysters and carefully watch them
ricultural department, the labor department frizzle for exactly one minute, and then, just
and social security, and would have sweeping as the edges are curling, add them to the hot
powers over the country's non-military man- milk mixture and serve at once. Float a
power. The third, "Construction and Trans, square of butter on a soup plate of the stew,
portation," would control federal public dust lightly with pepper and serve with hot
works, all communications, the power con- oyster crackers.
mission, the interstate commerce commis- That, to us, is oysters at their finest.
Ssion, the postoffice, and interior department.
The fourth, "Finance," would include the OUTLOOK FOR TRADE NOT SO BRIGHT
treasury department and other government There is one big catch in the cash-and-
fiscal bureaus, and would deal with banks, carry plan which would forbid American
trust institutions, insurance companies, etc. ships to transport cargoes, to belligerents
All of these divisions would be under the That catch lies in the fact that if cash-and
direct control of the president, who would carry is imposed, American ships can no
appoint their heads. The catch comes in the longer go to Australia, Canada, New Zealand,
plans for giving the proposed new divisions !the British West Indies-in brief, any num-
:authority. And, according to the news re- "ber of countries near or within this hem!-
ports, this authority would be virtually un- sphere. These countries are part of the al-
limited. Every business and every individual lied empires. They are formally at war with
in the country would come immediately un- Germany. German U boats would be per-
tder the fullest possible official domination. fectly justified in capturing or sinking ships
SLabor would be virtually conscripted-no trading with them, which would peril our
man could change a job without permission neutrality by untoward "incidents." And if
from the government. The orders which any that trade is stopped, the American merchant
business could accept would be determined by marine might as well shut up shop and go
official fiat. Industries' owners and execu- fishing. Most of the major parts would be
tives would be mere figureheads, who could closed to our vessels.
do nothing save carry out the orders given Perhaps some system may be worked out
them by government. A dictatorship, cor- to carry on this trade, but right now the out-
plete in every detail, would be established look for our merchant marine doesn't seem
And this isn't all there is to "M Day" plans very bright.
by a long shot. Complete government con-
trol and censorship of the radio, the press, the On June 30 there were 920,310 civil em-
rights of protest and assemblage are envis- ployes on the federal government's payroll-
ioned. Elections could be deferred if the 2,550 more than at the World War peak or
powers-that-be decided that the emergency November 11, 1918. And this is one reason
made it necessary-and undoubtedly it would why about 25 cents out of every dollar we
be decided "necessary." earn goes directly or indirectly for support
All this and more is going to happen if of the government.
war comes to the United States. Gone will
be democracy, gone our liberties. Could It probably occurred to you that Benjamin
there be a stronger case for neutrality? Stolberg's description of William Green as "a
fluent speaker, never at a loss for the wrong


If all drivers knowing that it is a privilege
to drive, and not an inhert one, will co-oper-
ate with law officials and really value the
privilege to drive, the state drivers' license
law will reduce accidents and fatalities to a
large extent, as has been proven in states
that have had a drivers' license law for years.

"Sharks Down Mullets" should be the
headline for the Port St. Joe-Carrabelle foot-
ball game last Friday. That is logical, as we
understand sharks have a fondness for down-
ing mullet.

A couple of men up around Crestview were
working a slick old age pension scheme, and
now it looks as though they will get the
"pen" out of pension.


word," might go for other fluent speakers
here and there.-Macon Telegraph.

Hitler urges German women to disregard
style and wear their dresses until they start
to ravel. A couple more strokes of genius
like that and he'll wish he had stuck to paper
hanging.-Omaha World-News.

In developing our long-range defense pro-
gram a major factor should be long-range
guns.

These cool, zippy mornings we have been
having, put wim, wigor and witality into the
old chassis.

Christmas is just around the corner.


IT'S ABOUT TIME!


Citizens Visit


State Hospital

(Continued from Page 1)
Gadsden, is still in use there as
a storehouse, having five-foot-
thick brick walls and a brick arch
roof.
Various activities are providea-
to occupy those inmates that are
well enough to work. The most in-
teresting feature of this was the
mattress factory where mattresse%
used in the institution are made.
'There are many park and play-
ground 'areas for those inmates
unable to work.
Dr. R. S. Atwood of the Univer-
sity of Florida, as chairman of the
inter-American committee, report-
ed to the directors the activities
of his committee in promoting
better South American relations.
Their efforts at holding an inter-
American conference in Florida Is
now assured. Some 50 representa-
tives from the Latin-American
countries have agreed to attend
this conference, to be held at the
University of Florida next April,
and will continue on to Washing-
ton, where other meetings are
scheduled for May. Many of these
representatives will be high-rank-
ing officials of their respective
countries, with a large number of
them making their first visit to
the United States at this time.
Major progress is the anticipated
outcome of this conference in fur-
therance of the committee's er-
forts to enhance our Latin-Ameri-
can friendships and an exchange
of students between the universi-
ties of these southern neighbors
and the universities of this coun-
try. The University of Florida al-
ready has a Latin-American sec-
tion where students from our
neighbors to the south are room-
mates with Florida students, thus
familiarizing them with each otlh-
ers language, habits and customs.
President Harold Colee recog-
nized Port St. Joe at the meeting,
introducing individually those in


)


attendance from this city. He als6 Florida, with a minimum flow of
instructed J. L. "Pop" Kerr to ten- 716 second feet and a maximum
der Mrs. Basil E. Kenney, Sr., a measurement of the flow of 847
place on Dr. Atwood's committee, second feet, which translated into
as he considered her a valuable gallons per day ranges from 462,-
addition to the committee Ir she 730,752 to 547,392,384 gallons each
would accept. The connections or day. Silver Springs was next in
the St. Joe Lumber and Export size with a flow of from 221,035,-
company, managed by Mr. Ken- 024 to 531,235,800. Itchatucknee
ney, would greatly benefit the Springs in Suwannee county is
work of this committee. Aside from third, with Wakulla Springs, near
this, Mrs. Kenney is considered Tallahassee, fourth.
one of the outstandingly active
women engaged in social activities itors at the meeting, accompanied
of the state. It was intimate Bryan Hanks, former president or
that President Colee would be a the Florida Power and Light com-
candidate in the next election for pany, and H. I. Mossburger to
governor. Tampa on busLness, returning to
C. A. Tovey, one of the local vis- this city Sun


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


FRIDAY. OCTOBF-R 20. 1939


0


The Low Down
from
Willis Swamp

Editor The Star:
I didn't really expect you to
print my letter last week, but of
course I hoped for the best, and
yesterday when I went over to
Sut Hawkins' air-conditioned ouL-
building, durned if I didn't find it
all over the front page.
I mentioned to my wife that 1
guessed you knew what you were
adoin'. And speaking' about wives
and gals, I have more fun talking'
and writing' about 'em than any-
thing else. 'Course everything Is
kinda funny to me, but I guess
any lazy guy has more time to see
the funny sights, and not be a
Gloomy Gus year in and year out
and never see anything comical.
The girls they are 0. K. and
some of 'em are better than a
show. But the keen ones, you don't
see them out there doin' all the
monkey shines, like crowdin' the
men outa the bar rooms, ana
showing' off. These wise ones they
are over at the cooking' school,
finding' out something about how
to season up the old, roast so as
to help 'em, maybe, captivate for
themselves a permanent me-
ticket.
And the thin youff- fell
standing' around and watching' th
other kind-the show-off gals-a
all sorts of stuff like a few of 'er
are doin' like learning' to swea
and to spit through their teeth, th
young fellers are just there to see .-
what will happen next, and they're
not there pickin' out gals for
wives. These young bloods they
are pretty wise geezers.
Yours, with the low-down,
JO SERRA.
------+--~------
LARGEST SPRING
A recent survey by the U. S.
Geological Department shows that
Rainbow Springs is the largest in


I










THE STR OO


STAX SUIT IN COURT TODAYt
I Tie suit of the city of Port St.
Joe against delinquent taxpayers
Is to come up for hearing today In
court at Panama City. The city is
endeavoring to collect approxt
lately $2100 in back taxes.

SMrs. Philip Lovett, Mrs. C. A.
LeHardy and Mrs. R. V. Coburn
spent Wednesday in Cottondale.

Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Cogdill ot
Gainesville were visiting in this
city Saturday.

HAVE YOU TRIED
LeHARDY'S PINK TIP
COLD CAPSULES
Hundreds have tried them and
recommend them highly
Unconditionally Guaranteed



DR. J. C. OE
--DENTIST--
Office Hours: 9 to 12; 1 to 5
Sunday By Appointment
Costin 'Bldg. Port fSt. Joe



EYES EXAMINE


Glass fitted when needed
Made In Oar Own Laboratory
All Work UncondttionaHy
Guaranteed -":
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to p.m.

DR. .T. NEWBERRY
OPTOMETRIST
PANAMA CITY, FLA.


ERASE the DOUBT
About Your
FRESH WATER FISHING

MIDWAY PARK
Is In the HEART of the
Dead Lakes Fishing Area
Gulf County's north line cuts
the Dead Lakes at the
waistline
Meet Your Friends At
S... M D WAY PARK
FURNISHED CABINS
On the Waterfront
J. H. SHOEMAKER, Prop.
Postoffice Address
WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA


FLORIDA SIGNS UP FOR 1940 FAIR


.. ..
.:2 n


Inasmuch as Florida was the first of the exhibitors at the 1939
New York World's Fair to sign up for 1940 the actual signing
was made an event of importance and the center of a cqrempny.
Not only were irepretentativet of all the JNew York newspaper
with their photographers present but cameramenn and sound
engineers from the Paramount ad 'M.G.M; newsreel companies
toqk shots for presentation in the :movie hours of the country.
'F~6m left tpo right t:i -the illustration above: Harvey D. Gibson
chairman of the board of diiretors of the ,Wordd'4 Fair. and -ar
'V. Brown, vic* president and "ei;eeral manaLi r of the Fldr'd
-.t Exhibit '


.GOVERNOR SETS ing to all the people by constantly
NOVEMBER 0 AS being a- government 'df wise;, just
NOVEMBER 30S A5 and constitutional':laws .'discreetl'
-THANKSGIVING Cnad faithfully executed ana
obeyed; to, protect and guide al
nations and to bless them with
(Continued from Page 1) good" government, -peace and con-
give thanks' for the fortitude and bt; to prdthate Ithe knowledd
fdith of our People, whichs i stals andd practice oftrue religion and
our nation 'through the m0t virtue and generally to grant unto
'troubid hours' in all its history; all mankind -such a degree of tien-
and h s n oral "-prosperity -as' 'He alone
-.WHEREAS, we cannot but re- knows to be best"
joice that we are at peace with Let us resolve to continue
the nations, of the world, that we faithful to the teachings of a kind
have been able and willing to feed providence and as a people may
and clothe the thousands of unf6i- we be strengthened in our influ-
tunate victims of our disordered once for truth, justice and good
economic system, that a great liu- "will to our neighbors. May the
manitarian leadership has saved people gather in their homes,
the Republic from those forces places of-worship and other ap-
which threateend to destroy It propriate places and by words and
and that our historic ideals of de- deeds make known their apprecia-
mocracy have been defended and tion of the love and guidance oq
upheld by those in high places;' their Heavenly Father.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, Fred P. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, i
Cone, by virtue of the power have hereunto set my hand and
vested in me as Governor of the caused the Great Seal of the StaLp
State of Florida,. do hereby pro- of Florida to be affixed at Talla-
claim Thursday, November 30th, hassee, the Capital, this 12th day
1939, as a day of Thanksgiving, of October, A. D. 1939.
and' in accordance with our stat- (SEAL) FRED P. CONE,
utes do hereby declare it a legal Governor.
holiday, "that we may unite in Attest:
most humbly offering our prayers R.A. GRAY,
and supplications to the Great Secretary of State.
Lord and Ruler of the Nations and _____
beseech Him to pardon our na-
tional and other transgressions; Medium: "The spirit of your
to enable us all, whether in public wife wishes to speak with you.
or private stations, to perform our What shall I say to her?"
several and relative duties prop- Jo Ask her where she pu
early and punctually; to render
our national government a bless- my winter underwear."


01'E POCKETBOOK

o/KNOWLEDETCoE pp


For Your

PROTECTION

Our special filtering process
and quick-freeze method as-
sures you ice that REALLY
is pure! It protects your food
therefore it protects you.
There is no substitute for the
value of REAL Ice.

THE WELL-INFORMED
USE ICE
Deliveries by Phone
or Regular Route

PHONE 47
0-o

ST. JOE ICE

COMPANY-
MAX KILBOURN, Prop.


At the Chirfis

Christ is King both of this 'orla
and of His Spiritual Kingdom. Ai4
church memb-ers are Hi's ubjectrs.
In any country, during war time,
all citizens are required to help
their country, and the giving of
aid or encouragement to the
eriemy makes them punishable Dy
death as traitors.
Church members make them-
selves as guilty before God as any
traitor when they in any way in-
jure the church or any member
or minister. They thus classify
themselves with Judas Iscariot.
Are you a loyal church member
as shown by faithful attendance,
giving, and harmonious working?
Are you boldly fighting for Christ
your King, or are you letting
others injure the church and its
work by criticism and you do
nothing to resist them? Be a loyal
soldier of your King.

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Rev. H. F. Beaty, Minister
Sunday evening's sermon topic
will be "What Christ Says olf 111n-
self" in John's Gospel. Is Christ
God? Does He claim that HE Is
GOD? Is He an all sufficient sa-
viour? Come hear this sermon to
your eternal profit!
All Presbyterians should hear
the morning sermon on "The True
Church."

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. J. W. Sisemore, Minister
9:45 a. m.--Snday School.
11:00 a. m.-Morning Worship.
7:.00 p. m.-B. Y. P. U.
8:00 p. m.-preaching service.
W. M. U., Monday, 3:00 p. m.
Prayermeeting Wedlnesday, 7:30 p.
m. Teachers meeting, Thursday,
7:30 p. m.

ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Rev. E. T. Corbin, Pastor
Full-time services
10:15 a. m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a. m.-Preaching Service.
7:30 p. m,-Evangelistic service.
Prayermeeting every Wednesday
night.

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL
10:00 a. m.-Church School.
Services first and third Sunday
nights at 7:30.
Communion service fourth Sun-
day mornings at 7:30.

METHODIST CHURCH
D. E. Marietta, Minister
Services Every Sunday
10:00 a. m.-Churen School.
11:00 a. m.-Morning worship.
7:30 p. m.-Evening worship.
HONOR ROLL
The names of the following pu-
pils appear upon the first honor
roll of the year tor tne Port St.
Joe elementary school:
First Grade-Donna Gay, Betty
Jean Hunt. Martha Louise Wilson.
Second Grade Billy Parker,
Waring Murdock, Edwina Howell,
Bobby Lou McPherson, Jan Wim-
berly.
Third Grade-Kathryn Horton,
Charles Gangneiux, Betty June
Wrigth, Myrtle Rhames, Betty
Blackburn, Mildred Whitaker, Do-
lores Mira.
Fourth Grade Bernard Pridi-
geon. Joe Wells, Archie Nations,
Carolyn Gangnelux, Dorothy M-_
nus, Sara Brinson, Howell Rob-
erts, Alex Fillingim, Peggy Hardy,
Charles Smith.
Fifth Grade Dudley Powell.
ohn Sealey, Edna Collingswortn,
Sara Jo Costin, Alma Larrimore,
P. B. Fairley, Tommy Hull, Sara
Horton, Francis Burgess, Betty
McPhaul. Jerry Sowers.
Sixth Grade Ernest Smith.
Martha Brinson, Eloise Scheffer.
The high school does not have
an honor roll until the end of the
first quarter.
9------'


PE&,S ON AL S

Robeilt Bellows expects to at-
tend the state -Red Cross roll call
meeting to be held today in Tat-
lahassee.

Dr. Cutts, state Baptist evange-
list; Dr. Wattenbarger of Bonifay
and Dr. Solomei, editor 'of the
Baptist Witness, attended the
Northwest Coast Baptist associa-
tion meeting in this city yesterday.

Arthur Lupton, Judge and Mrs.
T. R. L. Carter, J. L. Sharit and
Rev. H. F. Beaty attended the spe-
cial meeting of the county com-
missioners held yesterday in We-
wahitchka.

"Buddy" McLin of Tampa was
visiting in the city yesterday.

B. B. Conklin and B. A. Cogdill
were business visitors In Panama
City last Friday.

Mrs. C. A.' LeHardy, Miss Mar-
garet LeHardy and Miss Myrtice
Coody visited Brinson Coody, en-
gineer on the U.S.S. Yaka in Pan-
ama City last Saturday.

C. A. LeHardy returned to the
city Tuesday-after a several days*
trip to Montgomery, Ala.

Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Larkin vis-
ited in Bristol over the week-end.

Miss Bernice Beaty of Tallahas-
see was the week-end guest of her
parents, Rev. and Mrs. H. P,
Beaty.

Mrs. Annie Ryan-Mark~s, Mrs.-.
L. Oliver and-*'rs. John Marshall
o' Apalachicola attended the Le-
gion Auxiliary meeting Tuesday at
(he Legion hut.



Lodge Notices

Order of Eastern Star
Meets on second and fourth
Tuesday of each month in the
Masonic hall, over postoffice. Visi-
tors who are members are cor-
dially invited to be present.
American Legion
Gulf County Post 116 meets the
first Monday of each month at
the Legion Hut.
Masonic Lodge
St. Joe Lodge 111 meets second
and fourth Friday nights at 8:30
o'clock in Masonic hall.



CLASSIFIED ADS

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
SPECIAL PRICES ON LOTS are
being offered until Oct. 15 on
lots in Garden Crest Develop-
ment at White City by Rev. H.


TWO COTTAGES FOR SALE
Waterfront
Five rooms (two bedrooms) and:
batht (complete). Front and back
porches screened. Electric lights,
annd water.
$1450 EACH
TERMS-$o200 down and balance,
at $20 month. Interest at 5%.
$1350 CASH
Lot Size 50 by 90 feet

FOR SALE-First 10 lots in Ben-
der Addition at 20% reduction.
Investigate this before buying!
J. L. KERR, Realtor
Port St. Joe, Florida
FOR RENT
UNFURNISHED 9 by 18-foet cab-
ins; cei:ed overhead and sides;
good water; $4 month. Apply St.


Indian (after examining ham Joe Lumber Co. 12121tt
sandwich purchased at the lunch ROOMS FOR RENT
counter): "Ugh! You slice um
ham?,' IF YOU have a room for rent,
Clerk: "Yeah, chief, I slice um." why not place a classified adver-
tisement in The Star. The cost is
Indian: "UghT Darn near miss low and returns are gratifying. .
um!" Try it today. tf


*FRIDAY. OCTOER 20. 1939 '


T"E ATAR, PORT -ST. JO.E, GVL.F-C6UNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE FIVY,


9-15 10-6


F. Beaty.









PAGE ~ -c-----~ S! H TRPR T OE UFCUTY LRD -RDY COBR2,1


Tulips Ideal to Paint

-Spring Garden Picture


A Colorful Planting of May-Flowering Tulips.


._ A box of colors will paint no pic-
ture more beautiful than a box of
tulips. Nor will any artist find a
palette of colors more brilliant or
diverse to work with. In a fashion
they are nature's gift to the gar-
dener, whose sense of artistry may
be expressed and recreated each
spring 'as he paints his garden
picture with them.
Simple to look at and to work
,with, they furnish unending ar-
rangements of brilliant color begin-
ning in the earliest spring months
Sand continuing through May, which
.is tulip time in most states.
Few flowers are so satisfying to
work with as the tulip. Its growth
is dependable, and one can almost
:bet on the height it will attain. The
,colors have none of the capricious-
ness of seedlings, and can be relied
upon according to the catalog de-
scription. If planted at the same
,depth and in soil of the same na-
ture, they will all blossom togeth-
er, almost on the same day.
'Their gay colors, which contrast
so strikingly with the bleakness of
winter, come in a range which is
almost complete. Clear white, with
buift a tiny speck of pink,' is the
;beginning. Then comes the roses,
yellows, reds, orange, bronze, lav-
enders and violets, some of the lat-
ter being so deep they are almost
:black. Only blue is lacking.
The Darwin, breeder and cottage
types may be all planted at the
same time in the fall. Although
they are distinctly different strains,
they have characteristics much
alike, and are all May-flowering
types.
The basis of classification is blood
relationship and family resem-
blance. Ther.: is no reason why
*varieties of all these different
classes should not be grown in the
Same bed, provided colors are chos-
Sen which look well together; and
it0a hard to find a colot clash
among the May flowering tulips.

.COAST BAPTIST ASSN.
SIN ANNUAL MEETING


(Continued from Page 1)
the Baptist Training Union, in
charge of the director, Gene Stew-
art. Rev. O. T. Moncrief delivered
a doctrinal sermon at this time.
Installation services were held
with the following officers named
for the ensuing year: Director,
Eugene Stewart, Panama City; as-
sociate director, Miss Lois Ware,
St. Andrews; secretary and treas-
urer, Dorothy Fay, Panama City;
pianist, Mrs. J. E. Bell; choirister,
Miss Alice Baggett, Port St. Joe;
group leader No. 1, Whit Murray,
Panama City; group leader No. 2,
Mrs. Belle Harmon, Panama City;
group leader No. 3, Miss Eva Me
serve, Port St. Joe; adult leader,
Mrs. J. J. Roache, St. Andrews;
senior leader, Mrs..Erma Creel
Apalachicola; intermediate leader,
W. P. Hughes, Panama City; Ju
nior leader, Miss Carrie Beall
Blackwell, Panama City; story
hour leader, Mrs. Whit Murray
Panama City; publicity chairman
Miss Alice Ward, Lynn Haven.
After installation ceremonies
the following interesting program
was presented: Song service, with
Miss Alice Baggett of Port St. Joe
in charge; roll call of churches
business, etc.; special music
"God's Tomorrow," Miss Baggett;
director's report, Lugene Stewar
o_f Panama City; discussion, "Cour
ageous Witnessing Today," led b:
D. G. McPherson of Port St. Joe
discussion. "Every Christian Mus
Be a Soul Winner," led by J. P
Evans of Bayou George; special
music by Panama City choir; dli
cussion, "Is It Necessary to Con


All of these garden classes are
hybrids; that is, they have been
developed from native species.
Most of the native species are May
flowering. Many are still grown in
rock gardens and for naturalized ef-
fects. As a rule they are smaller
and less hardy and, of course, of a
much less interesting color range
than the hybrids which represent
several centuries of plant breeding
for improvement.
Being one of the oldest of garden
flowers with a recorded history, the
tulips have an interesting back-
ground. The eldest of the garden
types are the breeders. No one
knows from what native species
they came. But they were grown
by the Dutch breeders of the Six-
teenth century for the purpose of
producing, by the process known as
"breaking," the gayly striped va-
rieties now called bybloemans and
bizarre. These striped varieties
were highly valued and speculating
in them caused the financial crisis
known as the tulipomania.
The breeder tulips were never so
highly valued for their own merits
as they now are, when modern taste
considers their rich but somewhat
dull colors, in which tones of brown
are usually present, most desirable
in the garden.
Darwin tulips were an introduc-
tion late in the last century, sup-
posed to be hybrids of breeder
tulips, but the origin was kept se-
cret by the introducers. They are-
characterized by soft pastel colors,
always with white overbloom, in-
cluding a remarkably complete col-
6or ra!Wge, but lacking entirely so
far, good yellows.
Cottage tulips are brighter in col-
or, not so tall, and not so large as
the Darvt*m and breeders. They
are usually later and they have
brilliant yellows. The flowers as a
bha ted petals, which oft-
rF Ss reflex or turn
C A


Education Brings

Respect for State

Conservation Law

Program Found to. Be More Ef-
fective Than Campaign
Of Arrests

R. L. "Bob"' bowling, state so-
p'ervisor otf conservation, said he
believes an educational program Is
more effective than a campaign
of arrests in enforcing respect for
the state conservation laws.
This statement was made in
connection with annual reports hIs
office in Tallahassee is receiving
from field agents who ha-e been
carrying out just such instruc-
tions. One agent who agrees witi
Dowling's idea of obtaining public
support of the program is H. J.
McCormick of Lynn Haven. Mc-
Cormick, in co-operation with G.
L. Warren of CarrabeTle, patro.t
Gulf, Bay. Okaloosa and Walton
counties.
McCormick's annual report said,
"I am receiving 100 per cent co-
operation from boat. owners, sea-
food dealers and fishermen." Ree-
ords for his territory bear this
out, says Dowling.
Newspapers, business men, pub-
lic officials, civic organizations
and those engaged in the fishing
industry are friendly and helpful.
This is particularly true in Gurl
county.
McCormick's enforcement wor
has been directed at illegal fish-
ing, culling of oysters to prevent%
the sale of undersized oysters,
collection of licenses, and the
closing of the 30-day season on
salt water trout. This work has
been accomplished with few ar-
rests and a minimum amount of
friction and hard feeling.
Supervisor Dowling said he is
gratified with results in the Bay-
Gulf county area, and appreciates
the support of those who are co-
operating with the field agents for
a return to prosperity of all fish-
ing Interests.

SHARKS ARE NOW
CONTENDERS FOR
CHAMPIONSHIP


(Continued from Page 1)
Claims Allowed 25-yard line. The Sharks carried
the ball to the 3-yard line immedi-
ately, but at that point the Carra-
The following bills against the belle line tightened up and held
city were passed and ordered paid them for three downs for no gain.
by the city commissioners last On the fourth down a short pass
week: from Maddox to Ed Hufft a;-
General Fund counted for the second touchdown.
Schneider dropped back and booted
St. Joe Texaco Service ...$ 40.19Schneider dropped back andbooted
City Treasurer ........... 151.91 noher between the brs t
Black Cat Cafe .......... 40.50 more extra points, making the
H. & W. B. Drew Co....... 31.75 score 16-0.
Florida Power Corp........ 64.7n The Sharks then settled down
Gulf Hardware Co.......... 46.69 to playing a tight defensive game
M. G. Lewis & Sons...... .3 and did a fine job of it until the
The Pace Co.............. 8.68 fourth quarter. Carrabelle became
St: Joe Sentinel ........... 5.50 desperate during this period and
N. A. Johnson .............17.98 filled the air with passes. Wathen,
St. Joe Lumber Co......... 2.50 Carrabelle halfback, dropped back
SThe Star.................. 7.50 for a pass and not seeing anyone
City Port St. Joe........... 19.39 open, decided to advance the bal
St. Joe Hardware Co....... 21.28 himself, placing it on the St. Joo
St. Joseph Telephone Co... 6.30 10-yard line, after which they pro.
St. Joe Motor Co.......... 21.4 needed to run around end for their
SSt. Joe Motor Co........... 21.48 1 down. Extra po*1t was
Standard Oil Co............ 46.09 only touchdown. Extra po:It was
SW. D. Dare................. 7.00 made on a pass. The next fe,,
J. L. Sharit............... 62.00 minutes were spent with Carra-
, St. Joseph Telephone Co... 1.53 belle trying vainly to score ana
St. Joe Ice Co............. 10.00 St. Joe fighting valiantly to hold
Danley Furniture Co........ 10.00 their lead. The game ended on the
Sherrill Oil Co............. 4.9 Carrabelle 30-yard line with the
SCons. Decalcomania Corp... 302.83 score 16 to 7 in favor of the locals.
Water and Sewer Fund The Sharks invade Tallahassee
Water and Sewer Fund this afternoon for a game with the
Gulf Oil Corp..............$ 29.7S Florida High Demons, who have
St. Joe Lumber & Ex. Co. 60.04 lost only tto Chattahoochee. This
SFlorida Power Corp.. ...... 271.68 promises to be a good tilt, as the
t St. J.Toe Texaco Service..... 29.67 Demons are laying for the Sharks,
- City Treasurer............. 20.90 who stand in their way for the
y title, and the Sharks may be a
; tinue the Fight for Religious Lib- little overconfident since their
t erty?" led by Mrs. Ruth Gwins or game with Carrabelle.
.Apalachicola. Football fans are urged to go
1 Following closing remarks by to Tallahassee today and lend
I- the pastor of the local church, the their support to the Sharks, for
- meeting was dismissed, anything can happen.


VESSEL BRINGS
REFUGEES HERE

(Continued from Page 1)
eral naturalized Germans who
had been traveling in Germany,
and while they were glad to get
back to the United States, they
toUl stories of how well the Ger-
iaan. people were being fed, how
the great majority of them would
give their lives for Hitler, that the
English are forcing the war upon
Germanry, that they had viewed
German women mutilated by Pol-
ish p'esants and many other in-
cidents, ill of which, apparently,
is pure propaganda being passed
on by these Americanized Ge.-
mans, and whether they do it be-
cause they are afraid of Hitler anli
his secret police, or because they
are 'still loyal to their mother
country, is a matter of conjecture.
All the passengers told of varied
experiences in Europe and of life
boat drills aboard the Warrior in
case the ship was attacked and
they were' forced to take to 'the
boats. The ship had huge Ameri-
can flags painted on her sides and
on the deck hatches.
--------------,
Mrs. Helen Rollins and daughter
Peggy expect to leave this after-
noon to spend the week-end with
relatives in Monticello.


WAR BULLETIN
The following press dispatch
was reported heard over the r
dio last evening by one or oi
subscribers:
"It is reported that the Ge
mans have taken Saltz, near.t+
Dutch border, and rushed for t
dikes. The British war office
inits the Germans have take
Saltz, but dobut their ability I
hold it. The Germans are evacua
ing all along the lines. They triE
to suppress this, but it leaked ou
They realize now even the valh
of a scrap of paper."
-------.((------'
Trade at home-your local me
chants have just.what you want.


FRESH FLORIDA

Infertile
EGGS




30c doz


C. C. WILLIAMS
Next to Triangle Cafe


c1.


Progressively Serving the People in Port St. Joe
,/and Surrounding Community

,,


PAGE S!X


rch -4b.


K%


J


.THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


,FRIDAY. OCTOBER 20, IW5


BUY IT IN



PORT ST. JOE



The Things You Need


forYour Family, Home


and Comfort!

. Your purchasing power spent with Port St. Joe
merchants can be of real service to this community.

* Business is coming back. Gains in retail sales are be-
ing reported in Port St. Joe and all Florida. Figfm'e
show that sales increased 20.6 per cent in Florida during
the first six months of 1939 over the same period in 1938.
* There are many men and women in Port St. Joe re-
ceiving a fair income who can be of tremendous help in
boosting business in Port St. Joe. All they need to do
is to buy the things they need and can afford. This does
not mean that they have to be extravagant, wasteful or
reckless. It simply means buying in a normal and na-
tural way.
* Perhaps you have hesitated to buy the things you
need. You are doing a real service to this community
when you purchase the things you can afford to buy,
large or small, right here in Port St. Joe.
* Buy a new dress, a new pair of shoes, a new suit, a
radio, a new refrigerator, furniture for the home, or a
new car. Your action helps to give work and wages to
others. Plan now to have the house repainted,
rooms papered, roof fixed. You will directly assist de-
serving workmen and dealers in this community.
* Read the columns of The Star and you will find splen-
did opportunities to make advantageous purchases. It
pays to buy standard merchandise from your reliable
home town merchants. Don't send your money away to
the mail order houses. Business revival will be speeded
up if persons right here in Port St. Joe will buy useful
necessary things from local business houses and spend a
part of their money on home improvements,







THE STAR

"Your Home Town Newspaper"


i









"F rI1S-A 1 1 T


AT THE PORT SUNDAY


FLORIDA HIGHLIGHTS


Boats sailing over dangerous
Diamond Shoals, at Cape Hatteras,
N. C., pass over dozens of old
wrecks which can be seen plainly
by those above.

The Star gives Gold Stamps
on subscription payments.


Myrna Loy as she appears in
"The Rains Came," Darryl F.
Zanuck's greatest hit of the
year, which ,plays Sunday and
Monday at the Port theater.
others taking leading parts are
Tyrone Power and George Brent
LEGAL ADVERTISING
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, IN
.AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLOR-
.IDA. IN CHANCERY.
HORACE W, SOULE, Plaintiff,
vs, CHARLES H. DOLD, et al, De-
itendants.
NOTICE
The State of Florida;
TO: Charles H. Dold, if alive, and,
if dead, to his unknown heirs, de-
wisees, legatees, or grantees;
AND to all persons having, or
claiming, an interest in the fol-
lowing described lands: "Lots six
(6) and eight (8) in Block fifty-
one (51) of the City of Port St.
Joe, according to the official map
on file in the office of the Clerk
-of the Circuit Court of Gulf Coun-
ty, Florida, said map showing said
lots to be lying in and a part of
that part of Section 1, Township
8 South, Range 11 West, lying
South \of the right-of-way of the
Apalachicola Northern Railroad
Company."
GREETINGS:
Horace W. Soule, having filed In
this Court his sworn bill of com-
plaint in this suit, the nature and
purpose of which is to determine
the title of the plaintiff to the
land hereinabove described to be
a -good and, sufficient absolute fee
simple title, to have all claims and
interests of the defendants, and
each of them, in and to said land
passed upon and determined; to
remove clouds upon the plaintiff's
title to said land; to quiet and
confirm the plaintiff's title there-
to, and in which bill of complaint,
-the plaintiff state mnat he believes
tnere are persons interested in the
land herein involved and herein-
above described whose names are
. unknown to him, and having fur-
ther named therein certain per-
sons .as known by name to him,
the said plaintiff, but as not known
by him, the said plaintiff, whether
they or any of them are dead or
alive, and as believed by him, the
said plaintiff, if living to be inter-
ested in the property and prem-
ises herein involved and herein-
above described, and if dead to
have been interested therein;
AND having made all persons
having or claiming any interest
upon the above described land
party defendant to the said bill
of complaint;
AND having demanded from the
Clerk of the Circuit Court. in and
for Gulf County, Florida, the mak-
ing of an Order requiring such
persons and parties to appear to
his said bill of complaint upon a
day not less than twenty-eight
days, nor more than sixty days
from the date of the making or
said Order;
IT IS, THEREFORE, ORDERED,
That each and every the defend-
ants above named, designated ana
specified, are hereby required to
appear herein to the plaintiff's
bill of complaint herein filed on
the 4th day of December, 1939.
and that this Order be published
in "The Star." a newspaper pub-
lished in Gulf County, Florida,
once a week for four consecutive
week-s.
WITNESS my hand as Clerk and
the seal of said Court, this 2na
lhv of November, 1939, at Wewa-
'hitchka in the County and State
Saforesaid.
J. R. HUNTER,
Clerk of Circuit Court
Gulf Ccunty. Florida
(CIRCUIT COURT SEAL)
E. CLAY LEWIS, Jr.,
Solicitor for Plaintiff.' 12-1


The Low Down
from

Willis Swamp


Editor The Star:
With the war crowdin' even the
divorces and murders out of the
news, its not so hard to savvy wny
we don't pay too much attention
to Uncle Samuel when he borrows
another 10 or 20 million just to
pay interest on money which he
borrowed, before.
Borrowin' money to pay interest
on other borrowed money, brother
that IS borrowing .
How Uncle Samuel manages to
keep outa the calaboose while the
SEC puts other guys in for too
high financing it is kinda mysti-
fyin' to me.
But most of us, I reckon, are
kinda like the young duc when
he graduated from the University
of Florida. On the day he gradu-
ated the professor said to him,
young feller, you are now finishli.
here and there is just one thing
you don't know-you don't know
yet that you don't know anything.
I guess maybe one of the things
that professor had in mind must
been politics.
Yours with the low-down,
JO SERRA.


Labor To Form

Political Group


To Take Active Part In Approach-
ing State and National
Election Campaigns

The Florida Federation of Labor
planned Saturday the formation
within the next few months of a
statewide political committee to
take an active part in approaching
state and national election cam-
paigns.
The step, directed at placing
the labor movement in the state's
political field as a unit, was taken
at Daytona Beach by the federa-
tion's executive board.
The group will be composed of
"union members and those who
are in active sympathy with and
sarport the objectives of organized.
labor."


Teacher Fund To

Start Next Month


Teachers and State Will
tribute To Build Up
Pension Fund


Con-


Florida's teacher retirement pro-
gram will get off to a belated
start next month. The legislature
provided for the program to be-
gin July 1, but Attorney General
G. C. Gibbs ruled that a start in
December is legal because the du-
ties imposed on the trustees are
continuing.
Teachers and principals will
contribute a part of their salaries
each month, beginning in Decem-
ber, and state appropriations will
help build up a pension fund.
Retirement benefits will not be
available to those who immedi-
ately become eligible until the
state pays its share. Governor
Cone states the treasury is in no
position now to take care of the
$200,000 a year appropriated by
the 1939 legislature, which finally
adopted the program.
lMaximum retirement compensa-
tion would be about $600 a year,
for a teacher of at least 35 years
service and an average income or
$1200 a year. No credit is given
for salaries in excess of $1200.
Teachers may retire any time
after they are 60 years of age ana
receive benefits based upon their
years of service and average saE-
ary during the last 10 years of
their tenures.
Disability benefits of nine-
tenths of retirement payments are
allowed for a teacher with as
much as 15 years' service who be-
comes mentally or physically in-
capacitated.


Rice growing is being extended
in the Soviet Union, and machin-
ery adapted to rice cultivation is
gaining in use.


Because drug addicts- try to
keep their habit a secret, it has
never been possible to take an,
accurate census of addiction in
the United States.
-------c-~-------
Trade at home-your local mer-
chants have just what you want.


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If Alka-Seltzer is as good as we say it is, you want it in your med-
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Your family may need Alka-Seltzer sooner and more often than
you think. Our guarantee of satisfaction or money refunded
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Abd iI L~~~~'


& f-


PAGE THREE


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1939


TFHE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLOA10Abia


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