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SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | B2SPORTS: Hawks use summer league to prepare for title run WEDNESDAY, JULY 9, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWST AND INSIDE CLASSIFIED B5 CROSSWORDS B4 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN B2 SPORTS B1 VOICES A3WORD ON THE STREE T A2SOUTH LAKE PRESSV OLUME 99, NO. 28 3 SECTIOn N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reservedwww. southlakepress.com PRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comStaff Sgt. Socheat Sok Mom, a retired re support spe cialist with the United States Army, along with his wife and daughter, stood speechless in the driveway of his new home last week. The south Clermont home off U.S. Highway 27 near the Four Corners area had been abandoned and vacant but was renovated top to bottom and presented to Mom through the Military ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comDetails have emerged from a Mascotte city employees claim she was harassed by City Manager Jim Gleason, an allegation that has led him to seek employment elsewhere. I believe that I have been discriminated against because of my race (Black, Native Hawaiian/Pacic Islander) in violation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, Utility Accountant Alana Wilson wrote to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission on May 29. I continue to work for the city of Mascotte and the work environment remains hostile. An internal investigation by Fire Chief Randy Brasher and Police Chief Ronaldo Banasco, conducted after the complaint was lodged, found no validity to Wilsons claims. But Gleason, in an email to city council members last month, said he has applied for the job of city manager in Titusville because of the very tense work environ ment now at Mascotte City Hall. His search is in the pre liminary stages. Wilson claims Gleason told her she should change her computer log-in name to token black person and used the terms pickaninny and nappy headed in statements made in her presence. She also alleges the city man ager related a story about MASCOTTEDetails surface on city manager complaint LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comAn internal review of the Animal Services Intake Process concluded that the current pro cess relating to vacci nation and deworming animals is adequate. Bob Melton, inspector general with the Lake County Clerk of Courts ofce, who conducted the audit, said between February and May when the proce dures were reviewed, the ofce noted a grad ual improvement in the way the shelter handled animals. But prior mistakes and the need for consis tency were also noted in the report. Over the past several months there have been mistakes and they need to make sure those mis takes are not repeated, he said. Those mistakes in cluded inconsistencies in deworming and vaccinations during the intake process before written procedures were put into place at the end of April. But the same report also determined prior to the written protocols, animals were not vac cinated until they left the facility. It is important they are consistent in following these policies and procedures, Melton said. The data reviewed in the report found an 80 percent compliance rate for deworming for the four months. LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comWhen Sunstate Carriers opened its doors in Lake County in 2001, economic incentives served an important role in job creation, company ofcials said. It helped us to cover the ex pensive advertising for people and getting them to the training, Richard Baugh, president of Sunstate Companies, said. But at the same time, he said his company would have created those 20 to 25 jobs without in centives. We would have found a way CLERMONTVeterans family gets gift of independence from foundation PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Dao Mom receives the keys to a newly renovated house from John Moskos, alongside husband Staff Sgt. Socheat Sok Mom and daughter Keira. BELOW: The Patriot Guard Riders were the honor guard for the presentation. A home of their own Shelter makes improvements BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Dogs wait in their kennels to be adopted at Lake County Animal Services in Tavares on July 2.TAVARES TAVARESEconomic director weighs effect of incentives BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL A worker walks past a line of parked tractor-trailer cabs at Sunstate Carriers in Tavares, on Thursday. SEE HOUSE | A2SEE JOBS | A7SEE COMPLAINT | A4SEE SHELTER | A6

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, July 9, 2014 THE VILLAGES Scott launches campaign office near Lake Sumter LandingIn an ofce packed with telephones, campaign signs, American ags, men in suits with ear pieces and what seemed like hundreds of supporters, Gov. Rick Scott on Friday morning opened a campaign ofce in the heart of The Villages. The ofce is in the 900 block of Old Mill Run and directly across the street from Lake Sumter Landing, where Scott held a campaign rally in 2010. Telling the crowd it was a great place to spend the Fourth of July, Scott shook hands, chatted and posed for photographs with supporters. He gave a short campaign speech, in which he touted how much taxes had been cut and unemployment rates had dropped during his rst stint in ofce. At one point, he led supporters in a chant of lets keep working. The ofce will be staffed by Republican volunteers who will answer phones, distribute bumper stickers and posters and conduct other efforts to get Scott elected to his second term in his run against his presumed opponent, Democratic front-runner and former Republican Gov. Charlie Crist.TAVARES Sheriffs office launches web page for residentsReporting crime will become somewhat easier for area victims and provide less work for deputies, thanks to a new addition to the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce website. CopLogic was launched last week on the website, giving residents the option to le reports online on low-priority and minor crimes. Such crimes include criminal mischief, damaged property, lost property, petty theft, ID theft, fraud and harassing phone calls. Lt. John Herrell, sheriffs spokesman, said it should benet crime victims who are already trying to balance work, childrens activities, family and meal times and other demands for their time. To le a report online, residents can go to the sheriffs website at www. lcso.org and then to the right column under Whats New or the top row under How Do I? Once on the page, the resident is navigated through a series of questions.CLERMONT New guide showcases south Lake lifestyleThe South Lake Chamber of Commerce has announced the launch of its new South Lake, Florida: Visitors & Relocation Guide, available to the public in various businesses in south Lake and at the chamber ofce, 620 W. Montrose St. According to chamber president Ray San Fratello, This publication highlights and showcases many of the wonderful qualities associated with the south Lake area, which all come together to create a lifestyle that is the envy of Central Florida and beyond. The new guide is also available online at the chambers website, www. SouthLakeChamber-FL.com. For information, call 352-394-4191 or email ofce@southlakechamber-.com.MINNEOLA Household hazardous waste collection event setThe Lake County Solid Waste Division is encouraging Lake County residents to dispose of toxic materials in a safe and environmentally sensitive way at an upcoming household hazardous waste collection event, from 9 / a.m. to noon Thursday at the Minneola City Hall parking lot, 800 N. U.S. Highway 27. Representatives will be on hand to collect small quantities of unused or unwanted waste products such as lawn and gardening materials, photo and swimming pool chemicals, paint and related products, cleaning solutions, motor oil and used gas, batter ies, uorescent lamps, light bulbs and small propane tanks. For information, go to www.lakecounty.gov or call 352-343-3776. Area Briefs What south Lake residents are saying about ...IRAQWhat role do you think the U.S. should play in Iraq at this point?Its too late. We had our chance and blew it. KEN CAREK CLERMONT We dont need to be there at this point. Its really not our ght. Its unlikely that we would ever be able to make a change. As some one who has served in combat, I think that we need to pull out now and stay away and let them handle their own future. MAJOR MCCARGO MOUNT DORA Support, air attacks, advisers. We need some ground troops but not too many. If we get more involved it will be like it was before as long as they dont turn on us. Were not helping the sit uation if they turn on us. CHARLES MUNDO CLERMONT Well we should proba bly cry, because of all the people we lost and all the people in that country who thought we would be there. I do think we should help the Kurds. They want to have their own country. And we should let the rest of the country be carved up along tribal lines. Iraq has no natural borders. It is a country manufac tured by the British. WALTER ULEKOWSKI CLERMONT Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 Warriors Support Foundation in partnership with Bank of America. The family was invited inside to see it for the rst time after a brief presentation of colors and the Pledge of Allegiance headed by a local chapter of Patriot Guard Riders. Friends, family and neighbors looked on as the family, through smiles and tears of joy, entered. Reas Dip, Moms mother, who knows little English beyond Thank you, needed no words, because her tears, bows and uplifted hands spoke volumes. Despite all the thank yous directed at them, John P. Moskos, Bank of Americas Central Florida Market president, said it is Mom who deserves the gratitude. This is just a small way for us to say thank you to Sergeant Mom for his service to the country and to his family for their sacrices and support, Moskos said. After having a look around the house, Mom said the experience was a little bit overwhelming. I really didnt expect so many people to be here with us today and car ing so much for us. Were truly blessed and well be forever thankful. We have never had a house of our own and really, we havent been together as a family too much since I only just got out of the military in April, Mom said. Moms wife, Dao, said it all feels like a dream to her. One of her rst or ders of business, she said, is fencing the back yard and planting a garden. We love it (the house), but we just cant believe it. It hasnt hit us yet. Maybe in like a month well wake up and say, Where are we? How did we get here? Dao Mom said, adding that their furniture is scheduled to arrive from Washington state later this month. Keira, who immediately found her room because of the toys, treasure box, drawing tablets and cray ons, plopped down on a purple bean bag and began blowing bubbles. Keira said she could not wait to move in and hope future dcor ideas for her room include characters from Avatar and The Last Airbender. Seeing how happy the family is and peeking in to see Keira blowing bubbles and sitting in her room, not wanting to come out, just makes it all worthwhile. Thats what its all about, said Brian Chilton, Bank of Americas regional market manager for Lake County. Its incredibly moving seeing the impact of our program rsthand. And just knowing what these veterans did for the country, you just cant thank them enough. Bank of America recently surpassed its goal to donate 1,000 proper ties to nonprots supporting military service member families and rst responders. The bank works closely with Military Warriors Support Foundation and other nonprot organizations that identify the home recipients and also provide related services, such as nancial counsel ing. Originally envisioned as a three-year program when announced in August 2012, Bank of Amer ica reached its 1000th military home donation more than a year ahead of schedule. The bank will continue the program, ofcials said. Moms home marks the 240th home the bank has presented to a returning veteran in Florida. Mom served in the U.S. Army from October 2007 to April 2014. He was born in Cambodia, served in the ROTC throughout high school in Long Beach, Calif., and joined the Army, serving in Iraq and Afghanistan. While in the Uruzgan Province of Afghanistan in 2012, Moms platoon was attacked by a suicide bomber. Wounded and dazed, Mom aided fellow soldiers injured by the blast. Mom was awarded a Purple Heart and an Army Commendation Medal with V Device for valorous actions under enemy re. Mom, planning to pur sue a career in the medical eld, said he is grateful to be alive and home with his family. That suicide bomber came out of nowhere. There were kids all around the place and he was about 15 feet away from us. Nobody knew who he was. We tried to stop him, but he just exploded himself. Two people died and a lot of people were injured and on the ground. I was lucky, Mom said at the home dedication Wednesday. Mom and his family are no stranger to hardship. His mother led four small children and her own mother safely from the depths of the Cambodian jungle a refugee camp in Thailand. They made a grueling, monthlong trek through constant drizzling rain, rice eld res, mud, heat and shelling. The family arrived in Dallas, Texas, in the winter of 1980, and after settling in Long Beach, Calif., Mom recalls the familys struggles with gangs and poverty. Looking back, Mom said the entire family is grateful to be alive, in the safety of the United States and in close proximity to one another now. His siblings live only one hour away in Zephyrhills. Mom said even the injuries he sustained while serving in the Army are nothing compared to what the United States has given him and his family. I was a little kid, like about 5, so I vaguely remember eeing Cambodia, though Ive heard stories from my older sister and brother and from my mom and grandmother, Mom said. I clearly remember being just feet from the Thailand border when we turned around and saw that my sister, who was carrying our youngest brother, had dropped him, unable to endure his weight through deep banks of mud. My mother, older brother and me had to run and get him, and just as we were lifting him, a shell that landed right beside us in the mud slid away from us as a mudslide occurred so it didnt hit us. My mother always breaks down in tears when she talks about it, he said. Its amazing were here today. Its amazing what people have done to help us and well never forget that, Mom said. HOUSE FROM PAGE A1 LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Staff Sgt. Socheat Sok Mom and wife Dao approach their new house while veterans stand at attention and salute. Daughter Keira is hidden between her parents.

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Wednesday, July 9, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3A weaker AmericaThe editorial in todays paper, Hillary Clinton, world-class troublemaker, by Gina Barreca describes her record as secretary of state as an asset. It is the opposite. She failed to send help in Benghazi, lied about it later, didnt negotiate any treaty with anyone and said on her book tour the ve prisoners released posed no threat to America. Hello? Whats happening in Iraq now? The foreign policy of this president and State Department has emboldened our enemies and weakened our military substantially. Anyone who can read or watch television can see that. MARY ALDERTON | Grand IslandCompanies hide behind religionThe debate over the contraception mandate in the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) has taken a dangerous and alarming turn. One hundred businesses, religious entities and nonprofits have come out of the woodwork and sued to block women from receiving the reproductive health care to which theyre entitled under the law. The entities that have led lawsuits against the contraception mandate in the Affordable Care Act include military contractors, car dealerships, food processors and other for-profit businesses that depend on maintaining a good relationship with the public. Im offended by their use of religion to justify discrimination against women. Thats why Im supporting the National Organization for Women (NOW) in its Stand Against the Dirty 100 campaign. I refuse to support companies and groups that have decided that their personal beliefs are more important than the rights of their employees. Birth control is a vital and common aspect of womens reproductive health care. Ninetynine percent of sexually active women in the United States have used birth control at some point, and here I include my self. I do not believe that the religious beliefs of an employ er trump the religious freedoms and bodily autonomy of their companys female employees. A for-prot corporation is not a person capable of religious exercise. And, the birth control coverage requirement applies to the company not the individuals who own it. LUCINDA MCGINN | EustisAmerican values celebratedParades, reworks, patriotic music and family gatherings mark the annual holiday celebrating the birth of our nation. I have great memories of taking my children to the Mount Dora Fourth of July parade and watching the evening reworks on the shores of Lake Dora in Tavares. The Fourth of July is a great time to celebrate our nations heritage. But it is also a time to reect on those great Americans who preserved our freedoms. Woodrow Wilson said: A nation which does not remember what it was yesterday does not know what it is today, nor what it is trying to do. We are trying to do a futile thing if we do not know where we came from or what we have been about. How can we honor our nations heritage? President Ronald Reagan had the answer. He said, Our families nurture, preserve and pass on to each succeeding generation the values we share and cherish, values that are the foundation for our freedoms ... in raising and instructing our children, in providing personal and compassionate care for the elderly, in maintaining the spir itual strength of religious commitment among our people. I believe its important to remember that each man, woman and child make of themselves what they make of their country. REED MARKHAM | SORRENTOA hidden gemClermont, the Gem of the Hills, is an undervalued jewel. Since becoming a resident of Clermont last month, I realized it is one of the best kept secrets in Central Florida. The mix of big business and small entrepreneurial ventures creates an opportunity to satisfy anyones curiosity. As I go out and explore with my family, I continuously come across a variety of independently owned businesses that add to the charm of the city. While I have not fully tapped into the vast amount of possibilities, what I have experienced so far has been out of this world. I have enjoyed traditional dishes at Troys Cuban Deli, exceptionally created tacos at The Urban Spot and mouthwatering desserts from Sugar Mommas Bake Shoppe. Whether driving on State Road 50 or US 27, I get excited seeing the large variety of businesses available to me. As reported by Roxanne Brown for the Daily Commercial, my new city is attracting businesses at a record rate. The growth and establishment of these businesses, whether established chains or small mom-and-pop startups, proves that Clermont is the place to be. I dont know how long the secret will be kept, but I will enjoy it while it lasts. ALBERTO PIEDRA | ClermontIt is no wonder that Florida voters have limit e d choices at the polls. If there were employment ads for state lawmakers, the job description would hardly be enticing. WANTED: Qualied people to run for elected ofce. Must overcome barriers such as an election system rigged to favor incumbents and entrenched interests. Job pays about $30,000 a year and gets little respect. Even with the obvious difculties in recruiting good people to run for the Florida House and Senate, this year features an abysmal lack of choices. The qualifying deadline for candidates expired on June 20 with a third of the state Legislature facing absolutely no opposition. Eight state senators, all incumbent Republicans, and 38 state representatives all but one an incumbent automatically won despite having no ballots cast in their districts, the Tampa Bay Times reported. Another 14 state lawmakers face only thirdparty or write-in candidates that typically never win. Thus, 43 percent of the Legislature was decided four months before the election, based on the number of candidates with token opposition or no challengers, the Times reported. It gets worse. Even incumbents with challengers are likely to win. In 2012, incumbents won 96 percent of their races, according to the Times. From the perspective of incumbent lawmakers, of course, this isnt a problem. Theyll tell you that the lack of opposition is merely an indication that the public believes theyre doing a good job. Hogwash. A Quinnipiac University poll in April found that less than a third of respondents approved of the way the Legislature was doing its job. But low approval ratings dont matter when the system is rigged in your favor. As shown by the redistricting trial that ended this month, a voter-approved initiative to remove politics from the drawing of districts was largely ignored by lawmakers. Campaign nance reforms have left loopholes for large donors. Ballot access laws make it difcult for independent and third-party candidates to make the ballot. And when they run as write-in candidates, the end result actually limits voter participation. In races where candidates from just one party qualify, all voters can cast ballots in the primary. If a write-in candidate runs, the primary is closed. That happened this year in 10 state legislative races. Given all these barriers, Florida voters shouldnt be surprised that they have limited options at the polls. Despite dissatisfaction with the Legislature, throwing the bums out really isnt an option. True election reforms are the only way to bring real choices to state races. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . ........................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTOPINION WHATS YOUR OPINION?The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to: Letters to the Editor 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711By fax to: 352-394-8001EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed.GUEST COLUMNSIf you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OURVIEWIf you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veter-ans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to to www.lakeveterans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANS SOUTH LAKE PRESSYour community newspaper for more than 100 years.732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Florida 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region.All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. YOUROPINIONSLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Too few options for Fla. voters A Florida disgraceShame! Shame! Another mess-up with Florida vote counters. A judge, in the last 15 seconds of the time allotted to vote, drew lines to reverse his rst vote during the Miss Florida pageant. The vote should not have been counted at all and the ballot should have been declared invalid, especially since Miss Florida had already been crowned. What a tragedy for Leesburgs Elizabeth Fechtel, who has already won many pageants, including the early talent award, already made Miss America plans and looked forward to the competition and preparations to go to Miami, all because one nonvote gave the crown to the second in show. Knowing neither of these ladies, I can only ask my self, how much power did this judge have? Was he in his right mind? And how could the Miss Florida director, Mary Sullivan, uphold this travesty of justice? Is this really the American Way? N.E. CLEMENTS | Leesburg LETTER of the WEEK HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, July 9, 2014 Placey ouradher ea nd re ac ht heLocalMar ket!VE RY AF FO RDABLE!Call to da y3 52-394-2183 Living Yo urBestLife 255 Wa terman Av enue MountDora,FL32757 www.WatermanVillage.com Wa te rman Vi llage: Lo ca te d inoneof Am erica s Wa terman Vi llage s MountDorawasthe ONL Y TOWNINFLORIDA tobenamedto America s 20BestSmall To wns bySmithsonianMagazine.AndwhenUSA To day ranked smalltownsontheir re tirementappeal toBabyBoomers,theynamedMount Doraasoneofthe TOP 4 INTHENATION, andthe ONL Y ONEINFLORIDA!Se e fo ryou rs el f!To arrangeavisitto Wa termanVillageandMountDora,call (352)385-1126oremailinfo@watermanvillage.com. r f r f n rr rt n t r b b f f f f f n n f f t f f f t t f b white people putting jam on a black person a Jam Boy as a mos quito lure during social events. City ofcials had until June 30 to re spond to the allegations. In a letter to the EEOC from Randy Brown Jr., a Flagler Beach attorney hired by the city, he said there is no evidence that sup ports Wilsons allegations of discrimina tion, a hostile work environment and/ or retaliation because of her race. My clients internal investigation into the allegations raised by Ala na Wilson reveals that her claims are totally lacking in factual support, as discussed at length in this posi tion statement, he wrote. For this reason, respondent urges that a no cause determination be issued as ex peditiously as possible. Brown contends Wilson took many of Gleasons statements out of context and that she failed to complain to anyone at city hall about being ra cially harassed, as outlined in the citys personnel policies. Another black woman, who had been employed by Mascotte at one time, was interviewed by Banas co and Brasher. That employee said shed neither had a problem with Gleason nor had she heard him make any type of racial statement or comments against her or others. Wilson could not be reached for comment and EEOC ofcials would not release a statement because of privacy laws. It is not known when the EEOC will make a determination as to wheth er to continue with an investigation into Wilsons claim or issue a no cause determination. In Gleasons email to council mem bers, referencing the EEOC com plaint and his reasons for inquiring about positions elsewhere, he said, This (EEOC complaint) was investigated and found baseless but, because of the false accusations, it has created a very tense work environ ment for all at city hall. I am afraid to be around the per son and make sure I am not in the ofce or break room without a witness to assure additional false accusations are not made, Gleason said. COMPLAINT FROM PAGE A1 IN MEMORY DEATH NOTICESWilliam T. CoxWilliam T. Cox, 84, of Umatilla, died Friday, June 27, 2014. Beyers Fu neral Home, Umatilla.Johnny Lee Dukes Jr.Johnny Lee Dukes Jr., 55, of Eustis, died Monday, June 30, 2014. Hayes Brothers Funeral Home, Eustis.James Neil EastwoodJames Neil Eastwood, 59, of Tavares, died Sunday, June 29, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares.Margaret GoodwinMargaret Chapman Goodwin, 87, of Bush nell, died Saturday June 28, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Margie HicksMargie Hicks, 77, of Leesburg, died Thursday, July 3, 2014. Ar rangements by PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Leesburg.Thomas A. LachThomas A. Lach, 66, of Clermont, died July 1, 2014. Arrangements by Brewer and Sons Funer als and Cremation Ser vices, Clermont.Martha MartinezMartha Esperanza Martinez, 55, of Al tamonte Springs, died Saturday, June 28, 2014. Rocker-Cusack Mortuary, Leesburg.Daniel W. MasonDaniel W. Bill Mason, 90, of Tavares, died Wednesday, July 2, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares.Harry Van MeterHarry Van Meter, 91, of Altoona, died Friday, June 27, 2014. Beyers Fu neral Home, Umatilla.James A. PerkinsJames A. Perkins, 84, of Leesburg, died Tuesday, July 1, 2014. Ar rangements by PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Leesburg.Marian Arminta PetersonMarian Arminta Pe terson, 89, of Lady Lake, died Sunday, June 29, 2014. Harden/Pauli Fu neral Home, Eustis.Jane Dabkowski PichetteJane Dabkowski Pichette, 70, of Uma tilla, died Sunday, June 29, 2014. Beyers Funer al Home, Umatilla.Donald Walter Powell Jr.Donald Walter Powell, Jr., 66, of The Villages, died Sunday, June 29, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations. Wildwood.George Edward Santman IIGeorge Edward Santman, II, 53, of Leesburg, died Tuesday, July 1, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg.Nathan SessumNathan Duckworth Sessum, 58, of Wildwood, died Monday, June 30, 2014. Rock er-Cusack Mortuary, Leesburg.

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Wednesday, July 9, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comThe South Lake Chamber of Commerce will host its bi-annual Hob Nob event on Aug. 7 at the Clermont City Center, 620 West Montrose St., in downtown Cler mont. Guests will have the chance to vote in a straw poll in various city, county, state and federal races. The Hob Nob is a unique opportunity to see democ racy in action, as candidates for ofce meet face to face with voters eager to partic ipate in the free exchange of ideas, said Kasey Kes selring, Montverde Acade my headmaster and event chair. The chamber expects more than 20 candidates to take part, representing lo cal, county, state and federal ofces. More than 500 people are expected to attend. Chamber president Ray San Fratello said candidates like the event because they can share passions, platforms and views, and vot ers like it because they can learn more about candi dates by interacting with them in person. All the state referendum issues scheduled to be on the ballot in November will be included in the straw vote. The straw poll is great because it lets candidates see how they might be far ing with this group of qual ied voters who are asking questions about what they are planning to do for them if they get elected, San Fratello said. The atmosphere at these Hob Nobs is just a nice night out with great food, mingling and the feel of election night when really, we are just prepping for the primary. The Hob Nob will be host ed by the Kiwanis Club of South Lake. It will be ca tered by Carrabbas Italian Grill. Tickets will be available on a rst-come, rst-served basis and must be reserved in advance. The event is sponsored by many local businesses and organizations that have partnered with the cham ber. It will be a fun and valu able event for the public and candidates, San Fratello said. For information or to re serve tickets, call 352-3944191 or email ofce@south lakechamber-.com.CLERMONTHob Nob offers a preview of potential election results PHOTO COURTESY OF SOUTH LAKE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE At the last Hob Nob, guests watched an overhead screen to see the results of a straw poll. This years event is Aug. 7.

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A6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, July 9, 2014 HWY27/441 2 miles fr omHwy27 rfnnftb 787-4440 tnfrfnnnntr nrf bfnffnbtr rnn $300OFFREMANU FA CTURED CAR TSCashor ch eck.Must pr esentadonpurchase. Limited Ti meOffer Seestor e fordetails Ja sonCottoJulieKileyKrisMemoloMarianArmstrong rfrntb (352)242-4500 CLERMONTBLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCHrf rnrtfnrb English:4pmandSpanish:7pm 8am,10am,12noon(ContemporaryMass) 5pm(ContemporaryMass) 3:00pm-3:45pm(Eng.) 6:15pm-6:45pm(Sp.) CornerofHwy50&12thSt.(Rt561) CROSSROADSFAMILYFELLOWSHIPChristianNon-Denominational WhereourpriorityisGod,Families&Community 15701S.R.50,#106 Clermont,FL34711 AtGreaterHillsandHwy50 SundayWorship9:30a.m. WednesdayBibleStudy7:00p.m. Childrenclassesbothservices Menandwomensmonthlymeetings OpenprayerTuesdaysat10:00a.m. Sr.PastorsJimandLindaWatson Assoc.PastorsLeeandVanessaDobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone:(352)242-1144 Godisgood...allthetime!FIRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMakingDisciples Sunday-8&11am(Traditional) Sunday-9:30am(Contemporary) Thursday-7pm(CelebrateRecovery) ReverendDougKokx, SeniorPastor ReverendDawnFryman, PastorofCongregationalCare t rf rnrtfnf n GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONT,FL ManyOtherActivitieseachweek fff n JonBekemeyer,SeniorPastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.orgLIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH BibleFellowshipGroups9:30am WorshipService10:40am FamilyPrayerService6:00pm BibleStudy7:00pm Groupsforadults,teens,andchildren ChrisJohnson,SeniorPastor Fordirectionsandmoreinformation,visit: 11043TrueLifeWay Clermont,FL34711 352.394.0708 NEWJACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHrfnt bnntfnn Pastor:Rev.RexAnderson AssistantPastor:Rev.DarrylChurch YouthPastor:Rev.ToneLundy ChurchClerk:Mrs.LucressieD.Mcgriff ChurchMotto:EquippingChangedPeople forAChangingWorld! ScheduleofWorshipServices SundayMorningService-11:00a.m. Youth/AdultBibleStudy-Thursdays-6:45p.m. e-mailaddresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com(PastorAnderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com(ChurchClerk) Contact:LucressieMcgriff-352-348-7955 REALLIFECHRISTIANCHURCHHelpingRealPeopleFindRealFaith Saturday6:00pm Sunday9:30am,11:15am&6:00pm VidaReal(enespaol),Domingosalas6:00pm FamilyNightiseveryWednesday! LilLifeGroups(Nursery-5thgrade)6:30-7:30pm TheWay(MiddleSchool)-6:30-7:30pm Catalyst(HighSchool)-7:30-8:30pm RealParenting-6:30-7:30pm rnrtfnrrSOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131ChestnutSt.,Clermont 352-394-2753 EastAve-1blocksouthofSR50 WorshipTimes: Sunday 9AM(Contemporary);11AM(Traditional) Churchschoolforallages10:00AM Childcareprovided YouthGroup-Wednesdays6:30-8:30PM www.southlakepresbyterian.orgST.MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574WestMontroseStreet Clermont,FL34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00am(RiteI) 10:00am(RiteII) 5:00pm(Praise&Worship) MensPrayerBreakfastWOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH OFGODINCHRISTElderT.L.Wootson 836ScottSt.Clermont,FL34711 394-1396or394-3004 Sunday11:00am&7:30pm Thursday7:30pm FERNDALEFERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHatCR455&CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor:Gordon(Bird)Sanders SundaySchool:9:15am SundayMorningWorship:10:30am EveningWorship& DiscipleshipStudy:6:00pm TeamKid:Sunday6:30pm Wednesday:7:00pm PrayerService,YouthActivities, MissionKidsforChildrenGrovelandFIRSTBAPTISTCHURCH OFGROVELANDnt SundaySchool9:45am SundayServices10:50am&6:00pm WednesdayService6:30pmMT.OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSundayWorshipService-11:00AM SundaySchool-9:30AM BibleStudy-Wednesday7:00PM YouthBibleStudy-Wednesday7:00PM ComeAsYouAre.AllAreWelcome! bf rfrb n rftnr rftnrfMINNEOLACONGREGATIONSINAIOFMINNEOLAAProgressiveJewishCongregation Shabbatservicesareconductedevery Fridayat7:30pm Servicesareheldatthesynagoguelocatedat: 303ANorthUSHighway27,Minneola ReligiousSchool,MensClub&WomensClub rnfrnrr n NEWLIFEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH,PCA18237E.ApshawaRd. Minneola,FL34715 MusicMinistries 407-920-0378 SundaySchool9:30am Worship10:45amTEMPLEOFTHELIVINGGODn SundaySchool9:30am SundayWorship&ChildrensChurch11:00am SundayEveningWorship6:00pm WedWorship&YouthService7:00pm Rev.LoyceRowlandMONTVERDEWOODLANDSLUTHERAN(LCMS)15333CR455,Montverde,FL34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com PastorRev.Dr.BrianKneser SundayService8:30am&11am SundaySchool9:45amOAKLANDPRESBYTERIANCHURCH218E.OaklandAve. (1/2mileN.Hwy50at TubbSt./WestOrangeLumber) 8:45amContemporaryWorship 9:45amSundaySchoolForAllAges 11:00amTraditionalWorship NurseryProvidedAllServices 407-656-4452 Dr.RobertP.Hines,Jr. www.oaklandpres.org SouthLake SouthLake GatheringPlacesSpiritualWorshipforGatheringPlacesSpiritualWorshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOME ServingFlorida Fa miliesSince1957 -AFullServiceHome-LocallyOwned&OperatedRonBecker&CharlesBecker ,F uneralDirectors352394-712 180 6 W. Minneola Av e. ,C lermont,FL CremationChoicesDirectCremation$675PlusContainer RonBecker ,D irector352-394-8228921S.USHwy27,Minneola,FL The review notes the hiring of a new shel ter supervisor, which was vacant during the event, is expected to provide signicantly higher compliance. The review noted several other areas that re quired improvement: staff was inadequately trained on software, screening procedures needed to be imple mented for animal res cue groups, record keeping had to im prove, and an inventory system was needed to track vaccinations and microchips. In the last year, Lake County Animal Ser vices Division has had a growing list of problems in the shelter. Two internal audits published in 2013, one nding issues with re cord keeping at the shelter and the other on pet licensing laws, cited at least 45 areas for im provement. Management also has not been consistent at the shelter. The head of the Animal Services di vision announced her resignation in March, citing a tight budget and public pressure over the departments euthanization rate. Cyndi Nason was the second director of Animal Ser vices to resign within the past year. Nason and Marjorie Boyd both resigned amid pressure from animal activists who claim the shelter was euthanizing too many animals. But the public crit icism is only a partial reason for the resignations, county ofcials said, pointing to fund ing issues that kept the county from hiring a eld supervisor and res cue coordinator to help take the pressure off the director. County commissioners agreed in a meeting on March 11 to delay funding those positions until Oct. 1. Brian Sheahan, for mer director of animal services, said euthanizations have been reduced. Euthanization rates for dogs from Oc tober to May were at 19 percent, compared with 22 percent the prior year. But the incidents that occurred in the last few months particularly concerned ofcials. In April, six puppies adopted from the shel ter received no treatment and all later died as a result of what a vet erinarian said was a case of hookworm in one puppy. Two other puppies adopted from the same litter were also found to have hook worms but were saved through blood transfusions and intravenous drips, said Allison Zach ary, a member of Plenty of Pitbulls, a rescue or ganization that adopted the animals. Then, the shelter experienced a parvovirus outbreak the following month. Sixteen dogs were euthanized and the shelter was closed temporarily. Shortly thereafter, county ofcials called for a special review of the shelters intake and vaccination policies. Following the review request, Lake County commissioners agreed on June 10 to trans fer operations of Ani mal Services to the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce. Melton said it is criti cal to train staff on soft ware. When you have dif ferent staff put in (information) in different locations, it is impossi ble to generate accurate management reports, he said. Melton said he is es pecially concerned about the two records kept for each animal: computer software and animal ID cards not having the same, con sistent information. When you have inconsistencies in actions and dates, then no one can be sure what infor mation is accurate, he said. This is why he said it is critical to train staff on the software. If people do not know how to use the software properly, it is not generating the in formation that Animal Services needs to adequately manage the or ganization, he said. The need to screen rescue coordinators is also vital, he added. In many respects, rescue organizations are similar to the coun ties animal shelter and they should have pro tocols in place regard ing vaccination and deworming, he said. Several commissioners said they were pleased with the review and expressed hope the problems would go away under the sheriffs leadership. SHELTER FROM PAGE A1

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Wednesday, July 9, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A7 ClermontsNewest Seafood/Steakhouse!GrandOpeningJuly4thweekend!AgedPrimeSteaks AlwaysFreshSeafood Open7days Lunch/Dinner~Sundaybrunch Livemusic We d-Sun794 W. Minneola Av e.InHistoricDowntownClermont!352-242-3800 INCLUDES: GreenFees& CartFees. Va lidforupto4players.Notvalidwithanyotheroer. Mustpresentcouponatcheck-in.Expires9/10/14Call407-886-3303todayforyour Te e Ti me!www.ZellwoodGolf.comSLP18HOLES$25Plus Ta xFREESLEEVEOFGOLFBALLS RonBecker,Director352-394-8228rf ntbt$675t r f n t r r f n f t bntbb n r f n t b n rn n t t n nn n nn n n t n n b n n n nr n t r t b nn t n n b n n b t t b f t n t n n b n n rn t n n to make it work as most business people would, he said. You cant let the window of opportunity shut on it. In the coming months, Lake Countys Economic Develop ment and Tourism Department is evaluating its incentive program to determine whether the countys resources are being used appropriately. The department must come before the Lake County Commis sion for approval of any change in its incentive program. While the evaluation has been discussed for months, county ofcials said a recent review of incentives which revealed several outstanding incentive grants with auditing periods that had expired brought the issue to the forefront. Although all job growth incentive grants require an auditing pe riod to make sure the jobs created are re tained for a minimum of two years, according to county documents, six incentive grants, from 2004 to 2008, were found to have incomplete reporting. The department distributed $287,000 for 78 jobs created but could only verify 18 that were re tained. The county has 13 open incentive ac counts with eight differ ent companies. The contract agreements allow for $345,000 in incentive grants associated with the creation of 142 jobs. The department has paid out $290,000 on the creation of 85 jobs, according to economic development ofcials. A company must create the jobs and hire before receiving incentive pay ments. Robert Chandler, the countys director of Economic Develop ment and Tourism, said in his personal opinion, many of these compa nies were going to cre ate those jobs regard less of whether they received incentives. The whole reason we are here is to help businesses create jobs, he said. The question is, is providing incentives di rectly to a company for job growth the most ef cient way to do that? Chandler said direct ly incentivizing companies, in his opinion, leads to a far lesser re turn on investment than if the county were to in vest that same money in areas such as workforce, education, infrastructure and transportation. Training and developing the workforce con tinues to be the num ber one issue for small businesses, according to Chandler. Many businesses want to hire, he said, but do not have enough skilled labor. Chandler said if the department used the funding it receives for incentives, which was $150,000 last scal year, for workforce develop ment instead, it would be more benecial for economic development. For example, he said if a company said it need ed a certain type of skill, then perhaps the coun tys economic develop ment department could sponsor the training of that skill at Lake Techni cal College or Lake-Sumter State College. If a business needs a specic type of skill not made available, our money could help sub sidize the program to get people trained, Chandler said. He cited the Lake Tech Center for Advanced Manufactur ing a partnership between the county and the school to train workers in manufacturing, machining and welding, and the Part ners for Success program for bringing the business and education communities together. Infrastructure also is an important factor in economic develop ment, Chandler said. If you have better roads, better infrastructure, it is more attractive for companies to come in and help exist ing businesses, he said. Moving away from providing traditional economic incentives will allow the county to support a larger number of businesses with more benetting from incentive resources, Chandler said. If you are truly looking out for the best in terest of the taxpayer dollars and moving the needle with economic development, this is the best way to go, he said. Chandler said the county does not have a large amount of money to play the big recruit ment game, and when companies express in terest in relocating to the county, incentives are not high on the list of criteria in making their decision. Indeed, in the top 10 criteria for businesses to relocate, incentives are ranked seventh, ac cording to a Site Selection Consultant Location Criteria Study. At the top is an available workforce. Sean Snaith, director of the University of Central Floridas Institute for Economic Com petitiveness, said Chandlers idea is reasonable and logical. Things like work force development or infrastructure really benet any and all busi nesses currently there or thinking of locating or opening in the re gion, he said. Work force is always going to be an important com ponent of business lo cation decisions. All the incentives in the world arent going to matter if you arent getting the worker with the skills to run your business. Dy namic workforce is a much more powerful attractant than any other incentive program may be. JOBS FROM PAGE A1 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIALSunstate workers enjoy a pizza lunch in the workshop for tractor-trailer cabs.

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B1SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, July 9, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTSSPORTS EDITOR . ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE . .............................. 365-8268 FAX . .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL . ......... sports@dailycommercial.comSPORTSandLEISURE PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL TOP: Lake Minneolas Marcus Dodson (0) dribbles the ball around an opponent during a Foundation Academy Summer League game against Colonial High School at Foundation Academy in Winter Garden on June 30. BOTTOM: Lake Minneolas Anthony Brown dunks the ball during a Foundation Academy Summer League game. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comBasketball and summer ar ent often spoken in the same breath. The stifling heat and humid ity in Florida turns the con crete hardwood on area play grounds into baking sheets, more conducive to frying eggs instead of putting a basketball through a hoop. For local high-school programs, however, summer has become a time to lay the groundwork for next season. Even for teams that reached the apex just a few months ago, summer leagues are a way for coaches to get players back on the floor and re-establish the mind-set that made them so successful. At Lake Minneola, coach Freddie Cole led the Hawks to a 28-4 record in 2013-14 and a berth in the Class 6A state championship game, which they lost to Miami Norland. Rather than being satisfied simply with reaching the ti tle game, Cole and his charges spent June getting ready for an other postseason run. The Hawks played in a variety of camps and summer leagues during the month, eventual ly matching last years regu lar-season record. Lake Minne ola wrapped up the month on Monday by reaching the semifinals at the Winter Garden Foundation Academy summer league. At the Foundation Acade my gym, Lake Minneola blasted Class 8A Orlando Colonial 68-45 and edged Orlando Lake Highland Prep in the quarterfi nals by one despite trailing by 14 with five minutes to play. In the semifinals, the Hawks with only six players available fell to Windermere Prep by six. As it turned out, two of Lake Minneolas losses during the summer were against Winder mere Prep and a third came at the hands of perennial Class 8A powerhouse Orlando Dr. Phillips. I was very encouraged to play as well as we did against Windermere Prep, Cole said. We had key players who were injured and others at camps with their AAU teams, but the guys we had gave us every thing. Windermere Prep is a very good private-school team and we were playing our third game of the day. Winning the league championship wouldve been the best way to close out the league for us, but Im proud of what I saw. Our players are ready to get back to the state finals. Cole said his players had not worked together since los ing 60-44 to Miami Norland on March 1 at the Lakeland Cen ter. The loss closed out a sto rybook season for the Hawks, which spent most of the season as the No. 1-ranked team in Class 6A. Despite the disappointing loss in the title game, Cole said his team learned valuable les sons during the season-long run lessons he feels will pay dividends next season. Most teams know who were are now and we wont sneak up on anyone, Cole said. Thats a complement in a way, but that also means we have to be ready every night. Part of our summer work has been to get our men tal makeup where it needs to be. These guys arent just going through the motions, expecting to win. They have a little bit of a chip on their shoulders and thats good. Theyre playing to win, even in the summer, and thats the attitude we want. In many ways, Lake Minneola looked like the same team that beat opponents by an average of 25 points per game in 201314. Against Orlando Colonial, for example, the Hawks raced up and down the floor on of fense and clogged the passing lanes on defense. They forced countless turnovers with its frenetic, pressure defense. Even with only two of last years starters Marcus Dod son and Anthony Brown on the floor, they seemed to be in midseason form against the Grenadiers. We wanted to get back into it, Cole said. Ive always believed you get better by play ing good teams and thats what weve done this summer. We used last summer to establish our goals for the season and thats what were doing this year. Its been a very good summer. Dodson agreed with his coach. After the Hawks trounced Orlando Colonial, Dodson said it was important for the team to take their sum mer workouts seriously. He said the quicker Lake Minneola regained its timing and began playing with the co hesiveness that made them so effective last season, the better it would be for the program. Were not a secret to any one, Dodson said. Every team knows about Lake Minneola and what we do. We cant wait until the regular season to play ourselves into shape. We have to start now if we want to have a better season (in 2014-15) than we had last year. We only have to climb one more step to do that, but thats the toughest step. Like Dodson, Brown felt dis appointed with last seasons finish. He said that to help to fuel his summer preparations and will continue to work at raising his game to the next level. I think we can be the best team in the state, Brown said. We had a team good enough to win a state championship last year. Thats our goal this year and weve worked (toward that goal) all summer. We can do a lot of things now to help us get back (to the state cham pionship game). If playing in summer leagues and going to camps make us a better team, then its worth missing out on the other things our friends are doing.Hawks use summer league to prepare for title runFlying high FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comHigh school bas ketball teams from Lake and Sumter counties have been making postseason trips to The Lakeland Center for many of the 33 years the state tour nament has been held there. Now the Florida High School Athletic Association, which puts on the tournament and governs high school sports in the state, is thinking about moving the tour nament elsewhere, possibly to Tallahassee or Jackson ville. The Florida As sociation of Basketball Coaches re leased a statement this week, demonstrating its desire to keep the boys and girls tournaments in Lakeland. According to Jim Ha ley, FABC executive director, the organization is in full sup port of keeping both the boys and girls state hoops tourney in its current home site, The Lakeland Center. In his statement, Haley cited the effort put forth by the tournament committee to get the Polk County community behind the event, which lasts for two weeks one week for the girls tournament and one week for the boys tournament. Haley goes on to question if another city would be able to produce the same level of sup port. I dont believe any other city can match their efforts of dedication each year of their 300 vol unteers that makes this enormous con tribution of work hours a huge suc cess over the years, Haley said. Coaches want hoops finals in Lakeland PHOTO COURTESY OF MAUREEN SHORTMount Doras 16U softball team. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comClay Tew asked his team to have a players only meeting to decide if they wanted to win. They did and they havent lost since. Now, the Mount Dora Babe Ruth League 12-under All-Star baseball team, coached by Tew, is preparing to play in the state tourna ment at 11 / a.m. today against N orth Fort My ers in Palm Beach Gardens. It will mark the rst time a 12U baseball team from Mount Dora has played in the state tournament. These kids wanted to play for a state championship, said Tew. Theyve played and practiced with a lot of heart and desire and that has gotten them through districts. Im very proud of them. Tew said the team is made up of players from the leagues three 12U teams the Reds, Cubs and Braves. Players were chosen based on their interest in playing and on the observations of coaches during the spring season. In its rst game in the district tournament in June, Mount Dora suffered a loss. Tew said he noticed a lot of heads hung low after the defeat, but he believed the players not the coaches needed to be the ones to decide if they had it in them to continue. The coaches got the players together and let them meet by themselves for about 10 or 15 minutes, Tew said. When they nished, they came back to us and said, We want to win. That was something they had to gure out for themselves and they picked them selves back up and went back to work. Since that meeting, they havent lost. To help offset the costs of its trip down state, including food and lodging, the team has set up a site on www.gofundme.com/ Mt-Dora-12U-allstars to accept donations. Mount Dora teams prepare for postseason

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Ann DupeeREMEMBER WHENA weekly column that reprints some of the more interesting news stories that have appeared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press.B2SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, July 9, 2014 www.southlakepress.comCOMMUNITYProudly servingCLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWSSTAFF WRITER . ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE . .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 EMAIL..... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com %  en HOMETOWN: Chicago %  en OCCUPATION: Broker and owner of Travis Realty Group %  en FAMILY: Two sisters, three brothers and two lab doggies, Riley and Star What do you enjoy most about south Lake County? I enjoy the lakes and hills and all the people who live and visit here. 1) If you had to summarize your philosophy of life in one sentence, what would it be? Live it dont just dream it. 2) Name a person or incident youve come across recently thats touched you in some way. Why did this person or incident impress you so much? My latest trip took me to Pontevedra, Spain. There were no cars allowed in the city center and everyone walked or rode a bike to all of the businesses. Ev erything was so nice and clean. 3) How does what you do contribute to the welfare of the area? I help people nd their dream homes and show them all the wonderful things we have going on in our community. 4) Name one of your greatest accomplishments so far. One of my greatest accomplishments, although it took 16 years of trying, is that I nally got a silver medal for the world duathlon championships. Never give up is my message. 5) Whats something youve always wanted to do but havent yet? Go to New Zealand. 6) What advice would you give to people who want to help out in the community? Get involved. It will come back to you 100 times over. Besides helping others you will nd out a lot about yourself and what is really important in life. FROM THE FILES | 25 YEARS AGO 1989Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press Meet YourNEIGHBORDIANE TRAVIS CLERMONTS OLDEST NATIVE PASSESMrs. Winnie H. Seaver, the eldest native of Clermont, died June 2, one week before her 93rd birthday. She was born June 10, 1896, in a house next door to her present home at 865 Montrose St. (present site of the Clermont Police Department) where she had lived for 60 years. The oldest member of the First Baptist Church, she assisted her late husband, Percy, in the ministry of bringing children to Sunday school. At age 17 she began her teaching career. For 2 years she taught elementary grades in the two-room schoolhouse on Broome Street (now the Clermont Womans Club building). She then taught six months in the new, two-story Clermont Elementary School building, (site of Cypress Ridge Elementary School on East Avenue).NAMES IN THE NEWSClermont Elementary School Principal Sharon Powell presented awards at the schools 1989 Honors Reception: Outstanding Chorus student award, Ashley Hudson; Outstanding Orff student, Janine Connell; Outstanding fth grade students, Nathan Bishop, Melissa Riddle and Kelly Graham; plaques for six years of perfect attendance, Jennifer Barnard and Kelly Graham. Dell Smoak, youngest daughter of Claude and Honey Jean Smoak of Clermont, graduated from the University of Florida. Ruth Alice Ray ew to New York City to attend the graduation of her oldest son, John, from New York University. John attained an A+ average on his masters degree in business administration and inter national marketing. New ofcers of Beta Theta ESA are: Nancy Hettinger, president; Bonnie Kranz, vice president; Carol Andrews, parliamentarian; Toni Bell, corresponding secretary; Terry Moherek, treasurer; Eleanor Lofgren, recording secretary and Lynda McMurphy, educational director. Kranz was named Miss Enthusiasm, outgoing president Michelle Delaney was Woman of the Year and Lynda McMurphy was Philanthropic Award for chairing Las Vegas Night. Our south Lake veter ans were remembered at a Memorial Day breakfast and service at the American Legion Hall. Alvin Knight gave the invocation, Jean Winston led the Pledge of Allegiance, guest speaker was Richard Harris and the benediction was by Bill Rennegarbe. Mrs. Jo Cunningham chaired the annual Bike-a-Thon for cystic brosis. Winners were Larry Maynor, Nick Ar tis, Jeremiah Kelly, Katie Saunders and Joey Saunders. THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comLegally Blonde, The Musical! is a summer hit for Bay Street Players, much to the delight of the 40-member cast as it debuts the high-en ergy show with a catchy score at Eustis Historic State The atre stage. The musical opened June 27 and runs through July 20. Its a really, really great ex perience to see everybody become so involved in this one production, said Mar go Slaby, theater operations manager. We were so sur prised to have such an amaz ing following on the show. We have two more weekends left and our box ofce has been running around selling tickets. It is a little bit stressful, but were really, really happy. Its happy stress. Bay Street Players summer show is typically the biggest production of the year, and the cast and crew have been hard at work promoting Legally Blonde throughout Lake County, The Villages and Orlando, inviting com panies, law ofces, real es tate agents and sororities to make the trip to Eustis to see the musical. She believes those who enjoyed the 2001 movie really will love the musical. Just like the hit movie, the musical centers around the life of Elle Woods, a homecoming queen who doesnt take no for an answer. So when Elle, played by Mere dith Pughe, is dumped by her boyfriend, Warner, played by Nick Brown, for someone serious, Elle puts down the credit cards, hits the books and heads for Harvard Law School. Along the way, the sorority sister proves that being true to yourself never goes out of style. While in law school, she discovers that her knowledge of the law can help others, especially an exercise queen who is accused of murder. The musical is a lot more deep in terms of personal goals and troubles that re ally arent touched on in the movie, but they are really expressed through music and singing, Slaby said. The cast does a really great job of interpreting those differ ent roles that we dont usual ly see in the movie. Written by Heather Hach, with music and lyrics by Lau rence OKeefe and Nell Ben jamin, the show is loaded with humorous moments, Slaby said. Joining Pughe and Brown are more than 30 other per formers, including Max Her skovitz as Emmett, Laura De grenia as Vivian, Jonathan Olson as Callahan and Maria Rossodivito as Paulette. Director and choreog rapher Amanda Warren is joined by producer James Meadows, while Andy Matchett serves as the shows mu sical director. Scenic designs were created by Scott Fattiz zi and Tom Mangieri, light ing by John Whitely and cos tumes by Sara Gray. Tickets for Legally Blonde, The Musical! are $21 for Fri day, Saturday and Sunday shows, and $18 for Wednes day and Thursday produc tions. The cost for students with ID is $11. Evening shows start at 8 / p.m. and matinees are at 2 / p.m. at Historic State Theatre, 109 N. Bay St., Eus tis. For tickets, call 352-3577777 or go to www.baystreetplayers.org. Theatergoers who cant get enough of Bay Street Players productions can see another play, Glengarry Glen Ross, a 1984 Pulitzer Prize black comedy by David Mamet, at the theaters second stage at 7:30 / p.m. Sunday and July 20. Tickets for Glenngar ry Glenn Ross are $12 for adults and $7 for students, and may be purchased online or through the theaters box ofce. Directed by John DiDonna, Glenngarry Glenn Ross contains strong language that may not be suitable for children.EUSTISLegally Blonde, The Musical! is big hit for Bay Street Players PHOTO COURTESY OF BAY STREET PLAYERS Meredith Pughe stars as Elle Woods in Bay Street Players production of Legally Blonde, The Musical! The show runs through July 20 at Historic State Theatre in Eustis.Its a really, really great experience to see everybody become so involved in this one production. We were so surprised to have such an amazing following on the show. We have two more weekends left and our box office has been running around selling tickets. It is a little bit stressful, but were really, really happy. Its happy stress.Margo Slaby, theater operations manager

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Wednesday, July 9, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B3 D004329 rffntbbrfSelectedfromHistoricDowntown Clermont's80-plusmembers,we're pleasedtopresenttheCDPFeatured BusinessoftheMonth...FINDERSKEEPERSFINDERSKEEPERS wasopenedonNovember 1,2010on8thandMontrosestreetsinHistoric DowntownClermont.Owner,PatMatson,who retire d after 30 yearsinthecorporatebu si ness world,decidedshecouldfinallyfollowherdream ofowningherownsmallbusiness.Notexactly surewhatFindersKeeperswouldbetoday ithas evolvedintoaUniqueGift,HomeDcorandgently usedFurnitureboutique. Customersenjoytheuniqueitemstheycan purchaseatFindersKeepersandappreciate theeverturninginventorywithnewitemsbeing introduceddaily.AccordingtoPatfindingthe treasu resandmerchandisingthemiswhatshe lovestodo.SellingisjustsomethingIhaveto dotostayinbusinessshelaughs. 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SEEJULIE (352)394-61 11 rfnn tttbIh avepartsforallmajorappliancesandair conditioningandauthorizedrepairservicetoo!rr D002889 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comBill and Cyndi Bry an, local business owners and members of Brookside Church in Minneola, have started a new ministry there called Reels on Wheels. The Bryans, under the direction of senior pastors Wade and Julie Davis, hope to bring lo cal families together at 7 / p.m. on the rst Fri day of every month for a free movie. The church is located at 120 W. Washington St. in Minneola, and Fri days showing of Gods not Dead will be the kickoff. We are wanting to bring families together, and what better way than a movie night? Cyndi Bryan said, adding that every movie they show will have a Christian or family-re lated message. As former owners of a Java & Jesus, a Christian bookstore and coffee shop that was in down town Clermont, the Bryans were interested in showing movies to their customers but didnt have a license. Now, however, the Bryans are licensed through the Pureix Movie Ministry. And with Brookside as their venue, Bryan said the pairing is perfect. This is good, clean entertainment we are bringing, and I think people will not only like the venue but the mov ies, Bryan said. The movies will not necessarily be all Christian movies all the time, but they will have a positive and inspiring message. Bryan said she expects many great things to come of the couples new venture because of the way movies seem to touch people. In fact, Bryan was introduced to God through a movie. Growing up, my fam ily was not a religious one and we didnt go to church or anything. But when I was a bit older, someone invited me to a movie night. It was a drive-in Christian mobile setup, and at the end of the movie, there was a chance to accept God and I did. That was about 36 years ago, Bryan said. Bryan said the de cision to sign on with Pureix was a simple one. I knew it (Reels on Wheels) was what we should be doing. I thought, I get to give back in the same way, and I feel like Ive come full circle almost. Bryan said this months movie, Gods Not Dead, is about a college professor who gives his young students an assignment: to write God is dead on a piece of paper or fail the class. When one student refuses, the professor gives the entire class three days to present ar guments about why he is wrong, or they all fail. Its a very good mov ie that I think peo ple will really like and may have already heard about because its message is one that has re ally caught on and that is all over the Internet, Bryan said. Bryan said at the showing, patrons will have the opportunity to order the DVD of Gods Not Dead at a special price before its avail able in stores on Aug. 5. For information on Fridays movie or future ones, call Pastor Wade at 931-237-7500 or Bry an at 407-346-3345.The Bryans hope to bring families together with Friday movie nights SUBMITTED PHOTO Bill and Cyndi Bryan will host movie nights at Brookside Church in Minneola.MINNEOLA THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comHabitat for Humanity of Lake-Sumter is investing more than $1 million in new home construction in Lake County this year, and is also restructuring and expanding its corporate and regional ofc es throughout the two counties. Kent Adcock, chief executive ofcer of Habitat for Humanity of Lake-Sumter, said the local agency wants to be more responsive and in collabo ration with the local communities in the 1,700-square-mile ser vice area that Habitat serves in its mission to provide sustainable home ownership for families earning from 30 to 80 percent of the area median income. The organizations back ofce moved to the Spanish Springs location, 900 Main St., Suite 210, in The Vil lages last week, he said. That is the site of Habitats human rela tions, payroll, compliance and fund devel opment. Adcock will oper ate out of The Villages, while also taking time about twice a week to travel and meet with staff at each of the re gional ofces, including the Domestic Glob al Village ofce in Eustis and the Golden Triangle ofce, also in Eustis.THE VILLAGES Habitat is restructuring and expanding

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B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, July 9, 2014 Solution on page B7 Mon.Fr i.9amto4pm, Sa t. by appoint mentLAKECOUNTYS MOSTTRUSTED NAMEINHEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone,HAS, BC -HIS President& Wi feLinda221N.USHwy27,SuiteH(AcrossfromtheCitrus To wer)CLERMONT243-HEAR( 4327 )2755 S. Ba y St.Suit eF(Acrossfrom Tr actorSupplyCompany)EUSTIS483-HEAR( 4327 )

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B6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, July 9, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHER'S NOTICEFederal and State laws prohibit advertising expressing a discriminatory preference on the basis of race, age, sex, color, national origin, religion, handicap or marital status. The Daily Commercial will not knowingly accept advertisement for employment which is in violation of the law. Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance Employment Classifications are intended to announce bona de employment offers only. Employment advertising must disclose the specic nature of the work being offered. Some employment categories may charge fees. If any advertiser does not comply with these standards, please notify a Classied Sales Representative at 365-8245 or 365-8200.

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Wednesday, July 9, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B7 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr Crossword puzzle is on page B4. Thanks for reading the local paper!

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B8 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, July 9, 2014 rffntbbnnfbfrfrntb bnntb rf rntbtr bntb r nnn tb t b nb or bn b nb nn bbt rfr rf or ntbrntt r f n tb r ntb btttt bt nn nn ntb t b tbn tbn ntb bn bn t tr or Ce rt ied Pr e-Ow ne d r f ntb nbn n tb n bbbbf b t b rf ntb nbn n tb n b bb bf btb b bb fb b b n b b f f f t 9145So.Hwy441(AcrossFromTheAirport) MON-FRI9am-9pm,SAT9am-8pm SUNNoon-6pm MON-FRI7:00am-6:00pm SAT8am-5pmHABLAMOS ESPAOL f JENKINSHYUNDAIofLeesburg rfntbbtnt r frrn t bfrr r b rfn n r r r brr rrrrf b rrbrnrrrbrfrrbrnfrbrrnb n rn r b rbrnrfbrb nrbrn rnff b rrnb rnrfrnnff rrfr t nfrbrrnb frf r fn t b n n n t n n n n n n r r nGr ea t Se le ct io n of fn b r t t rfnt brnt r fnt rfft rfnft rfnnt brnt rfft rft r r rt rff rft r ft r ft rfnt rft rft rftf r r t rf br rfft rft rfft rft rbf rffn t t rft rffft rbf rft rfft rfnnt rft rft tt f rf nt bf t



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SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | B2 SPORTS: Hawks use summer league to prepare for title run WEDNESDAY, JULY 9, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWSTAND INSIDE CLASSIFIED B5 CROSSWORDS B4 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN B2 SPORTS B1 VOICES A3 WORD ON THE STREE T A2 SO UTH LAKE PRE SS V OLUME 99, NO. 28 3 SECTIO N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reserved www. southlakepress.com PRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com S taff Sgt. Socheat Sok Mom, a retired re support spe cialist with the United States Army, along with his wife and daughter, stood speechless in the driveway of his new home last week. The south Clermont home off U.S. Highway 27 near the Four Corners area had been aban doned and vacant but was reno vated top to bottom and present ed to Mom through the Military ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Details have emerged from a Mascotte city employees claim she was harassed by City Manager Jim Gleason, an allegation that has led him to seek employment elsewhere. I believe that I have been discriminated against because of my race (Black, Native Hawaiian/Pacic Islander) in violation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, Utility Accountant Alana Wilson wrote to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission on May 29. I continue to work for the city of Mascotte and the work environment remains hostile. An internal investigation by Fire Chief Randy Brash er and Police Chief Ronaldo Banasco, conducted after the complaint was lodged, found no validity to Wilsons claims. But Gleason, in an email to city council members last month, said he has applied for the job of city manager in Titusville because of the very tense work environ ment now at Mascotte City Hall. His search is in the pre liminary stages. Wilson claims Gleason told her she should change her computer log-in name to to ken black person and used the terms pickaninny and nappy headed in state ments made in her presence. She also alleges the city man ager related a story about MASCOTTE Details surface on city manager complaint LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com An internal review of the Animal Services In take Process concluded that the current pro cess relating to vacci nation and deworming animals is adequate. Bob Melton, inspec tor general with the Lake County Clerk of Courts ofce, who con ducted the audit, said between February and May when the proce dures were reviewed, the ofce noted a grad ual improvement in the way the shelter handled animals. But prior mistakes and the need for consis tency were also noted in the report. Over the past several months there have been mistakes and they need to make sure those mis takes are not repeated, he said. Those mistakes in cluded inconsisten cies in deworming and vaccinations during the intake process be fore written procedures were put into place at the end of April. But the same report also determined prior to the written protocols, animals were not vac cinated until they left the facility. It is important they are consistent in follow ing these policies and procedures, Melton said. The data reviewed in the report found an 80 percent compliance rate for deworming for the four months. LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com When Sunstate Carriers opened its doors in Lake County in 2001, economic incentives served an important role in job creation, company ofcials said. It helped us to cover the ex pensive advertising for people and getting them to the training, Richard Baugh, president of Sun state Companies, said. But at the same time, he said his company would have creat ed those 20 to 25 jobs without in centives. We would have found a way CLERMONT Veterans family gets gift of independence from foundation PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Dao Mom receives the keys to a newly renovated house from John Moskos, alongside husband Staff Sgt. Socheat Sok Mom and daughter Keira. BELOW: The Patriot Guard Riders were the honor guard for the presentation. A home of their own Shelter makes improvements BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Dogs wait in their kennels to be adopted at Lake County Animal Services in Tavares on July 2. TAVARES TAVARES Economic director weighs effect of incentives BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL A worker walks past a line of parked tractor-trailer cabs at Sunstate Carriers in Tavares, on Thursday. SEE HOUSE | A2 SEE JOBS | A7 SEE COMPLAINT | A4 SEE SHELTER | A6

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, July 9, 2014 THE VILLAGES Scott launches campaign office near Lake Sumter Landing In an ofce packed with telephones, campaign signs, American ags, men in suits with ear pieces and what seemed like hundreds of support ers, Gov. Rick Scott on Friday morning opened a campaign ofce in the heart of The Villages. The ofce is in the 900 block of Old Mill Run and directly across the street from Lake Sumter Landing, where Scott held a campaign rally in 2010. Telling the crowd it was a great place to spend the Fourth of July, Scott shook hands, chatted and posed for photographs with supporters. He gave a short campaign speech, in which he touted how much taxes had been cut and unemployment rates had dropped during his rst stint in ofce. At one point, he led supporters in a chant of lets keep working. The ofce will be staffed by Republican volunteers who will answer phones, distribute bumper stickers and posters and conduct other efforts to get Scott elected to his second term in his run against his presumed opponent, Democratic front-runner and former Republican Gov. Charlie Crist. TAVARES Sheriffs office launches web page for residents Reporting crime will become some what easier for area victims and pro vide less work for deputies, thanks to a new addition to the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce website. CopLogic was launched last week on the website, giving residents the option to le reports online on low-priority and minor crimes. Such crimes include criminal mischief, damaged property, lost property, petty theft, ID theft, fraud and harass ing phone calls. Lt. John Herrell, sheriffs spokes man, said it should benet crime vic tims who are already trying to balance work, childrens activities, family and meal times and other demands for their time. To le a report online, residents can go to the sheriffs website at www. lcso.org and then to the right column under Whats New or the top row under How Do I? Once on the page, the resident is navigated through a se ries of questions. CLERMONT New guide showcases south Lake lifestyle The South Lake Chamber of Commerce has announced the launch of its new South Lake, Florida: Visitors & Relocation Guide, available to the public in various businesses in south Lake and at the chamber ofce, 620 W. Montrose St. According to chamber president Ray San Fratello, This publication highlights and showcases many of the wonderful qualities associated with the south Lake area, which all come together to create a lifestyle that is the envy of Central Florida and beyond. The new guide is also available on line at the chambers website, www. SouthLakeChamber-FL.com. For information, call 352-394-4191 or email ofce@southlakechamber-.com. MINNEOLA Household hazardous waste collection event set The Lake County Solid Waste Division is encouraging Lake County residents to dispose of toxic materi als in a safe and environmentally sen sitive way at an upcoming household hazardous waste collection event, from 9 a.m. to noon Thursday at the Minneola City Hall parking lot, 800 N. U.S. Highway 27. Representatives will be on hand to collect small quantities of unused or unwanted waste products such as lawn and gardening materials, photo and swimming pool chemicals, paint and related products, cleaning solu tions, motor oil and used gas, batter ies, uorescent lamps, light bulbs and small propane tanks. For information, go to www.lake county.gov or call 352-343-3776. Area Briefs What south Lake residents are saying about ... IRAQ What role do you think the U.S. should play in Iraq at this point? Its too late. We had our chance and blew it. KEN CAREK CLERMONT We dont need to be there at this point. Its really not our ght. Its unlikely that we would ever be able to make a change. As some one who has served in combat, I think that we need to pull out now and stay away and let them handle their own future. MAJOR MCCARGO MOUNT DORA Support, air attacks, advisers. We need some ground troops but not too many. If we get more involved it will be like it was before as long as they dont turn on us. Were not helping the sit uation if they turn on us. CHARLES MUNDO CLERMONT Well we should proba bly cry, because of all the people we lost and all the people in that country who thought we would be there. I do think we should help the Kurds. They want to have their own country. And we should let the rest of the country be carved up along tribal lines. Iraq has no natural borders. It is a country manufac tured by the British. WALTER ULEKOWSKI CLERMONT Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 Warriors Support Foun dation in partnership with Bank of America. The family was invit ed inside to see it for the rst time after a brief pre sentation of colors and the Pledge of Allegiance headed by a local chapter of Patriot Guard Riders. Friends, family and neighbors looked on as the family, through smiles and tears of joy, entered. Reas Dip, Moms moth er, who knows little En glish beyond Thank you, needed no words, because her tears, bows and uplifted hands spoke volumes. Despite all the thank yous directed at them, John P. Moskos, Bank of Americas Central Florida Market president, said it is Mom who deserves the gratitude. This is just a small way for us to say thank you to Sergeant Mom for his service to the country and to his family for their sacrices and support, Moskos said. After havin g a look around the house, Mom said the experience was a little bit overwhelming. I really didnt expect so many people to be here with us today and car ing so much for us. Were truly blessed and well be forever thankful. We have never had a house of our own and really, we havent been together as a family too much since I only just got out of the military in April, Mom said. Moms wife, Dao, said it all feels like a dream to her. One of her rst or ders of business, she said, is fencing the back yard and planting a garden. We love it (the house), but we just cant believe it. It hasnt hit us yet. Maybe in like a month well wake up and say, Where are we? How did we get here? Dao Mom said, adding that their furniture is scheduled to arrive from Washington state later this month. Keira, who immediately found her room because of the toys, treasure box, drawing tablets and cray ons, plopped down on a purple bean bag and be gan blowing bubbles. Keira said she could not wait to move in and hope future dcor ideas for her room include characters from Avatar and The Last Airbender. Seeing how happy the family is and peek ing in to see Keira blow ing bubbles and sitting in her room, not wanting to come out, just makes it all worthwhile. Thats what its all about, said Brian Chilton, Bank of Americas regional market manager for Lake Coun ty. Its incredibly moving seeing the impact of our program rsthand. And just knowing what these veterans did for the coun try, you just cant thank them enough. Bank of America re cently surpassed its goal to donate 1,000 proper ties to nonprots sup porting military service member families and rst responders. The bank works closely with Mil itary Warriors Support Foundation and oth er nonprot organiza tions that identify the home recipients and also provide related services, such as nancial counsel ing. Originally envisioned as a three-year program when announced in Au gust 2012, Bank of Amer ica reached its 1000th military home donation more than a year ahead of schedule. The bank will continue the program, of cials said. Moms home marks the 240th home the bank has presented to a returning veteran in Florida. Mom served in the U.S. Army from October 2007 to April 2014. He was born in Cambodia, served in the ROTC through out high school in Long Beach, Calif., and joined the Army, serving in Iraq and Afghanistan. While in the Uruzgan Province of Afghanistan in 2012, Moms platoon was attacked by a suicide bomber. Wounded and dazed, Mom aided fellow soldiers injured by the blast. Mom was award ed a Purple Heart and an Army Commendation Medal with V Device for valorous actions under enemy re. Mom, planning to pur sue a career in the medi cal eld, said he is grate ful to be alive and home with his family. That suicide bomb er came out of nowhere. There were kids all around the place and he was about 15 feet away from us. Nobody knew who he was. We tried to stop him, but he just ex ploded himself. Two peo ple died and a lot of peo ple were injured and on the ground. I was lucky, Mom said at the home dedication Wednesday. Mom and his family are no stranger to hardship. His mother led four small children and her own mother safely from the depths of the Cam bodian jungle a refugee camp in Thailand. They made a grueling, monthlong trek through con stant drizzling rain, rice eld res, mud, heat and shelling. The family arrived in Dallas, Texas, in the win ter of 1980, and after set tling in Long Beach, Ca lif., Mom recalls the familys struggles with gangs and poverty. Looking back, Mom said the entire family is grateful to be alive, in the safety of the United States and in close proximity to one another now. His sib lings live only one hour away in Zephyrhills. Mom said even the in juries he sustained while serving in the Army are nothing compared to what the United States has given him and his family. I was a little kid, like about 5, so I vaguely re member eeing Cam bodia, though Ive heard stories from my older sis ter and brother and from my mom and grand mother, Mom said. I clearly remember being just feet from the Thailand border when we turned around and saw that my sister, who was carrying our young est brother, had dropped him, unable to endure his weight through deep banks of mud. My moth er, older brother and me had to run and get him, and just as we were lift ing him, a shell that land ed right beside us in the mud slid away from us as a mudslide occurred so it didnt hit us. My mother always breaks down in tears when she talks about it, he said. Its amaz ing were here today. Its amazing what people have done to help us and well never forget that, Mom said. HOUSE FROM PAGE A1 LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Staff Sgt. Socheat Sok Mom and wife Dao approach their new house while veterans stand at attention and salute. Daughter Keira is hidden between her parents.

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Wednesday, July 9, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3 A weaker America The editorial in todays paper, Hillary Clinton, world-class troublemaker, by Gina Barreca describes her record as secre tary of state as an asset. It is the opposite. She failed to send help in Benghazi, lied about it later, didnt negotiate any treaty with anyone and said on her book tour the ve prisoners released posed no threat to America. Hello? Whats happening in Iraq now? The foreign poli cy of this president and State Department has emboldened our enemies and weakened our military substantially. Anyone who can read or watch televi sion can see that. MARY ALDERTON | Grand Island Companies hide behind religion The debate over the con traception mandate in the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) has taken a dan gerous and alarming turn. One hundred businesses, re ligious entities and nonprof its have come out of the wood work and sued to block women from receiving the reproductive health care to which theyre en titled under the law. The entities that have led lawsuits against the contracep tion mandate in the Affordable Care Act include military con tractors, car dealerships, food processors and other for-prof it businesses that depend on maintaining a good relationship with the public. Im offended by their use of religion to justify discrimination against women. Thats why Im supporting the National Organization for Women (NOW) in its Stand Against the Dirty 100 campaign. I refuse to support companies and groups that have decided that their personal beliefs are more important than the rights of their employees. Birth control is a vital and common aspect of womens re productive health care. Ninetynine percent of sexually ac tive women in the United States have used birth control at some point, and here I include my self. I do not believe that the re ligious beliefs of an employ er trump the religious freedoms and bodily autonomy of their companys female employees. A for-prot corporation is not a person capable of religious exercise. And, the birth control coverage requirement applies to the company not the individuals who own it. LUCINDA MCGINN | Eustis American values celebrated Parades, reworks, patriot ic music and family gatherings mark the annual holiday cele brating the birth of our nation. I have great memories of tak ing my children to the Mount Dora Fourth of July parade and watching the evening reworks on the shores of Lake Dora in Tavares. The Fourth of July is a great time to celebrate our nations heritage. But it is also a time to reect on those great Americans who preserved our freedoms. Woodrow Wilson said: A nation which does not remember what it was yesterday does not know what it is today, nor what it is trying to do. We are trying to do a futile thing if we do not know where we came from or what we have been about. How can we honor our na tions heritage? President Ronald Reagan had the answer. He said, Our families nurture, preserve and pass on to each succeeding generation the values we share and cherish, values that are the foundation for our freedoms ... in raising and instructing our children, in providing personal and compassionate care for the elderly, in maintaining the spir itual strength of religious com mitment among our people. I believe its important to re member that each man, woman and child make of themselves what they make of their country. REED MARKHAM | SORRENTO A hidden gem Clermont, the Gem of the Hills, is an undervalued jewel. Since becoming a resident of Clermont last month, I real ized it is one of the best kept se crets in Central Florida. The mix of big business and small entre preneurial ventures creates an opportunity to satisfy anyones curiosity. As I go out and explore with my family, I continuously come across a variety of independent ly owned businesses that add to the charm of the city. While I have not fully tapped into the vast amount of possibili ties, what I have experienced so far has been out of this world. I have enjoyed traditional dishes at Troys Cuban Deli, exception ally created tacos at The Urban Spot and mouthwatering des serts from Sugar Mommas Bake Shoppe. Whether driving on State Road 50 or US 27, I get excited see ing the large variety of business es available to me. As report ed by Roxanne Brown for the Daily Commercial my new city is attracting businesses at a re cord rate. The growth and es tablishment of these business es, whether established chains or small mom-and-pop startups, proves that Clermont is the place to be. I dont know how long the se cret will be kept, but I will enjoy it while it lasts. ALBERTO PIEDRA | Clermont I t is no wonder that Florida voters have limit e d choices at the polls. If there were employment ads for state law makers, the job description would hardly be enticing. WANTED: Qualied people to run for elected ofce. Must overcome barriers such as an election system rigged to favor incumbents and entrenched interests. Job pays about $30,000 a year and gets little respect. Even with the obvious difculties in recruiting good people to run for the Florida House and Senate, this year features an abysmal lack of choices. The qualifying deadline for candidates expired on June 20 with a third of the state Legislature facing absolutely no opposition. Eight state senators, all incumbent Republicans, and 38 state representatives all but one an incumbent automatically won despite having no ballots cast in their districts, the Tampa Bay Times reported. Another 14 state lawmakers face only thirdparty or write-in candidates that typically never win. Thus, 43 percent of the Legislature was decided four months before the election, based on the number of candidates with token opposition or no challengers, the Times reported. It gets worse. Even incumbents with challengers are likely to win. In 2012, incumbents won 96 percent of their races, according to the Times From the perspective of incumbent lawmakers, of course, this isnt a problem. Theyll tell you that the lack of opposition is merely an indication that the public believes theyre doing a good job. Hogwash. A Quinnipiac University poll in April found that less than a third of respondents approved of the way the Legislature was doing its job. But low approval ratings dont matter when the system is rigged in your favor. As shown by the redistricting trial that ended this month, a voter-approved initiative to remove politics from the drawing of districts was largely ignored by lawmakers. Campaign nance reforms have left loopholes for large donors. Ballot access laws make it difcult for independent and third-party candidates to make the ballot. And when they run as write-in candidates, the end result actually limits voter participation. In races where candidates from just one party qualify, all voters can cast ballots in the primary. If a write-in candidate runs, the primary is closed. That happened this year in 10 state legislative races. Given all these barriers, Florida voters shouldnt be surprised that they have limited options at the polls. Despite dissatisfaction with the Legislature, throwing the bums out really isnt an option. True election reforms are the only way to bring real choices to state races. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD ........................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST O PINION WHATS YOUR OPINION? The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Letters to the Editor 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711 By fax to: 352-394-8001 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. GUEST COLUMNS If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OUR VIEW If you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veter ans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to to www.lake vet erans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANS S OUTH LAKE PRESS Your community newspaper for more than 100 years. 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001 The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Florida 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region. All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. YOUR OPINIONS LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Too few options for Fla. voters A Florida disgrace Shame! Shame! Another mess-up with Florid a vote counters. A judge, in the last 15 sec onds of the time allotted to vote, drew lines to reverse his rst vote during the Miss Florida pageant. The vote should not have been count ed at all and the ballot should have been declared invalid, es pecially since Miss Florida had already been crowned. What a tragedy for Leesburgs Elizabeth Fechtel, who has already won many pageants, including the early talent award, already made Miss America plans and looked forward to the compe tition and preparations to go to Miami, all because one nonvote gave the crown to the sec ond in show. Knowing neither of these ladies, I can only ask my self, how much power did this judge have? Was he in his right mind? And how could the Miss Florida director, Mary Sullivan, uphold this travesty of justice? Is this really the American Way? N.E. CLEMENTS | Leesburg LETTER of the WEEK HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, July 9, 2014 Placey our ad her ea nd re ac ht he Local Mar ke t!VE RY AF FO RD AB LE!Call to da y3 52-3 94-2183 Living Yo ur Best Life 255 Wa terman Av enue Mount Dora, FL 32757 www .W atermanV illage.com Wa te rman Vi llage: Lo ca te d in one of Am erica s Wa terman Vi llage s Mount Dora was the ONL Y TOWN IN FLORIDA to be named to America s 20 Best Small To wns by Smithsonian Magazine. And when USA To day ranked small towns on their re tir ement appeal to Baby Boomers, they named Mount Dora as one of the TOP 4 IN THE NA TION, and the ONL Y ONE IN FLORIDA!Se e fo r you rs el f!To arrange a visit to Wa ter man Village and Mount Dora, call (352) 385-1126 or email info@water manvillage.com. r f r f n r r rt n t r b b f f f f f n n f f t f f f t t f b white people putting jam on a black person a Jam Boy as a mos quito lure during social events. City ofcials had until June 30 to re spond to the allegations. In a letter to the EEOC from Randy Brown Jr., a Flagler Beach attorney hired by the city, he said there is no evidence that sup ports Wilsons allegations of discrimina tion, a hostile work environment and/ or retaliation because of her race. My clients internal investigation into the allegations raised by Ala na Wilson reveals that her claims are totally lacking in factual support, as discussed at length in this posi tion statement, he wrote. For this reason, respondent urges that a no cause determination be issued as ex peditiously as possible. Brown contends Wilson took many of Gleasons statements out of con text and that she failed to complain to anyone at city hall about being ra cially harassed, as outlined in the citys personnel policies. Anoth er black woman, who had been employed by Mascotte at one time, was interviewed by Banas co and Brasher. That employee said shed neither had a problem with Gleason nor had she heard him make any type of racial statement or com ments against her or others. Wilson could not be reached for comment and EEOC ofcials would not release a statement because of privacy laws. It is not known when the EEOC will make a determination as to wheth er to continue with an investigation into Wilsons claim or issue a no cause determination. In Gleasons email to council mem bers, referencing the EEOC com plaint and his reasons for inquiring about positions elsewhere, he said, This (EEOC complaint) was inves tigated and found baseless but, be cause of the false accusations, it has created a very tense work environ ment for all at city hall. I am afraid to be around the per son and make sure I am not in the of ce or break room without a witness to assure additional false accusations are not made, Gleason said. COMPLAINT FROM PAGE A1 IN MEMORY DEATH NOTICES William T. Cox William T. Cox, 84, of Umatilla, died Friday, June 27, 2014. Beyers Fu neral Home, Umatilla. Johnny Lee Dukes Jr. Johnny Lee Dukes Jr., 55, of Eustis, died Monday, June 30, 2014. Hayes Brothers Funeral Home, Eustis. James Neil Eastwood James Neil Eastwood, 59, of Tavares, died Sunday, June 29, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares. Margaret Goodwin Margaret Chapman Goodwin, 87, of Bush nell, died Saturday June 28, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Margie Hicks Margie Hicks, 77, of Leesburg, died Thurs day, July 3, 2014. Ar rangements by PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Leesburg. Thomas A. Lach Thomas A. Lach, 66, of Clermont, died July 1, 2014. Arrangements by Brewer and Sons Funer als and Cremation Ser vices, Clermont. Martha Martinez Martha Esperan za Martinez, 55, of Al tamonte Springs, died Saturday, June 28, 2014. Rocker-Cusack Mortu ary, Leesburg. Daniel W. Mason Daniel W. Bill Ma son, 90, of Tavares, died Wednesday, July 2, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares. Harry Van Meter Harry Van Meter, 91, of Altoona, died Friday, June 27, 2014. Beyers Fu neral Home, Umatilla. James A. Perkins James A. Perkins, 84, of Leesburg, died Tues day, July 1, 2014. Ar rangements by PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Leesburg. Marian Arminta Peterson Marian Arminta Pe terson, 89, of Lady Lake, died Sunday, June 29, 2014. Harden/Pauli Fu neral Home, Eustis. Jane Dabkowski Pichette Jane Dabkowski Pichette, 70, of Uma tilla, died Sunday, June 29, 2014. Beyers Funer al Home, Umatilla. Donald Walter Powell Jr. Donald Walter Pow ell, Jr., 66, of The Villag es, died Sunday, June 29, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations. Wildwood. George Edward Santman II George Edward Sant man, II, 53, of Lees burg, died Tuesday, July 1, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg. Nathan Sessum Nathan Duckworth Sessum, 58, of Wild wood, died Monday, June 30, 2014. Rock er-Cusack Mortuary, Leesburg.

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Wednesday, July 9, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com The South Lake Chamber of Commerce will host its bi-annual Hob Nob event on Aug. 7 at the Clermont City Center, 620 West Mon trose St., in downtown Cler mont. Guests will have the chance to vote in a straw poll in various city, county, state and federal races. The Hob Nob is a unique opportunity to see democ racy in action, as candidates for ofce meet face to face with voters eager to partic ipate in the free exchange of ideas, said Kasey Kes selring, Montverde Acade my headmaster and event chair. The chamber expects more than 20 candidates to take part, representing lo cal, county, state and federal ofces. More than 500 peo ple are expected to attend. Chamber president Ray San Fratello said candidates like the event because they can share passions, plat forms and views, and vot ers like it because they can learn more about candi dates by interacting with them in person. All the state referendum issues scheduled to be on the ballot in November will be included in the straw vote. The straw poll is great because it lets candidates see how they might be far ing with this group of qual ied voters who are asking questions about what they are planning to do for them if they get elected, San Fratello said. The atmo sphere at these Hob Nobs is just a nice night out with great food, mingling and the feel of election night when really, we are just prepping for the primary. The Hob Nob will be host ed by the Kiwanis Club of South Lake. It will be ca tered by Carrabbas Italian Grill. Tickets will be available on a rst-come, rst-served basis and must be reserved in advance. The event is sponsored by many local businesses and organizations that have partnered with the cham ber. It will be a fun and valu able event for the public and candidates, San Fratel lo said. For information or to re serve tickets, call 352-3944191 or email ofce@south lakechamber-.com. CLERMONT Hob Nob offers a preview of potential election results PHOTO COURTESY OF SOUTH LAKE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE At the last Hob Nob, guests watched an overhead screen to see the results of a straw poll. This years event is Aug. 7.

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A6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, July 9, 2014 HWY 27/4 41 2 miles fr om Hwy 27 rf nnftb 787-4440 tnfrfn n nntr nrf bfnffn bt r rn n $300OFFRE MA NU FA CTURED CAR TSCas h or ch ec k. Mu st pr ese nt ad on pu rch ase Lim ite d Ti me Offer See stor e for details Ja son Cotto Julie Kiley Kris Memolo Marian Armstrong rf r ntb (352)242-4500 CLERMONTBLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH rf rnrtfnrb English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSFAMILYFELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time!FIRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care t r f rnrtfnf n GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONT, FL Many Other Activities each week fff n Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.orgLIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWJACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH r f nt b nnt f nn Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLIFECHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm rnrtfnrrSOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary) ; 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.orgST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am (Rite I) 10:00 am (Rite II) 5:00 pm (Praise & Worship) Mens Prayer BreakfastWOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH OFGOD INCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALEFERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for ChildrenGrovelandFIRSTBAPTISTCHURCH OFGROVELANDnt Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pmMT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! bf rfrb n r ftnr r ftnrfMINNEOLACONGREGATIONSINAI OFMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club rnfrnrr n NEWLIFEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH, PCA18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 amTEMPLE OF THELIVINGGOD n Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce RowlandMONTVERDEWOODLANDSLUTHERAN(LCMS)15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 amOAKLANDPRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org South Lake South Lake Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKER FUNERAL HOME Ser ving Florida Fa milies Since 1957 A Full Ser vice Home -Locally Owned & Opera tedRon Becker & Charles Becker ,F uneral Directors352394 -7 12 180 6 W. Minneola Av e. ,C ler mont, FL Cremation ChoicesDir ect Cr emation$675Plus Container Ron Beck er ,D ir ector352-394-8228921 S. US Hwy 27, Minneola, FL The review notes the hiring of a new shel ter supervisor, which was vacant during the event, is expected to provide signicantly higher compliance. The review noted sev eral other areas that re quired improvement: staff was inadequate ly trained on software, screening procedures needed to be imple mented for animal res cue groups, record keeping had to im prove, and an inventory system was needed to track vaccinations and microchips. In the last year, Lake County Animal Ser vices Division has had a growing list of problems in the shelter. Two internal audits published in 2013, one nding issues with re cord keeping at the shelter and the other on pet licensing laws, cited at least 45 areas for im provement. Management also has not been consistent at the shelter. The head of the Animal Services di vision announced her resignation in March, citing a tight bu dget and public pressure over the departments euthani zation rate. Cyndi Na son was the second director of Animal Ser vices to resign within the past year. Nason and Marjorie Boyd both resigned amid pressure from animal activists who claim the shelter was euthanizing too many animals. But the public crit icism is only a partial reason for the resigna tions, county ofcials said, pointing to fund ing issues that kept the county from hiring a eld supervisor and res cue coordinator to help take the pressure off the director. County com missione rs agreed in a meeting on March 11 to delay funding those po sitions until Oct. 1. Brian Sheahan, for mer director of animal services, said euthani zations have been re duced. Euthanization rates for dogs from Oc tober to May were at 19 percent, compared with 22 percent the pri or year. But the incidents that occurred in the last few months particularly concerned ofcials. In April, six puppies adopted from the shel ter received no treat ment and all later died as a result of what a vet erinarian said was a case of hookworm in one puppy. Two other puppies adopted from the same litter were also found to have hook worms but were saved through blood transfu sions and intravenous drips, said Allison Zach ary, a member of Plenty of Pitbulls, a rescue or ganization that adopted the animals. Then, the shelter ex perienced a parvovi rus outbreak the follow ing month. Sixteen dogs were euthanized and the shelter was closed temporarily. Shortly thereafter, county ofcials called for a special review of the shelters intake and vaccination policies. Following the review request, Lake County commissioners agreed on June 10 to trans fer operations of Ani mal Services to the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce. Melton said it is criti cal to train staff on soft ware. When you have dif ferent staff put in (in formation) in different locations, it is impossi ble to generate accurate management reports, he said. Melton said he is es pecially concerned about the two records kept for each animal: computer software and animal ID cards not having the same, con sistent information. When you have in consistencies in actions and dates, then no one can be sure what infor mation is accurate, he said. This is why he said it is critical to train staff on the software. If people do not know how to use the software properly, it is not generating the in formation that Animal Services needs to ade quately manage the or ganization, he said. The need to screen rescue coordinators is also vital, he added. In many respects, rescue organizations are similar to the coun ties animal shelter and they should have pro tocols in place regard ing vaccination and de worming, he said. Several commis sioners said they were pleased with the review and expressed hope the problems would go away under the sheriffs leadership. SHELTER FROM PAGE A1

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Wednesday, July 9, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A7 Cler monts Newest Seafood/Steakhouse!Grand Opening July 4thweekend!Aged Prime Steaks Always Fr esh Seafood Open 7 days Lunch/Dinner ~ Sunday brunch Live music We d-Sun794 W. Minneola Av e.In Historic Downtown Cler mont!352-242-3800 INCLUDES: Gr een Fees & Cart Fees. Va lid for up to 4 players. Not valid with any other oer Must pr esent coupon at check-in.Expir es 9/10/14Call 407-886-3303 today for your Te e Ti me!www .ZellwoodGolf.comSLP18 HOLES$25Plus Ta xFREE SLEEVEOF GOLF BALLS Ron Beck er Dir ector352-394-8228 r f nt b t $675 t r f n t r r f n f t b n t b b n r f n t b n r n n t t n n n n n n n n t n n b n n n n r n t r t b n n t n n b n n b t t b f t n t n n b n n r n t n n to make it work as most business people would, he said. You cant let the window of opportunity shut on it. In the coming months, Lake Coun tys Economic Develop ment and Tourism De partment is evaluating its incentive program to determine whether the countys resources are being used appropri ately. The department must come before the Lake County Commis sion for approval of any change in its incentive program. While the evaluation has been discussed for months, county of cials said a recent re view of incentives which revealed several outstanding incentive grants with auditing pe riods that had expired brought the issue to the forefront. Although all job growth incentive grants require an auditing pe riod to make sure the jobs created are re tained for a minimum of two years, according to county documents, six incentive grants, from 2004 to 2008, were found to have incom plete reporting. The department distribut ed $287,000 for 78 jobs created but could only verify 18 that were re tained. The county has 13 open incentive ac counts with eight differ ent companies. The contract agree ments allow for $345,000 in incentive grants associated with the creation of 142 jobs. The department has paid out $290,000 on the creation of 85 jobs, according to economic development ofcials. A company must create the jobs and hire before receiving incentive pay ments. Robert Chandler, the countys director of Economic Develop ment and Tourism, said in his personal opinion, many of these compa nies were going to cre ate those jobs regard less of whether they received incentives. The whole reason we are here is to help busi nesses create jobs, he said. The question is, is providing incentives di rectly to a company for job growth the most ef cient way to do that? Chandler said direct ly incentivizing com panies, in his opinion, leads to a far lesser re turn on investment than if the county were to in vest that same money in areas such as workforce, education, infrastruc ture and transportation. Training and develop ing the workforce con tinues to be the num ber one issue for small businesses, accord ing to Chandler. Many businesses want to hire, he said, but do not have enough skilled labor. Chandler said if the department used the funding it receives for incentives, which was $150,000 last scal year, for workforce develop ment instead, it would be more benecial for economic develop ment. For example, he said if a company said it need ed a certain type of skill, then perhaps the coun tys economic develop ment department could sponsor the training of that skill at Lake Techni cal College or Lake-Sum ter State College. If a business needs a specic type of skill not made available, our money could help sub sidize the program to get people trained, Chandler said. He cited the Lake Tech Center for Ad vanced Manufactur ing a partnership between the county and the school to train workers in manufac turing, machining and welding, and the Part ners for Success pro gram for bringing the business and education communities together. Infrastructure also is an important factor in economic develop ment, Chandler said. If you have better roads, better infrastruc ture, it is more attrac tive for companies to come in and help exist ing businesses, he said. Moving away from providing tradition al economic incentives will allow the county to support a larger num ber of businesses with more benetting from incentive resources, Chandler said. If you are truly look ing out for the best in terest of the taxpayer dollars and moving the needle with economic development, this is the best way to go, he said. Chandler said the county does not have a large amount of money to play the big recruit ment game, and when companies express in terest in relocating to the county, incentives are not high on the list of criteria in making their decision. Indeed, in the top 10 criteria for businesses to relocate, incentives are ranked seventh, ac cording to a Site Selec tion Consultant Loca tion Criteria Study. At the top is an available workforce. Sean Snaith, direc tor of the University of Central Floridas Insti tute for Economic Com petitiveness, said Chan dlers idea is reasonable and logical. Things like work force development or infrastructure really benet any and all busi nesses currently there or thinking of locating or opening in the re gion, he said. Work force is always going to be an important com ponent of business lo cation decisions. All the incentives in the world arent going to matter if you arent getting the worker with the skills to run your business. Dy namic workforce is a much more powerful attractant than any oth er incentive program may be. JOBS FROM PAGE A1 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Sunstate workers enjoy a pizza lunch in the workshop for tractor-trailer cabs.

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A8 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, July 9, 2014 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY ENTRY FORMName ________________________________________________________________ Address ________________________________________________________________ Home Phone ________________________________________________________________ Work Phone ________________________________________________________________H O W T O PLAY1. Fin d the hidde n Bing o chips with in the ad ve rtis em en ts in th is sec tio n that spe ll Bin go 2. Ma rk an X on the ma tc hing num be rs on yo ur ent ry for m. 3. Fil l out yo ur nam e, addres s, da ytime phone & h ome pho ne nu mbe rs and mail the e ntry fo rm an d Bi ng o card to : So uth L ak e Pre ss c/ o Bin go 73 2 W Mon tro se St Cl er mo nt FL 347 11C O NTES T R U LES1. A ny reside nt of any area within South Lake Presss circulat ion area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Emplo yees of South Lake Press, their immedia te families, independ ent contrac tors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winn er must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualificatio n. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifyin g Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawin g to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermon t, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. BINGO B I N G O SOU TH LA KEPRE SSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde 7 25 34 47 67 13 18 31 59 74 9 21FREE SPA CE53 72 2 16 42 48 63 5 29 39 52 68 N I B O G B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Suzanne Mini WIN$25CASH! WIN$25CASH! D004626 D002923 SUMMER SERIES MUSIC SERIES SERIES SERIES JUL Y5TH,12TH, 19TH&26THFREE ADMISSION LIVEMUSIC EVER YSATURDA Y1-4PM FREETOURS& WINETASTING WWW.LAKERIDGEWIN ER Y.COM DONTFORGET!YOU CAN FIND OUR WINE IN YOUR LOCAL SUPERMARKET OR WINE SHOP. D004867 I 16 I 29 I 21 I 18 I 25

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B1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, July 9, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTS SPORTS EDITOR ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE .............................. 365-8268 FAX .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL ......... sports@dailycommercial.com S PORTS and LEISURE PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL TOP: Lake Minneolas Marcus Dodson (0) dribbles the ball around an opponent during a Foundation Academy Summer League game against Colonial High School at Foundation Academy in Winter Garden on June 30. BOTTOM: Lake Minneolas Anthony Brown dunks the ball during a Foundation Academy Summer League game. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Basketball and summer ar ent often spoken in the same breath. The stifling heat and humid ity in Florida turns the con crete hardwood on area play grounds into baking sheets, more conducive to frying eggs instead of putting a basketball through a hoop. For local high-school pro grams, however, summer has become a time to lay the groundwork for next season. Even for teams that reached the apex just a few months ago, summer leagues are a way for coaches to get players back on the floor and re-establish the mind-set that made them so successful. At Lake Minneola, coach Freddie Cole led the Hawks to a 28-4 record in 2013-14 and a berth in the Class 6A state championship game, which they lost to Miami Norland. Rather than being satisfied simply with reaching the ti tle game, Cole and his charges spent June getting ready for an other postseason run. The Hawks played in a variety of camps and summer leagues during the month, eventual ly matching last years regu lar-season record. Lake Minne ola wrapped up the month on Monday by reaching the semi finals at the Winter Garden Foundation Academy summer league. At the Foundation Acade my gym, Lake Minneola blast ed Class 8A Orlando Colonial 68-45 and edged Orlando Lake Highland Prep in the quarterfi nals by one despite trailing by 14 with five minutes to play. In the semifinals, the Hawks with only six players available fell to Windermere Prep by six. As it turned out, two of Lake Minneolas losses during the summer were against Winder mere Prep and a third came at the hands of perennial Class 8A powerhouse Orlando Dr. Phil lips. I was very encouraged to play as well as we did against Windermere Prep, Cole said. We had key players who were injured and others at camps with their AAU teams, but the guys we had gave us every thing. Windermere Prep is a very good private-school team and we were playing our third game of the day. Winning the league championship wouldve been the best way to close out the league for us, but Im proud of what I saw. Our players are ready to get back to the state finals. Cole said his players had not worked together since los ing 60-44 to Miami Norland on March 1 at the Lakeland Cen ter. The loss closed out a sto rybook season for the Hawks, which spent most of the sea son as the No. 1-ranked team in Class 6A. Despite the disappointing loss in the title game, Cole said his team learned valuable les sons during the season-long run lessons he feels will pay dividends next season. Most teams know who were are now and we wont sneak up on anyone, Cole said. Thats a complement in a way, but that also means we have to be ready every night. Part of our summer work has been to get our men tal makeup where it needs to be. These guys arent just going through the motions, expecting to win. They have a little bit of a chip on their shoulders and thats good. Theyre playing to win, even in the summer, and thats the attitude we want. In many ways, Lake Minneola looked like the same team that beat opponents by an average of 25 points per game in 201314. Against Orlando Colonial, for example, the Hawks raced up and down the floor on of fense and clogged the passing lanes on defense. They forced countless turnovers with its frenetic, pressure defense. Even with only two of last years starters Marcus Dod son and Anthony Brown on the floor, they seemed to be in midseason form against the Grenadiers. We wanted to get back into it, Cole said. Ive always be lieved you get better by play ing good teams and thats what weve done this summer. We used last summer to establish our goals for the season and thats what were doing this year. Its been a very good sum mer. Dodson agreed with his coach. After the Hawks trounced Orlando Colonial, Dodson said it was important for the team to take their sum mer workouts seriously. He said the quicker Lake Minneola regained its timing and began playing with the co hesiveness that made them so effective last season, the better it would be for the program. Were not a secret to any one, Dodson said. Every team knows about Lake Minneola and what we do. We cant wait until the regular season to play ourselves into shape. We have to start now if we want to have a better season (in 2014-15) than we had last year. We only have to climb one more step to do that, but thats the toughest step. Like Dodson, Brown felt dis appointed with last seasons fin ish. He said that to help to fuel his summer preparations and will continue to work at raising his game to the next level. I think we can be the best team in the state, Brown said. We had a team good enough to win a state championship last year. Thats our goal this year and weve worked (toward that goal) all summer. We can do a lot of things now to help us get back (to the state cham pionship game). If playing in summer leagues and going to camps make us a better team, then its worth missing out on the other things our friends are doing. Hawks use summer league to prepare for title run Flying high FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com High school bas ketball teams from Lake and Sum ter counties have been making post season trips to The Lakeland Center for many of the 33 years the state tour nament has been held there. Now the Florida High School Ath letic Association, which puts on the tournament and governs high school sports in the state, is thinking about moving the tour nament elsewhere, possibly to Talla hassee or Jackson ville. The Florida As sociation of Bas ketball Coaches re leased a statement this week, demon strating its desire to keep the boys and girls tournaments in Lakeland. Ac cording to Jim Ha ley, FABC executive director, the organi zation is in full sup port of keeping both the boys and girls state hoops tourney in its current home site, The Lakeland Center. In his statement, Haley cited the ef fort put forth by the tournament com mittee to get the Polk County com munity behind the event, which lasts for two weeks one week for the girls tournament and one week for the boys tournament. Haley goes on to question if anoth er city would be able to produce the same level of sup port. I dont believe any other city can match their efforts of dedication each year of their 300 vol unteers that makes this enormous con tribution of work hours a huge suc cess over the years, Haley said. Coaches want hoops finals in Lakeland PHOTO COURTESY OF MAUREEN SHORT Mount Doras 16U softball team. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Clay Tew asked his team to have a players only meeting to decide if they wanted to win. They did and they havent lost since. Now, the Mount Dora Babe Ruth League 12-under All-Star baseball team, coached by Tew, is preparing to play in the state tourna ment at 11 a.m. today against North Fort My ers in Palm Beach Gardens. It will mark the rst time a 12U baseball team from Mount Dora has played in the state tournament. These kids wanted to play for a state championship, said Tew. Theyve played and practiced with a lot of heart and desire and that has gotten them through districts. Im very proud of them. Tew said the team is made up of players from the leagues three 12U teams the Reds, Cubs and Braves. Players were chosen based on their interest in playing and on the observations of coaches during the spring season. In its rst game in the district tournament in June, Mount Dora suffered a loss. Tew said he noticed a lot of heads hung low after the defeat, but he believed the players not the coaches needed to be the ones to decide if they had it in them to continue. The coaches got the players together and let them meet by themselves for about 10 or 15 minutes, Tew said. When they nished, they came back to us and said, We want to win. That was something they had to gure out for themselves and they picked them selves back up and went back to work. Since that meeting, they havent lost. To help offset the costs of its trip down state, including food and lodging, the team has set up a site on www.gofundme.com/ Mt-Dora-12U-allstars to accept donations. Mount Dora teams prepare for postseason

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Ann Dupee REMEMBER WHEN A weekly column that reprints some of the more interesting news stories that have appeared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press. B2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, July 9, 2014 www.southlakepress.com C OMMUNITY Proudly serving CLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWS STAFF WRITER ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 EMAIL ..... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com HOMETOWN: Chicago OCCUPATION: Broker and owner of Travis Realty Group FAMILY: Two sisters, three brothers and two lab doggies, Riley and Star What do you enjoy most about south Lake County? I enjoy the lakes and hills and all the people who live and vis it here. 1) If you had to summarize your philosophy of life in one sentence, what would it be? Live it dont just dream it. 2) Name a person or incident youve come across recently thats touched you in some way. Why did this person or incident impress you so much? My latest trip took me to Pon tevedra, Spain. There were no cars allowed in the city center and everyone walked or rode a bike to all of the businesses. Ev erything was so nice and clean. 3) How does what you do con tribute to the welfare of the area? I help people nd their dream homes and show them all the wonderful things we have going on in our community. 4) Name one of your greatest accomplishments so far. One of my greatest accom plishments, although it took 16 years of trying, is that I nally got a silver medal for the world duathlon championships. Never give up is my message. 5) Whats something youve al ways wanted to do but havent yet? Go to New Zealand. 6) What advice would you give to people who want to help out in the community? Get involved. It will come back to you 100 times over. Besides helping others you will nd out a lot about yourself and what is really important in life. FROM THE FILES | 25 YEARS AGO 1989 Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press Meet Your NEIGHBOR DIANE TRAVIS CLERMONTS OLDEST NATIVE PASSES Mrs. Winnie H. Seaver, the eldest na tive of Clermont, died June 2, one week before her 93rd birthday. She was born June 10, 1896, in a house next door to her present home at 865 Montrose St. (pres ent site of the Clermont Police Department) where she had lived for 60 years. The oldest mem ber of the First Bap tist Church, she assist ed her late husband, Percy, in the minis try of bringing chil dren to Sunday school. At age 17 she began her teaching career. For 2 years she taught ele mentary grades in the two-room schoolhouse on Broome Street (now the Clermont Wom ans Club building). She then taught six months in the new, two-story Clermont Elementary School building, (site of Cypress Ridge Elemen tary School on East Av enue). NAMES IN THE NEWS Clermont Elementary School Principal Sha ron Powell presented awards at the schools 1989 Honors Reception: Outstanding Chorus student award, Ashley Hudson; Outstand ing Orff student, Janine Connell; Outstanding fth grade students, Nathan Bishop, Melis sa Riddle and Kelly Gra ham; plaques for six years of perfect atten dance, Jennifer Barnard and Kelly Graham. Dell Smoak, young est daughter of Claude and Honey Jean Smoak of Clermont, graduated from the University of Florida. Ruth Alice Ray ew to New York City to attend the graduation of her oldest son, John, from New York University. John attained an A+ av erage on his masters degree in business ad ministration and inter national marketing. New ofcers of Beta Theta ESA are: Nan cy Hettinger, president; Bonnie Kranz, vice president; Carol An drews, parliamentarian; Toni Bell, correspond ing secretary; Terry Mo herek, treasurer; Elea nor Lofgren, recording secretary and Lynda McMurphy, education al director. Kranz was named Miss Enthusiasm, out going president Mi chelle Delaney was Woman of the Year and Lynda McMurphy was Philanthropic Award for chairing Las Vegas Night. Our south Lake veter ans were remembered at a Memorial Day breakfast and service at the American Legion Hall. Alvin Knight gave the invocation, Jean Winston led the Pledge of Allegiance, guest speaker was Richard Harris and the bene diction was by Bill Ren negarbe. Mrs. Jo Cunning ham chaired the annual Bike-a-Thon for cystic brosis. Winners were Larry Maynor, Nick Ar tis, Jeremiah Kelly, Ka tie Saunders and Joey Saunders. THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com Legally Blonde, The Musi cal! is a summer hit for Bay Street Players, much to the delight of the 40-member cast as it debuts the high-en ergy show with a catchy score at Eustis Historic State The atre stage. The musical opened June 27 and runs through July 20. Its a really, really great ex perience to see everybody become so involved in this one production, said Mar go Slaby, theater operations manager. We were so sur prised to have such an amaz ing following on the show. We have two more weekends left and our box ofce has been running around selling tick ets. It is a little bit stressful, but were really, really happy. Its happy stress. Bay Street Players sum mer show is typically the big gest production of the year, and the cast and crew have been hard at work promoting Legally Blonde through out Lake County, The Villages and Orlando, inviting com panies, law ofces, real es tate agents and sororities to make the trip to Eustis to see the musical. She believes those who en joyed the 2001 movie really will love the musical. Just like the hit movie, the musical centers around the life of Elle Woods, a home coming queen who doesnt take no for an answer. So when Elle, played by Mere dith Pughe, is dumped by her boyfriend, Warner, played by Nick Brown, for someone serious, Elle puts down the credit cards, hits the books and heads for Harvard Law School. Along the way, the sorority sister proves that being true to yourself never goes out of style. While in law school, she discovers that her knowledge of the law can help others, especially an exercise queen who is accused of murder. The musical is a lot more deep in terms of personal goals and troubles that re ally arent touched on in the movie, but they are really ex pressed through music and singing, Slaby said. The cast does a really great job of interpreting those differ ent roles that we dont usual ly see in the movie. Written by Heather Hach, with music and lyrics by Lau rence OKeefe and Nell Ben jamin, the show is loaded with humorous moments, Slaby said. Joining Pughe and Brown are more than 30 other per formers, including Max Her skovitz as Emmett, Laura De grenia as Vivian, Jonathan Olson as Callahan and Maria Rossodivito as Paulette. Director and choreog rapher Amanda Warren is joined by producer James Meadows, while Andy Match ett serves as the shows mu sical director. Scenic designs were created by Scott Fattiz zi and Tom Mangieri, light ing by John Whitely and cos tumes by Sara Gray. Tickets for Legally Blonde, The Musical! are $21 for Fri day, Saturday and Sunday shows, and $18 for Wednes day and Thursday produc tions. The cost for students with ID is $11. Evening shows start at 8 p.m. and matinees are at 2 p.m. at Historic State Theatre, 109 N. Bay St., Eus tis. For tickets, call 352-3577777 or go to www.baystreet players.org. Theatergoers who cant get enough of Bay Street Players productions can see another play, Glengarry Glen Ross, a 1984 Pulitzer Prize black comedy by David Mamet, at the theaters second stage at 7:30 p.m. Sunday and July 20. Tickets for Glenngar ry Glenn Ross are $12 for adults and $7 for students, and may be purchased on line or through the theaters box ofce. Directed by John DiDonna, Glenngarry Glenn Ross contains strong lan guage that may not be suit able for children. EUSTIS Legally Blonde, The Musical! is big hit for Bay Street Players PHOTO COURTESY OF BAY STREET PLAYERS Meredith Pughe stars as Elle Woods in Bay Street Players production of Legally Blonde, The Musical! The show runs through July 20 at Historic State Theatre in Eustis. Its a really, really great experience to see everybody become so involved in this one production. We were so surprised to have such an amazing following on the show. We have two more weekends left and our box office has been running around selling tickets. It is a little bit stressful, but were really, really happy. Its happy stress. Margo Slaby, theater operations manager

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Wednesday, July 9, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B3 D004329 r f f nt b b rfSel ected from Historic Downt own Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to pres ent the CDP Featu red Business of the Month...FINDERS KEEPERSFINDERS KEEPERS was opened on November 1, 2010 on 8th and Mo ntro se str eets in Hist oric Downtown Clermont. Owner, Pat Matson, who retire d af ter 30 years in the corporate bu si ness world, decided she could finally follow her dream of owning her own sma ll bu sines s. Not exa ctly sure what Finders Keepers would be toda y it has evolved into a Unique Gift, Home Dcor and gently used Furniture boutique. Custo mers enj oy the unique items they can purchase at Find ers Keepers and appreciate the ever turning invent ory with new items being intro duced daily. According to Pat find ing the tr ea su res and merchandising them is what she loves to do. Selling is just something I have to do to stay in business she laughs. Having expanded twice in the past 4 years, Pat contributes her success to her husband Bobs sup por t an d the ass ist an ce of her bab y gir l, as she refers to her, Jennifer Silva. Jen is really the salesperson, she is a real go getter and is always here for me. We are all a great team that makes FINDERS KEEPERS the success that it is. Whether you are looking for a birthday or wedding gift, something funny to give to someone or great furni ture for your home FI NDERS KEE PERS is wh ere you will fin d it Open Tuesd ay thro ugh Satur da y from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and Sund ay 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. you will be greated by the smiles of either Pat or Jen and usually on Sundays both will be in the boutique. S top in and say Hi, you never know what you may find. Pat and her husband Bob Matson have lived in Cler mo nt for the past 11 year s and have 4 ch il d ren and 8 grandch ildren. When not working th ey love to travel and are getting ready for a three week Norway trip in July. Not to worry FINDERS KEE PER S will be open in the capa ble hands of Jen To be sure there will be a huge sale when momma is gone. r f n t b f nf b f b nf nn n f LOOKING FOR PA RTS? SEE JULIE (352) 394-61 11 r fnn ttt b Ih ave par ts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair ser vice too!rr D002889 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Bill and Cyndi Bry an, local business own ers and members of Brookside Church in Minneola, have start ed a new ministry there called Reels on Wheels. The Bryans, under the direction of senior pas tors Wade and Julie Da vis, hope to bring lo cal families together at 7 p.m. on the rst Fri day of every month for a free movie. The church is locat ed at 120 W. Washington St. in Minneola, and Fri days showing of Gods not Dead will be the kickoff. We are wanting to bring families togeth er, and what better way than a movie night? Cyndi Bryan said, add ing that every movie they show will have a Christian or family-re lated message. As former owners of a Java & Jesus, a Christian bookstore and coffee shop that was in down town Clermont, the Bryans were interest ed in showing movies to their customers but didnt have a license. Now, however, the Bryans are licensed through the Pureix Movie Ministry. And with Brookside as their venue, Bryan said the pairing is perfect. This is good, clean entertainment we are bringing, and I think people will not only like the venue but the mov ies, Bryan said. The movies will not neces sarily be all Christian movies all the time, but they will have a positive and inspiring message. Bryan said she ex pects many great things to come of the couples new venture because of the way movies seem to touch people. In fact, Bryan was introduced to God through a movie. Growing up, my fam ily was not a religious one and we didnt go to church or anything. But when I was a bit older, someone invited me to a movie night. It was a drive-in Christian mo bile setup, and at the end of the movie, there was a chance to accept God and I did. That was about 36 years ago, Bryan said. Bryan said the de cision to sign on with Pureix was a simple one. I knew it (Reels on Wheels) was what we should be doing. I thought, I get to give back in the same way, and I feel like Ive come full circle almost. Bryan said this months movie, Gods Not Dead, is about a college professor who gives his young stu dents an assignment: to write God is dead on a piece of paper or fail the class. When one student refuses, the professor gives the entire class three days to present ar guments about why he is wrong, or they all fail. Its a very good mov ie that I think peo ple will really like and may have already heard about because its mes sage is one that has re ally caught on and that is all over the Internet, Bryan said. Bryan said at the showing, patrons will have the opportunity to order the DVD of Gods Not Dead at a special price before its avail able in stores on Aug. 5. For information on Fridays movie or future ones, call Pastor Wade at 931-237-7500 or Bry an at 407-346-3345. The Bryans hope to bring families together with Friday movie nights SUBMITTED PHOTO Bill and Cyndi Bryan will host movie nights at Brookside Church in Minneola. MINNEOLA THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com Habitat for Human ity of Lake-Sumter is investing more than $1 million in new home construction in Lake County this year, and is also restructuring and expanding its corpo rate and regional ofc es throughout the two counties. Kent Adcock, chief executive ofcer of Habitat for Humani ty of Lake-Sumter, said the local agency wants to be more respon sive and in collabo ration with the local communities in the 1,700-square-mile ser vice area that Habitat serves in its mission to provide sustainable home ownership for families earning from 30 to 80 percent of the area median income. The organizations back ofce moved to the Spanish Springs lo cation, 900 Main St., Suite 210, in The Vil lages last week, he said. That is the site of Habitats human rela tions, payroll, compli ance and fund devel opment. Adcock will oper ate out of The Villages, while also taking time about twice a week to travel and meet with staff at each of the re gional ofces, includ ing the Domestic Glob al Village ofce in Eustis and the Golden Trian gle ofce, also in Eustis. THE VILLAGES Habitat is restructuring and expanding

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Wednesday, July 9, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B5 To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact the Classied Department at (352) 314-3278.D004096 A/C Services Appliance Repair r f n tb b r b r f n trf n b Cleaning Services 352-255-8432 $ 20 OFFFIRST CLEANI NGHome Cleaning Ser vices Ci sC i sCall for FREE Estimate Ya rd Wo rk Garage Cleaning WindowsBest Rates in To wn Concrete Services Concrete For Less 8x10 Slab $450 10x48 Slab $1700No UPFRONT Costs!Blocking/ Ref./Lic./Ins.Phillip 352-504-8372Includes Concrete &L abor Construction Services Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Electrical Services Enclosure Screening rf nrt rfrb r r Garage Door Services Handyman Services r f n tb Hauling Services f rb r Lic Ins. Home Improvement Irrigation Services Spri nk ler Rep air sTi mer s, V alv es ,H eads ,L eaks etc .(352) 787-9 001Th ats all we do .S inc e1 979 Native ,4 th Gener ation Land Clearing Services Ca ll Duane Goodwin(35 2) 78 7-9001 Tr actor Wo rkBush Hogging, Rototilling, Fr on ten dW or k, Prepare Garden Beds nb t b b r r LA KES HO RES &M OR EProfessional Wa terfront Cleanup rf n t b f fb fr b b f f b r bf bf Please call to arr ange af re eq uote Landscaping Services t f t t r f r rrb r ffrb b r ff nf t r fb r r Lawn Services Dannys Lawn Care Ser viceQu al ity Ser vic ef ro mt he Ground UpMo wing ,E dging ,T rimmingFREE ESTIMA TESNo job too lar ge or small352-455-6679 Legal Services Marine Services Painting Services Af fordable Home Repair ,L LC b t r r rr r nn n t 352-551-607 3 C& SP aintingInterior /E xterior Painting Pressure Washing Deck Restorations Refinishing &S tainingLicensed, Insured &B ondedFree Estimates 352-350-1515www.cspainting03.com D004095 All Accurate Painting &D esignsInt./Ext. ~D riveway Coatings &M oreSenior &V eterans DiscountsAsk for Paul 352-267-6601 One call does it all! Plumbing Services Pressure Cleaning All County Pressure Washing Quality Work At AF air Price100% Satisfaction Guaranteed rf n tf bt tf t 352-396-9447tn Psychic Services Roong Services Shower Doors Service Tree Service bt b b b nt t Window Services AT otal Lawn Service FREE ESTIMATES -L IC./INS. r f n tn tb t 352-326-8712 /3 52-406-3354 Bathtub Renishing BATHTUBS REFINISHED ON LOCATIONRenew, on location, your rf LAKESIDE TUB &T ILE REFINISHING(352) 742-9602 LA WN SERVICE35 224 278 64Mowing Tr imming Mulching 352-444-4943 843-694-8796 Fr ee Es ti mate s 20% Se nio rD is cou nt If we ca n t xi t, it ca n tb e xe d

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B6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, July 9, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHER'S NOTICEFederal and State laws prohibit advertising expressing a discriminatory preference on the basis of race, age, sex, color, national origin, religion, handicap or marital status. The Daily Commercial will not knowingly accept advertisement for employment which is in violation of the law. Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance Employment Classifications are intended to announce bona de employment offers only. Employment advertising must disclose the specic nature of the work being offered. Some employment categories may charge fees. If any advertiser does not comply with these standards, please notify a Classied Sales Representative at 365-8245 or 365-8200.

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Wednesday, July 9, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B7 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr Crossword puzzle is on page B4. Thanks for reading the local paper!

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