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SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | B2SPORTS: MVAs Lindor on the cusp of the major leagues WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWST AND INSIDE CLASSIFIED B5 CROSSWORDS B5 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN B2 SPORTS B1 VOICES A4WORD ON THE STREE T A2SOUTH LAKE PRESSV OLUME 99, NO. 27 3 SECTIOn N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reservedwww. southlakepress.comPRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comLake County Fire Rescue enters the upcoming budget talks with the County Commission asking for $1.2 million in addition al funding just to maintain the service it has been of fering. But tight funding leaves the department unable to replace several aging re stations and trucks, according to re ofcials. Meanwhile, the two replacement stations the County Commission approved, Station 90 in Cler mont and Station 14 in Altoona, have been delayed TAVARESLake Fire Rescue expresses concerns about aging stations PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Lake County Fire Rescues engine 14 is too tall to t inside of the re station in Altoona on Friday. Matt Roudabush walks past lockers full of reghting gear in the garage of the re station. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comClermont city ofcials believe they will be able to balance a larger mu nicipal budget for 2015 without having to raise taxes, they told the city council this week. At a workshop last week, Clermont Finance Director Joe Van Zile and City Manag er Darren Gray shared highlights of the citys scal year 2015 draft budget with council members. Perhaps the best news concerning the budget is that a tax rate hike is not forecast, in spite of an increase in expen ditures that includes the $6.3 million pur chase of the new Arts and Recreation Center. That means the current 3.729 millage rate will more than likely stay the same. We considered raising the millage rate to cover the Arts and Rec reation building, but it was our feeling we should wait until anoth er year to implement that after we evaluate the revenue it brings, Van Zile said. The city council welcomed the news af ter facing budget de cits the past three years: $134,007 in 2011, $267,222 in 2012 and $1,105,328 in 2013. The projected decit for 2014 is $1,679,194. And with revenues for 2015 projected at $19,916,371 against Council members briefed on next years budget LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comLake County School Board Member Tod Howard is asking his fellow board members to embark on a search for a new superintendent because of dissatisfaction with Susan Moxley. Howard expressed frustration with Moxley again this week after she stuck by her decision to reassign Rhonda Hunt, a principal at Lost Lake Elementary School to Eustis Heights TAVARESSchool Board member calls for superintendent search MOXLEY HOWARDCLERMONT ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comCity of Groveland ofcials are prepping for their big south Lake Fourth of July Festival Fri day. The event is being organized by city ofcials and Bella Faire, a special events planning com pany out of Orlando. It will be held at Lake David Park and will feature music, food vendors, events and games. Mayor Tim Loucks said the event is the only one in south Lake County and attracts thou sands of visitors each year. We are very excited about this event. It will be fun for the whole family, so come out and join us, said Lisa Cortese, executive assistant to the city manager. Festivities begin at 9 / a.m. with a car show. Prizes will be award ed in several categories. Automobiles on display will range from exotic to antique. Musical entertainment also begins at 9 a.m. and will contin ue throughout the day on two main stages leading into the reworks show at about 9 / p .m., weather permitting. From 9 / a.m. to 4 / p .m., people may also want to stop in at the Lake David Center for the usedbook sale hosted by the Groveland-Mascotte Womens Club and the Friends of the Marion Baysinger Memorial Library in Groveland. The Mr. and Miss Firecracker pageant will be held at 10 / a.m. at the Puryear Building, 243 S. Lake Ave. At 11 / a.m., the ofcial Fourth of July opening ceremony kicks Groveland preparing for July 4 festivitiesThis years Fourth of July is gonna surpass any other Fourth of July celebration weve had I think, as far as entertainment. We have a great, great lineup. This is our premier event. Its completely family-oriented and so much fun for everyone.Groveland Mayor Tim LoucksSEE STATIONS | A2SEE BUDGET | A5SEE FOURTH | A6SEE BOARD | A5

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, July 2, 2014 CLERMONT South Lake Hospitals Obstetrics Department honoredSouth Lake Hospitals Obstetrics Department was honored by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists District XII and the March of Dimes for reducing the number of early elective inductions and cesarean deliveries. The hospital recently met the criteria by achieving a rate for elective deliveries before 39 completed weeks of pregnancy of 5 percent or lower and having policies in place to prevent such deliveries. South Lake Hospital, in Clermont, was the only hospital in Lake County to receive this recognition. We are delighted to present this commemorative banner to South Lake Hospital for adhering to standards that directly benet the health of babies, said Dr. Karen Harris, Chair of the Program Services Committee for the March of Dimes Florida Chapter. The last few weeks of pregnancy are extremely important for the babys brain and lung development, among other organs, so we want to commend this momentous achievement.CLERMONT FDOT review gives green light for new traffic signalA Florida Department of Transportation review concluded there is a need for a trafc signal at the intersection of U.S. Highway 27 and Margaux Drive/Sawgrass Bay Blvd. near Sawgrass Bay Elementary School. Parents and ofcials have asked for the signal since the school opened in 2008 because of difculties entering and exiting Sawgrass Bay Blvd. Lake County School Board member Tod Howard said while many had pushed for the trafc signal for years, the FDOT said the numbers did not warrant it at the time. In 2010, a ashing signal was added to the intersection. In a letter to Lake County Engineer Fred Schneider, the FDOT said the conversion of the overhead ashing beacon to a fully operational trafc signal will improve overall safety of the intersection, particularly during school arrival and dismissal times. The same letter states the FDOT intends to have the signal put in place within the next 12 months, possibly sooner, depending on signal contract funding.CLERMONT Man blames DUI on beer-flavored chickenA Clermont motorist who allegedly had alcohol on his breath during a vehicle crash investigation blamed it on chicken he had eaten that was seasoned with beer. Taito Sanchez, 32, was arrested June 25 on charges of DUI and DUI with property damage. Sanchez was also charged with ve counts of child neglect because most of the children in the back seat were injured and not restrained during the crash. Sanchez was admitted to Orlando Regional Medical Center for his injuries and arrested after leaving the hospital. He was released from the Lake County jail after posting a $6,500 bail. The crash occurred Friday on County Road 565A near Max Hooks Road in Clermont as Sanchez was allegedly leaving a barbecue. According to an arrest afdavit, Sanchez told troopers he was pulling out and didnt see a second vehicle approaching and was unable to avoid a collision. But the responding trooper said he could smell alcohol on Sanchezs breath, his eyes were watery and there was an unopened beer and chicken on the vehicles oorboard. When asked about the smell of alcohol, Sanchez was adamant that it came from barbecue chicken, but he refused to let ofcials draw blood for a DUI test. Area Briefs What South Lake residents are saying about ...LOCAL FOODWhat importance do you place on locally grown food?I think the importance is to keep our money here, keep our local growers going, because if you dont, there will come a time when we dont have the option of locally grown. It will come from out of state or out of country, where you dont know what their rules are. And things just taste better if theyre from home ground. COURTNEY ISHMAN MASCOTTE Very important. There are no pesticides and it helps improve with aller gies. And it helps support local businesses. JULIE KILEY GROVELAND We go, we buy the fresh baked bread and the fresh vegetables every Sun day at the farmers mar ket downtown. Thats our weekly ritual. Its near to our home with fresh baked bread and pro duce, and were support ing our local community. DAN DREVES CLERMONT Well, I think its import ant because the closer we are to the source, the fresh er and more nutritious it is. If the produce has been locally grown, then its usually picked ripe, so that it is ready to go. BARBARA PERRY CLERMONT Word on theStreet Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 more than once. Lake County Assistant Fire Chief Jack Fillman said there are several aging re stations that must be replaced. They were built to house volunteers, he said. But today those same re stations house at least two full-time reghters working 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Fire Stations in Fruitland Park, Bassville Park, Sorrento and Pennbroke were never built to be a fulltime re station, Fillman said. The living quarters are small and some have only one bathroom, he said. Brian Gamble, vice president of the Professional Fireghters of Lake County, said his biggest concern is those re stations and six others are not storm-ready. Those re stations are housed in metal storage warehouse buildings and are not designed for storms, Gamble said. The problem is not that re stations are old, he said. A proper ly built re station can last 50 to 60 years or more. The problem is when you take a storage building and make it into a re station, it is not designed to be a safe place for your rescuers to stay. A few stations would have to be shut down in the event of a hurricane because they dont have generators. Gamble said in addition to storm readiness he is concerned about repair costs for many of the re stations. The Plantation station has had mold remediation twice and when they do that they have to put those guys out, he said. That affects response time. In addition to Plantation, the Yalaha and Bassville Park stations have been gutted for mold and, in some of those stations, rats, Gamble said. We had some mold issues at several of our stations, costing $180,000 to x two stations several years ago, Fillman said. The department receives funding from impact fees, re assessments and the Municipal Service Taxing Unit. The MSTU has been reduced by $1 million since 2009 and the re assessment has remained the same since 2011, at $181 yearly. Stephen Koontz, the countys budget director, said the department has exhausted its impact fees for a new station at Altoona and the relocation of Station 90. Currently, six Lake County Fire Rescue Station 90 reghters are serving on rotating shifts out of the Value Place Hotel off of State Road 50 in Clermont. In May, county commissioners reached an agreement with Senninger Inc., a company which manufactures products for agricultural irrigation, to acquire a parcel of land for a modular re station at 16220 SR 50 in exchange for the rst section of the realignment of Hartle Road to be completed. There have been vandalism and thefts of property at the hotel and re ofcials said they lack the resources to secure equipment there. One reghters personal vehicles tires and rims were stolen, and the car was left on cinder blocks. Currently, reghters are leaving their personal vehicles at the Sher iffs substation about a quarter of a mile from the hotel, which has helped, according to Gamble. But the timeline on the project continues to be pushed back, with the latest projection being spring 2015. County Manager David Heath said the delays are because of the right-of-way acquisition concerning the extension of the road and formalizing the agreements with Clermont and Senninger. Gamble said he is cautiously optimistic about the timeline. Commissioner Sean Parks also shared his concerns. I know it is moving frustratingly slow and I hope it can be done as soon as possible, he said. Meanwhile, in Altoona, the building continues to deteriorate, re ofcials said. A portion of the ceiling fell through this past week. Fillman said the reghters are not expected to move into a new station there until the end of 2015. The roof is in poor shape, Fillman said. The apparatus bay is not even big enough. We cant put our engine in there and close the door. Gamble said the re truck is relatively new and has been sitting outside 24 hours a day. Also, the barracks are in a storage closet, Gamble said. Certainly, the wear and tear on half of the eet also concerns ofcials. The National Fire Protection Agency recommends replacing re trucks every seven years, according to Fillman. It is concerning, Fillman said. Your (truck) reaches a certain point and then maintenance costs continue to rise. It costs more and more to keep that vehicle on the road. Gamble said he is concerned if one of the trucks breaks down while on a call and is unable to supply water to reghters rescuing someone inside a burning structure, it could be deadly. There is also the added concern of the truck breaking down on the way to a call. Koontz said while the MSTU and re assessment fund operations, there is not enough funding to build new stations or buy capital with the funds remaining. STATIONS FROM PAGE A1 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL One room at the re station in Altoona serves as the laundry room, kitchen and ofce. Above the kitchen counter, a light-colored patch can be seen on the wall where a kitchen cabinet fell more than six months ago, but was never replaced.

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Wednesday, July 2, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3 r f r n t bb ForpeoplewithMedicare rfrnCarePlusoffersavarietyofplanstochoosefromonemaybejustrightforyou! We vebeenspecializinginMedicareandonlyMedicare for15years,soletushelpyousortthroughyouroptions.www.careplushealthplans.com Keeping th e HEALTH inhealthcare r f rCalltoday,andfindoutwhichone ofourplansbestsuitsyourneeds.n tbbnbnttbbfnrrtb r tt brfrrtrtrbfrbntntbbf fntnbtrtrfrntrbttbrtrnrfrnbbttrr rfrtbrrtrfbrntrfbnbrbrntrrrfrnbttr ttrrnrrtnrtbbrrtbrr b r r r r

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, July 2, 2014Scott cannot be trustedRegistered voters, do not be misled by the campaign tactics of Floridas present governor. Anyone who took the Fifth Amendment 75 times when being questioned about the largest Medicare fraud in history is not to be trusted. I am amazed that he and his cronies bought the last election. Wake up, Floridians, and vote for anyone else. Is it any wonder that Florida made the list of the top 10 most corrupt states in the union? We must especially beware of selsh men who would clip the wings of the American eagle in order to feather their own nests. Franklin Delano Roosevelt. MICHAEL J. HARRIS | WebsterYes on Amendment 2Las Vegas billionaire Sheldon Adelson has contributed $2.5 million to the group ghting Amendment 2 to make medical marijuana legal in Florida. This represents 92 percent of the total contributions to that cause. This also represents a shocking attempt by an outof-state individual to control Florida government. Adelsons actions point out the great value of our individual votes. While he will be attempting to inuence the choices made by Florida voters with TV advertisements, he himself has zero votes. At the same time, we dont have the money to ght his advertisements. We voters must appreciate the power of our votes. We should educate ourselves on the issues on the ballot and then vote to have our choices approved. We control the outcome. In spite of this power, only 42 percent of those eligible in Florida voted in the 2010 election. I believe that medical marijuana should be legalized because of its ability to help people with great pain to live better lives. The greatest benefactors that I am personally aware of are military veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress syndrome. The medical profession, and 7 out of 10 Florida voters support Amendment 2. If you arent aware of the benets or disadvantages of legal medical marijuana, go to www. UnitedForCare.com and educate yourself. Dont rely on the TV advertisements being nanced by Sheldon Adelson. You already know what they are going to say. Your vote is valuable. Dont throw it away by not voting or by voting the way Adelson would want you to. BILL LORSON | LeesburgLove the sinner, not the sinThe June 14 Associated Press article in the Daily Commercial, S. Baptist leader: No change on marriage stance involving the Rev. Ronnie Floyd becoming the new president of the Southern Baptist Convention was quite interesting. Floyd, senior pastor of Cross Church in Northwest Arkansas, ... told the Associated Press that although Americas attitude toward gay and transgender individuals is rapidly changing, the convention does not intend to alter its position that gender identity cannot be different from biological sex and that homosexuality is immoral. We stand strong on what the Scripture says about marriage between a man and a woman ... Floyd said. But ... we must hold the word of God in one hand and the love of God in the other ... The love from God is now endless and comes from His hand continuously. Regarding the mystery of God, realize that He still loves us and that Jesus has shown how much. God had so much love for His human cre ation that He was willing to have Jesus come and do what was necessary to get forgiveness for us. What Jesus went through for us was horric and fantastic. We must accept Gods word for what it says and means. If we try to rewrite His intentions and meaning we are (and get) in deep trouble. This article cited that ear lier this month a Southern California Southern Baptist Church decided to stop condemning homosexuality as sinful and instead embraced a third way. Now, is that rewriting the word of God or not? Somebody needs to start to think. Gods love is for all sinful people; its mainly their sin that troubles Him. Lets get it straight, OK? Remember, we cannot rewrite His word. Sin is sin. He loves us in spite of our sins. Our need is to ask for forgiveness. ELMER A. WOLFORD | Mount DoraThe Lake County School Board is hard to g ure. They raised a ruckus rightly so when they discovered that some of their schools were violating the states class-size limits. So they paid a consultant $20,000 to get to the bottom of the problem, and the consultant came back with a series of recommendations that included hiring an administrator to ensure schools were keeping their class sizes within the limits of the law. During its review, the consultant surveyed hundreds of teachers and administrators, learning that well over 100 said they were asked to sign class-size reports that they knew were wrong. There was a great wailing and gnashing of teeth from the School Board when the report came back. The review didnt go deep enough, they said. They had concerns about Superintendent Susan Moxleys ability to lead the district, they said. But then a couple of funny things happened. First, instead of drilling deeper to nd out why teachers were being asked to violate the class-size law and who was asking them to do it, the School Board dropped it. Having made their windy speeches of outrage, board members forfeited their responsibility to seek out and identify the administrators who were fudging the numbers and exposing the district to potential nes. And then, as if to underscore their lack of honest concern, last week the board voted down a proposal to hire a class-size compliance ofcer as the consultant had recommended. Too expensive, they said. The message the ve board members sent was that they are more interested in impressing voters than in solving a serious problem. Contrast that, their approach to another controversy that erupted last week when Moxley tried to move the popular and successful principal of Lost Lake Elementary School to a struggling school in Eustis. It seemed a prudent strategy by Moxley to prop up an underperforming school and frankly, one that school districts across the state use all the time. Yet, when parents, teachers and others ooded the School Board meeting room last week to object to the move, the board predictably joined the chorus of outrage and again began wondering aloud about Moxleys leader ship ability. But why? What did she do wrong? Board member Bill Mathias suggested to us that the backlash toward Moxley was political in this case, and we have to agree. In fact, the School Boards behavior time and again appears to be political. How else do you explain their willingness to drop the ball on the class-size scandal while micromanaging the superintendent over a reasonable stafng decision? So while the School Board wonders aloud about the superintendents ability to lead the local public school system, we have to wonder about their ability and willingness to do the same. Its time they quit playing politics and get serious about the business of public education. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . ........................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTOPINION WHATS YOUR OPINION?The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to: Letters to the Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711By fax to: 352-394-8001EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed.GUEST COLUMNSIf you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OURVIEWIf you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veter-ans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to to www.lakeveterans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANS SOUTH LAKE PRESSYour community newspaper for more than 100 years.732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Florida 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region.All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. YOUROPINIONSLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Corrupt culture promotes violenceYour recent editorial on gun violence ignored one problem the most basic. Senseless violence already pervades our anything-goes literary and entertainment culture, much more so than in other developed countries. Our glorious First Amendment has been twisted by the elitist, relativistic Supreme Court to legalize vile, anti-social lth, which is brain washing impressionable youth and the psychologically vulnerable. From among the latter groups come the murder ers. The idea that guns, knives, clubs or rope that can be tied in a noose are the killers is nonsense. Only a little research is required to prove that the cur rent permissiveness of insensate violence in print and visual media is not what those who drafted, passed and ratied the First Amendment meant by freedom of speech and freedom of the press. They would all be outraged if they knew that great, human provision had been used judicially to strike down restraints on anti-human productions of the most destructive sort. Lots of us are old enough to remember the America of 60 years ago, when school and public mass violence were extremely rare. Guns were plentiful even then, but violent lth, both in print and graphically presented, was illegal. Until conscientious Americans pressured the politically powerful (including judges who can insulate themselves from the social effects of their disastrous decisions) to repudiate the pretense that freedom of expression requires tolerating anti-social poison, the problem of the senseless violence you deplore will remain insoluble. JOHN A. RENICK | Grand Island LETTER of the WEEK HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO School Board plays politics

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Wednesday, July 2, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5Elementary, an under performing school, to the disapproval of par ents and teachers at the school. It is not just this incident, Howard said in a phone interview. This has been building since I have been on the board. We are not plan ning for the long-term future of this district when it comes to the administration. Howard said he does not believe the district is improving. We need stability, he said. We need growth. We were an A district and now we are a C district. How far are we willing to go? I have reached that limit. At this point, I believe we need to go in a new di rection with new leadership. Moxley declined to comment about How ards criticisms. Howard said the classsize issue affecting the schools earlier this year also played a part in his decision to call for the search. He called it a serious error in judgment. The review of all schools in the Lake County School District, which analyzed classsize compliance and whether violations were knowingly made, found 136 anonymously sur veyed teachers who said a supervisor asked them to sign reports re lated to class-size requirements that they knew to be inaccurate. Surveys were sent to teachers, administrators and data process ing staff, the review stated. Out of 2,818 surveys, 1,518 were returned. General statements from the district ofce such as we will make class size and be creative and make it work may have put perceived pressure on staff to meet class-size requirements, the review stated. Moxley previously said no one in her ofce knowingly coerced school principals to lie about their class sizes to skirt state rules. The superintendent called for the review after nding that six principals broke the law by inaccurately reporting their class sizes to the state. One of Howards other concerns is the high turnover rate of princi pals and assistant prin cipals at many of the schools. For example, he said, at Eustis Heights, there have been three principals in four years. But Chris Patton, spokesman for the dis trict, said a number of principals have been moved because of retirements. In particular, he said, since 2011 there has been seven retirements. Patton added there has also been the open ing of the Lake Virtual School, Lake Minneola High and Sorrento Elementary in the last four years contributing to the shift in staff. All these things af fect overall principal appointment, he said. There have been a lot of changes in the last four years. The Center for Public Education released a re port showing that prin cipal turnover adversely affects schools. In a study of Mi ami-Dade County Public Schools researchers found that students attending schools with a new principal made lower achievement gains in math than they had been under the previous principal, the centers report states. The center reported research that showed it takes a highly effec tive principal about ve years to fully impact a schools performance. Stuart Klatte, president of the Lake County Education Association, said different principals have different management styles. Some are better at getting staff to work to gether, while others are more punitive, he said. She has been trying to move people around to put the right principals with the right personal ity of the schools. In order for a super intendent search to commence, the School Board must hold a vote on the issue. Moxleys contract is up in June 2015. The search does not mean the superintendent will automatically be replaced, as she is matched up against other qualifying candidates, School Board member Bill Mathias said. I dont have a problem with a superinten dent search, he said. I dont believe it ought to be in the arena of a po litical campaign. I think she has a complex job where she has to bal ance input from ve di verse board members. Anyone who serves the public is accountable and there is no guaran tee of their continued service. Howard is up for re-election this year and faces a challenge from two candidates at the Aug. 26 primary, Marc Anthony Dodd and Ja mie Maret Hanja. Kyleen Fischer, another School Board member, had previously asked to review the superintendents contract. She did not ask for the search, Howard said. I am askin g for the search. I am done with the whole contract bit. D004329 RonBecker,Director352-394-8228rf ntbt$675t HWY27/441 2 miles fr omHwy27 rfnnftb 787-4440 tnfrfnnnntr nrf bfnffnbtr rnn $300OFFREMANU FA CTURED CAR TSCashor ch eck.Must pr esentadonpurchase. Limited Ti meOffer Seestor e fordetails expenditures of $21,599,591, the projected decit for 2015 is $1,683,220. Still, Clermonts reserves after the 2015 projection would remain at $6,289,863. Regardless, the city manager and staff have reduced spending and our reserves are over $6 million. I know of no other city our size that has a balance sheet as good as ours, Councilman Ray Goodgame said in an email after the meeting. Perhaps the biggest effect to the budget was the purchase of the Arts and Recreation Center. Revenues from the rental of rooms and the use of the commu nity pools and gymnasium, howev er, were not yet known. Gray said ofcials project about $260,000 in user fees. Smaller expenditures included $98,000 in events department special events and sponsorship, histor ic village building repairs at $62,000 and $3,000 for iPads for the use of city council members raised no questions. Other spending includ ed $400,000 for a splash park at Wa terfront Park, $509,200 for improve ments to the Arts and Recreation Center, $1,057,400 for the buildout of Lake Hiawatha Preserve, $170,000 for the re departments new rescue boats and $316,733 in merit increases for city staff and $391,005 for new positions. A couple of other items, howev er, raised a few eyebrows, including a utility rate study projected at a cost of $108,000 and $1.4 million for new recycling trucks and carts. Also noted in the budget is a pro jection of the expenditure versus the revenue of the red light camer as Clermont recently implemented at three intersections in town. The projected revenues from the camer as were $335,000, and projected expenditures were $443,829. BUDGET FROM PAGE A1 BOARD FROM PAGE A1 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comThe Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford Metropolitan Statistical Area, which includes Lake County, saw a 2.9 percent drop in sales of single-family homes in May compared to last May but also saw a 9.1 percent rise in the median sale price compared to last May, according to data from Florida Realtors. According to the report, there were 2,576 closed sales for single-family homes in May 2014, with a median sale price of $180,000. Betty Salas, the president of the Realtors Association of Lake and Sumter Coun ties and the broker/owner of Coldwell Banker All Vil lage Realty in Lady Lake, said Lake County is following the trend of the larger statistical area. She said sales might be down because a lot of the short sales and bankowned sales that were pop ular last year are now off the market and fewer in vestors are in the market, but she thinks more actual homeowners are. She said investors are buying fewer homes because of the price increase. When your prices are at an all-time low, you seem to have a feeding frenzy of investors trying to pick them up, Salas said. She said prices increase when there is a low inventory. She added people who lost homes to foreclosure at the downturn are now buying homes again. They are now requal ied to purchase. Were seeing a lot of those come back, you know, that were hit right at the fall of the market, theyre back in and theyre buying homes again because of course owning a home is still the American dream for every one, Salas said. In Florida, the reports shows 23,013 sales of sin gle-family homes in May, an increase of 3.6 percent from last May, at a median price of $180,000, the same as the Orlando areas median price. The median price for the whole state was up 4.3 percent from last May, according to the report. The overall metropolitan statistical area for the Orlando area also saw an 18.7 percent drop in closed sales for townhouses and condos this May compared to last May and a 10.5 per cent increase in medi an sale price for those, ac cording to the report.Lake County single-family home sales down 2.9 percent in May HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO In this section of the High Grove development in the Lake County section of Four Corners, the homes for sale outnumber the homes that are not for sale.When your prices are at an all-time low, you seem to have a feeding frenzy of investors trying to pick them up.Betty Salas, President of the Realtors Association of Lake and Sumter Counties

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A6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, July 2, 2014off with the presentation of colors by Koran Way Veterans, playing of the Nation Anthem and a rie salute. Visi t ing dignitaries, includ ing U.S. Congressman Daniel Webster, Florida House of Represen tatives member Larry Metz and Lake County Commissioner (District 2) Sean Parks will speak briey, as will May or Loucks, Vice May or James Smith and City Manager Redmond Jones II. Afterwards, Jones will take his post inside the dunk tank at the Groveland Fire Explorers Booth. A kids area will in clude a bounce house, water slide and, begin ning at noon, activities and contests, including a watermelon-eating contest and hula hoop contest. Bands playing on stage two include Dav ida, Dear Destiny, Chris Ash and Fender Benders. The main stage lineup includes Rain er Berry, Aaron Tay lor and Patrick Gibson. At 7:30 / p.m., the days headliner, Bucky Cov ington, a former Amer ican Idol contestant, takes the stage. This years Fourth of July is gonna surpass any other Fourth of July celebration weve had I think, as far as entertainment. We have a great, great lineup, Loucks said. This is our premier event. Its completely family-oriented and so much fun for everyone. Cortese said people are encouraged to bring lawn chairs and blankets for the reworks show, along with bathing suits and towels for the days water attractions and swimming in the lake. For information, go to groveland-.gov /4th-of-july. FOURTH FROM PAGE A1 Placey ouradher ea nd re ac ht heLocalMar ket!VE RY AF FO RDABLE!Call to da y3 52-394-2183 D003191 ClermontsNewest Seafood/Steakhouse!GrandOpeningJuly4thweekend!AgedPrimeSteaks AlwaysFreshSeafood Open7days Lunch/Dinner~Sundaybrunch Livemusic We d-Sun794 W. Minneola Av e.InHistoricDowntownClermont!352-242-3800 Ja sonCottoJulieKileyKrisMemoloMarianArmstrong rfrntb (352)242-4500 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comDespite a recommendation for approval by city staff, Clermont council members unanimously rejected a per mit for an underground gun range off U.S. High way 27 north of DeSoto Street, the same project they had originally approved in October 2010. The approval in 2010 came after more than a year of working with then-owner David Heck to satisfy the concerns of citizens about the ranges proximity to a neighborhood, park, school and ice cream stand. The underground range would have also in cluded an above-ground gun shop that did not require a conditional use permit and a 10-foot re taining wall that would stand at least six-feet above ground surround ing the 7,000-squarefoot facility. In Jan 2012, Heck, still not having started con struction of the range, came before the council again. His conditional use permit was amend ed with a few changes, including the types of weapons that could be used, and was approved for the second time. Heck was then given two years to start construction but before he could do so, he died. Before council last week were John Hill, owner of Black Label Shooting Sports, who worked alongside Heck getting the project ap proved the rst and sec ond time, and his partner, Aaron Collins. They asked for the condition al use permit to be approved once more. They would have already started on the construc tion, but because the propertys sale to them was delayed and in pro bate since Hecks death, the two-year time frame to start the build-out expired. This time around, staff recommended its approval, but council members denied it. We were very disappointed, well actual ly completely shocked, that this wasnt voted in again. Weve put in a lot of time, mon ey, effort and emotion into making sure weve done everything weve been asked to do in the right and most efcient way possible for the last nine months and for it to be denied Im just clueless, said Hill. At the meeting Tues day night, a handful of residents of a neighbor hood located behind the commercial property and others in the community opposed the project because of fear that the gun range and shop would not only be noisy but would endanger anyone who lives near it. The same protests were heard by council when Heck was seeking their blessing be fore. Jim Purvis, a local Clermont resident who does not live near the gun range, pleaded with council members to re ject it. Im in total sup port of the gun range. Its a good business, its something thats need ed in the community and it would be well uti lized. I also think its the most stupid location for this, Purvis said. Unfortunately, David Heck died, but mercifully, that gave us another bite at the apple, and hopefully, this time youll bite it the right way. Tim Murry, a lifelong resident of Clermont who said he lives about 1,200 feet from the lo cation of the proposed range also plead with council to vote against the project. Theres a playground less than 50 feet from the location. There are two churches, theres Clermont Elementary School and Clermont Head Start about 300500 feet from the facility. There are homes and residents that have been there for years. We are here discussing this for the third time but we really dont need to be here again, Murry said. David Gustason, a customer of Hills who was at the meeting Tuesday, said he has vis ited dozens of ranges throughout the nation and never heard of any freak accidents or noise, even when standing in the parking lots. Ive never heard of anything like that. I challenge you to nd one, Gustason said, responding to fears that bullets would y out of the building. Please know about it. Research the real facts about the noise, the ventilation, everything. Still, when the time came for a vote, the council voted 5-0 against the project. Many neighbors were against this facilitys application being approved. There are children, schools and churches close by and none of the residents supported the gun range. There were citizens in support of the range, but they did not live in this area, Councilman Ray Goodgame said in an email to constituents after the meeting.CLERMONTCouncil throws out gun range proposal, 5-0We were very disappointed, well actually completely shocked, that this wasnt voted in again. Weve put in a lot of time, money, effort and emotion into making sure weve done everything weve been asked to do in the right and most efficient way possible for the last nine months and for it to be denied Im just clueless.John Hill, owner of Black Label Shooting Sports

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A8 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, July 2, 2014 Fromleft:KneeworksstaffDr.JoeBandur(topleft),Receptionist AllysonBonville,BusinessAssociateKennethHuffstutler, promoterandProfessionalfootballplayerwiththe Ta mpaBay BuccaneersJeffDemps(frontcenter),DirectorofBusiness DevelopmentStevePisarkiewiczandDr.MikeRay(farright). Dr.RaynowteamingupwithDr.Bandur andBusinessConsultantJeffDemps inanewventureKNEEWORKS! Dr.RaynowteamingupwithDr.Bandur andBusinessConsultantJeffDemps inanewventureKNEEWORKS! Call 1-844KNEEWORKS (1-844-563-3967) rfnrtb www.KNEEWORKS.com KNEEWORKS KNEEWORKSoffers: Analternativetreatmentforarthritic kneepainthatmaydelaysurger y. Visco-supplementationisan establishedinjectabletreatment protocolforkneearthritis. Our ex periencedmedicalstaffuses uoroscopyforaccuracyindelevering thelubricatinguidintothekneejoint. Otheradditiveandtreatment modalitiesincludekneebracing, physicaltherap y, ch iropracticcar e, oralnaturalsupplementsandtopical compoundedointments. displays by local artists, as well as having resi dent musicians playing on certain nights and bringing in guest artists. Most of the music will take place outside, but he wants to do acoustic indie showcases inside as well. At his current shop, Savion Wright, who competed on Amer ican Idol with David this past season, per formed June 21. David also plans on having a friend do ur ban gardening outside the house. The location will also have a gift shop that will sell items like local honey and coffee. He listed a number of renovations that will be done to the proper ty, including building a small stage outside, get ting the outdoor pond working again, building a bar on the porch, and making the location handicap-accessible. There will also be courtyard seating. David said Third & Baker will have a different menu than the coffee shop and will be more like a gastropub and upscale soul food place. He said he also hopes to have an ofce space and employee break room, which he does not have at his current location, on the second oor. He was also excited about the view for cus tomers from the second oor because of the streetscape work taking place on Third Avenue. Hopefully it will look pretty cool at night, David said. In addition to need ing more space for fre quent entertainment, he said they cannot keep their current loca tion stocked because of its small size. The cur rent coffee shop will be closed. David said they will have to add more em ployees for the new space. Rob English, the president of the Mount Dora Area Chamber of Commerce, said David has been very successful since he opened at his current location and he does not have the room for the large numbers of people he draws for the entertainment there. So, by moving to that location he will be able to satisfy the space needs for people to come and hear the mu sic in the evening, English said. With his mix of items that he plans to offer at his store, I think hell be very successful playing into the arts and the eclectic nature of Mount Dora. He said the new lo cation will drive more people to that part of downtown and will t well with the nearby Norms Palette Wine, Beer, and Tapas Bar. Kelda Senior, public communications ofcer for the city of Mount Dora, said the vision of the new location ties in perfectly with what the character of downtown Mount Dora already is. Its about art and cul ture and an eclectic at mosphere and music and vitality, Senior said. WILLIS FROM PAGE A7 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL David Oliver Willis tours what will be the location of his new business. SUBMITTED PHOTO Frank Klum, Jim Mackey, Dave Lofgren and Gene Thomas, members of the Kiwanis Club of Clermont, placed 374 ags on the graves of veterans at the Oak Hill Cemetery in Clermont in honor of Memorial Day. The event is conducted by the club twice a year on Veterans Day and Memorial Day.KIWANIS MEMBERS PLACE FLAGS FOR MEMORIAL DAY

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B1SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, July 2, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTSSPORTS EDITOR . ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE . .............................. 365-8268 FAX . .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL . ......... sports@dailycommercial.comSPORTSandLEISURE PAUL BARNEY I Staff Writerpaul.barney@dailycommercial.comFor one more year defensive coordinators in Lake and Sumter counties will have to gure out a way to stop Adrian Falconer. After that, he will be the Big Tens problem. Everyone except for Iowa, that is. Falconer, a 6-foot-1 wide re ceiver who caught 55 passes for 714 yards and ve touchdowns as a junior last season for Leesburg, committed to the University of Iowa over the weekend during a visit to the Iowa City campus. Falconer, who had offers from 16 other FBS schools, took to Twitter on Saturday to let every one know where he will be play ing in the fall of 2015. just committed to the univer sity of iowa #itsgreattobeahawk eye Last season, Falconer helped lead Leesburg all the way to the 6A Regional Seminals against Daytona Beach Mainland. Yellow Jackets rst-year head coach Rich Maresco couldnt be happier for his star wideout. I think its fantastic, Maresco said. Playing in the Big Ten in a stadium like that with that com petition is just awesome. Hes a darn good (football player) and I think hes going to do great in the Big Ten, I really do. Im really ex cited for him. Maresco knows a thing or two about receivers, originally having been hired as the schools wide receivers coach two months be fore Randy Trivers resigned as the head coach in May to take the same position at Washington D.C.s Gonzaga College High School. When Maresco rst met Falconer, he was blown away by the fact hes a wide receiver who also plays linebacker.Falconer to play football at IowaBRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIALLeesburgs Adrian Falconer is brought down by a Seabreeze defender during the Leesburg-Daytona Beach Seabreeze Class 6A quarternal playoff game in Leesburg last season. PHOTO COURTESY OF JOSH BOYER Iron Jungle Weightliftings Brett Ollila competes during the USA Weightlifting Youth Nationals recently at Port Orange Spruce Creek High School. In only his second competition, Ollila nished 25th with a combined weight of 163 kilograms (about 359 pounds) in the 77 kilogram (169 pound) classication. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comFour lifters from Iron Jungle weightlifting set personal records recently at USA Weight liftings Youth National Championships, which were held at Port Or ange Spruce Creek High School. The only weightlifting club in Lake and Sum ter counties, Iron Jungle sent Morgan Rhone, Car los Molano, Brett Ollila and Alexis Smith to the meet, with Smith posting the clubs best nish fourth place at 75 kilograms (approximately 165 pounds.) Rhone was 10th in the Girls 16-17 age group with 97 kilograms (213 pounds), while Molano, lifting at 69 kilograms in the Boys 16-17 clas sication, nished 19th with 139 kilograms (306 pounds) and Ollila with 25th at 77 kilograms with 163 kilograms (359 pounds) in the Boys 1617 age group. Each of our lifters are outstanding people, Iron Jungle coach Josh Boyer said. They are the examples that more than deserve praise and recognition. Too often, I feel as though there are those that receive a lot of recogni tion that pale in compar ison to these kids. They are great students, elite level lifters and fantastic people. I never have to worry about their behavior away from the weight room, their academics or their level of dedication. I can say this about all our club lifters who will soon be known in the weightlifting world. Smith, the Iron Jungles nal lifter in the tour nament, nished with a combined weight of 105 kilograms (231 pounds) in the Girls 16-17 age group. She hoisted 41 ki lograms on her rst attempt in the Snatch and followed with 43 kilo grams, before nishing with a 46 kilograms on her nal attempt. In the Clean-and-Jerk, Smith also bettered her self on each lift, starting with 52 kilograms and nishing with 59 kilo grams (130 pounds). Smith was 16 kilo grams behind MacKen zie Baker in third place. Olivia Davis won the classication with a total weight of 132 kilograms. To nish fourth in the nation is quite an ac complishment, Boyer said. Alexis is truly developing into an out standing lifter. Her con dence grows daily and I cant wait to see how she continues to progress. Rhone started with 39 kilograms on her rst attempt in the Snatch and improved to 41 ki lograms on her second attempt. She failed in crease her total weight with her third attempt, placing her ahead of ve lifters heading into the Clean-and-Jerk competition.Iron Jungle weightlifting competes at national meet Welcome to the Jungle Each of our lifters are outstanding people. They are the examples that more than deserve praise and recognition. Too often, I feel as though there are those that receive a lot of recognition that pale in comparison to these kids. They are great students, elite level lifters and fantastic people.Josh Boyer, Iron Jungle coach FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comLake County might soon have another major leaguer. Former Montverde Academy standout Francisco Lindor is considered a virtual lock to be called up in September by the Cleveland Indians for what likely will be an opportunity to earn a starting role with club in 2015. Clevelands current starting shortstop, As drubal Cabrera is ex pected to become a free agent this winter, and the Indians will be on the lookout for a re placement. The Indians have been grooming Lindor, the eighth pick in the 2011 FirstYear Player Draft, as the clubs shortstop of the future. After starting spring training with Cleveland, where he hit .267 with one home run and four RBIs, Lindor was shipped to Dou ble-A Akron and pro duced a solid rst half. Lindor hit .283 with six homers and 43 RBIs for the Rub berDucks and earned his third-consecutive trip to the All-Star Futures game, which will be played on July 13 at Target Field in Minneapolis.MVAs Lindor on the cusp of the major leagues AP FILE PHOTO Indians shortstop Francisco Lindor throws during spring training last February in Goodyear, Ariz. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comBen Simmons has long been considered one of the top highschool basketball play ers in the country. The Montverde Academy senior is on the verge of becoming the best. According to ESPN Recruiting Nation, which ranks many of the nations top prep players, Simmons is the second-best play er in the country. A 6-foot-8 power forward originally from Mel bourne, Australia, Sim mons received a scout grade of 97 out of 100 and is considered a ve-star recruit. From when he rst entered the (United) States a year-and-a-half ago, his skills and body frame have changed dramatically, the ESPN Recruiting Nation re port surmised. Now, noticeably lled out in the upper body, (Simmons is) more pre pared to nish through contact along with the speed to out run guards. Simmons ver bally committed in October to play at Louisiana State University after his graduation from Montverde Academy in 2015. During his junior sea son, Simmons helped lead Montverde Academy to an undefeated season (28-0) and a sec ond-straight national championship. He recorded a double-double in the Eagles 71-62 win against Mouth of Wilson (Va.) Oak Hill Academy in the title game .MVAs Simmons is nations second-best recruit in basketball FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comUmatilla High School has pro duced one of the states top athlet ic programs. The school was recently hon ored by the Florida High School Athletic Association with the the Fred E. Rozelle Sportsmanship Award for Class 5A for the 2013-14 school year. According to the FH SAA, the award is given to schools whose athletic teams demon strated exemplary sportsmanship during the year and FHSAA State Series events. A total of 21 high schools in the states eight classications and three middle schools received the award. Umatilla was the Section Two winner in Class 5A, in addition to the classications overall winner. Overall winners in each clas sication received $2,500 and a plaque. Section winners earned $500 and a plaque. Demonstrating respect and appropriate sportsmanships has been a primary focus for Umatilla High School athletes this year, said Umatilla Principal Randy Campbell. We are very proud of how these students have repre sented the school and their community. They may not have won every game in each sport, but this award show they end the school year as winners! Umatilla is the only school from Lake and Sumter counties to be recognized by the FHSAA. Other schools in Class 5A to received rec ognition were: Jacksonville Bishop Kenny in Section One and Naples Golden Gate in Section Three. Every chance we get, we em phasize to our student-athletes that the heart and soul of high school athletics is sportsmanship, said FHSAA Executive Director Dr.Umatilla honored with prestigious FHSAA award SIMMONS

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Ann DupeeREMEMBER WHENA weekly column that reprints some of the more interesting news stories that have appeared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press.B2SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, July 2 2014 www.southlakepress.comCOMMUNITYProudly servingCLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWSSTAFF WRITER . ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE . .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 EMAIL..... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com %  en HOMETOWN: Windermere %  en OCCUPATION: Tutu goddess! I custom design and create tutus for little girls. What do you enjoy most about south Lake County? The small-town atmosphere with all the luxuries of fast-paced living. 1) If you had to summarize your philosophy of life in one sentence, what would it be? Live for today, we may not have tomorrow. 2) Name a person or incident youve come across recently thats touched you in some way. Why did this person or incident impress you so much? Mr. Dave Teske at the Clermont Community Center (recreation director) impressed me very much with his high level of profession alism and attentiveness in work ing with him. 3) How does what you do contribute to the welfare of the area? I keep all the little princesses in style and up to date with the newest princess looks. 4) Name one of your greatest accomplishments so far. The fact that I have been blessed with such support, both public and personal, in that I have been able to turn my hobby of tutu design and creation into a thriving business. 5) Whats something youve always wanted to do but havent yet? Although I am proud of my business accomplishments, there is still so much for me to learn. Traveling to the fashion industry meccas of the world to see rsthand whats out there would be nice. 6) What advice would you give to people who want to help out in the community? Be involved with an open mind and heart. FROM THE FILES | 25 YEARS AGO 1989Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press Meet YourNEIGHBORBARBIE DELKER RECREATION FUNDINGThe Lake County Recreation Committee recommended to the County Commissioners they hire a consultant to assist in distributing $329,000 set aside by the county for recreational use, the rst year the county has provided money. Commissioner Richard Swartz suggested setting up a program similar to the countywide library system, which provides county monies based on the number of county residents utilizing the library facilities. The MGM Theme Park at Disney opened in May.SORORITY HONOREDPictured with May or Bob Pool signing a proclamation celebrating Epsilon Sigma Alpha sororitys 60th anniversary were representatives of the three Clermont chapters: Phyllis Schelske, Delta Nu President; Pat Mey er, Delta Nu sister; Michelle Delaney, past President of Beta Theta and Highland Area Council representative; Bonnie Kranz, Beta Theta Vice President; and Paulette Davis, Alpha Eta President.NEW RED CROSS OFFICERSNew America Red Cross ofcers who serve South Lake Memorial Hospital are: Vir ginia Rudolph, Chair man; Sarah Jane Seaver, Vice Chairman; Pat Parker, Secretary; Mir iam Johnson, Historian; and Olga Granger, Scheduler.SENIOR LEAGUE CHAMPSMembers of the Senior League Pirates, Clermont 1989 season champions, sponsored by B.G. Harmon Fruit Company, were Kyle LeFils, Wyatt Berry, Nathan Naslatka, Brian Buss, Joe Padilla, Chad Krajcir, Adam Yuha, Jon Stephens, Stacey Isaacs, Roger Kropp, Matt Dennis, Manager Nick Bacon and Coach Willie Kropp.CHS COACH VERN EPPINETTE RESIGNSBasketball, track and cross country coach Ver non Eppinette resigned from Clermont High School to pursue his masters in social studies or administration. Eppinette compiled an unprecedented 780111 record in track while his boys basketball team recorded a 253-103 mark. He led the Highlanders to nine consecutive district titles and nished second twice. His protg, Gary Kinninger, was named boys basketball coach. CHS players honored by the Daily Commer cial were Seniors Melis sa Cornelius and Andy Stone in track, Jake Doty in golf and Brian Williams and Dawn Droege in tennis. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comThe Clermont Police Department edged out Clermont reghters Sunday in the ongoing quest to see who ranks highest when it comes to ... just about anything, be it sandwich making, row ing, running, tug-of-war, cooking chili or basketball. In the past year, the two agencies have gone head-to-head in several competitions, with the re department coming out on top each time. Not this time. Police Chief Chuck Broadway said heading into Sundays event that the department was determined to re deem itself at City Hall Park during last weeks Farmers Market and Shop the Shoppes event. Fitness trainers from CrossTrain of Clermont, a gym where many police of cers and reghters train, created a challenging tness course and led the competition. The event benetted Clermonts Real Life Church food pantry. Guests were asked to donate a non-perishable food item to the pantry.CLERMONTPolice edge firefighters in battle of the fittest competition DAILY COMMERCIAL FILE PHOTO Lettuce ies at a hoagie-building contest between police ofcers and reghters at the Wawa convenience store in Clermont. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comA number of Grammy and Emmy-nominated musicians will be in town this fall for a concert to benet South Lake Hospitals Mammography Fund. The concert Oct. 25 at the Clermont Arts and Recreation Center will feature jazz, swing, big band, bossanova, Latin, R&B and beach shag and is being organized by local songwriter, composer and acoustic guitarist Carlos Solis, the owner of Graphics Direct and president of Solis Bravo Music and Publishing out of Clermont. Solis band consists of nine musicians who have played with many big bands and names in the music industry. The group was formed when those artists reunited with Solis in an effort to help him produce a CD inspired by his wifes ght with cancer. The main song Solis wrote for his wife is called Youre Not Alone featuring Char lie De Chant from Hall and Oates on saxophone. Tickets are on sale now. All the proceeds go to the Mam mography Fund. This is hopefully a big thing. Our drummer just got back from a tour in Australia with Barry Gibb, so for these guys to be coming together here in Clermont is exciting and will be a great treat for the community, Solis said. And while Im excited about getting getting these guys up here, I think the most important thing is go ing to be raising money for the cause. Musicians who will be playing at the concert are Solis, bassist Jerry Bravo, a 14th annual Grammy Award Achievement certicate win ner, drummer Richard Bra vo, a 26-time Grammy Award Achievement Certicate win ner who played and recorded with Barry Gibb, Barbra Strei sand and Shakira, saxophonist Camilo Valencia, who was responsible for soundtrack horn arrangements for Dirty Dancing/Havana Nights. Carlos Oliva an Emmy Award winning recording artist, composer and producer, is also being touted as the nights special guest. Oliva produced and directed Miami Sound Machine with Gloria Estefan. Tickets are $30 per person at local businesses, including the Livewell Fitness Center, NTC, Graphics Direct, Napolis Piz za, Troys Cuban Deli, Minute man Press, Tony Hubbard Re alty, Cornerstone Music, Fifth Third Bank, Bacchus Vino, Clermont Massage, Beef-oBradys, Minneola City Hall and The Urban Spot. For information, go to www.solisbravo.com.CLERMONTNotable musicians plan reunion for fall concert

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Wednesday, July 2, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 NEWGAMEEVERYWEDNESDAY ENTRYFORMName________________________________________________________________ Address________________________________________________________________ HomePhone________________________________________________________________ WorkPhone________________________________________________________________HOWTO PLAY1.Findthe hidde n Bing o chips withintheadvertisementsin thissection that spellBin go 2.MarkanX onthematc hing numbe rson yo ur entryfor m. 3.Filloutyo ur nam e,addres s,da ytimephone & h omephone numbers and mail theentryform andBingocardto: SouthL ak ePress c/ oBingo 732W.MontroseSt Cl er mo nt,FL34711CO NTESTRU LES1. A ny reside nt of any area within South Lake Presss circulat ion area may enter. Participants mustbe21yearsofageorolder.EmployeesofSouthLakePress,theirimmediatefamilies, independentcontractorsandcarriersofSouthLakePressareineligible.Drawingwillbeheld eachTuesday.EntryformsmustbereceivedbyMondayatnoonfollowingtheWednesday publication.SouthLakePressretainstherighttopublishthewinnersnameinthefollowing weeksnewspaper. 2.Officialentryform:Limitoneentryperpersonperweek.Entriesmustbemadeontheofficial entryblankpublishedinSouthLakePress.AllentriesbecomepropertyofSouthLakePress. 3.Winnerswillbenotifiedviathephonetheweekfollowingthedrawing.Ifunabletoreach winner,theprizewillbegivenawaytheupcomingweek. 4.Claimingaprize:WinnermustpresentproofofagewithadriverslicenseorSocialSecurity card.Alterationofthesedocumentswillleadtoimmediatedisqualification. EachWednesdaythereadersofSouthLakePresswillreceiveaBingo.Bycorrectlyidentifying Bingochipsinseveraladvertisersads,youllqualifyforthedrawingtobeheldeachweek. EntriesmaybemailedordeliveredtoSouthLakePress.SouthLakePresssBingoareavailable eachweekat:732W.MontroseSt,Clermont,Fl34711.Nopurchasenecessary.Pleaseprint legible,wearenotheldresponsibleformisspellednames. BINGO B I N G O SOU TH LA KEPRE SSServingClermont,Minneola,Groveland,Mascotte,Montverde 725344767 1318315974 921FREE SPACE5372 216424863 529395268 N IBO G BOIN GLastWeeksWinner:FranKersey WIN$25CASH! WIN$25CASH! D002928 SUMMER SERIES MUSIC SERIES SERIES SERIES JULY5TH,12TH, 19TH&26THFREEADMISSION LIVEMUSIC EVERYSATURDAY1-4PM FREETOURS& WINETASTING WWW.LAKERIDGEWINERY.COM DONTFORGET!YOUCANFINDOURWINEINYOUR LOCALSUPERMARKETORWINESHOP. D002926 B 13 B 2 B 5 B 9 B 7

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B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, July 2, 2014 CLERMONTBLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCHrf rnrtfnrb English:4pmandSpanish:7pm 8am,10am,12noon(ContemporaryMass) 5pm(ContemporaryMass) 3:00pm-3:45pm(Eng.) 6:15pm-6:45pm(Sp.) CornerofHwy50&12thSt.(Rt561) CROSSROADSFAMILYFELLOWSHIPChristianNon-Denominational WhereourpriorityisGod,Families&Community 15701S.R.50,#106 Clermont,FL34711 AtGreaterHillsandHwy50 SundayWorship9:30a.m. WednesdayBibleStudy7:00p.m. Childrenclassesbothservices Menandwomensmonthlymeetings OpenprayerTuesdaysat10:00a.m. Sr.PastorsJimandLindaWatson Assoc.PastorsLeeandVanessaDobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone:(352)242-1144 Godisgood...allthetime!FIRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMakingDisciples Sunday-8&11am(Traditional) Sunday-9:30am(Contemporary) Thursday-7pm(CelebrateRecovery) ReverendDougKokx, SeniorPastor ReverendDawnFryman, PastorofCongregationalCare t rf rnrtfnf n GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONT,FL ManyOtherActivitieseachweek fff n JonBekemeyer,SeniorPastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.orgLIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH BibleFellowshipGroups9:30am WorshipService10:40am FamilyPrayerService6:00pm BibleStudy7:00pm Groupsforadults,teens,andchildren ChrisJohnson,SeniorPastor Fordirectionsandmoreinformation,visit: 11043TrueLifeWay Clermont,FL34711 352.394.0708 NEWJACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHrfnt bnntfnn Pastor:Rev.RexAnderson AssistantPastor:Rev.DarrylChurch YouthPastor:Rev.ToneLundy ChurchClerk:Mrs.LucressieD.Mcgriff ChurchMotto:EquippingChangedPeople forAChangingWorld! ScheduleofWorshipServices SundayMorningService-11:00a.m. Youth/AdultBibleStudy-Thursdays-6:45p.m. e-mailaddresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com(PastorAnderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com(ChurchClerk) Contact:LucressieMcgriff-352-348-7955 REALLIFECHRISTIANCHURCHHelpingRealPeopleFindRealFaith Saturday6:00pm Sunday9:30am,11:15am&6:00pm VidaReal(enespaol),Domingosalas6:00pm FamilyNightiseveryWednesday! LilLifeGroups(Nursery-5thgrade)6:30-7:30pm TheWay(MiddleSchool)-6:30-7:30pm Catalyst(HighSchool)-7:30-8:30pm RealParenting-6:30-7:30pm rnrtfnrrSOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131ChestnutSt.,Clermont 352-394-2753 EastAve-1blocksouthofSR50 WorshipTimes: Sunday 9AM(Contemporary);11AM(Traditional) Churchschoolforallages10:00AM Childcareprovided YouthGroup-Wednesdays6:30-8:30PM www.southlakepresbyterian.orgST.MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574WestMontroseStreet Clermont,FL34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00am(RiteI) 10:00am(RiteII) 5:00pm(Praise&Worship) MensPrayerBreakfastWOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH OFGODINCHRISTElderT.L.Wootson 836ScottSt.Clermont,FL34711 394-1396or394-3004 Sunday11:00am&7:30pm Thursday7:30pm FERNDALEFERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHatCR455&CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor:Gordon(Bird)Sanders SundaySchool:9:15am SundayMorningWorship:10:30am EveningWorship& DiscipleshipStudy:6:00pm TeamKid:Sunday6:30pm Wednesday:7:00pm PrayerService,YouthActivities, MissionKidsforChildrenGrovelandFIRSTBAPTISTCHURCH OFGROVELANDnt SundaySchool9:45am SundayServices10:50am&6:00pm WednesdayService6:30pmMT.OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSundayWorshipService-11:00AM SundaySchool-9:30AM BibleStudy-Wednesday7:00PM YouthBibleStudy-Wednesday7:00PM ComeAsYouAre.AllAreWelcome! bf rfrb n rftnr rftnrfMINNEOLACONGREGATIONSINAIOFMINNEOLAAProgressiveJewishCongregation Shabbatservicesareconductedevery Fridayat7:30pm Servicesareheldatthesynagoguelocatedat: 303ANorthUSHighway27,Minneola ReligiousSchool,MensClub&WomensClub rnfrnrr n NEWLIFEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH,PCA18237E.ApshawaRd. Minneola,FL34715 MusicMinistries 407-920-0378 SundaySchool9:30am Worship10:45amTEMPLEOFTHELIVINGGODn SundaySchool9:30am SundayWorship&ChildrensChurch11:00am SundayEveningWorship6:00pm WedWorship&YouthService7:00pm Rev.LoyceRowlandMONTVERDEWOODLANDSLUTHERAN(LCMS)15333CR455,Montverde,FL34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com PastorRev.Dr.BrianKneser SundayService8:30am&11am SundaySchool9:45amOAKLANDPRESBYTERIANCHURCH218E.OaklandAve. (1/2mileN.Hwy50at TubbSt./WestOrangeLumber) 8:45amContemporaryWorship 9:45amSundaySchoolForAllAges 11:00amTraditionalWorship NurseryProvidedAllServices 407-656-4452 Dr.RobertP.Hines,Jr. www.oaklandpres.org SouthLake SouthLake GatheringPlacesSpiritualWorshipforGatheringPlacesSpiritualWorshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOME ServingFlorida Fa miliesSince1957 -AFullServiceHome-LocallyOwned&OperatedRonBecker&CharlesBecker ,F uneralDirectors352394-712 180 6 W. Minneola Av e. ,C lermont,FL CremationChoicesDirectCremation$675PlusContainer RonBecker ,D irector352-394-8228921S.USHwy27,Minneola,FL CLERMONT ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comOn June 24, friends and fam ilies of employees, dignitaries and local youth sports coach es, parents and students got a preview of the new Dicks Sporting Goods in Clermont. A crowd formed around the stores main entrance, located at 1325 Sandy Grove Ave., as store manager Adam Tomko welcomed the community. Clermont City Manager Darren Gray and Mayor Pro Tem Ray Goodgame spoke about what the store means to Clermont. Our brand is health, wellness and tness, and this store ts into that and into our city perfectly, Gray said. Ofcials then cut the rib bon while patrons streamed into the store to check out their favorite departments. Dicks Sporting Goods is a great addition to the com munity because as much as weve grown here in the last 10 years, its good to have a big sporting goods deal er here. Its a great advantage to the coaches, to the par ents and to the kids around here, said Mike Boyack, a Cl ermont resident and coach at South Lake and East Ridge High Schools. The brief celebration Tuesday was a prelude to the of cial grand opening at 8 / a.m. Friday, which will feature free Reebok Play Dry T-shirts for the rst 100 people and free Mystery Gift Cards worth be tween $5 and $500 for the rst 100 adults in line on Saturday beginning at 8 / a.m. and Sun day beginning at 9 / a.m. Guests in line early will re ceive a combination for a chance to open the DICKS Sporting Goods Gift Locker at 7:45 / a.m. on F riday and Satur day and 8:45 / a.m. on Sunday. We are very excited. This was a great, welcoming crowd today. The community has been terric and everyones response to our store has been just wonderful, Senior Community Marketing Manager Lauren Delany said. Delaney said that perhaps the biggest attraction for the weekend-long grand opening is a 4,000-gallon bass tank that will be set up in the parking lot where shing demonstra tions will be held hourly from 11 / a.m. to 6 / p .m. According to a press release, on Saturday, Addictive Fishing host Blair Wiggins will make an appear ance from 11 / a.m. to 4 / p.m. Were wanting to bring out the outdoors enthusiasts, in addition to the sports and shing enthusiasts, Delaney said. The 40,218-square-foot store, built by Schmidt Con struction, will have extended hours throughout the weekend. The opening of the Cler mont Dicks Sporting Goods marks the retailers 28th store in Florida and 573rd nationwide. The biggest thing is you dont have to drive all the way to Winter Garden or Or lando for quality products. Leagues can also come here too, Clermont resident Patrick Sweeney said.New Dicks Sporting Goods store opens ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Clermont resident Patrick Sweeney looks at lacrosse sticks for his son Jack, 11, during the Friends and Family night of Dicks Sporting Goods in Clermont on June 24.

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Wednesday, July 2, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B5 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance rt t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital Ad No.: 10015662 June 25, 2014 & July 02, 2014 Solution on page B7 Call the South Lake Press to get your ad in! 394-2183

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Wednesday, July 2, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B7 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr Crossword puzzle is on page B5. Thanks for reading the local paper!

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B8 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, July 2, 2014 rffntbbnnfbfrfrntb bnntb rf rntbtr bntb r nnn tb t b nb or bn b nb nn bbt rfr rf or ntbrntt r f n tb r ntb btttt bt nn nn ntb t b tbn tbn ntb bn bn t tr or Ce rt ied Pr e-Ow ne d r f ntb nbn n tb n bbbbf b t b rf ntb nbn n tb n b bb bf btb b bb fb b b n b b f f f t 9145So.Hwy441(AcrossFromTheAirport) MON-FRI9am-9pm,SAT9am-8pm SUNNoon-6pm MON-FRI7:00am-6:00pm SAT8am-5pmHABLAMOS ESPAOL f JENKINSHYUNDAIofLeesburg rfntbbtnt r frrn t bfrr r b rfn n r r r brr rrrrf b rrbrnrrrbrfrrbrnfrbrrnb n rn r b rbrnrfbrb nrbrn rnff b rrnb rnrfrnnff rrfr t nfrbrrnb frf r fn t b n n n t n n n n n n r r nGr ea t Se le ct io n of fn b r t t t t rrr fr r n tb tr ftr r r r r t t r r r r tr n r bbr br br r tt r tr r r br r r rt f t f br tr ttr r bbr nrr rf nt bf t



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SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | B2 SPORTS: MVAs Lindor on the cusp of the major leagues WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWSTAND INSIDE CLASSIFIED B5 CROSSWORDS B5 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN B2 SPORTS B1 VOICES A4 WORD ON THE STREE T A2 SO UTH LAKE PRE SS V OLUME 99, NO. 27 3 SECTIO N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reserved www. southlakepress.com PRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com L ake County Fire Rescue enters the upcoming budget talks with the County Commission asking for $1.2 million in addition al funding just to maintain the service it has been of fering. But tight funding leaves the department unable to replace several aging re stations and trucks, accord ing to re ofcials. Meanwhile, the two re placement stations the County Commission ap proved, Station 90 in Cler mont and Station 14 in Al toona, have been delayed TAVARES Lake Fire Rescue expresses concerns about aging stations PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Lake County Fire Rescues engine 14 is too tall to t inside of the re station in Altoona on Friday. Matt Roudabush walks past lockers full of reghting gear in the garage of the re station. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Clermont city ofcials believe they will be able to balance a larger mu nicipal budget for 2015 without having to raise taxes, they told the city council this week. At a workshop last week, Clermont Fi nance Director Joe Van Zile and City Manag er Darren Gray shared highlights of the citys scal year 2015 draft budget with council members. Perhaps the best news concerning the budget is that a tax rate hike is not forecast, in spite of an increase in expen ditures that includes the $6.3 million pur chase of the new Arts and Recreation Center. That means the current 3.729 millage rate will more than likely stay the same. We considered rais ing the millage rate to cover the Arts and Rec reation building, but it was our feeling we should wait until anoth er year to implement that after we evaluate the revenue it brings, Van Zile said. The city council wel comed the news af ter facing budget de cits the past three years: $134,007 in 2011, $267,222 in 2012 and $1,105,328 in 2013. The projected decit for 2014 is $1,679,194. And with revenues for 2015 projected at $19,916,371 against Council members briefed on next years budget LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com Lake County School Board Member Tod Howard is asking his fellow board members to embark on a search for a new superintendent because of dis satisfaction with Susan Moxley. Howard expressed frustration with Moxley again this week after she stuck by her decision to reassign Rhonda Hunt, a principal at Lost Lake Elementary School to Eustis Heights TAVARES School Board member calls for superintendent search MOXLEY HOWARD CLERMONT ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com City of Groveland ofcials are prepping for their big south Lake Fourth of July Festival Fri day. The event is being organized by city ofcials and Bella Faire, a special events planning com pany out of Orlando. It will be held at Lake David Park and will feature music, food vendors, events and games. Mayor Tim Loucks said the event is the only one in south Lake County and attracts thou sands of visitors each year. We are very excited about this event. It will be fun for the whole family, so come out and join us, said Lisa Cortese, executive as sistant to the city manager. Festivities begin at 9 a.m. with a car show. Prizes will be award ed in several categories. Auto mobiles on display will range from exotic to antique. Musical entertainment also begins at 9 a.m. and will contin ue throughout the day on two main stages leading into the reworks show at about 9 p.m., weather permitting. From 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., people may also want to stop in at the Lake David Center for the usedbook sale hosted by the Grove land-Mascotte Womens Club and the Friends of the Marion Baysinger Memorial Library in Groveland. The Mr. and Miss Firecracker pageant will be held at 10 a.m. at the Puryear Building, 243 S. Lake Ave. At 11 a.m., the ofcial Fourth of July opening ceremony kicks Groveland preparing for July 4 festivities This years Fourth of July is gonna surpass any other Fourth of July celebration weve had I think, as far as entertainment. We have a great, great lineup. This is our premier event. Its completely family-oriented and so much fun for everyone. Groveland Mayor Tim Loucks SEE STATIONS | A2 SEE BUDGET | A5 SEE FOURTH | A6 SEE BOARD | A5

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, July 2, 2014 CLERMONT South Lake Hospitals Obstetrics Department honored South Lake Hospitals Obstetrics Department was honored by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists District XII and the March of Dimes for reducing the number of early elective inductions and cesarean deliveries. The hospital recently met the crite ria by achieving a rate for elective de liveries before 39 completed weeks of pregnancy of 5 percent or lower and having policies in place to prevent such deliveries. South Lake Hospital, in Clermont, was the only hospital in Lake County to receive this recognition. We are delighted to present this commemorative banner to South Lake Hospital for adhering to stan dards that directly benet the health of babies, said Dr. Karen Harris, Chair of the Program Services Committee for the March of Dimes Florida Chapter. The last few weeks of pregnancy are extremely important for the babys brain and lung development, among other organs, so we want to commend this momentous achievement. CLERMONT FDOT review gives green light for new traffic signal A Florida Department of Transportation review conclud ed there is a need for a trafc signal at the intersection of U.S. Highway 27 and Margaux Drive/Sawgrass Bay Blvd. near Sawgrass Bay Elementary School. Parents and ofcials have asked for the signal since the school opened in 2008 because of difculties entering and exiting Sawgrass Bay Blvd. Lake County School Board mem ber Tod Howard said while many had pushed for the trafc signal for years, the FDOT said the numbers did not warrant it at the time. In 2010, a ashing signal was added to the intersection. In a letter to Lake County Engineer Fred Schneider, the FDOT said the conversion of the overhead ash ing beacon to a fully operational traf c signal will improve overall safety of the intersection, particularly during school arrival and dismissal times. The same letter states the FDOT in tends to have the signal put in place within the next 12 months, possibly sooner, depending on signal contract funding. CLERMONT Man blames DUI on beer-flavored chicken A Clermont motorist who alleged ly had alcohol on his breath during a vehicle crash investigation blamed it on chicken he had eaten that was sea soned with beer. Taito Sanchez, 32, was arrested June 25 on charges of DUI and DUI with property damage. Sanchez was also charged with ve counts of child ne glect because most of the children in the back seat were injured and not re strained during the crash. Sanchez was admitted to Orlando Regional Medical Center for his inju ries and arrested after leaving the hos pital. He was released from the Lake County jail after posting a $6,500 bail. The crash occurred Friday on County Road 565A near Max Hooks Road in Clermont as Sanchez was al legedly leaving a barbecue. According to an arrest afdavit, Sanchez told troopers he was pulling out and didnt see a second vehicle approaching and was unable to avoid a collision. But the responding trooper said he could smell alcohol on Sanchezs breath, his eyes were watery and there was an unopened beer and chick en on the vehicles oorboard. When asked about the smell of alcohol, Sanchez was adamant that it came from barbecue chicken, but he re fused to let ofcials draw blood for a DUI test. Area Briefs What South Lake residents are saying about ... LOCAL FOOD What importance do you place on locally grown food? I think the importance is to keep our money here, keep our local growers go ing, because if you dont, there will come a time when we dont have the option of locally grown. It will come from out of state or out of country, where you dont know what their rules are. And things just taste better if theyre from home ground. COURTNEY ISHMAN MASCOTTE Very important. There are no pesticides and it helps improve with aller gies. And it helps support local businesses. JULIE KILEY GROVELAND We go, we buy the fresh baked bread and the fresh vegetables every Sun day at the farmers mar ket downtown. Thats our weekly ritual. Its near to our home with fresh baked bread and pro duce, and were support ing our local community. DAN DREVES CLERMONT Well, I think its import ant because the closer we are to the source, the fresh er and more nutritious it is. If the produce has been locally grown, then its usually picked ripe, so that it is ready to go. BARBARA PERRY CLERMONT Word on the Street Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 more than once. Lake County Assistant Fire Chief Jack Fillman said there are several aging re stations that must be re placed. They were built to house volun teers, he said. But today those same re sta tions house at least two full-time reghters working 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Fire Stations in Fruitland Park, Bassville Park, Sorrento and Penn broke were never built to be a fulltime re station, Fillman said. The living quarters are small and some have only one bathroom, he said. Brian Gamble, vice president of the Professional Fireghters of Lake County, said his biggest con cern is those re stations and six others are not storm-ready. Those re stations are housed in metal storage warehouse buildings and are not designed for storms, Gamble said. The problem is not that re sta tions are old, he said. A proper ly built re station can last 50 to 60 years or more. The problem is when you take a storage building and make it into a re station, it is not designed to be a safe place for your rescuers to stay. A few stations would have to be shut down in the event of a hurri cane because they dont have gen erators. Gamble said in addition to storm readiness he is concerned about repair costs for many of the re stations. The Plantation station has had mold remediation twice and when they do that they have to put those guys out, he said. That affects re sponse time. In addition to Plantation, the Yalaha and Bassville Park stations have been gutted for mold and, in some of those stations, rats, Gam ble said. We had some mold issues at several of our stations, costing $180,000 to x two stations several years ago, Fillman said. The department receives funding from impact fees, re assessments and the Municipal Service Taxing Unit. The MSTU has been reduced by $1 million since 2009 and the re assessment has remained the same since 2011, at $181 yearly. Stephen Koontz, the countys budget director, said the depart ment has exhausted its impact fees for a new station at Altoona and the relocation of Station 90. Currently, six Lake County Fire Rescue Station 90 reghters are serving on rotating shifts out of the Value Place Hotel off of State Road 50 in Clermont. In May, county commission ers reached an agreement with Senninger Inc., a company which manufactures products for agricul tural irrigation, to acquire a parcel of land for a modular re station at 16220 SR 50 in exchange for the rst section of the realignment of Hartle Road to be completed. There have been vandalism and thefts of property at the hotel and re ofcials said they lack the re sources to secure equipment there. One reghters personal vehicles tires and rims were stolen, and the car was left on cinder blocks. Currently, reghters are leaving their personal vehicles at the Sher iffs substation about a quarter of a mile from the hotel, which has helped, according to Gamble. But the timeline on the project continues to be pushed back, with the latest projection being spring 2015. County Manager David Heath said the delays are because of the right-of-way acquisition concern ing the extension of the road and formalizing the agreements with Clermont and Senninger. Gamble said he is cautiously op timistic about the timeline. Commissioner Sean Parks also shared his concerns. I know it is moving frustrating ly slow and I hope it can be done as soon as possible, he said. Meanwhile, in Altoona, the building continues to deteriorate, re ofcials said. A portion of the ceiling fell through this past week. Fillman said the reghters are not expected to move into a new station there until the end of 2015. The roof is in poor shape, Fill man said. The apparatus bay is not even big enough. We cant put our engine in there and close the door. Gamble said the re truck is rel atively new and has been sitting outside 24 hours a day. Also, the barracks are in a storage closet, Gamble said. Certainly, the wear and tear on half of the eet also concerns of cials. The National Fire Protection Agency recommends replacing re trucks every seven years, according to Fillman. It is concerning, Fillman said. Your (truck) reaches a certain point and then maintenance costs continue to rise. It costs more and more to keep that vehicle on the road. Gamble said he is concerned if one of the trucks breaks down while on a call and is unable to supply water to reghters res cuing someone inside a burning structure, it could be deadly. There is also the added concern of the truck breaking down on the way to a call. Koontz said while the MSTU and re assessment fund opera tions, there is not enough funding to build new stations or buy capital with the funds remaining. STATIONS FROM PAGE A1 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL One room at the re station in Altoona serves as the laundry room, kitchen and ofce. Above the kitchen counter, a light-colored patch can be seen on the wall where a kitchen cabinet fell more than six months ago, but was never replaced.

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, July 2, 2014 Scott cannot be trusted Registered voters, do not be misled by the campaign tactics of Floridas present governor. Anyone who took the Fifth Amendment 75 times when being questioned about the largest Medicare fraud in history is not to be trusted. I am amazed that he and his cronies bought the last election. Wake up, Floridians, and vote for anyone else. Is it any wonder that Florida made the list of the top 10 most corrupt states in the union? We must especially be ware of selsh men who would clip the wings of the American eagle in order to feather their own nests. Franklin Delano Roosevelt. MICHAEL J. HARRIS | Webster Yes on Amendment 2 Las Vegas billionaire Sheldon Adelson has contributed $2.5 million to the group ghting Amendment 2 to make medi cal marijuana legal in Florida. This represents 92 percent of the total contributions to that cause. This also represents a shocking attempt by an outof-state individual to control Florida government. Adelsons actions point out the great value of our individ ual votes. While he will be at tempting to inuence the choic es made by Florida voters with TV advertisements, he himself has zero votes. At the same time, we dont have the money to ght his advertisements. We voters must appreciate the power of our votes. We should educate ourselves on the issues on the ballot and then vote to have our choices approved. We control the outcome. In spite of this power, only 42 percent of those eligible in Florida voted in the 2010 election. I believe that medical mari juana should be legalized be cause of its ability to help peo ple with great pain to live better lives. The greatest benefactors that I am personally aware of are military veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress syndrome. The medical profession, and 7 out of 10 Florida voters support Amendment 2. If you arent aware of the ben ets or disadvantages of legal medical marijuana, go to www. UnitedForCare.com and edu cate yourself. Dont rely on the TV advertisements being nanced by Sheldon Adelson. You already know what they are going to say. Your vote is valuable. Dont throw it away by not voting or by voting the way Adelson would want you to. BILL LORSON | Leesburg Love the sinner, not the sin The June 14 Associated Press article in the Daily Commercial S. Baptist leader: No change on marriage stance involving the Rev. Ronnie Floyd becoming the new president of the Southern Baptist Convention was quite interesting. Floyd, senior pastor of Cross Church in Northwest Arkansas, ... told the Associated Press that although Americas attitude to ward gay and transgender in dividuals is rapidly changing, the convention does not intend to alter its position that gen der identity cannot be different from biological sex and that ho mosexuality is immoral. We stand strong on what the Scripture says about marriage between a man and a woman ... Floyd said. But ... we must hold the word of God in one hand and the love of God in the other ... The love from God is now endless and comes from His hand continuously. Regarding the mystery of God, realize that He still loves us and that Jesus has shown how much. God had so much love for His human cre ation that He was willing to have Jesus come and do what was necessary to get forgiveness for us. What Jesus went through for us was horric and fantastic. We must accept Gods word for what it says and means. If we try to rewrite His intentions and meaning we are (and get) in deep trouble. This article cited that ear lier this month a Southern California Southern Baptist Church decided to stop con demning homosexuality as sin ful and instead embraced a third way. Now, is that rewriting the word of God or not? Somebody needs to start to think. Gods love is for all sinful people; its mainly their sin that troubles Him. Lets get it straight, OK? Remember, we cannot rewrite His word. Sin is sin. He loves us in spite of our sins. Our need is to ask for forgiveness. ELMER A. WOLFORD | Mount Dora T he Lake County School Board is hard to g ure. They raised a ruckus rightly so when they discovered that some of their schools were violating the states class-size limits. So they paid a consultant $20,000 to get to the bottom of the problem, and the consultant came back with a series of recommendations that included hiring an administrator to ensure schools were keeping their class sizes within the limits of the law. During its review, the consultant surveyed hun dreds of teachers and administrators, learning that well over 100 said they were asked to sign class-size reports that they knew were wrong. There was a great wailing and gnashing of teeth from the School Board when the report came back. The review didnt go deep enough, they said. They had concerns about Superin tendent Susan Moxleys ability to lead the dis trict, they said. But then a couple of funny things happened. First, instead of drilling deeper to nd out why teachers were being asked to violate the class-size law and who was asking them to do it, the School Board dropped it. Having made their windy speeches of outrage, board members forfeited their responsibility to seek out and identify the administrators who were fudging the numbers and exposing the district to potential nes. And then, as if to underscore their lack of honest concern, last week the board voted down a proposal to hire a class-size compliance ofcer as the consultant had recommended. Too expensive, they said. The message the ve board members sent was that they are more interested in impressing voters than in solving a serious problem. Contrast that, their approach to another con troversy that erupted last week when Moxley tried to move the popular and successful prin cipal of Lost Lake Elementary School to a strug gling school in Eustis. It seemed a prudent strategy by Moxley to prop up an underperforming school and frankly, one that school districts across the state use all the time. Yet, when parents, teachers and others ooded the School Board meeting room last week to object to the move, the board pre dictably joined the chorus of outrage and again began wondering aloud about Moxleys leader ship ability. But why? What did she do wrong? Board member Bill Mathias suggested to us that the backlash toward Moxley was political in this case, and we have to agree. In fact, the School Boards behavior time and again appears to be political. How else do you explain their willingness to drop the ball on the class-size scandal while micromanaging the su perintendent over a reasonable stafng decision? So while the School Board wonders aloud about the superintendents ability to lead the local pub lic school system, we have to wonder about their ability and willingness to do the same. Its time they quit playing politics and get se rious about the business of public education. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD ........................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST O PINION WHATS YOUR OPINION? The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Letters to the Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711 By fax to: 352-394-8001 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. GUEST COLUMNS If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OUR VIEW If you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veter ans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to to www.lake vet erans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANS S OUTH LAKE PRESS Your community newspaper for more than 100 years. 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001 The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Florida 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region. All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. YOUR OPINIONS LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Corrupt culture promotes violence Your recent editorial on gun violence ignored one problem the most basic. Senseless vi olence already pervades our anything-goes literary and en tertainment culture, much more so than in other devel oped countries. Our glorious First Amendment has been twist ed by the elitist, relativistic Supreme Court to legalize vile, anti-social lth, which is brain washing impressionable youth and the psychologically vul nerable. From among the lat ter groups come the murder ers. The idea that guns, knives, clubs or rope that can be tied in a noose are the killers is nonsense. Only a little research is re quired to prove that the cur rent permissiveness of in sensate violence in print and visual media is not what those who drafted, passed and rat ied the First Amendment meant by freedom of speech and freedom of the press. They would all be outraged if they knew that great, human provision had been used judi cially to strike d own restraints on anti-human productions of the most destructive sort. Lots of us are old enough to remember the America of 60 years ago, when school and public mass violence were ex tremely rare. Guns were plenti ful even then, but violent lth, both in print and graphically presented, was illegal. Until conscientious Americans pressured the po litically powerful (including judges who can insulate them selves from the social effects of their disastrous decisions) to repudiate the pretense that freedom of expression re quires tolerating anti-social poison, the problem of the senseless violence you deplore will remain insoluble. JOHN A. RENICK | Grand Island LETTER of the WEEK HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO School Board plays politics

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Wednesday, July 2, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5 Elementary, an under performing school, to the disapproval of par ents and teachers at the school. It is not just this in cident, Howard said in a phone interview. This has been building since I have been on the board. We are not plan ning for the long-term future of this district when it comes to the administration. Howard said he does not believe the district is improving. We need stabili ty, he said. We need growth. We were an A district and now we are a C district. How far are we willing to go? I have reached that limit. At this point, I believe we need to go in a new di rection with new lead ership. Moxley declined to comment about How ards criticisms. Howard said the classsize issue affecting the schools earlier this year also played a part in his decision to call for the search. He called it a serious error in judgment. The review of all schools in the Lake County School District, which analyzed classsize compliance and whether violations were knowingly made, found 136 anonymously sur veyed teachers who said a supervisor asked them to sign reports re lated to class-size re quirements that they knew to be inaccurate. Surveys were sent to teachers, administra tors and data process ing staff, the review stat ed. Out of 2,818 surveys, 1,518 were returned. General sta tements from the district ofce such as we will make class size and be cre ative and make it work may have put perceived pressure on staff to meet class-size require ments, the review stat ed. Moxley previously said no one in her of ce knowingly coerced school principals to lie about their class sizes to skirt state rules. The superintendent called for the review af ter nding that six prin cipals broke the law by inaccurately reporting their class sizes to the state. One of Howards oth er concerns is the high turnover rate of princi pals and assistant prin cipals at many of the schools. For example, he said, at Eustis Heights, there have been three princi pals in four years. But Chris Patton, spokesman for the dis trict, said a number of principals have been moved because of re tirements. In particular, he said, since 2011 there has been seven retirements. Patton added there has also been the open ing of the Lake Virtual School, Lake Minneola High and Sorrento Ele mentary in the last four years contributing to the shift in staff. All these things af fect overall principal appointment, he said. There have been a lot of changes in the last four years. The Center for Public Education released a re port showing that prin cipal turnover adversely affects schools. In a study of Mi ami-Dade County Pub lic Schools researchers found that students at tending schools with a new principal made lower achievement gains in math than they had been under the pre vious principal, the centers report states. The center reported research that showed it takes a highly effec tive principal about ve years to fully impact a schools performance. Stuart Klatte, presi dent of the Lake County Education Association, said different principals have different manage ment styles. Some are better at getting staff to work to gether, while others are more punitive, he said. She has been trying to move people around to put the right principals with the right personal ity of the schools. In order for a super intendent search to commence, the School Board must hold a vote on the issue. Moxleys contract is up in June 2015. The search does not mean the superinten dent will automatical ly be replaced, as she is matched up against other qualifying can didates, School Board member Bill Mathias said. I dont have a prob lem with a superinten dent search, he said. I dont believe it ought to be in the arena of a po litical campaign. I think she has a complex job where she has to bal ance input from ve di verse board members. Anyone who serves the public is accountable and there is no guaran tee of their continued service. Howard is up for re-election this year and faces a challenge from two candidates at the Aug. 26 primary, Marc Anthony Dodd and Ja mie Maret Hanja. Kyleen Fischer, an other School Board member, had previous ly asked to review the superintendents con tract. She did not ask for the search, Howard said. I am askin g for the search. I am done with the whole contract bit. D004329 Ron Beck er Dir ector352-394-8228 r f nt b t $675 t HWY 27/4 41 2 miles fr om Hwy 27 rf nnftb 787-4440 tnfrfn n nntr nrf bfnffn bt r rn n $300OFFRE MA NU FA CTURED CAR TSCas h or ch ec k. Mu st pr ese nt ad on pu rch ase Lim ite d Ti me Offer See stor e for details expenditures of $21,599,591, the projected decit for 2015 is $1,683,220. Still, Clermonts reserves after the 2015 projection would remain at $6,289,863. Regardless, the city manager and staff have reduced spending and our reserves are over $6 mil lion. I know of no other city our size that has a balance sheet as good as ours, Councilman Ray Goodgame said in an email after the meeting. Perhaps the biggest effect to the budget was the purchase of the Arts and Recreation Center. Revenues from the rental of rooms and the use of the commu nity pools and gymnasium, howev er, were not yet known. Gray said ofcials project about $260,000 in user fees. Smaller expenditures included $98,000 in events department spe cial events and sponsorship, histor ic village building repairs at $62,000 and $3,000 for iPads for the use of city council members raised no questions. Other spending includ ed $400,000 for a splash park at Wa terfront Park, $509,200 for improve ments to the Arts and Recreation Center, $1,057,400 for the buildout of Lake Hiawatha Preserve, $170,000 for the re departments new rescue boats and $316,733 in merit increases for city staff and $391,005 for new positions. A couple of other items, howev er, raised a few eyebrows, includ ing a utility rate study projected at a cost of $108,000 and $1.4 million for new recycling trucks and carts. Also noted in the budget is a pro jection of the expenditure versus the revenue of the red light camer as Clermont recently implemented at three intersections in town. The projected revenues from the camer as were $335,000, and pro jected expenditures were $443,829. BUDGET FROM PAGE A1 BOARD FROM PAGE A1 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com The Orlando-Kissim mee-Sanford Metropoli tan Statistical Area, which includes Lake County, saw a 2.9 percent drop in sales of single-family homes in May compared to last May but also saw a 9.1 percent rise in the medi an sale price compared to last May, according to data from Florida Realtors. According to the report, there were 2,576 closed sales for single-family homes in May 2014, with a median sale price of $180,000. Betty Salas, the president of the Realtors Association of Lake and Sumter Coun ties and the broker/owner of Coldwell Banker All Vil lage Realty in Lady Lake, said Lake County is follow ing the trend of the larger statistical area. She said sales might be down because a lot of the short sales and bankowned sales that were pop ular last year are now off the market and fewer in vestors are in the market, but she thinks more actual homeowners are. She said investors are buying fewer homes because of the price increase. When your prices are at an all-time low, you seem to have a feeding frenzy of investors trying to pick them up, Salas said. She said prices increase when there is a low inven tory. She added people who lost homes to foreclosure at the downturn are now buying homes again. They are now requal ied to purchase. Were seeing a lot of those come back, you know, that were hit right at the fall of the market, theyre back in and theyre buying homes again because of course owning a home is still the American dream for every one, Salas said. In Florida, the reports shows 23,013 sales of sin gle-family homes in May, an increase of 3.6 percent from last May, at a median price of $180,000, the same as the Orlando areas medi an price. The median price for the whole state was up 4.3 percent from last May, according to the report. The overall metropoli tan statistical area for the Orlando area also saw an 18.7 percent drop in closed sales for townhouses and condos this May compared to last May and a 10.5 per cent increase in medi an sale price for those, ac cording to the report. Lake County single-family home sales down 2.9 percent in May HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO In this section of the High Grove development in the Lake County section of Four Corners, the homes for sale outnumber the homes that are not for sale. When your prices are at an all-time low, you seem to have a feeding frenzy of investors trying to pick them up. Betty Salas, President of the Realtors Association of Lake and Sumter Counties

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A6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, July 2, 2014 off with the presenta tion of colors by Koran Way Veterans, playing of the Nation Anthem and a rie salute. Visi t ing dignitaries, includ ing U.S. Congressman Daniel Webster, Flori da House of Represen tatives member Larry Metz and Lake County Commissioner (District 2) Sean Parks will speak briey, as will May or Loucks, Vice May or James Smith and City Manager Redmond Jones II. Afterwards, Jones will take his post inside the dunk tank at the Groveland Fire Ex plorers Booth. A kids area will in clude a bounce house, water slide and, begin ning at noon, activities and contests, including a watermelon-eating contest and hula hoop contest. Bands playing on stage two include Dav ida, Dear Destiny, Chris Ash and Fender Bend ers. The main stage lineup includes Rain er Berry, Aaron Tay lor and Patrick Gibson. At 7:30 p.m., the days headliner, Bucky Cov ington, a former Amer ican Idol contestant, takes the stage. This years Fourth of July is gonna surpass any other Fourth of July celebration weve had I think, as far as entertain ment. We have a great, great lineup, Loucks said. This is our premier event. Its completely family-oriented and so much fun for everyone. Cortese said people are encouraged to bring lawn chairs and blan kets for the reworks show, along with bath ing suits and towels for the days water attrac tions and swimming in the lake. For information, go to groveland-.gov /4th-of-july. FOURTH FROM PAGE A1 Placey our ad her ea nd re ac ht he Local Mar ke t!VE RY AF FO RD AB LE!Call to da y3 52-3 94-2183 D003191 Cler monts Newest Seafood/Steakhouse!Grand Opening July 4thweekend!Aged Prime Steaks Always Fr esh Seafood Open 7 days Lunch/Dinner ~ Sunday brunch Live music We d-Sun794 W. Minneola Av e.In Historic Downtown Cler mont!352-242-3800 Ja son Cotto Julie Kiley Kris Memolo Marian Armstrong rf r ntb (352)242-4500 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Despite a recommen dation for approval by city staff, Clermont council members unan imously rejected a per mit for an underground gun range off U.S. High way 27 north of DeSoto Street, the same project they had originally ap proved in October 2010. The approval in 2010 came after more than a year of working with then-owner David Heck to satisfy the concerns of citizens about the ranges proximity to a neighborhood, park, school and ice cream stand. The underground range would have also in cluded an above-ground gun shop that did not re quire a conditional use permit and a 10-foot re taining wall that would stand at least six-feet above ground surround ing the 7,000-squarefoot facility. In Jan 2012, Heck, still not having started con struction of the range, came before the council again. His conditional use permit was amend ed with a few changes, including the types of weapons that could be used, and was approved for the second time. Heck was then given two years to start con struction but before he could do so, he died. Before council last week were John Hill, owner of Black Label Shooting Sports, who worked alongside Heck getting the project ap proved the rst and sec ond time, and his part ner, Aaron Collins. They asked for the condition al use permit to be ap proved once more. They would have already started on the construc tion, but because the propertys sale to them was delayed and in pro bate since Hecks death, the two-year time frame to start the build-out expired. This time around, staff recommended its approval, but council members denied it. We were very disap pointed, well actual ly completely shocked, that this wasnt vot ed in again. Weve put in a lot of time, mon ey, effort and emotion into making sure weve done everything weve been asked to do in the right and most efcient way possible for the last nine months and for it to be denied Im just clueless, said Hill. At the meeting Tues day night, a handful of residents of a neighbor hood located behind the commercial prop erty and others in the community opposed the project because of fear that the gun range and shop would not only be noisy but would endanger anyone who lives near it. The same protests were heard by council when Heck was seek ing their blessing be fore. Jim Purvis, a local Clermont resident who does not live near the gun range, pleaded with council members to re ject it. Im in total sup port of the gun range. Its a good business, its something thats need ed in the community and it would be well uti lized. I also think its the most stupid location for this, Purvis said. Un fortunately, David Heck died, but mercifully, that gave us another bite at the apple, and hopeful ly, this time youll bite it the right way. Tim Murry, a lifelong resident of Clermont who said he lives about 1,200 feet from the lo cation of the proposed range also plead with council to vote against the project. Theres a playground less than 50 feet from the location. There are two churches, theres Clermont Elementary School and Clermont Head Start about 300500 feet from the fa cility. There are homes and residents that have been there for years. We are here discussing this for the third time but we really dont need to be here again, Murry said. David Gustason, a customer of Hills who was at the meeting Tuesday, said he has vis ited dozens of ranges throughout the nation and never heard of any freak accidents or noise, even when standing in the parking lots. Ive never heard of anything like that. I challenge you to nd one, Gustason said, re sponding to fears that bullets would y out of the building. Please know about it. Research the real facts about the noise, the ventilation, everything. Still, when the time came for a vote, the council voted 5-0 against the project. Many neighbors were against this fa cilitys application be ing approved. There are children, schools and churches close by and none of the residents supported the gun range. There were citizens in support of the range, but they did not live in this area, Councilman Ray Goodgame said in an email to constituents af ter the meeting. CLERMONT Council throws out gun range proposal, 5-0 We were very disappointed, well actually completely shocked, that this wasnt voted in again. Weve put in a lot of time, money, effort and emotion into making sure weve done everything weve been asked to do in the right and most efficient way possible for the last nine months and for it to be denied Im just clueless. John Hill, owner of Black Label Shooting Sports

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Wednesday, July 2, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A7 18 HOLES$25Plus Ta x INCLUDES: Gr een Fees & Cart Fees.FREE SLEEVEOF GOLF BALLS Call 407-886-3303 toda y for yo ur Te e Ti me!www .Zellw oodGolf.com Va lid for up to 4 players. Not va lid with an y other offer Must present coupon at check-in.Expires 9/10/14 D003624 r f f nt b b rfSel ected from Historic Downt own Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to pres ent the CDP Featu red Business of the Month...FINDERS KEEPERSFINDERS KEEPERS was opened on November 1, 2010 on 8th and Mo ntro se str eets in Hist oric Downtown Clermont. Owner, Pat Matson, who retire d af ter 30 years in the corporate bu si ness world, decided she could finally follow her dream of owning her own sma ll bu sines s. Not exa ctly sure what Finders Keepers would be toda y it has evolved into a Unique Gift, Home Dcor and gently used Furniture boutique. Custo mers enj oy the unique items they can purchase at Find ers Keepers and appreciate the ever turning invent ory with new items being intro duced daily. According to Pat find ing the tr ea su res and merchandising them is what she loves to do. Selling is just something I have to do to stay in business she laughs. Having expanded twice in the past 4 years, Pat contributes her success to her husband Bobs sup por t an d the ass ist an ce of her bab y gir l, as she refers to her, Jennifer Silva. Jen is really the salesperson, she is a real go getter and is always here for me. We are all a great team that makes FINDERS KEEPERS the success that it is. Whether you are looking for a birthday or wedding gift, something funny to give to someone or great furni ture for your home FI NDERS KEE PERS is wh ere you will fin d it Open Tuesd ay thro ugh Satur da y from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and Sund ay 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. you will be greated by the smiles of either Pat or Jen and usually on Sundays both will be in the boutique. S top in and say Hi, you never know what you may find. Pat and her husband Bob Matson have lived in Cler mo nt for the past 11 year s and have 4 ch il d ren and 8 grandch ildren. When not working th ey love to travel and are getting ready for a three week Norway trip in July. Not to worry FINDERS KEE PER S will be open in the capa ble hands of Jen To be sure there will be a huge sale when momma is gone. r f n t b f nf b f b nf nn n f LOOKING FOR PA RTS? SEE JULIE (352) 394-61 11 r fnn ttt b Ih ave par ts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair ser vice too!rr D002937 IN MEMORY DEATH NOTICES Teresa Cruz Acevedo Teresa Cruz Acevedo, 71, of Davenport, died Tuesday, June 24, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Tenson Bennett Tenson Bennett, 56, of Eustis, died Saturday, June 21, 2014. Hayes Brothers Funeral Home, Eustis. Nora I. Demchar Nora I. Demchar, 73, of Grand Island, died Sunday, June 22, 2014. Harden/Pauli Funeral Home, Eustis. Linda Lee Frisby Linda Lee Frisby, 65, of Leesburg, died Tues day, June 24, 2014. Bey ers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg. Janice Marie Gillard Janice Marie Gillard, 57, of Leesburg, died Sunday, June 22, 2014. Marvin C. Zanders Fu neral Home, Inc., Apop ka. Berthold Green Jr. Berthold Green, Jr., 83, of Leesburg, died Monday, June 23, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Lees burg. Martin W. Grey Martin W. Grey, 80, of Wildwood, died Mon day, June 23, 2014. Banks/Page Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Mary Ann Hartenstein Mary Ann Harten stein 76, of Wildwood died Monday June 23, 2014. Hamlin & Hilbish Funeral Directors, Eus tis. Thomas Cleary Holden III Thomas Cleary Hold en, III, 80, of Umatilla, died Wednesday June 25, 2014. Beyers Funer al Home, Umatilla. Elizabeth F. Martin Elizabeth F. Bet ty Martin, 93, of Eus tis, died June 24, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatilla. Robert Stark McCance Robert Stark Mc Cance, 76, of Tavares, died Thursday, June 19, 2014. Page-Theus Fu nerals & Cremations, Leesburg. Adrian M. Neil Adrian M. Neil, 91, of Oxford, passed away Friday June 27, 2014. Arrangements are en trusted to Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Gary A. Roach Gary A. Roach, 57, of Tavares, died Sunday, June 22, 2014. Harden/ Pauli Funeral Home, Eustis. Rosa Delsenia Wright Rosa Delsenia Wright, 81, of Orlando, died Tuesday, June 17, 2014. Rocker-Cusack Mortu ary, Leesburg. AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com David Oliver Willis and his wife Olivia, who own the Mount Dora Coffee house & Bistro, have been thinking of different ideas for the house on the cor ner of Third Avenue and Baker Street for ve years. They now hope to open a new place called Third & Baker in the two-story building this August, said David, a former Ameri can Idol contestant. The overall vision, in short, is to have a com munity where the arts are alive, where music is from the heart, and where people feel like they are home, he said. David hopes to exe cute that vision by hav ing rooms on the sec ond oor rotate between Former American Idol star looks to branch out in Mount Dora BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL David Oliver Willis and his wife Olivia will be opening a new business called Third & Baker at this house in Mount Dora. SEE WILLIS | A8

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A8 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, July 2, 2014 From left: Kneew orks staff Dr Joe Bandur (top left), Receptionist Allyson Bonville Business Associate Kenneth Huffstutler promoter and Professional football play er with the Ta mpa Bay Buccaneers Jeff Demps (front center), Dir ector of Business Development Steve Pisarkiewicz and Dr Mik e Ray (far right). Dr Ray now teaming up with Dr Bandur and Business Consultant Jeff Demps in a new venture KNEEWORKS! Dr Ray now teaming up with Dr Bandur and Business Consultant Jeff Demps in a new venture KNEEWORKS! Call 1-844KNEEWORKS (1-844-563-3967) r fnr tb www .KNEEWORKS.com KNEEWORKS KNEEWORKSoffers: An alter native tr eatment for arthritic knee pain that may delay sur ger y. Visco-supplementation is an established injectable tr eatment protocol for knee arthritis. Our ex perienced medical staff uses uoroscop y for accur ac y in delevering the lubricating uid into the knee joint. Other additive and tr eatment modalities include knee br acing ph ysical ther ap y, ch iropr actic car e, or al natur al supplements and topical compounded ointments. displays by local artists, as well as having resi dent musicians playing on certain nights and bringing in guest artists. Most of the music will take place outside, but he wants to do acoustic indie showcases inside as well. At his current shop, Savion Wright, who competed on Amer ican Idol with David this past season, per formed June 21. David also plans on having a friend do ur ban gardening outside the house. The location will also have a gift shop that will sell items like local hon ey and coffee. He listed a number of renovations that will be done to the proper ty, including building a small stage outside, get ting the outdoor pond working again, building a bar on the porch, and making the location handicap-accessible. There will also be courtyard seating. David said Third & Baker will have a dif ferent menu than the coffee shop and will be more like a gastropub and upscale soul food place. He said he also hopes to have an ofce space and employee break room, which he does not have at his current location, on the second oor. He was also excited about the view for cus tomers from the sec ond oor because of the streetscape work taking place on Third Avenue. Hopefully it will look pretty cool at night, David said. In addition to need ing more space for fre quent entertainment, he said they cannot keep their current loca tion stocked because of its small size. The cur rent coffee shop will be closed. David said they will have to add more em ployees for the new space. Rob English, the pres ident of the Mount Dora Area Chamber of Com merce, said David has been very successful since he opened at his current location and he does not have the room for the large numbers of people he draws for the entertainment there. So, by moving to that location he will be able to satisfy the space needs for people to come and hear the mu sic in the evening, En glish said. With his mix of items that he plans to offer at his store, I think hell be very success ful playing into the arts and the eclectic nature of Mount Dora. He said the new lo cation will drive more people to that part of downtown and will t well with the nearby Norms Palette Wine, Beer, and Tapas Bar. Kelda Senior, public communications of cer for the city of Mount Dora, said the vision of the new location ties in perfectly with what the character of downtown Mount Dora already is. Its about art and cul ture and an eclectic at mosphere and mu sic and vitality, Senior said. WILLIS FROM PAGE A7 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL David Oliver Willis tours what will be the location of his new business. SUBMITTED PHOTO Frank Klum, Jim Mackey, Dave Lofgren and Gene Thomas, members of the Kiwanis Club of Clermont, placed 374 ags on the graves of veterans at the Oak Hill Cemetery in Clermont in honor of Memorial Day. The event is conducted by the club twice a year on Veterans Day and Memorial Day. KIWANIS MEMBERS PLACE FLAGS FOR MEMORIAL DAY

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B1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, July 2, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTS SPORTS EDITOR ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE .............................. 365-8268 FAX .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL ......... sports@dailycommercial.com S PORTS and LEISURE PAUL BARNEY I Staff Writer paul.barney@dailycommercial.com For one more year defensive coordinators in Lake and Sumter counties will have to gure out a way to stop Adrian Falconer. After that, he will be the Big Tens problem. Everyone except for Iowa, that is. Falconer, a 6-foot-1 wide re ceiver who caught 55 passes for 714 yards and ve touchdowns as a junior last season for Leesburg, committed to the University of Iowa over the weekend during a visit to the Iowa City campus. Falconer, who had offers from 16 other FBS schools, took to Twitter on Saturday to let every one know where he will be play ing in the fall of 2015. just committed to the univer sity of iowa #itsgreattobeahawk eye Last season, Falconer helped lead Leesburg all the way to the 6A Regional Seminals against Daytona Beach Mainland. Yel low Jackets rst-year head coach Rich Maresco couldnt be happier for his star wideout. I think its fantastic, Maresco said. Playing in the Big Ten in a stadium like that with that com petition is just awesome. Hes a darn good (football player) and I think hes going to do great in the Big Ten, I really do. Im really ex cited for him. Maresco knows a thing or two about receivers, originally having been hired as the schools wide receivers coach two months be fore Randy Trivers resigned as the head coach in May to take the same position at Washing ton D.C.s Gonzaga College High School. When Maresco rst met Falconer, he was blown away by the fact hes a wide receiver who also plays linebacker. Falconer to play football at Iowa BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Leesburgs Adrian Falconer is brought down by a Seabreeze defender during the Leesburg-Daytona Beach Seabreeze Class 6A quarternal playoff game in Leesburg last season. PHOTO COURTESY OF JOSH BOYER Iron Jungle Weightliftings Brett Ollila competes during the USA Weightlifting Youth Nationals recently at Port Orange Spruce Creek High School. In only his second competition, Ollila nished 25th with a combined weight of 163 kilograms (about 359 pounds) in the 77 kilogram (169 pound) classication. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Four lifters from Iron Jungle weightlifting set personal records re cently at USA Weight liftings Youth National Championships, which were held at Port Or ange Spruce Creek High School. The only weightlifting club in Lake and Sum ter counties, Iron Jungle sent Morgan Rhone, Car los Molano, Brett Ollila and Alexis Smith to the meet, with Smith post ing the clubs best nish fourth place at 75 kilograms (approximate ly 165 pounds.) Rhone was 10th in the Girls 16-17 age group with 97 kilograms (213 pounds), while Molano, lifting at 69 kilograms in the Boys 16-17 clas sication, nished 19th with 139 kilograms (306 pounds) and Ollila with 25th at 77 kilograms with 163 kilograms (359 pounds) in the Boys 1617 age group. Each of our lifters are outstanding people, Iron Jungle coach Josh Boyer said. They are the examples that more than deserve praise and recognition. Too of ten, I feel as though there are those that re ceive a lot of recogni tion that pale in compar ison to these kids. They are great students, elite level lifters and fantastic people. I never have to worry about their behav ior away from the weight room, their academics or their level of dedication. I can say this about all our club lifters who will soon be known in the weightlifting world. Smith, the Iron Jungles nal lifter in the tour nament, nished with a combined weight of 105 kilograms (231 pounds) in the Girls 16-17 age group. She hoisted 41 ki lograms on her rst at tempt in the Snatch and followed with 43 kilo grams, before nishing with a 46 kilograms on her nal attempt. In the Clean-and-Jerk, Smith also bettered her self on each lift, starting with 52 kilograms and nishing with 59 kilo grams (130 pounds). Smith was 16 kilo grams behind MacKen zie Baker in third place. Olivia Davis won the classication with a total weight of 132 kilograms. To nish fourth in the nation is quite an ac complishment, Boyer said. Alexis is truly de veloping into an out standing lifter. Her con dence grows daily and I cant wait to see how she continues to progress. Rhone started with 39 kilograms on her rst attempt in the Snatch and improved to 41 ki lograms on her second attempt. She failed in crease her total weight with her third attempt, placing her ahead of ve lifters heading into the Clean-and-Jerk compe tition. Iron Jungle weightlifting competes at national meet Welcome to the Jungle Each of our lifters are outstanding people. They are the examples that more than deserve praise and recognition. Too often, I feel as though there are those that receive a lot of recognition that pale in comparison to these kids. They are great students, elite level lifters and fantastic people. Josh Boyer, Iron Jungle coach FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Lake County might soon have another major leaguer. Former Montverde Academy standout Francisco Lindor is considered a virtu al lock to be called up in September by the Cleveland Indians for what likely will be an opportunity to earn a starting role with club in 2015. Clevelands current starting shortstop, As drubal Cabrera is ex pected to become a free agent this winter, and the Indians will be on the lookout for a re placement. The Indi ans have been groom ing Lindor, the eighth pick in the 2011 FirstYear Player Draft, as the clubs shortstop of the future. After starting spring training with Cleve land, where he hit .267 with one home run and four RBIs, Lindor was shipped to Dou ble-A Akron and pro duced a solid rst half. Lindor hit .283 with six homers and 43 RBIs for the Rub berDucks and earned his third-consecutive trip to the All-Star Fu tures game, which will be played on July 13 at Target Field in Minne apolis. MVAs Lindor on the cusp of the major leagues AP FILE PHOTO Indians shortstop Francisco Lindor throws during spring training last February in Goodyear, Ariz. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Ben Simmons has long been considered one of the top highschool basketball play ers in the coun try. The Montverde Academy senior is on the verge of becoming the best. According to ESPN Recruit ing Nation, which ranks many of the nations top prep players, Simmons is the second-best play er in the country. A 6-foot-8 power forward originally from Mel bourne, Australia, Sim mons received a scout grade of 97 out of 100 and is considered a ve-star recruit. From when he rst entered the (United) States a year-and-a-half ago, his skills and body frame have changed dramatically, the ESPN Recruiting Nation re port surmised. Now, noticeably lled out in the upper body, (Sim mons is) more pre pared to nish through contact along with the speed to out run guards. Simmons ver bally committed in October to play at Louisiana State University after his graduation from Mont verde Academy in 2015. During his junior sea son, Simmons helped lead Montverde Acad emy to an undefeated season (28-0) and a sec ond-straight national championship. He re corded a double-dou ble in the Eagles 71-62 win against Mouth of Wilson (Va.) Oak Hill Academy in the title game MVAs Simmons is nations second-best recruit in basketball FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Umatilla High School has pro duced one of the states top athlet ic programs. The school was recently hon ored by the Florida High School Athletic Association with the the Fred E. Rozelle Sportsmanship Award for Class 5A for the 2013-14 school year. According to the FH SAA, the award is given to schools whose athletic teams demon strated exemplary sportsmanship during the year and FHSAA State Series events. A total of 21 high schools in the states eight classications and three middle schools received the award. Umatilla was the Section Two winner in Class 5A, in addition to the classications overall winner. Overall winners in each clas sication received $2,500 and a plaque. Section winners earned $500 and a plaque. Demonstrating respect and appropriate sportsmanships has been a primary focus for Umatil la High School athletes this year, said Umatilla Principal Randy Campbell. We are very proud of how these students have repre sented the school and their com munity. They may not have won every game in each sport, but this award show they end the school year as winners! Umatilla is the only school from Lake and Sumter counties to be recognized by the FHSAA. Other schools in Class 5A to received rec ognition were: Jacksonville Bishop Kenny in Section One and Naples Golden Gate in Section Three. Every chance we get, we em phasize to our student-athletes that the heart and soul of high school athletics is sportsmanship, said FHSAA Executive Director Dr. Umatilla honored with prestigious FHSAA award SIMMONS

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Ann Dupee REMEMBER WHEN A weekly column that reprints some of the more interesting news stories that have appeared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press. B2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, July 2 2014 www.southlakepress.com C OMMUNITY Proudly serving CLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWS STAFF WRITER ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 EMAIL ..... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com HOMETOWN: Windermere OCCUPATION: Tutu goddess! I custom design and create tu tus for little girls. What do you enjoy most about south Lake County? The small-town atmosphere with all the luxuries of fast-paced liv ing. 1) If you had to summarize your philosophy of life in one sentence, what would it be? Live for today, we may not have tomorrow. 2) Name a person or incident youve come across recently thats touched you in some way. Why did this person or incident impress you so much? Mr. Dave Teske at the Clermont Community Center (recreation di rector) impressed me very much with his high level of profession alism and attentiveness in work ing with him. 3) How does what you do con tribute to the welfare of the area? I keep all the little princesses in style and up to date with the newest princess looks. 4) Name one of your greatest accomplishments so far. The fact that I have been bless ed with such support, both pub lic and personal, in that I have been able to turn my hobby of tutu design and creation into a thriving business. 5) Whats something youve al ways wanted to do but havent yet? Although I am proud of my busi ness accomplishments, there is still so much for me to learn. Traveling to the fashion industry meccas of the world to see rsthand whats out there would be nice. 6) What advice would you give to people who want to help out in the community? Be involved with an open mind and heart. FROM THE FILES | 25 YEARS AGO 1989 Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press Meet Your NEIGHBOR BARBIE DELKER RECREATION FUNDING The Lake County Rec reation Committee recommended to the County Commission ers they hire a consul tant to assist in distrib uting $329,000 set aside by the county for rec reational use, the rst year the county has pro vided money. Commis sioner Richard Swartz suggested setting up a program similar to the countywide library sys tem, which provides county monies based on the number of coun ty residents utilizing the library facilities. The MGM Theme Park at Disney opened in May. SORORITY HONORED Pictured with May or Bob Pool signing a proclamation cele brating Epsilon Sigma Alpha sororitys 60th anniversary were repre sentatives of the three Clermont chapters: Phyllis Schelske, Delta Nu President; Pat Mey er, Delta Nu sister; Mi chelle Delaney, past President of Beta The ta and Highland Area Council representa tive; Bonnie Kranz, Beta Theta Vice President; and Paulette Davis, Al pha Eta President. NEW RED CROSS OFFICERS New America Red Cross ofcers who serve South Lake Me morial Hospital are: Vir ginia Rudolph, Chair man; Sarah Jane Seaver, Vice Chairman; Pat Parker, Secretary; Mir iam Johnson, Histori an; and Olga Granger, Scheduler. SENIOR LEAGUE CHAMPS Members of the Se nior League Pirates, Cl ermont 1989 season champions, sponsored by B.G. Harmon Fruit Company, were Kyle Le Fils, Wyatt Berry, Nathan Naslatka, Brian Buss, Joe Padilla, Chad Kraj cir, Adam Yuha, Jon Ste phens, Stacey Isaacs, Roger Kropp, Matt Den nis, Manager Nick Bacon and Coach Willie Kropp. CHS COACH VERN EPPINETTE RESIGNS Basketball, track and cross country coach Ver non Eppinette resigned from Clermont High School to pursue his masters in social studies or administration. Eppinette compiled an unprecedented 780111 record in track while his boys basket ball team recorded a 253-103 mark. He led the Highlanders to nine consecutive district ti tles and nished sec ond twice. His protg, Gary Kinninger, was named boys basketball coach. CHS players honored by the Daily Commer cial were Seniors Melis sa Cornelius and Andy Stone in track, Jake Doty in golf and Bri an Williams and Dawn Droege in tennis. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com The Clermont Police Department edged out Clermont reghters Sunday in the ongoing quest to see who ranks highest when it comes to ... just about anything, be it sandwich making, row ing, running, tug-of-war, cooking chili or basketball. In the past year, the two agencies have gone head-to-head in several competi tions, with the re department coming out on top each time. Not this time. Police Chief Chuck Broadway said heading into Sundays event that the department was determined to re deem itself at City Hall Park during last weeks Farmers Market and Shop the Shoppes event. Fitness trainers from CrossTrain of Clermont, a gym where many police of cers and reghters train, created a challenging tness course and led the competition. The event benetted Clermonts Real Life Church food pantry. Guests were asked to donate a non-perishable food item to the pantry. CLERMONT Police edge firefighters in battle of the fittest competition DAILY COMMERCIAL FILE PHOTO Lettuce ies at a hoagie-building contest between police ofcers and reghters at the Wawa convenience store in Clermont. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com A number of Grammy and Emmy-nominated musi cians will be in town this fall for a concert to benet South Lake Hospitals Mammogra phy Fund. The concert Oct. 25 at the Clermont Arts and Recre ation Center will feature jazz, swing, big band, bossanova, Latin, R&B and beach shag and is being organized by local songwriter, composer and acoustic guitarist Carlos Solis, the owner of Graphics Direct and president of Solis Bravo Music and Publishing out of Clermont. Solis band consists of nine musicians who have played with many big bands and names in the music industry. The group was formed when those artists reunited with Solis in an effort to help him produce a CD inspired by his wifes ght with cancer. The main song Solis wrote for his wife is called Youre Not Alone featuring Char lie De Chant from Hall and Oates on saxophone. Tickets are on sale now. All the proceeds go to the Mam mography Fund. This is hopefully a big thing. Our drummer just got back from a tour in Australia with Barry Gibb, so for these guys to be coming together here in Clermont is exciting and will be a great treat for the community, Solis said. And while Im excited about getting getting these guys up here, I think the most important thing is go ing to be raising money for the cause. Musicians who will be playing at the concert are Solis, bassist Jerry Bravo, a 14th annual Grammy Award Achievement certicate win ner, drummer Richard Bra vo, a 26-time Grammy Award Achievement Certicate win ner who played and recorded with Barry Gibb, Barbra Strei sand and Shakira, saxophon ist Camilo Valencia, who was responsible for soundtrack horn arrangements for Dirty Dancing/Havana Nights. Carlos Oliva an Emmy Award winning recording artist, composer and produc er, is also being touted as the nights special guest. Oliva produced and direct ed Miami Sound Machine with Gloria Estefan. Tickets are $30 per person at local businesses, including the Livewell Fitness Center, NTC, Graphics Direct, Napolis Piz za, Troys Cuban Deli, Minute man Press, Tony Hubbard Re alty, Cornerstone Music, Fifth Third Bank, Bacchus Vino, Clermont Massage, Beef-oBradys, Minneola City Hall and The Urban Spot. For information, go to www.solisbravo.com. CLERMONT Notable musicians plan reunion for fall concert

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Wednesday, July 2, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY ENTRY FORMName ________________________________________________________________ Address ________________________________________________________________ Home Phone ________________________________________________________________ Work Phone ________________________________________________________________H O W T O PLAY1. Fin d the hidde n Bing o chips with in the ad ve rtis em en ts in th is sec tio n that spe ll Bin go 2. Ma rk an X on the ma tc hing num be rs on yo ur ent ry for m. 3. Fil l out yo ur nam e, addres s, da ytime phone & h ome pho ne nu mbe rs and mail the e ntry fo rm an d Bi ng o card to : So uth L ak e Pre ss c/ o Bin go 73 2 W Mon tro se St Cl er mo nt FL 347 11C O NTES T R U LES1. A ny reside nt of any area within South Lake Presss circulat ion area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Emplo yees of South Lake Press, their immedia te families, independ ent contrac tors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winn er must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualificatio n. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifyin g Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawin g to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermon t, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. BINGO B I N G O SOU TH LA KEPRE SSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde 7 25 34 47 67 13 18 31 59 74 9 21FREE SPA CE53 72 2 16 42 48 63 5 29 39 52 68 N I B O G B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Fran Kersey WIN$25CASH! WIN$25CASH! D002928 SUMMER SERIES MUSIC SERIES SERIES SERIES JUL Y5TH,12TH, 19TH&26THFREE ADMISSION LIVEMUSIC EVER YSATURDA Y1-4PM FREETOURS& WINETASTING WWW.LAKERIDGEWIN ER Y.COM DONTFORGET!YOU CAN FIND OUR WINE IN YOUR LOCAL SUPERMARKET OR WINE SHOP. D002926 B 13 B 2 B 5 B 9 B 7

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B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, July 2, 2014 CLERMONTBLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH rf rnrtfnrb English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSFAMILYFELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time!FIRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care t r f rnrtfnf n GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONT, FL Many Other Activities each week fff n Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.orgLIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWJACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH r f nt b nnt f nn Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLIFECHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm rnrtfnrrSOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary) ; 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.orgST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am (Rite I) 10:00 am (Rite II) 5:00 pm (Praise & Worship) Mens Prayer BreakfastWOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH OFGOD INCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALEFERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for ChildrenGrovelandFIRSTBAPTISTCHURCH OFGROVELANDnt Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pmMT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! bf rfrb n r ftnr r ftnrfMINNEOLACONGREGATIONSINAI OFMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club rnfrnrr n NEWLIFEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH, PCA18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 amTEMPLE OF THELIVINGGOD n Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce RowlandMONTVERDEWOODLANDSLUTHERAN(LCMS)15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 amOAKLANDPRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org South Lake South Lake Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKER FUNERAL HOME Ser ving Florida Fa milies Since 1957 A Full Ser vice Home -Locally Owned & Opera tedRon Becker & Charles Becker ,F uneral Directors352394 -7 12 180 6 W. Minneola Av e. ,C ler mont, FL Cremation ChoicesDir ect Cr emation$675Plus Container Ron Beck er ,D ir ector352-394-8228921 S. US Hwy 27, Minneola, FL CLERMONT ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com On June 24, friends and fam ilies of employees, dignitaries and local youth sports coach es, parents and students got a preview of the new Dicks Sporting Goods in Clermont. A crowd formed around the stores main entrance, located at 1325 Sandy Grove Ave., as store manager Adam Tomko welcomed the community. Cl ermont City Manager Darren Gray and Mayor Pro Tem Ray Goodgame spoke about what the store means to Clermont. Our brand is health, well ness and tness, and this store ts into that and into our city perfectly, Gray said. Ofcials then cut the rib bon while patrons streamed into the store to check out their favorite departments. Dicks Sporting Goods is a great addition to the com munity because as much as weve grown here in the last 10 years, its good to have a big sporting goods deal er here. Its a great advantage to the coaches, to the par ents and to the kids around here, said Mike Boyack, a Cl ermont resident and coach at South Lake and East Ridge High Schools. The brief celebration Tues day was a prelude to the of cial grand opening at 8 a.m. Friday, which will feature free Reebok Play Dry T-shirts for the rst 100 people and free Mystery Gift Cards worth be tween $5 and $500 for the rst 100 adults in line on Saturday beginning at 8 a.m. and Sun day beginning at 9 a.m. Guests in line early will re ceive a combination for a chance to open the DICKS Sporting Goods Gift Locker at 7:45 a.m. on Friday and Satur day and 8:45 a.m. on Sunday. We are very excited. This was a great, welcoming crowd today. The community has been terric and everyones response to our store has been just wonderful, Senior Community Marketing Manager Lauren Delany said. Delaney said that perhaps the biggest attraction for the weekend-long grand opening is a 4,000-gallon bass tank that will be set up in the parking lot where shing demonstra tions will be held hourly from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. According to a press release, on Saturday, Addictive Fishing host Blair Wiggins will make an appear ance from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Were wanting to bring out the outdoors enthusiasts, in addition to the sports and shing enthusiasts, Delaney said. The 40,218-square-foot store, built by Schmidt Con struction, will have extended hours throughout the week end. The opening of the Cler mont Dicks Sporting Goods marks the retailers 28th store in Florida and 573rd nation wide. The biggest thing is you dont have to drive all the way to Winter Garden or Or lando for quality products. Leagues can also come here too, Clermont resident Pat rick Sweeney said. New Dicks Sporting Goods store opens ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Clermont resident Patrick Sweeney looks at lacrosse sticks for his son Jack, 11, during the Friends and Family night of Dicks Sporting Goods in Clermont on June 24.

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