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LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com B eginning this fall, trash pickups for the majority of residents in unincorpo rated Lake County will change from twice a week to once a week. The new 1-1-1 service con sists of once-per-week trash, re cycling and yard waste pickup, according to county ofcials. Trash and recycling are collect ed on the same day by different trucks, while yard waste will be picked up on a separate day. Previously, trash and yard waste was collected at the same time twice a week and disposed of at the Covanta incinerator, while recycling was taken once a week. In 2013, the County Commis sion, with Commissioner Leslie Campione dissenting, approved three hauler contracts, in addi tion to disposal at the Heart of Florida Environmental landll in Lake Panasoffkee. The vote came after the coun tys Solid Waste Task Force rec ommended 22 ways to reduce costs and increase recycling. The group proposed the oncea-week trash pickup using au tomated and semi-automated collection vehicles. The task force also recom mended separating yard waste Waste savings BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Don Brown steps off the back of a Progressive Waste Solutions garbage truck during a trash collection run in Mount Dora, on Friday. SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | B3 SPORTS: South Sumter grad powers Gators to World Series WEDNESDAY, JUNE 4, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWSTAND INSIDE CLASSIFIED B6 CROSSWORDS B2 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN B3 SPORTS B1 VOICES A3 WORD ON THE STREE T A2 SO UTH LAKE PRE SS V OLUME 99, NO. 23 3 SECTIO N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reserved www. southlakepress.com PRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID Lake County prepares to roll out new trash service But the cost of collecting 1-1-1 is more expensive than the current collection. Leslie Campione, Lake County commissioner Campione made a motion to solesource bid the incinerator, the biggest rip-off to the people in this county. I dont think anybody who supports sole-source bidding with the incinerator has any moral authority to criticize the County Commission for following the recommendations of a citizens task force. Jimmy Conner, Lake County commissioner LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com Lake County School District Chief Academ ic Ofcer David Chris tiansen expressed both concern and optimism last week about the rst set of results of the Flor ida Comprehensive As sessment Test scores. We did better in one category: writing, he said. Lake students in eight and 10th grade saw substantial im provement on the writ ing portion. However, he ex pressed concern about the third-grade reading results, which showed the district lagging be hind the statewide av erage by two percent age points. What resources can we put in pre-k to sec ond-grade level to get in front of this? he said. Half or more of the kids are not reading at grade level. Christiansen said he is building more resourc es and support for stu dents in pre-k to third grade and sixth through ninth grades. Christiansen said he is assigning additional teachers and tutors to work directly with stu dents. School board mem bers and educators agree more needs to be done to pinpoint stu dents who are having difculties and pro mote collaborative ef forts between teachers. Meanwhile, the FCAT 2.0 results for third grade math showed 58 percent of Lake Coun ty students were pro cient, dead even with the state. The Florida Department of Educa tion also released the complete results from the writing portion of the test administered to fourth, eighth and 10th Finding FCAT success in Lake School officials, board members discuss latest test results BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Students in Jennifer Ross fourth-grade class at Sorrento Elementary School write invitations to their end-of-theschool-year party in Sorrento. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com The city of Clermont and the Lake County Rowing Associ ation announced Friday that the rst-ever rowing regatta the Leader of the Lake Regatta will be hosted on Nov. 8-9 at Lake Minneola. The regatta is one result of a grant the city of Clermont won to build the Clermont Boathouse at Waterfront Park, city ofcials said. Lake Coun ty is working with Clermont on the 5,000-square-foot boat house, which will serve as the CLERMONT Boathouse could help city become rowing mecca SUBMITTED PHOTO This is an architects rendering of the Clermont Boathouse at Waterfront Park. Lake County is working with Clermont on the 5,000-square-foot boathouse. SEE BOATHOUSE | A2 SEE WASTE | A2 SEE FCAT | A8

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, June 4, 2014 CLERMONT Man accused of possessing child pornography A 21-year-old man who was em ployed at a childrens play center in Clermont has been charged by a fed eral grand jury with nearly a dozen criminal counts relating to child pornography. According to the U.S. Attorneys Ofce, Middle District of Florida, Aaron Michael Murray was charged with ve counts of advertising for child pornography over the Internet, four counts of transporting child pornography over the Internet and two counts of possessing child pornography. Murray was arrested on June 28, 2013, after investigators found more than 102 images of child pornography on his iPod, the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce said. Detectives searched Murrays Winding Ridge Road home, looked on his iPod and found chats and interac tions with what appeared to be chil dren, as well as at least 102 images of child pornography, they said. At the time, Murray was employed at Jump-N-Joeys Play and Party Zone in Clermont, a child play center owned by his family. His trial is scheduled to begin on July 1. TAVARES Carpenter to run for commission seat Orange County Sheriffs Capt. Sandy Carpenter has led paperwork to run for the Lake County Commission District 2 seat, facing incumbent Commissioner Sean Parks, according to the Supervisor of Elections ofce. Carpenter previously ran for Lake County sheriff in 2012 against current incumbent Sheriff Gary Borders. In the August 2012 primary election, Carpenter received 32 percent of the vote com pared with 67 percent for Borders. Parks, who is running for his second term, founded the South Lake Water Initiative along with Groveland Mayor Tim Loucks. The group has come to gether in conjunction with the Central Florida Water Initiative to nd an al ternative water source for south Lake County. The primary election is Aug. 26. Despite repeated attempts, Carpenter could not be reached for comment. CLERMONT Disney employee arrested in 4-day prostitution sting Some 98 people were arrested in cluding a Walt Disney World manage ment trainer from Clermont during a four-day prostitution sting aimed at nding victims of human trafck ing, Polk County Sheriffs Ofce of cials said. Paul Keane, 46, of 16204 Saint Augustine St., in Clermont, was charged with soliciting another to commit prostitution. The Sheriffs Ofce said the married suspect re portedly offered an undercover opera tive $30 for unprotected sex. Keanes Linkedin prole said he works at Walt Disney World as a learn ing and development manager, and was previously a cast recruiter there. Polk Sheriff Grady Judd said that among those arrested, 16 were accused of being pimps who brought prosti tutes, 28 were accused of being prosti tutes and 52 were johns attempting to pay for sex. The department used e-commerce sites to set up the sting. GROVELAND Willy Wonka Jr. to be presented at South Lake High Caponis Cannolis School of the Arts, made up of students from var ious south Lake schools, will pres ent Willy Wonka Jr. at 7 p.m. Thursday and Friday and at 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. Saturday at the South Lake High School auditorium, located at 15600 Silver Eagle Road in Groveland. Tickets are $8 per person and chil dren 3 and under are admitted free. Tickets can be purchased online at www.caponimusic.com or at the door before performance times. There will be concessions, a 50/50 and a surprise intermission performance. Area Briefs What south Lake residents are saying about ... OUTDOORS What is your favorite outdoor place in south Lake? My favorite place in South Lake is my ve acres right across from Lake Louisa State Park. NANCY FULLERTON CLERMONT The view of the lakes and hills and the trails to run and exercise. CHARLES BROADWAY CLERMONT Waterfront Park. Every one can afford it and chil dren use their own imag ination and sometimes theres other children they can have nice interaction with. ELAINE HALEY MINNEOLA Lake Louisa State Park. Its such a gorgeous place in a beautiful area, and before we came here wed detour on Lake Louisa Road and then go back to 27. We really loved it. JOANNE APEL CLERMONT Word on the Street Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 headquarters for the Lake County Rowing Association. Lake County Commissioner Sean Parks helped Clermont secure a matching tourism grant for the boathouse, which is expected to cost $750,000. The Lake County Rowing Associa tion is a nonprot organization cre ated to promote rowing as a sport at all levels of interest. It has incor porated a crew of masters and high school students. Many of the student athletes in volved with the association repre sent South Lake High School, East Ridge High School, Minneola High School and Montverde Academy, according to the association. Using the boathouse as a hub, training will take place year round in preparation for local, regional and national competitions, city of cials said in a press release. The boathouse, which will hold about 30 boats, is expected to be completed in late September. Ofcials, association members and supporters gathered at the site a few weeks ago as a sign was put up, indicating the boathouses ar rival in the fall. The boathouse will present nu merous opportunities for recre ation, tness and economic de velopment, City Manager Darren Gray said. It has already generat ed a lot of enthusiasm and interest, and we look forward to this and fu ture regattas on Lake Minneola. It will also give our youth another recreational activity that could lead to scholarships (because of the for mation of local high school teams). It will enhance the vision we have for our downtown waterfront area that is going to be a major focus in our future plans for Clermont. Debbie Kiely, past president of the Lake County Rowing Associa tion, said her club will host the No vember regatta. Races are typically hosted during the fall rowing sea son and are about 5,000 meters long, she said. The association, which has about 40 members, anticipates hosting several regattas per year, Kiely said. Kiely said her club plans to attract northern teams during the winter when they are seeking a warm cli mate in which to train. Parks, a rower himself, had simi lar thoughts. What I hope the boathouse brings is winter training in Cler mont for high schools and colleges from up north, he said. The people from those groups would then stay in Clermont or somewhere in Lake County and spend money here at our business es, Parks said. Additionally, in 2017, Sarasota will host the World Rowing Cham pionships, which is likely to draw more than 100,000 rowing enthusi asts to Florida. Some might return to Lake County, since they would already know the area, ofcials said. Parks said there are also many possibilities for participants in other water sports, such as sailing and ca noeing, to use the boathouse and/ or hold events at Lake Minneola. BOATHOUSE FROM PAGE A1 SUBMITTED PHOTO Lake County Rowing Association ofcials, members and supporters gathered at the boathouse site a few weeks ago as a sign was raised, indicating the boathouses arrival in the fall. fro m the trash. County ofcials said the new sys tem will reduce the solid waste assessment in two out of three service areas, while increasing re cycling. In service area one, covering the north central region, residents will pay $8 less on their assessment a year; while in service area 2, cov ering the central region, residents will pay $16 less. The only service area increasing its assessment, by $5, is the south part of the unincorporated portion of the county because haulers have to travel a longer distance to the disposal facility. The countys current recycling rate is 8 percent, while Florida stat utes recommend all counties re cycle 75 percent of their waste streams by the year 2020. Skip McCall, the countys Solid Waste Division manager, said res idents will receive one free 95-gal lon container for trash and one free 65-gallon container for recycling. Residents currently have 18-gal lon recycling bins. They are doubling the recycling capacity over the current system, he said. We are increasing the re cycling capacity, which in turn we hope reduces the overall waste stream, equating to disposal cost savings at the landll. Since Leon County changed the recycling carts it supplied to resi dents from 18-gallon to 64-gallon bins, there has been a 5 percent in crease in recycling, bringing their rate up to 47 percent, said Robert Mills, Leons solid waste director. Within the rst year, McCall said he expects Lake Countys recycling rate to increase to at least 25 per cent. Homeowners in unincorporat ed portions of the county have re ceived postcards featuring instruc tions about the containers. No action is required by the res idents unless they would like to change their cart sizes, McCall said. Within the rst six months of the contract, residents can request addi tional carts or switch out cart sizes. The new system will save the county money because yard waste will be disposed of at the coun ty facility in Astatula instead of at the landll, which costs more than twice as much per ton, Mc Call said. Once the new system is in place beginning Oct. 6, McCall said the countys haulers will use semi-auto mated and automated trucks, mak ing the collection more efcient. The automated trucks will re duce the manpower from a two to one man operation, saving on costs and reducing employee inju ries, McCall said. While most communities have agreed to switch to the once-aweek trash pickup, 29 communi ties are keeping the twice-a-week pickup and once a week recycling service, paying between $39-46 more a year for the extra service. Campione voiced concerns about the new system in an email message. Many of my constituents are concerned about once-a-week pickup and they would prefer dis posal at the incinerator instead of the landll, but we are trying to be optimistic because we must live with it, she wrote. Campione also said there was a misunderstanding that the county would save money under the new agreement. But the cost of collecting 1-1-1 is more expensive than the current collection, she wrote. Commissioners Sean Parks and Jimmy Conner disagreed. Campione made a motion to sole-source bid the incinerator (re ferring to Covanta), the biggest rip-off to the people in this coun ty, Conner said. I dont think any body who supports sole-source bidding with the incinerator has any moral authority to criticize the County Commission for following the recommendations of a citizens task force. Conner said the savings were clear. The more you recycle, the less cost it is going to be, he said. Parks said the new system is re ducing the waste stream by re cycling and is nally allowing competition for the commercial sector. WASTE FROM PAGE A1

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Wednesday, June 4, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3 Benghazi as a political weapon While observing the graves of veterans from World War II, Korea, Iraq, Vietnam and the Gulf War, I am remembering those who gave their lives for this great country. I must also remember the four who gave their lives at Benghazi serving their country. I ask myself and all of you, did we hold extensive hearings on the deaths of all these men and women who have died serving this country? Yes, mistakes were made and will always be when serving our country. These men died serv ing in an area of questionable stability. These men were serv ing a country free of wars on our homeland. We should thank God for their service. America, let their families rest from this madness of politics. Congressman Isaac and oth ers should be ashamed of them selves to use it as a political tool. As a former taxi owner, driv er and former government em ployee in our nations capital, I listened to those from other countries stating how gullible this country has become. Let Benghazi go. Stop using it as a political tool to destroy a sit ting president. Common sense will tell you and others that our intelligence sources will never reveal all that they know due to the future safety of others who serve abroad. If we tell every thing, you and others will leak it out for your political greed. HILLARD S. TURNER | Leesburg Impeach the president As someone who graduated from high school with a C-plus average, I do not claim to be the smartest person around, but it is way past time to impeach President Obama and get our country back to being a coun try of by the people and for the people. Why neither party has the guts to get rid of him can only be one of two things: They are making too much money doing as they are, or so few of them have ever served in any division of the armed forces. They are more for money than America. This country is going down the tube and its being put there by a guy who wont even show that he was born in the USA. DALE LAMB | Lady Lake A s th e longest war in American history winds down, renewed attention must be paid to caring for veterans who served in the nearly 13-year war in Afghanistan as well as in Iraq and other conicts. It is already known that many of th e survivors of those wars suffered and survived injuries they would not have recovered from in any earlier conict, thanks to modern medicine. Allegations of treatment delays and falsied records at veterans hospita ls show a failure to give appropriate attention to the growing and changing dynamic of Veterans Affairs. As many as 40 veterans might have died awaiting treatment in Phoenix, and allegations have come to light that secret waiting lists were used to conceal the fact that appointments werent scheduled within the required two weeks. Waiting lists also have been reported at oth er VA hospitals, including, closer to home, the Malcom Randall VA Medical Center in Gaines ville. A handwritten list of m ore than 200 men tal health patients was discovered last week by a VA team visiting the hospital. Three mental health administrators were sub sequently placed on leave. On the national level, a top ofcial for veter ans health has already resigned, and Congress is considering legislation that would give the VA secretary greater authority to re or demote ad ministrators at the agency and its 152 medical centers. Shinseski himself stepped down on Friday under intense pressure from veterans groups and some lawmakers. To be sure, the Obama administration has shown an unwillingness to make top ofcials accountable in scandals such as the disastrous rollout of the Affordable Care Act website. But the VAs problems go beyond just waiting lists. One issue that must be addressed is perfor mance bonuses awarded to VA managers based on wait times. They appear to have given a per verse incentive for managers to hide waits rath er than address them. Addressing them requires adequate stafng and funding. VA medical care and infrastructure have been underfunded by more than $15 bil lion over the past decade, according to Disabled American Veterans. The group last week called on Congress to ensure veterans are shielded from Washingtons perpetually late budgets for VA benets, programs and services. The waiting-list scandal must be fully investi gated, including determining the harm done to veterans on the lists. Heads have rolled and more should roll over the scandal. Yet lawmakers will be doing a dis service to veterans if they dont also ensure the proper stafng, funding and technology to ad dress any delays. From Ocala.com. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD ........................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST O PINION WHATS YOUR OPINION? The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Letters to the Editor 732 W. Montrose St. Clermont, FL 34711 By fax to: 352-394-8001 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. GUEST COLUMNS If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@daily commercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. A VIEW If you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veter ans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to to www.lake vet erans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANS S OUTH LAKE PRESS Your community newspaper for more than 100 years. 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001 The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Florida 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region. All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. YOUR OPINIONS LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Pro-pot arguments are misguided Regarding the recent Letter to the Editor pub lished on May 18 in the Daily Commercial enti tled, A case for legaliz ing pot, I hope Sandra Platt of Fruitland Park does more research on marijuana before she endorses the legal ization of recreational marijuana. It is one thing to use marijuana for medical purposes that is pre scribed by a licensed physician under strict guidelines includ ing dosage and fre quency of use for treatment of a legit imate illness or dis ease while in the con nes of ones home. It is entirely another if the main purpose for its use and the prima ry psychoactive effect is relaxation, pleasure, getting high and pro ducing euphoria. We know the main, active ingredient in marijuana is THC. We know THC is psycho active. That is what the effect of cannabis is. The use of marijuana is already being cau tioned against when driving, swimming and operating ma chinery or oth er ac tivities that are unsafe when not sober. President Obama is not a scientist or phy sician, so just because he admits to smok ing large amounts of pot and thinks it is no worse than alco hol is no reason to en dorse it. Oh, and yes, I did smoke pot recre ationally but have not in many, many years. I do not need it to be at peace. But I do not condemn the use of it for legitimate medical purposes. Depending upon the frequency of use and amount, it can induce auditory and visual hallucinations, cause euphoria and anxiety, dry mouth, red eyes, cold hands or feet and marked depression. The long-term usage can produce schizo phrenia, major de pression and bipolar disorder, and can lead to substance addiction and crime. Regarding the consumption of marijuana during pregnancy, there is some evidence that it restricts growth of the fetus, produces mis carriages and causes cognitive defects. The length of time of marijuanas effect de pends on the frequen cy of use, the amount and how it was con sumed, if other legal or illegal drugs were taken, the tolerance of the marijuana con sumer, and wheth er the marijuana was laced with other sub stances. Marijuana is being studied more frequently and in even more depth than it has been, especial ly the effects on the growing brain of the adolescent. Please use caution, and study both sides of this debate. Let it not be yet anoth er politics-as-usual, one-sided discussion. MARION SCHOELLER Eustis LETTER of the WEEK FILE PHOTO Employees trim retail marijuana at 3D Cannabis Center, in Denver. Now is the time to reform the Veterans Administration

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, June 4, 2014 Staff Report A benet for Ryan Boyd, a 7-yearold Groveland Elementary student who sustained traumatic brain head injuries when he was thrown off a golf cart, will take place from 1 to 6 p.m. Saturday at the Elks Lodge, 705 W. Minneola Ave., Clermont. Food and drinks will be avail able for purchase and all pro ceeds will benet the Boyd fam ily. Entertainment will feature many local bands, including Baby Blues, Bill Kyle, Bill Grifth, Randall Crawford, Spartans by the Dozen and others. There will be a silent auction and donations will be ac cepted throughout the event. A ma gician will also perform. Ryan just returned home after spending months at Arnold Palmer Hospital in Orlando and Brooks Rehabilitation Center in Jacksonville. For information, con tact Mandy Boyd at 352-255-2805 or Renee Jones at 352-242-6369. Benefit to be held for boy injured in fall GROVELAND ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Aurelia Cole, chief of administration for Lake County Schools, is counting down the days to her retirement next month after 43 years as an educator. On June 11, the Edu cational Foundation of Lake County will host a benet dinner in her honor, but the city of Cl ermont recently hosted a reception recognizing her efforts. Nearly 100 people were in attendance, in cluding friends, fami ly, city ofcials, fellow teachers and former students. Many shared sto ries about how Cole touched their lives, but the one thing every one acknowledged was Coles love for children and her efforts to en sure they were educat ed and cared for. Paula Johnson Hoisington, one of Coles former students, now the vice president of Net Communica tions in Orlando, said she credits much of her condence and success to Cole. I am one of the seeds she planted, Hoising ton told the crowd be fore addressing Cole personally. I can remember the days in your class, and I thank you for the seeds you planted in me ... You used to tell us, You can do whatever youd like to do. You can be whatever you want to be. I believed it and I achieved it, Hoisington said to Cole. Clermont City Man ager Darren Gray shared Coles history as an educator, and ac knowledged the con tributions she and her family have made to the south Lake community and beyond. Cole is the only daughter of the late Rev. William N. and Marie Rose McKinney, who were both longtime ed ucators in the commu nity. She completed her elementary and sec ondary education in Cl ermont, where she was the salutatorian of her class. She went on to re ceive her bachelors de gree in English from Tuskegee Institute (Uni versity). Years later she received a master of sci ence degree in educa tional leadership from Nova University. Immediately after graduation, Cole began teaching in the Lake County School District, where she was a teach er for 18 years, admin istrative dean for six years, assistant princi pal for four years, mid dle school principal for ve years, high school principal for ve years and chief of adminis tration (assistant super intendent), her present position, for ve years. Cole has been married to her husband, Devon, for 44 years, and is the mother of two children, Devon Michael, an as sistant principal, and Danielle Marie, a read ing teacher. The cou ple has four grandsons: Devon Jr., Ethon Wil liam, Willie III and Wes ley Daniel. Cole is a member of New Jacobs Chapel Mis sionary Baptist Church, where she serves in the Family Matters (food CLERMONT Lake County educator retiring after 43 years LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Aurelia Cole, retiring after 43 years as an educator, is surprised by a remark made during a benet dinner in her honor. SEE EDUCATOR | A7 7th Annual Mike Conley Hospice HouseGolf TournamentSponsored by South Lake County Moose Lodge rfntb June 14th2014Green Valley Country ClubrnrfntbRegistration at 7:30am 8:30am Shotgun Start Entry Fee is $50.00nrnntn REGISTER EARLY Call Robert (352) 516-9232 trrrtf brnrftnrrnrttnnrn rntnnttRobert: (352) 516-9232 or Craig: (734) 552-3382

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Wednesday, June 4, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A7 distribution) and Vision Committee ministries. She is also the Home coming chairperson, pastor of the support team and on the Black History Committee. In addition, she is a long time member of Del ta Sigma Theta Sorority, the South Lake Histor ical Society and presi dent of the W.N. McK inney Gospel Choir. She also serves on the South Lake Chambers Educa tion and Teacher Appre ciation Breakfast com mittees. Chris Patton, Lake County Schools spokes person, said the fact that so many gathered to honor her Cole shows how well respected she is in the community. Her service and con tributions to the chil dren, to the education system and to the com munity are enormous, and I think it it shows when a local municipal ity goes out of their way to honor someone like that, Patton said. Devon Cole, Aurel ias husband, who re tired 11 years ago after 35 years with UPS, said he is glad to see his wife nally willing to slow down a bit. Were just gonna take it one day at a time, en joy life, he said. Its good to have her retir ing because shes been at the craft for many years, but she doesnt sit (still). She will nd something to do, Im absolutely sure of that. EDUCATOR FROM PAGE A4 IN MEMORY DEATH NOTICES Stephen J. Bleier Stephen J. Bleier, 81, of Sebring, died on Sunday, May 25, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations. Warren Cameron Warren Cameron, 73, of Astor, died Tuesday, May 27, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Astor. Bessie B. Dawson Bessie B. Dawson, 93, of Leesburg, died Mon day, May 26, 2014. East side Funeral Home, Leesburg. Evelyn D. Henderson Evangelist Evelyn D. Henderson, 68, of Bush nell, died, Wednesday May 21, 2014. Eastside Funeral Home, Lees burg. Audrey Louise Mich Audrey Louise Mich, 92, of Leesburg, died Friday, May 30, 2014. Harden/Pauli Funeral Home, Eustis. James Dale Michels James Dale Michels, 71, of Leesburg, died Sunday, May 25, 2014. Harden/Pauli Funeral Home, Eustis. Johnny A. Mincy Johnny A. Mincy, 73, of Leesburg, died Tues day, May 27, 2014. East side Funeral Home, Leesburg. Minnie Nesz Minnie Nesz, 94, of Lady Lake, died Mon day, May 26, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Ann B. OLeary Ann B. OLeary, 84, of Leesburg, died Monday, May 26, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home and Cre matory, Leesburg. Dolores M. Rees Dolores M. Rees, 96, of Clermont, died Fri day, May 23, 2014. PageTheus Funerals & Cre mations. Leesburg. Jean E. Reif Jean E. Reif, 77, of Leesburg, died Friday, May 30, 2014. PageTheus Funerals & Cre mations, Leesburg. Angela M. Russell Angela M. Russell, 37, Floral City died Friday, May 23, 2014. Banks/ Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wild wood. Stacy Maurice Sayles Jr. Stacy Maurice Sayles, Jr., 24, of Leesburg, died May 19, 2014. Marvin C. Zanders Funeral Home, Inc. Apopka. Iva J. Wiegand Iva J. Wiegand, 90, of Leesburg, died on Sunday, May 25, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Mayra Martinez believes her apartment at the Century Citrus Tower Apartment Complex was bur glarized by a young woman who came to her door asking about walk ing Martinezs dog Ruka, a 3-year old yorkipoo, to raise money for her youth group. Martinez told police that the girl said she was asking everyone in the complex about the opportunity to exercise their pets. According to Martinez, she looked through the peep-hole and saw a white female with blonde hair but could not see her face, the po lice reports states. The girl left her name, phone number and email address on a small piece of paper. Martinez didnt open the door be cause she had just stepped out of the shower. The following week, Martinez al legedly contacted the girl via phone and text to set up a dog-walking schedule. Martinez also left a key under her mat for the girl to gain ac cess to the dog and left money on the counter for her services. Instead of coming home and nd ing her dog well exercised, Martinez found that Ruka was missing, along with a laptop and two Kindle tab lets. It seemed like the girl knew a lot about her life, Martinez said. From what I gather its a prof it scam, but that she knew that I just moved into my community and knew that I had multiple jobs, means she was watching me, and that really just makes me feel in secure and unsafe, Martinez said. The person I got to know for two weeks was so caring about animals. She just seemed so caring and inter ested in me and my dog. Martinez said the stolen electron ics are not as important as her pet. Im stressed and Im not doing well. I just really need my dog back, she said. Anyone with information can call the Clermont Police Department at 352-394-5588. Dognapper leaves owner devastated PHOTO COURTESY OF MAYRA MARTINEZ Mayra Martinez believes a phony dog walker stole her dog Ruka, a 3-year-old yorkipoo. CLERMONT

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A8 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, June 4, 2014 HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 Place your ad here and reach the Local Market!VERY AFFORDABLE!Call today 352-394-2183 Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) graders. Eighth graders scor ing a 3.5 or better (the test is graded on a 6-point scale, with a score of 3.5 considered procient) increased district-wide by 4 per cent to 48 percent, ac cording to a press re lease from the district. Further, 10th graders scoring a 3.5 or better jumped 9 percentage points to 57 percent, the district reported. Some of the middle schools with the largest percentage of students scoring a 3.5 or better on the writing assessment included Carver Middle School, with a 21-point increase. At Umatilla Middle School, 44 per cent of students were procient, a 14-percent jump. At Windy Hill Middle School, 64 per cent were procient, representing an 11 per cent increase. And at Eustis Middle, 56 per cent were procient. High schools with the largest gains on the writing assessment in cluded Leesburg High School, South Lake High School and Mount Dora High School. The top scores went to Lake Minneola High School, where 65 percent of stu dents were procient, and 62 percent of East Ridge High School stu dents were procient. In particular, Sorren to Elementary School made strong gains in third-grade math and fourth-grade writing. In fourth grade writ ing, 65 percent of stu dents were procient, a 24-percent increase from last year; and 74 percent in third-grade math, a 17 percent in crease. Susan Pegram, prin cipal of the school, said she credited the schools improvements to com ing up with an action plan and identifying the schools weaknesses. The school focused on collaborative planning and more effective prog ress monitoring of the students, Pegram said. The curriculum resource teacher also served as an effective tool, meet ing with the groups and breaking down the Flor ida Standards. Pegram said she met with a teacher each morning to identify spe cic concerns regarding student progress. I am so proud of the students and teachers, she said. Similarly, Lost Lake Elementary School, which also continues to score high on the third grade math portion of the FCATs, at 73 per cent, employs similar methods to achieve stu dent success, including common planning for teachers. We give low-achiev ing students extra time on assignments and ex tra practice, said Rhon da Hunt, principal for Lost Lake. Also effective, she said, is the use of in teractive math journals and thinking maps. Stuart Klatte, presi dent of the Lake County Education Association, said Lake County FCAT scores have always been around the state averages. I feel that all schools tend to spend too much time in benchmark test ing and testing in gen eral so that the students lose a lot of instruction al time, he said. Time is better spent in in struction rather than in repeating testing. Some of the low per forming schools on the FCATs included Bever ly Shores Elementary, Leesburg Elementary and Eustis Heights Ele mentary, which all have more than 80 percent of students on free or re duced lunches. Schools that have a higher percentage of students on free or re duced lunch tend to have a lower percentage of students passing, said Klatte. While agreeing with Klatte, Christiansen said there is no reason the district cant buck that trend. Bill Mathias, board member, said he was not satised with the scores and agrees with Christiansen that ad dressing issues early is paramount to student success. We need to have ear lier intervention for those children having issues and focused on the personalized learn ing initiatives, he said. FCAT FROM PAGE A1 READING SCORES Percentage of Lake County stu dents who scored procient on FCAT reading, by school Beverly Shores Elementary School 28 Clermont Elementary School 45 Eustis Elementary School 49 Sawgrass Bay Elementary School 54 Grassy Lake Elementary School 69 Sorrento Elementary 67 Eustis Heights Elementary School 39 Fruitland Park Elementary School 42 The Villages Elementary of Lady Lake 70 Seminole Springs Elem. School 70 Round Lake Elementary School 63 Treadway Elementary School 57 Minneola Elementary School 64 Astatula Elementary School 63 Lost Lake Elementary School 67 Leesburg Elementary School 34 Groveland Elementary School 40 Triangle Elementary School 52 Lake Academy Eustis Mascotte Elementary School 41 Tavares Elementary School 56 Umatilla Elementary School 60 Pine Ridge Elementary School 66 Cypress Ridge Elementary School 78 Spring Creek Charter School 41 Humanities and Fine Arts Charter School 38 Altoona School 51 Milestones Community School 43 Imagine Schools at South Lake 60 MATH SCORES Percentage of Lake County students who scored procient on FCAT math, by school Beverly Shores Elementary School 32 Clermont Elementary School 46 Eustis Elementary School 56 Sawgrass Bay Elementary School 59 Grassy Lake Elementary School 65 Sorrento Elementary 74 Eustis Heights Elementary School 45 Fruitland Park Elementary School 52 The Villages Elem Of Lady Lake 76 Seminole Springs Elem. School 77 Round Lake Elementary School 51 Treadway Elementary School 73 Minneola Elementary School 59 Astatula Elementary School 47 Lost Lake Elementary School 73 Leesburg Elementary School 37 Groveland Elementary School 43 Triangle Elementary School 56 Mascotte Elementary School 62 Tavares Elementary School 47 Umatilla Elementary School 59 Pine Ridge Elementary School 71 Cypress Ridge Elementary School 78 Spring Creek Charter School 58 Humanities and Fine Arts Charter School 24 Altoona School 62 Milestones Community School 48 Imagine Schools at South Lake 59 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Mary Lanning, background left, writes on her SMART Board at the front of the classroom during a cursive lesson and it is copied directly to her laptop at the back of the class at Sorrento Elementary School.

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B1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, June 4, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTS SPORTS EDITOR ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE .............................. 365-8268 FAX .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL ......... sports@dailycommercial.com S PORTS and LEISURE Lake Sumter baseball player earns highest honor FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Kirsti Merritt has proven the sophomore jinx to be just a myth. The former South Sumter High School standout produced a sol id sophomore season for the Uni versity of Florida softball team, raising her batting average and power numbers from her fresh man year. Merritt validated her season on May 25 with a three-run walkoff homer against Washington to close out the Gators 8-0 win against Washington and secured a berth for Florida in the NCAA Womens College World Series for the sixth time in seven years. The Gators beat Baylor and top-seeded Oregon in their rst two games in the WCWS in Okla homa City. Her game-ending blast was Merritts rst career home run in 43 at bats in the NCAA Tourna ment. She backed that hit up with a solo homer in the Gators WCWS opener against Baylor on May 29. The way I swing, yeah I guess I was trying to end it, but not in my head, the 5-foot-4 Merritt told re porters after the game. I always swing pretty big for being such a small person. An outelder, Merritt has started in all but one game this season for the Gators (53-12). She took a .289 batting average with 11 homers and 47 RBIs into the WCWS and was tied for second on the team with 13 stolen bases. Last year, Merritt hit .280 with six home runs and 29 RBIs with 21 stolen bases. She was the rst freshman to ever be named MVP in the SEC Tournament and earned SEC All-Freshman Team honors. Defensively, Merritt has a .983 elding percentage with only one error in 58 chances. A multi-sport star at South Sum ter, Merritt said her athletic dex terity helped her learn to play a new position in college without letting the change affect her over all play. With the Raiders, Merritt was primarily a shortstop. At South Sumter, Merritt earned 12 varsity letters while playing basketball, volleyball, softball, weightlifting and track and eld. She earned invitations to the state track-and-eld championships in 2009, 2011 and 2012. I love challenging myself, Mer ritt said in 2013. I like to get out there and do as many things as possible. For Merritt and the Gators, their next challenge will be to secure the schools rst WCWS title. Former South Sumter standout helps UF advance to Series BRAD MCCLENNY / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP Floridas Kirsti Merritt (24) hits a walk off three-run home run to win game three of the Gainesville Super Regional against Washington at Katie Seashole Pressly Stadium in Gainesville, on May 25. Merritt Role FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Chris Blanton is the epito me of a student-athlete. The Lake-Sumter State College catch er delivered a solid career for the Lake hawks with a .231 batting average in 2014 and sported a .994 elding per centage behind the plate. Solid numbers for sure, but it is in the class room where Blanton takes things to another level. Blanton became the rst student-athlete in LSSC his tory to win the Florida Col lege System Activities Asso ciation Male Scholar Athlete of the Year award, the high est honor a student-ath lete can receive from the Florida College System. Previously, Blanton was named the Bill Tuten Base ball Scholar-Athlete from the FCSAA Base ball Committee and the Mid-Florida Con ference Male Scholar Athlete of the Year. It is quite impressive and no small feat that Chris has been selected for all three awards in a single year, said LSSC Athletic Director Mike Matulia. We are extremely proud of him. Chris received these awards based on his tremendous accomplish ments as a student and ath lete, as well as being a great ambassador for Lake-Sumter State College. LSSC baseball coach Josh Holt said he considers Blan ton one of the most highly regarded student-athletes in program history. His transcript clearly rep resents his breadth of aca demic excellence and will ingness to be a leader in the classroom by achieving a 4.0 grade point average and the Presidents List every semes ter at LSSC, Holt said. Holt said Blanton was re cording at the FMUN pro gram was a leader, as well as for having a good sense of humor and for strong pro fessionalism by his peers. In addition, Blanton served on the schools SGA bud get committee for two years and was a representative on the college wide Student Life committee. He is a two-time All-Conference Academic Team and All-State Academ ic team. Not surprising, Blan ton was LSSCs 2014 Stu dent-Athlete of the Year. During his playing career at LSSC, Blanton threw out 44 percent of all base runners who tried to run against him. He played in 73 games and started 65. Blanton also spent time in the community, involved in a variety of community ser vice activities. Among his offthe-eld community service endeavors are: elementary school mentor, reading bud dy in the Read Across Amer ican program, buddy with the North Lake County Mir acle League and volunteer work at Little League clinics. He also assisted with Habitat for Humanity projects in the area. Blanton expects to attend the University of Central Florida in the fall. BLANTON FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Student-athletes in Lake and Sumter coun ties have been busy lately, wrapping up the school year with a number of signings. Eighteen local sign ees have been reported to the Daily Commer cial, including a class of nine from Tavares High School. In addition, ve student-athletes from First Academy of Lees burg signed or are in the process of signing, along with two soccer players at South Lake, one basketball stand out from Eustis and one from Liberty Christian in Tavares. The contingent from Tavares inked their deals during a ceremo ny in the school audito rium on May 22. Among the signees were: Gar rett Payne, Christian Sears, Osirus Munn, Demetrius Ramirez, Cole Higginbotham, Trevor Lamm, Michael Smith, David Buckner and Kristopher Wolfe. Payne, a lineback er, signed with Flori da Atlantic University, while Sears, a quarter back, signed with The Citadel. Munn and Ramirez, both receivers and defensive backs, signed with Method ist University Gaunt letts alma mater. Higginbotham, a punter, Lamm and Smith, both receivers, signed with North Car olina Wesleyan. Buck ner, a kicker, signed with Southeastern in Lakeland, and Wolfe, a guard, signed with Lu theran College. FIRST ACADEMY OF LEESBURG Byron Masoline, a running back who gained 1,885 yards in 2013 during First Acad emys run to the Sun shine State Athletic Conference champion ship, will play for War ner University in Lake Wales. School ofcials at First Academy said Masoline has not of cially signed, but will do so in the coming days. Also among the First Academys recent sign ees were: Luke Lea, Chip Gause and Trent Scarbrough. David El liott took part in a re cent ceremony at the school, but is still con sidering track offers from Gardner-Webb College and Anderson College. Lea is heading to Dal las Baptist University to play basketball. He av eraged 15 points and 12 rebounds per game in 2013-14 for the Eagles. Scarbrough will play basketball with Mount Vernon Nazarene Col lege in Ohio. Gause is moving on to play bas ketball at Trinity Baptist College in Jacksonville. EUSTIS Coy Patterson, a 6-foot combo guard for the Panthers, signed with Indian River State College in Fort Pierce. Patterson averaged 13 points and two assists this season for Eustis. Liberty Christian Prep Devante Green, a 6-foot point guard, be came Liberty Chris tians rst basketball signee during a cer emony on Tuesday at the school. Green signed to attend Lind enwood University in St. Charles, Mo. SOUTH LAKE A pair of boys soc cer players signed on Thursday to play at Harcum College in Bryn Mawr, Pa. Ricardo Tafolla and Jordy Fernandez com mitted during a cere mony in the South Lake auditorium to continue playing as teammates in college. Tavares leads class of college signees PHOTO COURTESY OF TAVARES HIGH SCHOOL Tavares High School football standouts Garrett Payne, Christian Sears, Osirus Munn, Demetrius Ramirez, Cole Higginbotham, Trevor Lamm, Michael Smith, David Buckner and Kristopher Wolfe sign national letters of intent during a recent signing ceremony. The way I swing, yeah I guess I was trying to end it, but not in my head. I always swing pretty big for being such a small person. Kirsti Merritt

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B2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, June 4, 2014 CHANGE OF PROGRAMBY DAN SCHOENHOLZ / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZNo. 0525RELEASE DATE: 6/1/2014 ACROSS1 Part of a rainbow7 Blanket14 Rear admirals rear19 Invader of 106620 Comment upon heading off21 Catch ___ (surf)22 Like farmland23 Stoners memoirs?25 ___ New Guinea26 Freud disciple Alfred27 Coaches28 Leverage in divorce negotiations?30 Mixologist32 Went from black to red, say33 Home with a view34 Whinny38 Sound in a hot tub41 Mallard relative44 Berth45 Theater opening46 Dumbstruck duo?50 Moolah51 Blemished52 Admit (to)53 Calculus calculation55 Makes the connection56 Zero-star movie57 Balkan capital59 ___ Beach, Fla.61 Susan of L.A. Law62 Tale of metropolitan religious diversity?67 Word before or after down70 Yam or turnip71 Theyre big in barns72 Huskers targets75 or now77 Western followers?80 Wire service inits.81 Some lapses83 Like many mens ties85 Grant Wood portrayal?88 The Canterbury Tales inn89 Yemeni port90 Wrapped (up)91 Conciliatory gesture92 Kitchen drawer?93 Some sites for sightseers94 Eke ___ living97 Maltreated99 Having trouble slowing down?105 Like radon among all gaseous elements108 Popped up109 Appointment in Samarra novelist110 Cobblers heirloom?113 Bet114 Aplomb115 Spamalot writer and lyricist116 Forward117 Heavens118 Clear-cuts, e.g.119 Off course DOWN1 Not on point2 Singer Jones3 Hang (over)4 Saturated5 Samsung smartphone6 With 10-Down, certain punch7 Marshy lowland8 Features of many kids place mats 9 Legal hearing10 See 6-Down11 Star of reality TVs The Girls Next Door, briefly12 Immodest display 13 Oscar nominee for The Wrestler14 Highlight15 Double takes?16 Gutter site17 One with a home away from home18 Crime-fighting Eliot20 Extra: Abbr.24 Actress ___ Dawn Chong26 Mentored, e.g.29 Celebrated30 Poe poem, with The31 The Tempest spirit33 Hieroglyphic symbol35 ___ Love, 1987 LL Cool J hit36 Stylists goop37 ___ fit38 Rest stop convenience, for short39 1956 Gregory Peck role40 Dont be a ___!42 Confronts43 Certain backscratcher45 The Rapture of Canaan author Reynolds47 See 49-Down48 Big name in barbecue grills49 With 47-Down, angry50 Building needs, informally54 Not straight up57 Tolerated58 Focusing problem, for short60 Ferrells cheerleading partner on S.N.L.63 Dealt (with)64 A musical might be on one65 Neighbors of Navajos66 Sale site, maybe67 Popular premarathon meal68 Wedding site69 Engine booster73 Tropicana Field team74 W.W. II invasion site76 Tight spot in South Florida?78 ___ Hawkins Day79 Correct81 Taedium vitae82 View from Lake Como84 Relatives of turtles86 Neon frame?87 Stirred89 Spare93 In a hurry95 Govt. securities96 Left open-mouthed, say98 Rent99 Wedding sight100 Fancy wheels, familiarly101 so long ___ both shall live?102 Part of an old military alphabet103 Big bands booking104 Pops105 Comes to pass, oldstyle106 Star Wars furball107 Others, to Ovid108 In111 End of un film112 Puncture preceder113 Mme.s cousin 123456 789101112131415161718 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3031 32 33 34353637 383940 41424344 45 46 4748 49 50 51 52 5354 55 56 57 58 59 6061 6263 6465 66 67686970 71 727374 75 7677 787980 81 82 83 84 8586 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 949596 9798 99100101 102103104 105106107 108 109 110 111112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Solution on page B7 CLERMONT BLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSAMILYELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time! IRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONTL Many Other Activities each week Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.org LIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLCHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm SOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary); 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.org ST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am (Rite I) 10:00 am (Rite II) 5:00 pm (Praise & Worship) Mens Prayer Breakfast WOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH GODINCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALE ERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for Children Groveland IRSTBAPTISTCHURCH GROVELAND Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pm MT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! MINNEOLA CONGREGATIONSMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club NEWLPRESBYTERIANCHURCH18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am TLIVINGGOD Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce Rowland MONTVERDE WOODLANDSLUTHERAN15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 am OAKLAND PRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforSouth Lake South LakeGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOMErfn tbt352-394-7121806 W. Minneola Ave.,Clermont,FL Cremation ChoicesDirect Cremation$675Plus Container Ron Becker,Director352-394-8228921 S.US Hwy 27,Minneola,FL

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Ann Dupee REMEMBER WHEN A weekly column that reprints some of the more interesting news stories that have appeared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press. B3 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, June 4, 2014 www.southlakepress.com C OMMUNITY Proudly serving CLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWS STAFF WRITER ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 EMAIL ..... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com HOMETOWN: Panama City OCCUPATION: Chief Executive Ofcer, Boys & Girls Clubs of Lake and Sumter Counties FAMILY: Melissa Williams, wife, and Lacy, dog (and the 1800+ children who we serve at our Boys & Girls Clubs) What do you enjoy most about south Lake County? The wonderful people, hills and lakes. 1) If you had to summarize your philosophy of life in one sen tence, what would it be? Leave all your worries to God. 2) Name a person or incident youve come across recently thats touched you in some way. Why did this person or incident impress you so much? This year our Corporate Board of Directors for the Boys & Girls Clubs has had near perfect atten dance at meetings and involve ment. Their commitment to rais ing money, raising awareness and leveraging resources to help us serve more children is unbeliev able. It is so inspiring to see a body of volunteers so committed to making a difference in the lives of children. 3) How does what you do contrib ute to the welfare of the area? We engage children 6-18 years old in after school and summer pro grams that encourage academic success, healthy lifestyles, good character and citizenship. 4) Name one of your greatest ac complishments so far. Outside of marrying my wife, it is being named new executive of the year by Boys & Girls Clubs of America in 2014. 5) Whats something youve al ways wanted to do but havent yet? Either skydiving or visiting Bora Bora. 6) What advice would you give to people who want to help out in the community? It is very important for citizens to become involved in the communi ty. There are so many opportuni ties and causes that need com mitted individuals and businesses to fulll their mission. Find some thing that you have a passion for and it will never get old. FROM THE FILES | 27 YEARS AGO 1987 Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press Meet Your NEIGHBOR FREDDY WILLIAMS M artha Sue Mc Lean of Cler mont is one of 10 contestants vying for the title of Miss Lake County. In honor of Arbor Day, Clermont Ele mentary School had a demonstration on how to plant a tree by a ranger from the Lake County Division of For estry. The magnolia tree was donated by Fred Sommer. Andrew Scott Het tinger has been named to the Deans List at Florida State Universi ty for the fall semester. Hettinger is completing his junior year and ma joring in accounting. Members of the Al pha and Omega Book Club met at the home of Peg Roman. Pres ent were Sally Pelfrey, Helen Gallagher, Hilda McCown, Bernice Ter ry, Polly Duncan, Lou ise Paxton and Dorothy and Edna Winther. Receiving top awards at Groveland High School are: freshmen Angelina Perez, Mi chelle Merriman and Tony Whicker; soph omores Melissa Metz, Leticia Harris and Charlie Davis; juniors Margaret Jahreis, Patri cia Crews and Kimber ly Gray and seniors Mi chael Hooten, Ralph van Beusekom and Bil lie Jo Rozar. An advertisement from Igous TV & Appli ances, located in South Lake Plaza on State Road 50: GE Refrigera tor, crushed ice, cubes, reg. $1,244, $995. Ama na Heavy Duty Wash er, three temperatures, $399. The smallest, lightest Zenith cam era/recorder ever, the new Zenith compact VHS Camcorder, only $1,249. General Electric family-size refrigerator, 16 cubic feet, $499. Would you believe that Ronald Reagan once judged a college beauty contest? It hap pened at the University of Florida. The editor of the 1947 UF yearbook, Seminole, thought it would be a great idea to get movie stars to pick out some pin-up pic tures for the yearbook. So he asked Ron ald Reagan and his then wife, Jane Wyman, if they would do the choosing. They did, and the Reagans got their pictures in the year book as well. By the way, the editor of that yearbook was Patrick ONeal, who lat er became a movie and television actor himself. One of the major rea sons Gainesville became UFs home was because the city fathers enticed the Florida Legislature with a bounty of $40,000 and 500 acres, beating out similar offers from Lake City, Fernandi na and Jacksonville. The citys Methodist church also contributed $30,000 and the city offered free water service. LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com Men are unlikely to go to the doctor regularly, even though they are more likely to die of heart disease, stroke and cancer, said Dr. Jamin Brahmbhatt, co-director of the PUR Clinic at South Lake Hospital. Brahmbhatt and Dr. Sijo Parekat til, who is also co-director of the clin ic specializing in male infertility and chronic groin and testicular pain, want to change that mindset. So the doctors, who are pioneers in the eld of robotic assisted microsur gery and part of the founding board for the Robotic Assisted Microsurgi cal and Endoscopic Society, are taking their message on the road in hopes of beginning a conversation with men on health topics from heart disease to dia betes to prostate cancer. The urologists will travel 1,100 miles in an all-electric TESLA, a 24-hour road trip from Clermont to Manhattan on June 12 and 13. Stopping only to recharge the vehicle every 150-200 miles, they will stop in seven states, where they will host lec tures delivered by 45 speakers on mens health topics. Speakers include not ed physicians along the East Coast and university professors. The event, which is sponsored by at least 15 medical companies, will also include a car. At each stop there will be a mobile platform displaying the newest medi cal technologies, such as a robotic mi cro Doppler used to check blood ow and tiny blood vessels, and they will demonstrate a robotic daVinci XI sys tem used in urological surgery. The rst event of its kind, the Drive for Mens Health includes participa tion from numerous chambers of commerce, including the Manhattan Chamber. We need to continually bring issues of health to the forefront for both men and women, said Nancy Ploeger, pres ident of the Manhattan Chamber of Commerce. Indeed, half of all men will be diag nosed with cancer in their lives and 230,000 men are diagnosed with pros tate cancer annually, according to Parekattil. Lake County ofcials and economists say the event will serve as a catalyst for bringing additional medical technolo gy companies into the county, helping to bolster medical tourism. During the trip, the doctors will use Google Glass and Go-Pro camer as to broadcast their journey live, dis cuss mens health issues and answer health-related questions, according to a press release from South Lake Hospi tal. Paul Simmons, the countys econom ic development and tourism coordi nator, said this event ts in with south Lake Countys theme of health and wellness. They are not just medical special ists, he said of the urologists. They utilize the daVinci robotic system for surgery. This event exposes Lake Coun ty to a larger audience that we have spe cialized medical services and brings at tention to the fact that Lake County can be a designation for medical tourism. Sean Snaith, director of the Universi ty of Central Floridas Institute for Eco nomic Competitiveness, said the event CLERMONT Urologists hit the road Pair of doctors to hold 1,100-mile lecture tour about mens health issues BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Drs. Jamin Brahmbatt and Sijo Parekattil of the Pur Clinic pose for a photo in front of Parekattils Tesla at South Lake Hospital in Clermont on Thursday. Brahmbatt and Parekattil will take a Tesla on a tour up the east coast to promote mens health. JUST THE FACTS Men are 24 percent less likely to go to the doctor then women. 100,000 men live with chronic groin pain and testicular pain. Half of all men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer annually. 230,000 men are diagnosed with cancer annually. Men are twice more likely to die of melanoma. Roughly 2,000 men are diagnosed with breast cancer each year, resulting in 400 deaths. Men on average die more than six years earlier than women. Six million men are diagnosed with depression each year, and men are four times more likely to commit suicide. Men who sit six or more days have a 18 percent higher chance of dying from heart dis ease or diabetes. Men suffer hearing loss at two times the rate of women. SEE DOCTORS | B4

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B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, June 4, 2014 Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...FINDERS KEEPERSFINDERS KEEPERS was opened on November 1, 2010 on 8th and Montrose streets in Historic Downtown Clermont. Owner, Pat Matson, who retired after 30 years in the corporate business world, decided she could finally follow her dream of owning her own small business. Not exactly sure what Finders Keepers would be today it has evolved into a Unique Gift, Home Dcor and gently used Furniture boutique. Customers enjoy the unique items they can purchase at Finders Keepers and appreciate the ever turning inventory with new items being introduced daily. According to Pat finding the treasures and merchandising them is what she loves to do. Selling is just something I have to do to stay in business she laughs. Having expanded twice in the past 4 years, Pat contributes her success to her husband Bobs support and the assistance of her baby girl, as she refers to her, Jennifer Silva. Jen is really the salesperson, she is a real go getter and is always here for me. We are all a great team that makes FINDERS KEEPERS the success that it is. Whether you are looking for a birthday or wedding gift, something funny to give to someone or great furniture for your home FINDERS KEEPERS is where you will find it. Open Tuesday through Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and Sunday 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. you will be greated by the smiles of either Pat or Jen and usually on Sundays both will be in the boutique. Stop in and say Hi, you never know what you may find. Pat and her husband Bob Matson have lived in Clermont for the past 11 years and have 4 children and 8 grandchildren. When not working they love to travel and are getting ready for a three week Norway trip in July. Not to worry FINDERS KEEPERS will be open in the capable hands of Jen. To be sure there will be a huge sale when momma is gone. LOOKING FOR PARTS? SEE JULIE (352) 394-6111 Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com Composing a song takes time and reection for jazz trumpeter Theo Cro ker. It is a creative pro cess, said the 29-yearold Leesburg native who has received national ac claim for his newest al bum AfroPhysicist. You have to let things go over in your head a few times. An idea can oat around in my head for a long time before I turn it into a nal piece. Indeed, it took Cro ker three years to release AfroPhysicist, but he wanted to make sure the album hit all the right notes. The album reects his experiences travel ing around the world and meeting and interacting with people from differ ent cultures, he said. It is DVRK Funk, the jazz composer and trum peter said of the genre and the title of his band. He said he likes jazz be cause of the freedom and the expression it allows. Every time you per form, you have the op portunity to express what is happening in the mo ment, he said. Croker has performed all over the world in countries such as China, England and Ja pan. It is a live conver sation through music. We play music to help people deal with the daily com ings and goings in life. AfroPhysicist is Cro kers third album, which has garnered attention from National Public Ra dios, All Things Consid ered and the New York Times. Crokers new album is showing his breadth, with plush funk and rock idioms, some subtle and complex new-jazz ones, a ballad standard Moodys Mood for Love and highwire soloing, the New York Times wrote. Croker said he grew to love music at an early age, inuenced by what he heard on TV and the mov ies. I think living life has been the biggest inspi ration for my music, he said. But it was his grandfa ther, legendary jazz artist Doc Cheatham, who con tinued to inspire him after hearing him play at the Sweet Basil, a jazz club in New York City, his mother Alicia Croker said. She said her son grew up surrounded by music. He kind of grew into the music naturally and did all the hard work to make it a reality for him, the Tavares High School guidance counselor said of her son, who began taking trumpet lessons at age 11. He has been amazingly focused and not afraid to take some chances. Croker said he learned a lot from his grandfather, a Grammy award-winning artist. He always emphasized a musician should learn to be themselves and nd their own voice, he said. I went my own way. Even if it was not accepted, I would stick with it any way. Leesburg still has a soft spot in Crokers heart. It was quiet and safe, he said, adding he was ap preciative of his nice, pure upbringing. Alicia said her son was independent, leaving home at age 16 to attend The Douglas Anderson School of the Arts. He lived in a different environment away from us to be in a full-time mu sic curriculum, she said. I thought that was pretty brave. After graduating, he at tended the Oberlin Con servatory in Oberlin, Ohio. He graduated in 2007. He then began playing with older musicians such as Benny Powell, Jim my and Tootie Heath, Bil ly Hart and Marcus Bel grave, according to his biography from his pub licist. In 2006, he received the Presser Music Foundation Award, using the grant money to record his rst studio album, The Fun damentals, according to the biography. He then spent seven years in China. Croker hopes peoples spirits are lifted by his music. I feel fortunate to be in a position to have my mu sic be relevant and plan to continue to strive to remain relevant to peo ples needs artistically, he said. His music expresses love and heartbreak, he said. Heartbreak is proba bly the biggest theme of anyones music, he said. There is social commen tary in my music. I hope when I write a song that people read the name, it settles in their mind and helps them deal with the same lesson, principle or interaction that I have. And the artist never tires of the trumpet, refer ring to it as powerful and expressive. My goal is to continue to push boundaries, trav el, learn about different cultures and continue to heal people, he said. LEESBURG Jazz artist hopes to heal many with music PHOTO COURTESY OF THOMAS BRODIN Jazz musician Theo Croker just released his third album, AfroPhysicist. is an innovative approach to economic development. I think there is a lot of potential in something like that, he said. They draw attention both to the issues and the physicians doing this unique kind of surgery in Lake County. Getting the word out, Snaith said, can help bolster medical tourism. This is another part of a starting ef fort with our medical tourism in really driving the economic engine we have for patients to come to a great location in Clermont to receive their services and top notch health care treatment, said Lance Sewell, chief nancial ofcer for South Lake Hospital. The event begins at South Lake Hospi tal at 7:30 a.m. June 12, and will include guest speakers such as Lake Coun ty Commissioner Sean Parks and Cler mont Police Chief Charles Broadway. It is a worthwhile cause of encour aging men to have regular visits to see their doctors and be able to talk about health concerns, said Broadway. Part of our main focus is enhancing the qual ity of life for all. Ketan Badani, director of robotic sur gery at Columbia University, called it one of the most unique events of its kind. The challenge is to gain widespread attention, get fathers and men and their signicant others to become more aware and feel more comfortable talking about mens health issues, Badani said. Chuck Swift, who was on the show Whale Wars, said he had groin pain for 16 months and saw 10 doctors with no remedy. He said he is grateful he went to see Dr. Parekattil, who performed a proce dure to help relieve his pain. Swift said had he not gone to the doc tor to seek relief ying all the way from California his life would have been much more difcult. I have had glimpses of that kind of deep, dark place people hear about when having long-term pain, he said. The quality of my life would have re mained degraded. For more information about the event, go to www.drive4menshealth.com. DOCTORS FROM PAGE B3

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Wednesday, June 4, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B5

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B6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, June 4, 2014 Classified IndexLegal Notices....................0001 Notices............................1000 At Your Service................9000 Employment....................2000 Pets/Animals....................6865 Merchandise....................6000 Real Estate/For RENT......3000 Real Estate/For SALE........4000 Recreation........................7000 Transportation..................8000 Cancellations for ads running Wednesday must be made by 4pm Monday.ADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since The Daily Commercial will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error call the classified department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error.TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde

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Wednesday, June 4, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B7 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance r t t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital I N D I G O S M O T H E R S T E R N N O R M A N A W A Y W E G O A W A V E A R A B L E D A Z E O F O U R L I V E S P A P U A A D L E R T R A I N E R S T H E E X F I L E S B A R K E E P D Y E D A E R I E N E I G H A A H T E A L S L I P S C E N E I T H E A W E D C O U P L E S H E K E L S M A R R E D C O P S L O P E S E E S B O M B S O F I A V E R O D E Y S E C T S A N D T H E C I T Y P A T R O O T D O O R S E A R S A L U M P O S S E U P I E R R A T A S T R I P E D A M E R I C A N I D Y L L T A B A R D A D E N S E W N S O P A R O M A R U I N S O U T A I L L U S E D B R A K I N G B A D H E A V I E S T A R O S E O H A R A A W L I N T H E F A M I L Y S T A K E D P O I S E E R I C I D L E R E S E N D S K I E S D E N U D E S A S T R A Y Crossword puzzle is on page B2.

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B8 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, June 4, 2014 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 7 25 34 47 67 13 18 31 59 74 9 21FREE SPACE53 72 2 16 42 48 63 5 29 39 52 68ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N I B O G BINGO B I N G O SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Beverly Bailey WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! B 13 B 2 B 5 B 9 B 7



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LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comBeginning this fall, trash pickups for the majority of residents in unincorpo rated Lake County will change from twice a week to once a week. The new 1-1-1 service consists of once-per-week trash, recycling and yard waste pickup, according to county ofcials. Trash and recycling are collected on the same day by different trucks, while yard waste will be picked up on a separate day. Previously, trash and yard waste was collected at the same time twice a week and disposed of at the Covanta incinerator, while recycling was taken once a week. In 2013, the County Commission, with Commissioner Leslie Campione dissenting, approved three hauler contracts, in addition to disposal at the Heart of Florida Environmental landll in Lake Panasoffkee. The vote came after the countys Solid Waste Task Force recommended 22 ways to reduce costs and increase recycling. The group proposed the oncea-week trash pickup using automated and semi-automated collection vehicles. The task force also recommended separating yard waste Waste savings BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIALDon Brown steps off the back of a Progressive Waste Solutions garbage truck during a trash collection run in Mount Dora, on Friday. SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | B3SPORTS: South Sumter grad powers Gators to World Series WEDNESDAY, JUNE 4, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWST AND INSIDE CLASSIFIED B6 CROSSWORDS B2 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN B3 SPORTS B1 VOICES A3WORD ON THE STREE T A2SOUTH LAKE PRESSV OLUME 99, NO. 23 3 SECTIOn N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reservedwww. southlakepress.comPRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID Lake County prepares to roll out new trash service But the cost of collecting 1-1-1 is more expensive than the current collection.Leslie Campione, Lake County commissionerCampione made a motion to solesource bid the incinerator, the biggest rip-off to the people in this county. I dont think anybody who supports sole-source bidding with the incinerator has any moral authority to criticize the County Commission for following the recommendations of a citizens task force.Jimmy Conner, Lake County commissioner LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comLake County School District Chief Academ ic Ofcer David Chris tiansen expressed both concern and optimism last week about the rst set of results of the Flor ida Comprehensive As sessment Test scores. We did better in one category: writing, he said. Lake students in eight and 10th grade saw substantial improvement on the writing portion. However, he expressed concern about the third-grade reading results, which showed the district lagging be hind the statewide av erage by two percent age points. What resources can we put in pre-k to second-grade level to get in front of this? he said. Half or more of the kids are not reading at grade level. Christiansen said he is building more resources and support for stu dents in pre-k to third grade and sixth through ninth grades. Christiansen said he is assigning additional teachers and tutors to work directly with students. School board members and educators agree more needs to be done to pinpoint stu dents who are having difculties and promote collaborative efforts between teachers. Meanwhile, the FCAT 2.0 results for third grade math showed 58 percent of Lake Coun ty students were pro cient, dead even with the state. The Florida Department of Educa tion also released the complete results from the writing portion of the test administered to fourth, eighth and 10th Finding FCAT success in LakeSchool officials, board members discuss latest test results BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Students in Jennifer Ross fourth-grade class at Sorrento Elementary School write invitations to their end-of-theschool-year party in Sorrento. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comThe city of Clermont and the Lake County Rowing Association announced Friday that the rst-ever rowing regatta the Leader of the Lake Regatta will be hosted on Nov. 8-9 at Lake Minneola. The regatta is one result of a grant the city of Clermont won to build the Clermont Boathouse at Waterfront Park, city ofcials said. Lake County is working with Clermont on the 5,000-square-foot boathouse, which will serve as the CLERMONTBoathouse could help city become rowing mecca SUBMITTED PHOTO This is an architects rendering of the Clermont Boathouse at Waterfront Park. Lake County is working with Clermont on the 5,000-square-foot boathouse.SEE BOATHOUSE | A2SEE WASTE | A2SEE FCAT | A8

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, June 4, 2014 CLERMONT Man accused of possessing child pornographyA 21-year-old man who was employed at a childrens play center in Clermont has been charged by a federal grand jury with nearly a dozen criminal counts relating to child pornography. According to the U.S. Attorneys Ofce, Middle District of Florida, Aaron Michael Murray was charged with ve counts of advertising for child pornography over the Internet, four counts of transporting child pornography over the Internet and two counts of possessing child pornography. Murray was arrested on June 28, 2013, after investigators found more than 102 images of child pornography on his iPod, the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce said. Detectives searched Murrays Winding Ridge Road home, looked on his iPod and found chats and interactions with what appeared to be children, as well as at least 102 images of child pornography, they said. At the time, Murray was employed at Jump-N-Joeys Play and Party Zone in Clermont, a child play center owned by his family. His trial is scheduled to begin on July 1.TAVARES Carpenter to run for commission seatOrange County Sheriffs Capt. Sandy Carpenter has led paperwork to run for the Lake County Commission District 2 seat, facing incumbent Commissioner Sean Parks, according to the Supervisor of Elections ofce. Carpenter previously ran for Lake County sheriff in 2012 against current incumbent Sheriff Gary Borders. In the August 2012 primary election, Carpenter received 32 percent of the vote compared with 67 percent for Borders. Parks, who is running for his second term, founded the South Lake Water Initiative along with Groveland Mayor Tim Loucks. The group has come together in conjunction with the Central Florida Water Initiative to nd an alternative water source for south Lake County. The primary election is Aug. 26. Despite repeated attempts, Carpenter could not be reached for comment.CLERMONT Disney employee arrested in 4-day prostitution stingSome 98 people were arrested including a Walt Disney World management trainer from Clermont during a four-day prostitution sting aimed at nding victims of human trafcking, Polk County Sheriffs Ofce ofcials said. Paul Keane, 46, of 16204 Saint Augustine St., in Clermont, was charged with soliciting another to commit prostitution. The Sheriffs Ofce said the married suspect reportedly offered an undercover operative $30 for unprotected sex. Keanes Linkedin prole said he works at Walt Disney World as a learning and development manager, and was previously a cast recruiter there. Polk Sheriff Grady Judd said that among those arrested, 16 were accused of being pimps who brought prostitutes, 28 were accused of being prosti tutes and 52 were johns attempting to pay for sex. The department used e-commerce sites to set up the sting.GROVELAND Willy Wonka Jr. to be presented at South Lake HighCaponis Cannolis School of the Arts, made up of students from var ious south Lake schools, will present Willy Wonka Jr. at 7 / p.m. Thursday and Friday and at 1 / p.m. and 7 / p.m. Saturday at the South Lake High School auditorium, located at 15600 Silver Eagle Road in Groveland. Tickets are $8 per person and children 3 and under are admitted free. Tickets can be purchased online at www.caponimusic.com or at the door before performance times. There will be concessions, a 50/50 and a surprise intermission performance. Area Briefs What south Lake residents are saying about ...OUTDOORSWhat is your favorite outdoor place in south Lake?My favorite place in South Lake is my ve acres right across from Lake Louisa State Park. NANCY FULLERTON CLERMONT The view of the lakes and hills and the trails to run and exercise. CHARLES BROADWAY CLERMONT Waterfront Park. Everyone can afford it and children use their own imag ination and sometimes theres other children they can have nice interaction with. ELAINE HALEY MINNEOLA Lake Louisa State Park. Its such a gorgeous place in a beautiful area, and before we came here wed detour on Lake Louisa Road and then go back to 27. We really loved it. JOANNE APEL CLERMONT Word on theStreet Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 headquarters for the Lake County Rowing Association. Lake County Commissioner Sean Parks helped Clermont secure a matching tourism grant for the boathouse, which is expected to cost $750,000. The Lake County Rowing Associa tion is a nonprot organization cre ated to promote rowing as a sport at all levels of interest. It has incor porated a crew of masters and high school students. Many of the student athletes in volved with the association repre sent South Lake High School, East Ridge High School, Minneola High School and Montverde Academy, according to the association. Using the boathouse as a hub, training will take place year round in preparation for local, regional and national competitions, city of cials said in a press release. The boathouse, which will hold about 30 boats, is expected to be completed in late September. Ofcials, association members and supporters gathered at the site a few weeks ago as a sign was put up, indicating the boathouses ar rival in the fall. The boathouse will present nu merous opportunities for recreation, tness and economic de velopment, City Manager Darren Gray said. It has already generat ed a lot of enthusiasm and interest, and we look forward to this and fu ture regattas on Lake Minneola. It will also give our youth another recreational activity that could lead to scholarships (because of the for mation of local high school teams). It will enhance the vision we have for our downtown waterfront area that is going to be a major focus in our future plans for Clermont. Debbie Kiely, past president of the Lake County Rowing Associa tion, said her club will host the No vember regatta. Races are typically hosted during the fall rowing sea son and are about 5,000 meters long, she said. The association, which has about 40 members, anticipates hosting several regattas per year, Kiely said. Kiely said her club plans to attract northern teams during the winter when they are seeking a warm cli mate in which to train. Parks, a rower himself, had similar thoughts. What I hope the boathouse brings is winter training in Cler mont for high schools and colleges from up north, he said. The people from those groups would then stay in Clermont or somewhere in Lake County and spend money here at our businesses, Parks said. Additionally, in 2017, Sarasota will host the World Rowing Cham pionships, which is likely to draw more than 100,000 rowing enthusiasts to Florida. Some might return to Lake County, since they would already know the area, ofcials said. Parks said there are also many possibilities for participants in other water sports, such as sailing and ca noeing, to use the boathouse and/ or hold events at Lake Minneola. BOATHOUSE FROM PAGE A1 SUBMITTED PHOTO Lake County Rowing Association ofcials, members and supporters gathered at the boathouse site a few weeks ago as a sign was raised, indicating the boathouses arrival in the fall.fro m the trash. County ofcials said the new system will reduce the solid waste assessment in two out of three service areas, while increasing recycling. In service area one, covering the north central region, residents will pay $8 less on their assessment a year; while in service area 2, covering the central region, residents will pay $16 less. The only service area increasing its assessment, by $5, is the south part of the unincorporated portion of the county because haulers have to travel a longer distance to the disposal facility. The countys current recycling rate is 8 percent, while Florida statutes recommend all counties recycle 75 percent of their waste streams by the year 2020. Skip McCall, the countys Solid Waste Division manager, said res idents will receive one free 95-gallon container for trash and one free 65-gallon container for recycling. Residents currently have 18-gallon recycling bins. They are doubling the recycling capacity over the current system, he said. We are increasing the recycling capacity, which in turn we hope reduces the overall waste stream, equating to disposal cost savings at the landll. Since Leon County changed the recycling carts it supplied to residents from 18-gallon to 64-gallon bins, there has been a 5 percent increase in recycling, bringing their rate up to 47 percent, said Robert Mills, Leons solid waste director. Within the rst year, McCall said he expects Lake Countys recycling rate to increase to at least 25 per cent. Homeowners in unincorporated portions of the county have received postcards featuring instructions about the containers. No action is required by the residents unless they would like to change their cart sizes, McCall said. Within the rst six months of the contract, residents can request additional carts or switch out cart sizes. The new system will save the county money because yard waste will be disposed of at the county facility in Astatula instead of at the landll, which costs more than twice as much per ton, McCall said. Once the new system is in place beginning Oct. 6, McCall said the countys haulers will use semi-auto mated and automated trucks, mak ing the collection more efcient. The automated trucks will reduce the manpower from a two to one man operation, saving on costs and reducing employee injuries, McCall said. While most communities have agreed to switch to the once-aweek trash pickup, 29 communities are keeping the twice-a-week pickup and once a week recycling service, paying between $39-46 more a year for the extra service. Campione voiced concerns about the new system in an email message. Many of my constituents are concerned about once-a-week pickup and they would prefer disposal at the incinerator instead of the landll, but we are trying to be optimistic because we must live with it, she wrote. Campione also said there was a misunderstanding that the county would save money under the new agreement. But the cost of collecting 1-1-1 is more expensive than the current collection, she wrote. Commissioners Sean Parks and Jimmy Conner disagreed. Campione made a motion to sole-source bid the incinerator (referring to Covanta), the biggest rip-off to the people in this county, Conner said. I dont think any body who supports sole-source bidding with the incinerator has any moral authority to criticize the County Commission for following the recommendations of a citizens task force. Conner said the savings were clear. The more you recycle, the less cost it is going to be, he said. Parks said the new system is reducing the waste stream by recycling and is nally allowing competition for the commercial sector. WASTE FROM PAGE A1

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Wednesday, June 4, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3Benghazi as a political weaponWhile observing the graves of veterans from World War II, Korea, Iraq, Vietnam and the Gulf War, I am remembering those who gave their lives for this great country. I must also remember the four who gave their lives at Benghazi serving their country. I ask myself and all of you, did we hold extensive hearings on the deaths of all these men and women who have died serving this country? Yes, mistakes were made and will always be when serving our country. These men died serving in an area of questionable stability. These men were serving a country free of wars on our homeland. We should thank God for their service. America, let their families rest from this madness of politics. Congressman Isaac and others should be ashamed of themselves to use it as a political tool. As a former taxi owner, driver and former government employee in our nations capital, I listened to those from other countries stating how gullible this country has become. Let Benghazi go. Stop using it as a political tool to destroy a sit ting president. Common sense will tell you and others that our intelligence sources will never reveal all that they know due to the future safety of others who serve abroad. If we tell every thing, you and others will leak it out for your political greed. HILLARD S. TURNER | LeesburgImpeach the presidentAs someone who graduated from high school with a C-plus average, I do not claim to be the smartest person around, but it is way past time to impeach President Obama and get our country back to being a country of by the people and for the people. Why neither party has the guts to get rid of him can only be one of two things: They are making too much money doing as they are, or so few of them have ever served in any division of the armed forces. They are more for money than America. This country is going down the tube and its being put there by a guy who wont even show that he was born in the USA. DALE LAMB | Lady Lake As th e longest war in American history winds down, renewed attention must be paid to caring for veterans who served in the nearly 13-year war in Afghanistan as well as in Iraq and other conicts. It is already known that many of th e survivors of those wars suffered and survived injuries they would not have recovered from in any earlier conict, thanks to modern medicine. Allegations of treatment delays and falsied records at veterans hospitals show a failure to give appropriate attention to the growing and changing dynamic of Veterans Affairs. As many as 40 veterans might have died awaiting treatment in Phoenix, and allegations have come to light that secret waiting lists were used to conceal the fact that appointments werent scheduled within the required two weeks. Waiting lists also have been reported at other VA hospitals, including, closer to home, the Malcom Randall VA Medical Center in Gainesville. A handwritten list of more than 200 mental health patients was discovered last week by a VA team visiting the hospital. Three mental health administrators were subsequently placed on leave. On the national level, a top ofcial for veter ans health has already resigned, and Congress is considering legislation that would give the VA secretary greater authority to re or demote administrators at the agency and its 152 medical centers. Shinseski himself stepped down on Friday under intense pressure from veterans groups and some lawmakers. To be sure, the Obama administration has shown an unwillingness to make top ofcials accountable in scandals such as the disastrous rollout of the Affordable Care Act website. But the VAs problems go beyond just waiting lists. One issue that must be addressed is perfor mance bonuses awarded to VA managers based on wait times. They appear to have given a per verse incentive for managers to hide waits rather than address them. Addressing them requires adequate stafng and funding. VA medical care and infrastructure have been underfunded by more than $15 billion over the past decade, according to Disabled American Veterans. The group last week called on Congress to ensure veterans are shielded from Washingtons perpetually late budgets for VA benets, programs and services. The waiting-list scandal must be fully investigated, including determining the harm done to veterans on the lists. Heads have rolled and more should roll over the scandal. Yet lawmakers will be doing a disservice to veterans if they dont also ensure the proper stafng, funding and technology to address any delays.From Ocala.com. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . ........................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTOPINION WHATS YOUR OPINION?The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Letters to the Editor 732 W. Montrose St. Clermont, FL 34711By fax to: 352-394-8001EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed.GUEST COLUMNSIf you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@daily commercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. AVIEWIf you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veter-ans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to to www.lakeveterans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANS SOUTH LAKE PRESSYour community newspaper for more than 100 years.732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Florida 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region.All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. YOUROPINIONSLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Pro-pot arguments are misguidedRegarding the recent Letter to the Editor published on May 18 in the Daily Commercial entitled, A case for legalizing pot, I hope Sandra Platt of Fruitland Park does more research on marijuana before she endorses the legalization of recreational marijuana. It is one thing to use marijuana for medical purposes that is prescribed by a licensed physician under strict guidelines including dosage and frequency of use for treatment of a legitimate illness or disease while in the connes of ones home. It is entirely another if the main purpose for its use and the primary psychoactive effect is relaxation, pleasure, getting high and pro ducing euphoria. We know the main, active ingredient in marijuana is THC. We know THC is psychoactive. That is what the effect of cannabis is. The use of marijuana is already being cautioned against when driving, swimming and operating machinery or other activities that are unsafe when not sober. President Obama is not a scientist or phy sician, so just because he admits to smoking large amounts of pot and thinks it is no worse than alcohol is no reason to endorse it. Oh, and yes, I did smoke pot recreationally but have not in many, many years. I do not need it to be at peace. But I do not condemn the use of it for legitimate medical purposes. Depending upon the frequency of use and amount, it can induce auditory and visual hallucinations, cause euphoria and anxiety, dry mouth, red eyes, cold hands or feet and marked depression. The long-term usage can produce schizophrenia, major depression and bipolar disorder, and can lead to substance addiction and crime. Regarding the consumption of marijuana during pregnancy, there is some evidence that it restricts growth of the fetus, produces miscarriages and causes cognitive defects. The length of time of marijuanas effect depends on the frequency of use, the amount and how it was consumed, if other legal or illegal drugs were taken, the tolerance of the marijuana consumer, and whether the marijuana was laced with other sub stances. Marijuana is being studied more frequently and in even more depth than it has been, especially the effects on the growing brain of the adolescent. Please use caution, and study both sides of this debate. Let it not be yet another politics-as-usual, one-sided discussion. MARION SCHOELLER Eustis LETTER of the WEEK FILE PHOTO Employees trim retail marijuana at 3D Cannabis Center, in Denver.Now is the time to reform the Veterans Administration

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, June 4, 2014 Staff ReportA benet for Ryan Boyd, a 7-yearold Groveland Elementary student who sustained traumatic brain head injuries when he was thrown off a golf cart, will take place from 1 to 6 / p.m. Saturday at the Elks Lodge, 705 W. Minneola Ave., Clermont. Food and drinks will be available for purchase and all proceeds will benet the Boyd family. Entertainment will feature many local bands, including Baby Blues, Bill Kyle, Bill Grifth, Randall Crawford, Spartans by the Dozen and others. There will be a silent auction and donations will be accepted throughout the event. A magician will also perform. Ryan just returned home after spending months at Arnold Palmer Hospital in Orlando and Brooks Rehabilitation Center in Jacksonville. For information, contact Mandy Boyd at 352-255-2805 or Renee Jones at 352-242-6369.Benefit to be held for boy injured in fallGROVELAND ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comAurelia Cole, chief of administration for Lake County Schools, is counting down the days to her retirement next month after 43 years as an educator. On June 11, the Educational Foundation of Lake County will host a benet dinner in her honor, but the city of Cl ermont recently hosted a reception recognizing her efforts. Nearly 100 people were in attendance, in cluding friends, fami ly, city ofcials, fellow teachers and former students. Many shared sto ries about how Cole touched their lives, but the one thing every one acknowledged was Coles love for children and her efforts to en sure they were educated and cared for. Paula Johnson Hoisington, one of Coles former students, now the vice president of Net Communica tions in Orlando, said she credits much of her condence and success to Cole. I am one of the seeds she planted, Hoising ton told the crowd be fore addressing Cole personally. I can remember the days in your class, and I thank you for the seeds you planted in me ... You used to tell us, You can do whatever youd like to do. You can be whatever you want to be. I believed it and I achieved it, Hoisington said to Cole. Clermont City Manager Darren Gray shared Coles history as an educator, and ac knowledged the con tributions she and her family have made to the south Lake community and beyond. Cole is the only daughter of the late Rev. William N. and Marie Rose McKinney, who were both longtime ed ucators in the community. She completed her elementary and secondary education in Cl ermont, where she was the salutatorian of her class. She went on to receive her bachelors de gree in English from Tuskegee Institute (Uni versity). Years later she received a master of sci ence degree in educational leadership from Nova University. Immediately after graduation, Cole began teaching in the Lake County School District, where she was a teach er for 18 years, administrative dean for six years, assistant princi pal for four years, mid dle school principal for ve years, high school principal for ve years and chief of adminis tration (assistant super intendent), her present position, for ve years. Cole has been married to her husband, Devon, for 44 years, and is the mother of two children, Devon Michael, an assistant principal, and Danielle Marie, a reading teacher. The couple has four grandsons: Devon Jr., Ethon William, Willie III and Wesley Daniel. Cole is a member of New Jacobs Chapel Missionary Baptist Church, where she serves in the Family Matters (food CLERMONTLake County educator retiring after 43 years LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIALAurelia Cole, retiring after 43 years as an educator, is surprised by a remark made during a benet dinner in her honor.SEE EDUCATOR | A7 7th Annual Mike Conley Hospice HouseGolf TournamentSponsored by South Lake County Moose Lodge rfntb June 14th2014Green Valley Country ClubrnrfntbRegistration at 7:30am 8:30am Shotgun Start Entry Fee is $50.00nrnntn REGISTER EARLY Call Robert (352) 516-9232 trrrtf brnrftnrrnrttnnrn rntnnttRobert: (352) 516-9232 or Craig: (734) 552-3382

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Wednesday, June 4, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A7distribution) and Vision Committee ministries. She is also the Home coming chairperson, pastor of the support team and on the Black History Committee. In addition, she is a long time member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, the South Lake Histor ical Society and presi dent of the W.N. McK inney Gospel Choir. She also serves on the South Lake Chambers Educa tion and Teacher Appre ciation Breakfast committees. Chris Patton, Lake County Schools spokes person, said the fact that so many gathered to honor her Cole shows how well respected she is in the community. Her service and con tributions to the chil dren, to the education system and to the com munity are enormous, and I think it it shows when a local municipal ity goes out of their way to honor someone like that, Patton said. Devon Cole, Aurel ias husband, who re tired 11 years ago after 35 years with UPS, said he is glad to see his wife nally willing to slow down a bit. Were just gonna take it one day at a time, en joy life, he said. Its good to have her retir ing because shes been at the craft for many years, but she doesnt sit (still). She will nd something to do, Im absolutely sure of that. EDUCATOR FROM PAGE A4 IN MEMORY DEATH NOTICESStephen J. BleierStephen J. Bleier, 81, of Sebring, died on Sunday, May 25, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations.Warren CameronWarren Cameron, 73, of Astor, died Tuesday, May 27, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Astor.Bessie B. DawsonBessie B. Dawson, 93, of Leesburg, died Mon day, May 26, 2014. East side Funeral Home, Leesburg.Evelyn D. HendersonEvangelist Evelyn D. Henderson, 68, of Bushnell, died, Wednesday May 21, 2014. Eastside Funeral Home, Leesburg.Audrey Louise MichAudrey Louise Mich, 92, of Leesburg, died Friday, May 30, 2014. Harden/Pauli Funeral Home, Eustis.James Dale MichelsJames Dale Michels, 71, of Leesburg, died Sunday, May 25, 2014. Harden/Pauli Funeral Home, Eustis.Johnny A. MincyJohnny A. Mincy, 73, of Leesburg, died Tuesday, May 27, 2014. East side Funeral Home, Leesburg.Minnie NeszMinnie Nesz, 94, of Lady Lake, died Mon day, May 26, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Ann B. OLearyAnn B. OLeary, 84, of Leesburg, died Monday, May 26, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg.Dolores M. ReesDolores M. Rees, 96, of Clermont, died Fri day, May 23, 2014. PageTheus Funerals & Cre mations. Leesburg.Jean E. ReifJean E. Reif, 77, of Leesburg, died Friday, May 30, 2014. PageTheus Funerals & Cre mations, Leesburg.Angela M. RussellAngela M. Russell, 37, Floral City died Friday, May 23, 2014. Banks/ Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Stacy Maurice Sayles Jr.Stacy Maurice Sayles, Jr., 24, of Leesburg, died May 19, 2014. Marvin C. Zanders Funeral Home, Inc. Apopka.Iva J. WiegandIva J. Wiegand, 90, of Leesburg, died on Sunday, May 25, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMayra Martinez believes her apartment at the Century Citrus Tower Apartment Complex was bur glarized by a young woman who came to her door asking about walk ing Martinezs dog Ruka, a 3-year old yorkipoo, to raise money for her youth group. Martinez told police that the girl said she was asking everyone in the complex about the opportunity to exercise their pets. According to Martinez, she looked through the peep-hole and saw a white female with blonde hair but could not see her face, the po lice reports states. The girl left her name, phone number and email address on a small piece of paper. Martinez didnt open the door be cause she had just stepped out of the shower. The following week, Martinez allegedly contacted the girl via phone and text to set up a dog-walking schedule. Martinez also left a key under her mat for the girl to gain ac cess to the dog and left money on the counter for her services. Instead of coming home and nd ing her dog well exercised, Martinez found that Ruka was missing, along with a laptop and two Kindle tab lets. It seemed like the girl knew a lot about her life, Martinez said. From what I gather its a prof it scam, but that she knew that I just moved into my community and knew that I had multiple jobs, means she was watching me, and that really just makes me feel in secure and unsafe, Martinez said. The person I got to know for two weeks was so caring about animals. She just seemed so caring and inter ested in me and my dog. Martinez said the stolen electronics are not as important as her pet. Im stressed and Im not doing well. I just really need my dog back, she said. Anyone with information can call the Clermont Police Department at 352-394-5588.Dognapper leaves owner devastated PHOTO COURTESY OF MAYRA MARTINEZ Mayra Martinez believes a phony dog walker stole her dog Ruka, a 3-year-old yorkipoo.CLERMONT

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A8 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, June 4, 2014 HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 Place your ad here and reach the Local Market!VERY AFFORDABLE!Call today 352-394-2183 Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) graders. Eighth graders scor ing a 3.5 or better (the test is graded on a 6-point scale, with a score of 3.5 considered procient) increased district-wide by 4 per cent to 48 percent, ac cording to a press release from the district. Further, 10th graders scoring a 3.5 or better jumped 9 percentage points to 57 percent, the district reported. Some of the middle schools with the largest percentage of students scoring a 3.5 or better on the writing assessment included Carver Middle School, with a 21-point increase. At Umatilla Middle School, 44 per cent of students were procient, a 14-percent jump. At Windy Hill Middle School, 64 per cent were procient, representing an 11 per cent increase. And at Eustis Middle, 56 per cent were procient. High schools with the largest gains on the writing assessment included Leesburg High School, South Lake High School and Mount Dora High School. The top scores went to Lake Minneola High School, where 65 percent of stu dents were procient, and 62 percent of East Ridge High School stu dents were procient. In particular, Sorrento Elementary School made strong gains in third-grade math and fourth-grade writing. In fourth grade writing, 65 percent of stu dents were procient, a 24-percent increase from last year; and 74 percent in third-grade math, a 17 percent in crease. Susan Pegram, principal of the school, said she credited the schools improvements to coming up with an action plan and identifying the schools weaknesses. The school focused on collaborative planning and more effective prog ress monitoring of the students, Pegram said. The curriculum resource teacher also served as an effective tool, meet ing with the groups and breaking down the Flor ida Standards. Pegram said she met with a teacher each morning to identify spe cic concerns regarding student progress. I am so proud of the students and teachers, she said. Similarly, Lost Lake Elementary School, which also continues to score high on the third grade math portion of the FCATs, at 73 per cent, employs similar methods to achieve student success, including common planning for teachers. We give low-achiev ing students extra time on assignments and extra practice, said Rhonda Hunt, principal for Lost Lake. Also effective, she said, is the use of interactive math journals and thinking maps. Stuart Klatte, president of the Lake County Education Association, said Lake County FCAT scores have always been around the state averages. I feel that all schools tend to spend too much time in benchmark testing and testing in gen eral so that the students lose a lot of instructional time, he said. Time is better spent in instruction rather than in repeating testing. Some of the low per forming schools on the FCATs included Bever ly Shores Elementary, Leesburg Elementary and Eustis Heights Ele mentary, which all have more than 80 percent of students on free or re duced lunches. Schools that have a higher percentage of students on free or re duced lunch tend to have a lower percentage of students passing, said Klatte. While agreeing with Klatte, Christiansen said there is no reason the district cant buck that trend. Bill Mathias, board member, said he was not satised with the scores and agrees with Christiansen that addressing issues early is paramount to student success. We need to have ear lier intervention for those children having issues and focused on the personalized learn ing initiatives, he said. FCAT FROM PAGE A1 READING SCORESPercentage of Lake County students who scored procient on FCAT reading, by school %  enBeverly Shores Elementary School 28 %  enClermont Elementary School 45 %  enEustis Elementary School 49 %  enSawgrass Bay Elementary School 54 %  enGrassy Lake Elementary School 69 %  enSorrento Elementary 67 %  enEustis Heights Elementary School 39 %  enFruitland Park Elementary School 42 %  enThe Villages Elementary of Lady Lake 70 %  enSeminole Springs Elem. School 70 %  enRound Lake Elementary School 63 %  enTreadway Elementary School 57 %  enMinneola Elementary School 64 %  enAstatula Elementary School 63 %  enLost Lake Elementary School 67 %  enLeesburg Elementary School 34 %  enGroveland Elementary School 40 %  enTriangle Elementary School 52 %  enLake Academy Eustis %  enMascotte Elementary School 41 %  enTavares Elementary School 56 %  enUmatilla Elementary School 60 %  enPine Ridge Elementary School 66 %  enCypress Ridge Elementary School 78 %  enSpring Creek Charter School 41 %  enHumanities and Fine Arts Charter School 38 %  enAltoona School 51 %  enMilestones Community School 43 %  enImagine Schools at South Lake 60 MATH SCORESPercentage of Lake County students who scored procient on FCAT math, by school %  enBeverly Shores Elementary School 32 %  enClermont Elementary School 46 %  enEustis Elementary School 56 %  enSawgrass Bay Elementary School 59 %  enGrassy Lake Elementary School 65 %  enSorrento Elementary 74 %  enEustis Heights Elementary School 45 %  enFruitland Park Elementary School 52 %  enThe Villages Elem Of Lady Lake 76 %  enSeminole Springs Elem. School 77 %  enRound Lake Elementary School 51 %  enTreadway Elementary School 73 %  enMinneola Elementary School 59 %  enAstatula Elementary School 47 %  enLost Lake Elementary School 73 %  enLeesburg Elementary School 37 %  enGroveland Elementary School 43 %  enTriangle Elementary School 56 %  enMascotte Elementary School 62 %  enTavares Elementary School 47 %  enUmatilla Elementary School 59 %  enPine Ridge Elementary School 71 %  enCypress Ridge Elementary School 78 %  enSpring Creek Charter School 58 %  enHumanities and Fine Arts Charter School 24 %  enAltoona School 62 %  enMilestones Community School 48 %  enImagine Schools at South Lake 59 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Mary Lanning, background left, writes on her SMART Board at the front of the classroom during a cursive lesson and it is copied directly to her laptop at the back of the class at Sorrento Elementary School.

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B1SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, June 4, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTSSPORTS EDITOR . ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE . .............................. 365-8268 FAX . .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL . ......... sports@dailycommercial.comSPORTSandLEISURELake Sumter baseball player earns highest honor FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comKirsti Merritt has proven the sophomore jinx to be just a myth. The former South Sumter High School standout produced a sol id sophomore season for the Uni versity of Florida softball team, raising her batting average and power numbers from her fresh man year. Merritt validated her season on May 25 with a three-run walkoff homer against Washington to close out the Gators 8-0 win against Washington and secured a berth for Florida in the NCAA Womens College World Series for the sixth time in seven years. The Gators beat Baylor and top-seeded Oregon in their rst two games in the WCWS in Oklahoma City. Her game-ending blast was Merritts rst career home run in 43 at bats in the NCAA Tournament. She backed that hit up with a solo homer in the Gators WCWS opener against Baylor on May 29. The way I swing, yeah I guess I was trying to end it, but not in my head, the 5-foot-4 Merritt told re porters after the game. I always swing pretty big for being such a small person. An outelder, Merritt has started in all but one game this season for the Gators (53-12). She took a .289 batting average with 11 homers and 47 RBIs into the WCWS and was tied for second on the team with 13 stolen bases. Last year, Merritt hit .280 with six home runs and 29 RBIs with 21 stolen bases. She was the rst freshman to ever be named MVP in the SEC Tournament and earned SEC All-Freshman Team honors. Defensively, Merritt has a .983 elding percentage with only one error in 58 chances. A multi-sport star at South Sum ter, Merritt said her athletic dex terity helped her learn to play a new position in college without letting the change affect her over all play. With the Raiders, Merritt was primarily a shortstop. At South Sumter, Merritt earned 12 varsity letters while playing basketball, volleyball, softball, weightlifting and track and eld. She earned invitations to the state track-and-eld championships in 2009, 2011 and 2012. I love challenging myself, Mer ritt said in 2013. I like to get out there and do as many things as possible. For Merritt and the Gators, their next challenge will be to secure the schools rst WCWS title.Former South Sumter standout helps UF advance to Series BRAD MCCLENNY / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP Floridas Kirsti Merritt (24) hits a walk off three-run home run to win game three of the Gainesville Super Regional against Washington at Katie Seashole Pressly Stadium in Gainesville, on May 25. Merritt Role FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comChris Blanton is the epitome of a student-athlete. The Lake-Sumter State College catch er delivered a solid career for the Lake hawks with a .231 batting average in 2014 and sported a .994 elding per centage behind the plate. Solid numbers for sure, but it is in the classroom where Blanton takes things to another level. Blanton became the rst student-athlete in LSSC history to win the Florida College System Activities Asso ciation Male Scholar Athlete of the Year award, the highest honor a student-ath lete can receive from the Florida College System. Previously, Blanton was named the Bill Tuten Baseball Scholar-Athlete from the FCSAA Base ball Committee and the Mid-Florida Conference Male Scholar Athlete of the Year. It is quite impressive and no small feat that Chris has been selected for all three awards in a single year, said LSSC Athletic Director Mike Matulia. We are extremely proud of him. Chris received these awards based on his tremendous accomplishments as a student and ath lete, as well as being a great ambassador for Lake-Sumter State College. LSSC baseball coach Josh Holt said he considers Blanton one of the most highly regarded student-athletes in program history. His transcript clearly represents his breadth of academic excellence and will ingness to be a leader in the classroom by achieving a 4.0 grade point average and the Presidents List every semester at LSSC, Holt said. Holt said Blanton was recording at the FMUN pro gram was a leader, as well as for having a good sense of humor and for strong professionalism by his peers. In addition, Blanton served on the schools SGA bud get committee for two years and was a representative on the college wide Student Life committee. He is a two-time All-Conference Academic Team and All-State Academic team. Not surprising, Blanton was LSSCs 2014 Student-Athlete of the Year. During his playing career at LSSC, Blanton threw out 44 percent of all base runners who tried to run against him. He played in 73 games and started 65. Blanton also spent time in the community, involved in a variety of community ser vice activities. Among his offthe-eld community service endeavors are: elementary school mentor, reading bud dy in the Read Across Amer ican program, buddy with the North Lake County Mir acle League and volunteer work at Little League clinics. He also assisted with Habitat for Humanity projects in the area. Blanton expects to attend the University of Central Florida in the fall.BLANTON FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comStudent-athletes in Lake and Sumter coun ties have been busy lately, wrapping up the school year with a number of signings. Eighteen local signees have been reported to the Daily Commer cial, including a class of nine from Tavares High School. In addition, ve student-athletes from First Academy of Lees burg signed or are in the process of signing, along with two soccer players at South Lake, one basketball standout from Eustis and one from Liberty Christian in Tavares. The contingent from Tavares inked their deals during a ceremo ny in the school auditorium on May 22. Among the signees were: Gar rett Payne, Christian Sears, Osirus Munn, Demetrius Ramirez, Cole Higginbotham, Trevor Lamm, Michael Smith, David Buckner and Kristopher Wolfe. Payne, a lineback er, signed with Flori da Atlantic University, while Sears, a quarter back, signed with The Citadel. Munn and Ramirez, both receivers and defensive backs, signed with Method ist University Gauntletts alma mater. Higginbotham, a punter, Lamm and Smith, both receivers, signed with North Car olina Wesleyan. Buckner, a kicker, signed with Southeastern in Lakeland, and Wolfe, a guard, signed with Lu theran College.FIRST ACADEMY OF LEESBURGByron Masoline, a running back who gained 1,885 yards in 2013 during First Academys run to the Sunshine State Athletic Conference championship, will play for War ner University in Lake Wales. School ofcials at First Academy said Masoline has not of cially signed, but will do so in the coming days. Also among the First Academys recent sign ees were: Luke Lea, Chip Gause and Trent Scarbrough. David El liott took part in a re cent ceremony at the school, but is still considering track offers from Gardner-Webb College and Anderson College. Lea is heading to Dal las Baptist University to play basketball. He av eraged 15 points and 12 rebounds per game in 2013-14 for the Eagles. Scarbrough will play basketball with Mount Vernon Nazarene College in Ohio. Gause is moving on to play bas ketball at Trinity Baptist College in Jacksonville.EUSTISCoy Patterson, a 6-foot combo guard for the Panthers, signed with Indian River State College in Fort Pierce. Patterson averaged 13 points and two assists this season for Eustis. Liberty Christian Prep Devante Green, a 6-foot point guard, be came Liberty Christians rst basketball signee during a cer emony on Tuesday at the school. Green signed to attend Lind enwood University in St. Charles, Mo.SOUTH LAKEA pair of boys soc cer players signed on Thursday to play at Harcum College in Bryn Mawr, Pa. Ricardo Tafolla and Jordy Fernandez committed during a cere mony in the South Lake auditorium to continue playing as teammates in college.Tavares leads class of college signees PHOTO COURTESY OF TAVARES HIGH SCHOOL Tavares High School football standouts Garrett Payne, Christian Sears, Osirus Munn, Demetrius Ramirez, Cole Higginbotham, Trevor Lamm, Michael Smith, David Buckner and Kristopher Wolfe sign national letters of intent during a recent signing ceremony.The way I swing, yeah I guess I was trying to end it, but not in my head. I always swing pretty big for being such a small person.Kirsti Merritt

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B2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, June 4, 2014 CHANGE OF PROGRAMBY DAN SCHOENHOLZ / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZNo. 0525RELEASE DATE: 6/1/2014 ACROSS1 Part of a rainbow7 Blanket14 Rear admirals rear19 Invader of 106620 Comment upon heading off21 Catch ___ (surf)22 Like farmland23 Stoners memoirs?25 ___ New Guinea26 Freud disciple Alfred27 Coaches28 Leverage in divorce negotiations?30 Mixologist32 Went from black to red, say33 Home with a view34 Whinny38 Sound in a hot tub41 Mallard relative44 Berth45 Theater opening46 Dumbstruck duo?50 Moolah51 Blemished52 Admit (to)53 Calculus calculation55 Makes the connection56 Zero-star movie57 Balkan capital59 ___ Beach, Fla.61 Susan of L.A. Law62 Tale of metropolitan religious diversity?67 Word before or after down70 Yam or turnip71 Theyre big in barns72 Huskers targets75 or now77 Western followers?80 Wire service inits.81 Some lapses83 Like many mens ties85 Grant Wood portrayal?88 The Canterbury Tales inn89 Yemeni port90 Wrapped (up)91 Conciliatory gesture92 Kitchen drawer?93 Some sites for sightseers94 Eke ___ living97 Maltreated99 Having trouble slowing down?105 Like radon among all gaseous elements108 Popped up109 Appointment in Samarra novelist110 Cobblers heirloom?113 Bet114 Aplomb115 Spamalot writer and lyricist116 Forward117 Heavens118 Clear-cuts, e.g.119 Off course DOWN1 Not on point2 Singer Jones3 Hang (over)4 Saturated5 Samsung smartphone6 With 10-Down, certain punch7 Marshy lowland8 Features of many kids place mats 9 Legal hearing10 See 6-Down11 Star of reality TVs The Girls Next Door, briefly12 Immodest display 13 Oscar nominee for The Wrestler14 Highlight15 Double takes?16 Gutter site17 One with a home away from home18 Crime-fighting Eliot20 Extra: Abbr.24 Actress ___ Dawn Chong26 Mentored, e.g.29 Celebrated30 Poe poem, with The31 The Tempest spirit33 Hieroglyphic symbol35 ___ Love, 1987 LL Cool J hit36 Stylists goop37 ___ fit38 Rest stop convenience, for short39 1956 Gregory Peck role40 Dont be a ___!42 Confronts43 Certain backscratcher45 The Rapture of Canaan author Reynolds47 See 49-Down48 Big name in barbecue grills49 With 47-Down, angry50 Building needs, informally54 Not straight up57 Tolerated58 Focusing problem, for short60 Ferrells cheerleading partner on S.N.L.63 Dealt (with)64 A musical might be on one65 Neighbors of Navajos66 Sale site, maybe67 Popular premarathon meal68 Wedding site69 Engine booster73 Tropicana Field team74 W.W. II invasion site76 Tight spot in South Florida?78 ___ Hawkins Day79 Correct81 Taedium vitae82 View from Lake Como84 Relatives of turtles86 Neon frame?87 Stirred89 Spare93 In a hurry95 Govt. securities96 Left open-mouthed, say98 Rent99 Wedding sight100 Fancy wheels, familiarly101 so long ___ both shall live?102 Part of an old military alphabet103 Big bands booking104 Pops105 Comes to pass, oldstyle106 Star Wars furball107 Others, to Ovid108 In111 End of un film112 Puncture preceder113 Mme.s cousin 123456 789101112131415161718 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3031 32 33 34353637 383940 41424344 45 46 4748 49 50 51 52 5354 55 56 57 58 59 6061 6263 6465 66 67686970 71 727374 75 7677 787980 81 82 83 84 8586 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 949596 9798 99100101 102103104 105106107 108 109 110 111112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Solution on page B7 CLERMONT BLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSAMILYELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time! IRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONTL Many Other Activities each week Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.org LIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLCHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm SOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary); 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.org ST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am (Rite I) 10:00 am (Rite II) 5:00 pm (Praise & Worship) Mens Prayer Breakfast WOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH GODINCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALE ERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for Children Groveland IRSTBAPTISTCHURCH GROVELAND Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pm MT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! MINNEOLA CONGREGATIONSMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club NEWLPRESBYTERIANCHURCH18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am TLIVINGGOD Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce Rowland MONTVERDE WOODLANDSLUTHERAN15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 am OAKLAND PRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforSouth Lake South LakeGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOMErfn tbt352-394-7121806 W. Minneola Ave.,Clermont,FL Cremation ChoicesDirect Cremation$675Plus Container Ron Becker,Director352-394-8228921 S.US Hwy 27,Minneola,FL

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Ann DupeeREMEMBER WHENA weekly column that reprints some of the more interesting news stories that have appeared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press.B3SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, June 4, 2014 www.southlakepress.comCOMMUNITYProudly servingCLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWSSTAFF WRITER . ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE . .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 EMAIL..... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com %  en HOMETOWN: Panama City %  en OCCUPATION: Chief Executive Ofcer, Boys & Girls Clubs of Lake and Sumter Counties %  en FAMILY: Melissa Williams, wife, and Lacy, dog (and the 1800+ children who we serve at our Boys & Girls Clubs) What do you enjoy most about south Lake County? The wonderful people, hills and lakes. 1) If you had to summarize your philosophy of life in one sentence, what would it be? Leave all your worries to God. 2) Name a person or incident youve come across recently thats touched you in some way. Why did this person or incident impress you so much? This year our Corporate Board of Directors for the Boys & Girls Clubs has had near perfect attendance at meetings and involvement. Their commitment to raising money, raising awareness and leveraging resources to help us serve more children is unbelievable. It is so inspiring to see a body of volunteers so committed to making a difference in the lives of children. 3) How does what you do contribute to the welfare of the area? We engage children 6-18 years old in after school and summer programs that encourage academic success, healthy lifestyles, good character and citizenship. 4) Name one of your greatest accomplishments so far. Outside of marrying my wife, it is being named new executive of the year by Boys & Girls Clubs of America in 2014. 5) Whats something youve always wanted to do but havent yet? Either skydiving or visiting Bora Bora. 6) What advice would you give to people who want to help out in the community? It is very important for citizens to become involved in the community. There are so many opportunities and causes that need committed individuals and businesses to fulll their mission. Find something that you have a passion for and it will never get old. FROM THE FILES | 27 YEARS AGO 1987Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press Meet YourNEIGHBORFREDDY WILLIAMS Martha Sue Mc Lean of Cler mont is one of 10 contestants vying for the title of Miss Lake County. In honor of Arbor Day, Clermont Elementary School had a demonstration on how to plant a tree by a ranger from the Lake County Division of For estry. The magnolia tree was donated by Fred Sommer. Andrew Scott Hettinger has been named to the Deans List at Florida State University for the fall semester. Hettinger is completing his junior year and majoring in accounting. Members of the Alpha and Omega Book Club met at the home of Peg Roman. Present were Sally Pelfrey, Helen Gallagher, Hilda McCown, Bernice Ter ry, Polly Duncan, Louise Paxton and Dorothy and Edna Winther. Receiving top awards at Groveland High School are: freshmen Angelina Perez, Michelle Merriman and Tony Whicker; sophomores Melissa Metz, Leticia Harris and Charlie Davis; juniors Margaret Jahreis, Patricia Crews and Kimber ly Gray and seniors Michael Hooten, Ralph van Beusekom and Billie Jo Rozar. An advertisement from Igous TV & Appliances, located in South Lake Plaza on State Road 50: GE Refrigerator, crushed ice, cubes, reg. $1,244, $995. Amana Heavy Duty Washer, three temperatures, $399. The smallest, lightest Zenith camera/recorder ever, the new Zenith compact VHS Camcorder, only $1,249. General Electric family-size refrigerator, 16 cubic feet, $499. Would you believe that Ronald Reagan once judged a college beauty contest? It happened at the University of Florida. The editor of the 1947 UF yearbook, Seminole, thought it would be a great idea to get movie stars to pick out some pin-up pictures for the yearbook. So he asked Ronald Reagan and his then wife, Jane Wyman, if they would do the choosing. They did, and the Reagans got their pictures in the year book as well. By the way, the editor of that yearbook was Patrick ONeal, who later became a movie and television actor himself. One of the major reasons Gainesville became UFs home was because the city fathers enticed the Florida Legislature with a bounty of $40,000 and 500 acres, beating out similar offers from Lake City, Fernandina and Jacksonville. The citys Methodist church also contributed $30,000 and the city offered free water service. LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comMen are unlikely to go to the doctor regularly, even though they are more likely to die of heart disease, stroke and cancer, said Dr. Jamin Brahmbhatt, co-director of the PUR Clinic at South Lake Hospital. Brahmbhatt and Dr. Sijo Parekattil, who is also co-director of the clin ic specializing in male infertility and chronic groin and testicular pain, want to change that mindset. So the doctors, who are pioneers in the eld of robotic assisted microsur gery and part of the founding board for the Robotic Assisted Microsurgical and Endoscopic Society, are taking their message on the road in hopes of beginning a conversation with men on health topics from heart disease to dia betes to prostate cancer. The urologists will travel 1,100 miles in an all-electric TESLA, a 24-hour road trip from Clermont to Manhattan on June 12 and 13. Stopping only to recharge the vehicle every 150-200 miles, they will stop in seven states, where they will host lec tures delivered by 45 speakers on mens health topics. Speakers include noted physicians along the East Coast and university professors. The event, which is sponsored by at least 15 medical companies, will also include a car. At each stop there will be a mobile platform displaying the newest medi cal technologies, such as a robotic mi cro Doppler used to check blood ow and tiny blood vessels, and they will demonstrate a robotic daVinci XI sys tem used in urological surgery. The rst event of its kind, the Drive for Mens Health includes participation from numerous chambers of commerce, including the Manhattan Chamber. We need to continually bring issues of health to the forefront for both men and women, said Nancy Ploeger, pres ident of the Manhattan Chamber of Commerce. Indeed, half of all men will be diag nosed with cancer in their lives and 230,000 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer annually, according to Parekattil. Lake County ofcials and economists say the event will serve as a catalyst for bringing additional medical technology companies into the county, helping to bolster medical tourism. During the trip, the doctors will use Google Glass and Go-Pro camer as to broadcast their journey live, discuss mens health issues and answer health-related questions, according to a press release from South Lake Hospi tal. Paul Simmons, the countys econom ic development and tourism coordi nator, said this event ts in with south Lake Countys theme of health and wellness. They are not just medical special ists, he said of the urologists. They utilize the daVinci robotic system for surgery. This event exposes Lake Coun ty to a larger audience that we have spe cialized medical services and brings attention to the fact that Lake County can be a designation for medical tourism. Sean Snaith, director of the Universi ty of Central Floridas Institute for Economic Competitiveness, said the event CLERMONTUrologists hit the roadPair of doctors to hold 1,100-mile lecture tour about mens health issues BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIALDrs. Jamin Brahmbatt and Sijo Parekattil of the Pur Clinic pose for a photo in front of Parekattils Tesla at South Lake Hospital in Clermont on Thursday. Brahmbatt and Parekattil will take a Tesla on a tour up the east coast to promote mens health. JUST THE FACTS %  en Men are 24 percent less likely to go to the doctor then women. %  en 100,000 men live with chronic groin pain and testicular pain. %  en Half of all men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer annually. %  en 230,000 men are diagnosed with cancer annually. %  en Men are twice more likely to die of melanoma. %  en Roughly 2,000 men are diagnosed with breast cancer each year, resulting in 400 deaths. %  en Men on average die more than six years earlier than women. %  en Six million men are diagnosed with depression each year, and men are four times more likely to commit suicide. %  en Men who sit six or more days have a 18 percent higher chance of dying from heart dis ease or diabetes. %  en Men suffer hearing loss at two times the rate of women.SEE DOCTORS | B4

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B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, June 4, 2014 Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...FINDERS KEEPERSFINDERS KEEPERS was opened on November 1, 2010 on 8th and Montrose streets in Historic Downtown Clermont. Owner, Pat Matson, who retired after 30 years in the corporate business world, decided she could finally follow her dream of owning her own small business. Not exactly sure what Finders Keepers would be today it has evolved into a Unique Gift, Home Dcor and gently used Furniture boutique. Customers enjoy the unique items they can purchase at Finders Keepers and appreciate the ever turning inventory with new items being introduced daily. According to Pat finding the treasures and merchandising them is what she loves to do. Selling is just something I have to do to stay in business she laughs. Having expanded twice in the past 4 years, Pat contributes her success to her husband Bobs support and the assistance of her baby girl, as she refers to her, Jennifer Silva. Jen is really the salesperson, she is a real go getter and is always here for me. We are all a great team that makes FINDERS KEEPERS the success that it is. Whether you are looking for a birthday or wedding gift, something funny to give to someone or great furniture for your home FINDERS KEEPERS is where you will find it. Open Tuesday through Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and Sunday 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. you will be greated by the smiles of either Pat or Jen and usually on Sundays both will be in the boutique. Stop in and say Hi, you never know what you may find. Pat and her husband Bob Matson have lived in Clermont for the past 11 years and have 4 children and 8 grandchildren. When not working they love to travel and are getting ready for a three week Norway trip in July. Not to worry FINDERS KEEPERS will be open in the capable hands of Jen. To be sure there will be a huge sale when momma is gone. LOOKING FOR PARTS? SEE JULIE (352) 394-6111 Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comComposing a song takes time and reection for jazz trumpeter Theo Croker. It is a creative pro cess, said the 29-yearold Leesburg native who has received national ac claim for his newest al bum AfroPhysicist. You have to let things go over in your head a few times. An idea can oat around in my head for a long time before I turn it into a nal piece. Indeed, it took Croker three years to release AfroPhysicist, but he wanted to make sure the album hit all the right notes. The album reects his experiences travel ing around the world and meeting and interacting with people from differ ent cultures, he said. It is DVRK Funk, the jazz composer and trum peter said of the genre and the title of his band. He said he likes jazz be cause of the freedom and the expression it allows. Every time you per form, you have the op portunity to express what is happening in the mo ment, he said. Croker has performed all over the world in countries such as China, England and Ja pan. It is a live conver sation through music. We play music to help people deal with the daily comings and goings in life. AfroPhysicist is Cro kers third album, which has garnered attention from National Public Ra dios, All Things Considered and the New York Times. Crokers new album is showing his breadth, with plush funk and rock idioms, some subtle and complex new-jazz ones, a ballad standard Moodys Mood for Love and highwire soloing, the New York Times wrote. Croker said he grew to love music at an early age, inuenced by what he heard on TV and the mov ies. I think living life has been the biggest inspi ration for my music, he said. But it was his grandfather, legendary jazz artist Doc Cheatham, who con tinued to inspire him after hearing him play at the Sweet Basil, a jazz club in New York City, his mother Alicia Croker said. She said her son grew up surrounded by music. He kind of grew into the music naturally and did all the hard work to make it a reality for him, the Tavares High School guidance counselor said of her son, who began taking trumpet lessons at age 11. He has been amazingly focused and not afraid to take some chances. Croker said he learned a lot from his grandfather, a Grammy award-winning artist. He always emphasized a musician should learn to be themselves and nd their own voice, he said. I went my own way. Even if it was not accepted, I would stick with it any way. Leesburg still has a soft spot in Crokers heart. It was quiet and safe, he said, adding he was ap preciative of his nice, pure upbringing. Alicia said her son was independent, leaving home at age 16 to attend The Douglas Anderson School of the Arts. He lived in a different environment away from us to be in a full-time mu sic curriculum, she said. I thought that was pretty brave. After graduating, he at tended the Oberlin Con servatory in Oberlin, Ohio. He graduated in 2007. He then began playing with older musicians such as Benny Powell, Jimmy and Tootie Heath, Billy Hart and Marcus Bel grave, according to his biography from his publicist. In 2006, he received the Presser Music Foundation Award, using the grant money to record his rst studio album, The Fundamentals, according to the biography. He then spent seven years in China. Croker hopes peoples spirits are lifted by his music. I feel fortunate to be in a position to have my music be relevant and plan to continue to strive to remain relevant to peoples needs artistically, he said. His music expresses love and heartbreak, he said. Heartbreak is proba bly the biggest theme of anyones music, he said. There is social commen tary in my music. I hope when I write a song that people read the name, it settles in their mind and helps them deal with the same lesson, principle or interaction that I have. And the artist never tires of the trumpet, refer ring to it as powerful and expressive. My goal is to continue to push boundaries, travel, learn about different cultures and continue to heal people, he said.LEESBURGJazz artist hopes to heal many with music PHOTO COURTESY OF THOMAS BRODIN Jazz musician Theo Croker just released his third album, AfroPhysicist.is an innovative approach to economic development. I think there is a lot of potential in something like that, he said. They draw attention both to the issues and the physicians doing this unique kind of surgery in Lake County. Getting the word out, Snaith said, can help bolster medical tourism. This is another part of a starting ef fort with our medical tourism in really driving the economic engine we have for patients to come to a great location in Clermont to receive their services and top notch health care treatment, said Lance Sewell, chief nancial ofcer for South Lake Hospital. The event begins at South Lake Hospi tal at 7:30 / a.m. J une 12, and will include guest speakers such as Lake Coun ty Commissioner Sean Parks and Cler mont Police Chief Charles Broadway. It is a worthwhile cause of encour aging men to have regular visits to see their doctors and be able to talk about health concerns, said Broadway. Part of our main focus is enhancing the qual ity of life for all. Ketan Badani, director of robotic sur gery at Columbia University, called it one of the most unique events of its kind. The challenge is to gain widespread attention, get fathers and men and their signicant others to become more aware and feel more comfortable talking about mens health issues, Badani said. Chuck Swift, who was on the show Whale Wars, said he had groin pain for 16 months and saw 10 doctors with no remedy. He said he is grateful he went to see Dr. Parekattil, who performed a proce dure to help relieve his pain. Swift said had he not gone to the doc tor to seek relief ying all the way from California his life would have been much more difcult. I have had glimpses of that kind of deep, dark place people hear about when having long-term pain, he said. The quality of my life would have re mained degraded. For more information about the event, go to www.drive4menshealth.com. DOCTORS FROM PAGE B3

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Wednesday, June 4, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B5

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B6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, June 4, 2014 Classified IndexLegal Notices....................0001 Notices............................1000 At Your Service................9000 Employment....................2000 Pets/Animals....................6865 Merchandise....................6000 Real Estate/For RENT......3000 Real Estate/For SALE........4000 Recreation........................7000 Transportation..................8000 Cancellations for ads running Wednesday must be made by 4pm Monday.ADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since The Daily Commercial will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error call the classified department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error.TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde

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Wednesday, June 4, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B7 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance rt t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital INDIGOSMOTHERSTERN NORMANAWAYWEGOAWAVE ARABLEDAZEOFOURLIVES PAPUAADLERTRAINERS THEEXFILESBARKEEP DYED AERIENEIGH AAHTEALSLIPSCENEI THEAWEDCOUPLESHEKELS MARREDCOPSLOPESEES BOMBSOFIAVERODEY SECTSANDTHECITY PATROOTDOORSEARS ALUMPOSSEUPIERRATA STRIPEDAMERICANIDYLL TABARDADENSEWNSOP AROMARUINS OUTA ILLUSEDBRAKINGBAD HEAVIESTAROSEOHARA AWLINTHEFAMILYSTAKED POISEERICIDLERESEND SKIESDENUDESASTRAY Crossword puzzle is on page B2.

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B8 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, June 4, 2014 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 725344767 1318315974 921FREE SPACE5372 216424863 529395268ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N IB O G BINGO B I N G O SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Beverly Bailey WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! B 13 B 2 B 5 B 9 B 7