South Lake press

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
South Lake press
Physical Description:
Unknown
Publication Date:

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00028418:00238


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comThe venerable peach, long associated with Geor gia, is beginning to nd a place in Central Florida groves as farmers look for a crop more hardy and weather-resistant than citrus. Steve Copeland, who owns Copeland Nursery in Clermont, said Monday his u-pick season has been going on for about a week and a half and will probably continue into the second week in June, depending on heat and how fast the fruit matures. Copeland said his 50-acre farm has a nursery, citrus, and about four to ve acres of u-pick peaches. He added he has had the farm for 29 years in June and this is the third year with peaches. He said the farm started doing u-pick peaches because every bodys doing blueberries and because citrus greening and cit rus canker has decimated citrus crops. So, instead of planting citrus trees back we planted peach trees, Copeland said. Benny McLean, a production manager at Uncle Matts Organic, also said greening was a motivation for him to start growing peaches. We wanted to hedge our bets and get some experience with peaches, McLean said. He said they sell their peaches to Whole Foods and Publix, adding they have been harvesting for about six weeks and will be done at the end of the week. Uncle Matts has approximately 10 acres of peaches in the Clermont area. The farm got its trees from the University of Florida, with their oldest batches being there for ve years in July or August. They also have 1,500 acres of citrus that they own or lease in Lake, Polk, and Highlands counties, McLean said. We were experimenting to see if we could grow peaches organically in the ridge in the sandy soils, McLean said. He said there is a big learning curve to peaches and their background is in citrus. Weve learned a lot. Its all been trial and error. Are you looking to get an edge on your competition? Physiologically, small changes in your metabolism can lead to enhanced phyiscal performance. Experience DNA testing to determine which foods/fuels are ideal for your body. Call today to schedule your evaluation. 352-989-5901 www.marholinmedicalinstitute.com SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | B3SPORTS:Harlem Wizards take on Lake County WEDNESDAY, MAY 28, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWST AND INSIDE CLASSIFIED B6 CROSSWORDS B2 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN B3 SPORTS B1 VOICES A3DEATH NOTICES A5SOUTH LAKE PRESSV OLUME 99, NO. 22 3 SECTIOn N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reservedwww. southlakepress.comPRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID Florida peaches can be smaller but have a very high brix level (the measurement of sugar), meaning they are sweeter than California and Georgia peaches. PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIALPeaches beginning to find a place in Central Florida ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comDicks Sporting Goods, one of the larg est sporting goods re tailers in the world, will open its newest store on June 27 in Clermont. I think any grow ing community, or any community of stature, needs to have a good sporting goods store and weve got a big one now, said Jim Hitt, Cl ermonts economic de velopment director. Although Hibbit Sports has served Cler mont well, Dicks will increase the availability of merchandise for athletes and sports enthu siasts locally, Hitt said. Between whats here already, sportswise, and with Dicks opening now, I think weve got it covered, he said of the new store at 1325 Sandy Grove Ave. Personally, Im excit ed because Dicks Sport ing Goods is great, Hitt said. Theyve got a lot more than just sporting goods. Theyve got a whole bunch of differ ent things and they car ry big things like kayaks and canoes and stuff. Schmidt Construction is building the 40,218-square-foot store. According to a press release from the companys headquarters in Pittsburgh, the store will host three days of grand opening festiv ities with a variety of giveaways and special appearances. Dicks is a fortune 500 company that has more than 550 stores nationwide. Marketing spokesperson Cas sie Eberle said the new store will feature Nike, Adidas and Under Ar mour shops, athletic CLERMONTDicks Sporting Goods to open soon ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Dicks Sporting Goods is opening a new store in Clermont on June 27 at 1325 Sandy Grove Ave. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMascotte City Council mem bers agreed last week to continue talking about establishing the second domestic partner ship registry in Lake County. Mayor Tony Rosado casually brought up the matter to see if there was any opposition on the board or from residents. No one on council expressed any personal opposition to the registry, but some questioned the need. My concern or comment or question about this is that they say its most useful for hospi tal visits, and medical records, and funeral arrangements and such, but at this time, we have none of those facilities in our city, Councilman Steven Shef eld said. So, what benet are we going to have for our residents or non-residents on this and how much is it going to cost the city to set this up? Do we have a medical facility on its way? I just dont know. The city of Tavares established Lake Countys rst registry 15 months ago. Anyone, not just Tavares residents, can be registered as domestic partners on that registry and council mem ber Brenda Brasher questioned the need for Mascotte to have a separate registry. If its available, I would pre fer, instead of the city taking on more of a burden, just letting people know they can just regis ter in Tavares, she said. By the end of the meeting, staff was directed to determine the specics regarding benets and costs for which Mascotte would be responsible. Tavares spokesperson Joyce Ross said there were no set-up MASCOTTECity Council to discuss partnership registrySEE DICKS | A2SEE REGISTRY | A2SEE PEACHES | A4

PAGE 2

A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 28, 2014 CLERMONT Police seek publics help identifying thievesThe Lake County Sheriffs Ofce is looking for help in identifying two men who allegedly stole cash from a Hess gas station on Tuesday in Clermont. The business is located at 17431 U.S. Highway 192. According to Sgt. James Vachon, sheriffs spokesman, two men entered the gas station at 5:33 / p.m. and one walked up to the cash register with an energy drink. While the cash register was open, he grabbed a handful of cash. Both men then ran out of the store and ed the area in a dark blue, early model four-door Toyota either a Corolla or Camry. Vachon said the Sheriffs Ofce believes the men also committed a robbery in Osceola County. Anyone with information on the suspects identities can call the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce at 352-343-2101 or CRIMELINE at 1-800-423-TIPS.CLERMONT June is Caribbean Heritage MonthThe third annual Taste of the Caribbean and Jerk Festival, presented by the Caribbean American Association of Lake County (CAALC), is from 11 / a.m. to 10 / p.m. on Sat., June 14, at Waterfront Park in Clermont. Admission is $5 for adults, and $2 for children 10 and under. Parking is free. Events include a Jerk cook-off competition, Caribbean cuisine, live reggae music, gospel and steel bands, dancers, games, Kids Zone, bounce house, arts and crafts, and more. For information, vendor participation, email to: caalc@live.com, go to www.caalc.org, or call 352-978-0813.GROVELAND First Baptist Church welcomes new pastorFirst Baptist Church of Groveland, 137 East Cherry St., will welcome its new Pastor, Billy Stephens, at the 10:50 / a.m. service on June 1. The church will host a a light breakfast reception at 9 / a.m. prior to Sunday school. Stephens comes from First Baptist Church of High Springs, where he served for eight years. Prior to that, he served in the United States Navy. Stephens earned his master of arts in religion at Liberty Theological Seminary. For information, call 352-429-2651, or email fbcgroveland@embarqmail.CLERMONT Docs kick off tour for Mens Health WeekIn recognition of National Mens Health Week June 9-15, two doctors from the PUR Clinic at South Lake Hospital will hit the road to spread the word about mens health issues for the rst-ever Drive for Mens Health, a 24hour road trip from Florida to New York. Dr. Jamin Brahmbhatt and Dr. Sijo Prekattil will drive 1,100 miles in an all-electric TESLA, stopping only to recharge the vehicle and hosting mens health events along the way. Funds raised will benet genetic research for chronic male conditions and educational scholarships. The duo will depart at 8 / a.m. June 12 at South Lake Hospital, 1900 Don Wickham Dr., in Clermont. For information, go to www. Drive4MensHealth.com or call 407-833-9201.CLERMONT D-Day remembrance set at Historic VillageThe turning point of World War II will be remembered at 11 / a.m. June 7, with a D-Day commemoration ceremony at Clermonts Historic Village, 490 West Ave. After the ceremony, hot dogs, apple pie and sodas will be available For information, call 352-593-8496 or go to www.ClermontVillage.org. Area Briefs What south Lake residents are saying about ...THEATERWhat does community theater mean to you?I enjoy it. My wife and I have gone to it a couple of times. Its a nice outing for adults. We enjoy the closeness, the attachment to the characters, but we do oppose the language at times and have almost walked out. BOB PERRY CLERMONT Community theater is very important to the community and brings in business. It gives the advantage of having more things for people to do. It attracts more of the busi ness people, and its just a lot of fun. Its as import ant a music in that in volves participation for the community. FRAN BOHRER LAKELAND Speaking as an artist, community theater is im portant for me to have ex perience working with other artists. For me, I look at it as a learning ex perience. I learn dos and donts. I feel this is the fo rum to professional theater. LAVONTE ROGERS CLERMONT I love seeing people that I know in business partic ipating in something that expresses so much pas sion and pleasure as the ater. All work and no play thats not good. APRIL SHEPPARD CLERMONT Word on theStreet Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 and outdoor footwear and the latest gear for team sports, tness, camping, hunting and shing. The Dicks website is advertising at least a dozen or more jobs at the Clermont store, from sig nage coordinators, sales associates and specialists in various departments, to ofce personnel, sales leaders, maintenance workers, supervisors and general manager. The website touts competitive pay, exible schedules and associate discounts as benets of fered by Dicks. Hitt likes the stores location because it not only lls the gap next to Hob by Lobby in Clermont, but because of its proximity to the National Training Center/LiveWell Fitness Center and the athletes, trainers and coaches who use the facility. People wont have to travel out of south Lake to get what they need be cause its here, Hitt said. DICKS FROM PAGE A1 costs for the registry there. She said city staff created a form and residents have to pay $68.50 to register. Once registered, the record is led with the Lake Coun ty Clerk of Circuit Court so that its accessible on a statewide database and by hospitals and doctors 24 hours a day, she said. The only other expense for residents would be amendments to depen dents, addresses, etc., at a cost of $20 per change. Its getting more and more routine, Ross said. The registry just gives people a little added bit of protection when it comes to a lot of things. Being registered allows you to make certain de cisions having to do with your partner in instanc es such as childcare, chil drens education, parental or other visitation, funeral decisions, notication of family members in case of any accident, visitation in correctional facilities and more. Mascotte City Attorney Virginia Cassady said she would have to look into whether other legal documents would serve the same purpose. Why is it needed any way? Because if you are a durable power of attorney, or a designation of health care surrogate, or if you have a living will or a pre need guardian, what does this do? Cassady asked. Mascotte resident Bar bara Krull said she believes a living will or pow er of attorney would sufce in most matters of legality when it comes to domestic partners. Krull said she didnt want to see the city hire another per son to set up the registry. During the meeting, City Manager Jim Glea son told council mem bers that he had a gay son whose rights were not protected in Marion County. Rosado said he has a gay daughter and having a registry in Mascotte was a matter of pride for him, to some extent. I wanted to show her and to show people in the city is that we accept people for who they are and for what they are, Rosa do said. The registry would not only protect same-sex couples, but also couples who are in long-term re lationships and are not married, Rosado said. In Florida, more than 30 cities and counties have domestic partnership reg istries, including Gainesville, Clearwater, Sarasota, Orlando, Tampa and St. Petersburg, according to Equality Florida. Flor ida ranks third in the nation with more than 9 million people living in communities that recog nize domestic partner ships, the organizations website states. Its unclear when the city council will discuss the issue again. REGISTRY FROM PAGE A1 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comThe petting farm at Red Wing Restaurant, located at 12500 State Road 33 in Groveland, is grow ing but not because the 14 animals that were stolen a couple months ago were returned. According to Patrick Borsey, the restaurants owner, the sole goat left behind when Elvis the fainting goat, his father goat Donald and 11 others, plus two potbellied pigs were stolen had twin kids and a donkey who lives there had a foal. On Wednesday, Borsey said he is still working with Lake County Sheriffs Ofce investigators to re cover the lot, but only one pig has been returned after a picture of him was spotted on Facebook with someone other than his owner kissing him. All 14 animals were taken on the same night, but when the deputy came out a few days ago, he told me he was working on a warrant for the pigs theft only because the kid (who stole the pig) confessed to taking the pig when he got caught with it, Borsey said. According to LCSO spokesman Sgt. James Vachon, deputy Brett Rutzebeck, is preparing the warrant, which will be is sued next week. Vachon said suspects name and other informa tion may be released later. Borsey said he believes that the boy who con fessed to stealing the pig is 17 and a high school drop out, Borsey said the boy is now living out of state with his grandparents. When he does return, I guess therell be a warrant waiting for him, Borsey said. This is the second time in two years ago that Bors ey nds himself appealing to the community for Elviss safe return. Elvis had been stolen once before but was returned soon afterwards, he said. Since then, Elvis has been joined by other goats, pigs and animals that Borsey has either res cued or is fostering or that have been born throughout the months. Unlike the rst incident, Borsey called law enforce ment to report the theft and is offering a $500 re ward for information leading to the safe return of his animals. Im still just hoping that my animals are returned safely, Borsey said. Anyone with information about the missing animals can call the LCSO at 352-343-2101 or Central Florida Crimeline at 1-800-4236-TIPS, where one may be eligible for a reward for information leading to a felony arrest. Borsey has posted pic tures of his missing ani mals on Facebook on the Red Wing restaurant page.LCSO working on arrest warrant for stolen Groveland pig but no sign of goats SUBMITTED PHOTO Along with Elvis, seen here, and his father, Donald, someone has stolen 13 fainting goats and two pot-bellied pigs from a petting zoo at the Red Wing Restaurant in Groveland.

PAGE 3

Wednesday, May 28, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3Benghazi is about politicsYou cant blame the Republicans for trying to have the 16th Congressional hear ing to try to link the attack on Benghazi to the White House after 15 failures to do so. They need something to run on. They had planned on using the failure of the Affordable Care Act as the basis for their 2014 mid-term campaigns. The problem is that the Affordable Care Act is a success. Over 8 million people have signed up. Millions more young people under age 26 are covered under their par ents policies. Governor Rick Scott found out in his town hall meeting in South Florida that senior citizens liked Obamacare. The stock market is at alltime highs, and unemployment is down to 6.3 percent, so they cant run on the failed economy, especially when the big companies who support the Republican Party are making record prots. All the American troops are home from Iraq, and most will be home from Afghanistan by the end of the year. President Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry have been handling numerous international threats without sending in more troops. The U.S. is working with our partners to nd non-military solutions. We tend to forget that while the loss of four brave Americans in Benghazi is tragic, Moammar Gadha was removed after 25 years in power with the loss of four American lives. Regime change in Iraq initiated by President Bush resulted in the deaths of over 4,000 American military. So its our choice. Ill vote for the Obama team. BILL LORSON | LeesburgMoxley should step downThe recent crisis in our school system where ctitious, non-existent classes were created in an effort to meet class-size requirements for the State was not a result of lack of training as a recent report indicated, but rather it was an indication of a lack of effective and capable leadership right at the top. Superintendent Susan Moxley has indicated that she had no knowledge of the situation. Class size requirements have been front and center with the media since the amendment passed and for the superintendent to have no knowledge of this critical reporting is just ludicrous. This is another example of just how out-of-touch she is with what is happening within her organization. Remember a few years ago when a boatload of teachers were sent packing to the RitzCarlton in Orlando for a confer ence. Superintendent Moxley didnt know how many teachers were going, where they were staying, how much the confer ence cost, or who made the decision. This boondoggle costs taxpayers almost $150,000. Now I wonder how much the state will ne the county for the classsize misreporting. I am not expecting much action from the School Board either. They even lauded the superintendent for beginning training at the district level as if that action would correct the situation. And the tenor of the Board appears to be that it just may be too challenging to decide if anyone should be disciplined or discharged. Superintendent Moxley should do the school system a big favor by just resigning. Lake County Schools simply deserves better and more effective leadership. ROGER D. MIRACLE Fruitland Park Obama violated his oathReally Ron Ivey, you are going to refer to the murder of four Americans for which the then Secretary of State Hillary Clinton joined the rest of this administration in trying to blame it on a video when they knew it wasnt the truth? And the day she left ofce, Hillary Clinton refused to give a true account as to what happened on that day. Yet as a U.S. senator from New York, she was among the loudest screaming what did George W. Bush know and when did he know it? She even made a comment at one of the hearings that it didnt matter that those four Americans got killed on her watch. Well, excuse me Ron, but it matters a lot seeing as how this entire administration took an oath to uphold and protect the constitution of this country. It was Hillary Clintons job and her constitutional obligation to keep those people safe. And she could have sent the extra security to that embassy, whether Ambassador Stevens wanted them or not. But then this entire administration has gotten a pass on all the violations of their oaths since they have been in ofce, so whats one more, right? There have been so many impeachable offenses committed by this administration at every level it is pathetic, yet people just continue to turn a blind eye to them. I really wonder how much longer it will be before we see great efforts to vacate the entire Constitution and turn us into a completely socialist nation, because believe me this administration has been leading us down that path since Obama came into ofce GARY A. ZOOK | Fruitland ParkThe announcement by the Lake Coun ty Sheriffs Ofce that it is going to crack down on stores that sell synthetic mari juana, also known as K2, has to be a welcome sound for anyone who is familiar with the scourge of this so-called fake pot. As background, the Lake County Commission banned the family of substances, collectively known as synthetic marijuana, as of May 1. This, after commissioners watched Florida legislators struggle for years to come up with a law that covers all the possible combinations of ingredients back-room chemists use to make the stuff. The problem is, every time the Legislature wrote a law banning a substance, it had to describe in particular the chemical components of the substance it was outlawing. The chemists who made synthetic marijuana simply modied their formulas to confound law enforcement. The County Commission wisely decided not to roll over. It followed the lead of other Florida communities by passing an ordinance outlawing the sale of any synthetic substances designed to mimic the effects of marijuana, cocaine, crystal meth and other illegal drugs. Is it a perfect law? Probably not. Some clever defense attorney will likely argue that any number of household cleaners or other legal chemicals can mimic the effects of drugs and would have to be banned under the law. But it gives Sheriff Gary Borders a tool to begin cracking down on smoke shops, convenience stores and others who sell this poison to kids disguised as potpourri or incense and packaged in colorful cellophane wrappers adorned with such harmless-sounding names as Scooby Snacks. And Borders is running with it. Last week, he announced that deputies would deliver warnings to area stores to clear out their inventory of fake pot or risk arrest. We applaud the County Commission and the sheriff for their aggressive stance on this matter because, frankly, synthetic marijuana is truly nasty stuff. Dont let the name fool you. Fake pot has little in common with its namesake, except that its leafy form resembles pot. Synthetic marijuana is a different drug al together. Health ofcials warn that it can and often does produce psychotic episodes in those who smoke or ingest it. The effects can differ from packet to packet, too, because batches of fake pot are produced in poorly controlled environments, and the variations in chemical concentrations can cause unpredictable results. Good for the County Commission, and good for the sheriff. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . ........................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTOPINION WHATS YOUR OPINION?The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Letters to the Editor 732 W. Montrose St. Clermont, FL 34711By fax to: 352-394-8001EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed.GUEST COLUMNSIf you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@daily commercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OURVIEWIf you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veter-ans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to to www.lakeveterans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANS SOUTH LAKE PRESSYour community newspaper for more than 100 years.732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Florida 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region.All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. YOUROPINIONSLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Bold crackdown by Lake County Sheriff on K2Share the road safelyIts spring again, and youll be seeing more motorcycles on the roads. The Leesburg Partnerships Bike-Fest as an example attracted over 250,000 motorcyclists riding through our area. Every year sever al motorcyclists here in Lake County are seriously injured or killed in accidents with cars, often because drivers of cars dont share the road safely with them. I would like to thank Mayor Harold S. Turville, Jr. for proclaiming May as Motorcycle Safety and Awareness Month for the city of Clermont. I also want to take this opportunity to address both safety and awareness. I would ask all motorists to be aware of motorcycles on our highways. Motorcycles are smaller and harder to see. To my fellow motorcyclists, who are responsible for your own safety, proper operation and handling techniques are your best defense against tragic occurrences on the roads. There are several motorcycle safety courses available locally. These courses are well worth your time and investment. We have many motorcycle riders in this area. The beautiful weather and hills are a riding attraction that may make for more chances of accidents. In addition, motorcycle events are held almost every weekend, with groups of bikers riding together. Motorcycling is a growing hobby. There may be new riders on the roads whose riding skills and reaction times may not be well-developed. Please, lets all work together to make 2014 a safe and enjoy able riding season. HILARY SPENCELEY | Clermont LETTER of the WEEK

PAGE 4

A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 28, 2014 Everybodys saying, No, no, no way you can grow peaches organically, but weve done it, McLean said. In Howey-in-theHills, Tracey Estok, who is a doctor of physical therapy at the Rehabilitation Institute at Florida Hospital Water man, co-owns a u-pick farm called Valley View Vineyards with her husband Fred Estok, who is a prosthetist and area practice manager for Hanger Clinic. Were more farmers when people come here and its kinda nice to just put your day job behind you and talk to people about fruits and vegetables, Tracey said. Their farm has 26 peach trees, Tracey said. They also have grapes, persimmons, gs, pears and chestnuts, according to a provided list of crops. They have some citrus, which they do not really market, Fred said. I think for us and what we do here is more of like a niche farm, Fred said. Peaches are currently available for $1.50 per pound at the u-pick farm, which is open to the public most Saturday mornings when fruit is in season, but will not be open for Memorial Day weekend, according to the couple. They also are able to make appointments for the farm at 352-2434032. They said they expect to have peaches through the end of May. In addition to doing u-pick, they said they also have started selling their fruit at the Howey Markey. Jos Chaparro, an associate professor in the horticultural sciences department and a tree fruit breeder at the University of Florida, said he is the third peach breeder in the breeding program and has been there 10 years, releasing approximately 10 peach varieties in that time. He said the big increase in peaches in Florida has been in the last eight years, because of a promotion they have been aiming at growers. Farmers are also looking for additional crops as greening affects citrus and berry growing sees increased competition. Blueberries are highly protable and so are strawberries, but the amount of competition from overseas is increasing, Chapar ro said Gary England, who is a multi-county extension agent in fruit crops for the UF/IFAS extension in seven counties, said peaches have become more common in Florida in the past 20 years with the development of low-chill peaches. He said chill is temperatures between 32 and 45 degrees that the tree gets before owering. In this area other than very cold winters, thats not gonna work out, England said of peaches that needed more chill hours. He said peach trees can grow without those chill hours, but not ower and bear fruit efciently. He added Florida peaches have very good taste and run smaller, but thinning and the timing of the thinning will lead to bigger peaches. Thats part of the magic of growing peaches. You learn you actually have to thin. Times, theyll set so many fruit, that you remove anywhere from 70 to 90 percent of the fruit to get the remaining fruit to size proper ly, England said. He said area farmers are still learning about growing peaches. Peaches require a lot of hand pruning and hand thinning and any time you have a hand operation that runs your grow costs up considerably, England said. Chaparro also said people are learning as Florida is in the early stages of peach production. This is a blank book, were developing a new crop for Florida, Chaparro said. England added while peaches are a diversication, they will not match or replace citrus in Florida. Chaparro agreed. Its my opinion that peaches will never be as large a crop as citrus, theres no way, Chaparro said. The market window is very dened, were talking about a two and half month market window at the most, maybe three months at the most. England said peach season in Florida nor mally comes between Chiles peach season and the start of Geor gias peach season. We came to the conclusion that there was a niche for Florida, essentially coming in when Chile nishes in February and trying to be in the market before California and Geor gia come into the mar ket in a big way, with large volumes of fruit, Chaparro said. Chaparro said the rst commercial quality subtropical peach was released in the 1970s, which became promi nent around the world, but at the time there was not development in the United States. He dened subtropical as south of Inter state 4. Chaparro said they specialize in non-melt ing esh peaches, which have rm esh that al lows the grower to pick ripe peaches and then ship them while remaining rm, allowing the peach to accumu late more sugar from the tree. He explained traditional peaches have to be picked green to remain on the shelf. Rich Shopes of Scripps Howard News Service reported in No vember 2013 there were 15 acres of peaches in Central Florida and now there are 800 to 1,200 acres in central, south and southwest Flori da. There were 532,000 acres of oranges, grapefruit and tangerines, ac cording to that story. The Packer, an industry news-source, reported in April that Clear Springs Packing of B artow was planning on shipping peaches from a Wildwood grove through mid-June. PEACHES FROM PAGE A1 IF YOU GOSome Lake County farms that produce peaches: %  enValley View Vineyards, 22310 County Road 455 Howey-in-the-Hills %  enCopeland Nursery, 8335 County Road 561 Clermont %  enA&A Country Orchard, 2917 Lake Grifn Road Lady Lake %  enGreen Acres Fernery, Blueberry and Peach Farm, 8635 High St. YalahaPHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIALOne-hundred-year-old Myra Downer picks some peaches while daughter Pat Olson and family friend Stella Webb look on.

PAGE 5

Wednesday, May 28, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5 IN MEMORY DEATH NOTICESRita BarnardRita Barnard, 91, of Leesburg, died Monday, May 19, 2014. PageTheus Funerals & Cre mations. Leesburg.Maitland C. Brasher Jr.Maitland C. Brasher, Jr., 69, of Astatula died on Saturday, May 17, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares, FL.Virginia L. CarrollVirginia L. Carroll, 74, of Bushnell, died Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations. Wildwood.Dawn L. CodewalkerDawn L. Codewalk er, 54, of Tavares, died Sunday, May 17, 2014. Hayes Brothers Funeral Home, EustisGary Leroy EdgarGary Leroy Edgar, 80 of Fruitland Park, died Thursday, May 15, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations, Leesburg.Robert Eugene EmerichRobert Eugene Emer ich, 86, of Leesburg, died Monday, May 19, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg.John Duane FitchJohn Duane Fitch, 79, of Leesburg, died Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Page-Theus Fu nerals & Cremations, Leesburg.Clarence JonesClarence Jones, 95, of Sebring, died Thursday, May 22, 2014. Banks/ Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Donald Paul Jones Sr.Donald Paul Jones, Sr., 86, of Oxford, died on Saturday, May 17, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Donald KelleyDonald Kelley, 78, of Astor, died Saturday, May 17, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Astor.Paul Eugene LandisPaul Eugene Landis, 87, of Lady Lake, died Thursday, May 15, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations, Leesburg.Hattie B. LeeHattie B. Lee, 84, of Cherry Lake, died Fri day, May 16, 2014. Mar vin C. Zanders Funeral Home, Inc.Shirley M. MachlietShirley M. Machliet, 84, of Lake Placid, died Tuesday, May 20, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and CremaRobert Oliver PickensRobert Oliver Pick ens, 88, of Eustis, died Tuesday, May 20, 2014. Harden/Pauli Funeral Home. Eustis.Herbert E. RashHerbert E. Rash, 72, of Wildwood, died Mon day, May 19, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Mavis Preston TapanesMavis Preston Tapanes, 91, of Orlando died Sunday, May 18, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg.Edward TemplinEdward Templin, 73, of Webster, died on Saturday, May 17, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Martha Lu WalkerMartha Lu Walker, 88, of Tavares, died Tuesday, May 20, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares.Evelyn H. WojtachEvelyn H. Woitach, 89, of Umatilla, died Friday, May 16, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatil la. Lots of people navigate the classifieds every day and land some great deals on extraordinary merchandise! To sell your unwanted items in the classifieds, call352-787-0902 or log on to www.dailycommercial.comand place your ad today.

PAGE 6

A6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 28, 2014 CLERMONT BLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSAMILYELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time! IRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONTL Many Other Activities each week Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.org LIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLCHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm SOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary); 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.org ST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am (Rite I) 10:00 am (Rite II) 5:00 pm (Praise & Worship) Mens Prayer Breakfast WOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH GODINCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALE ERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for Children Groveland IRSTBAPTISTCHURCH GROVELAND Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pm MT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! MINNEOLA CONGREGATIONSMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club NEWLPRESBYTERIANCHURCH18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am TLIVINGGOD Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce Rowland MONTVERDE WOODLANDSLUTHERAN15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 am OAKLAND PRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforSouth Lake South LakeGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOMErfn tbt352-394-7121806 W. Minneola Ave.,Clermont,FL Cremation ChoicesDirect Cremation$675Plus Container Ron Becker,Director352-394-8228921 S.US Hwy 27,Minneola,FL HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comThe problem became noticeable quickly to Mount Dora city of cials and Country Club of Mount Dora employ ers. Utility records showed the country club was consuming a lot of wa ter because the timers were set too high. A lot of water was be ing thrown out onto the boulevard, said Bobby Douglas, communi ty association manag er of the Country Club of Mount Dora. It was causing the boulevard islands to be soggy and drenched with water. Michael Quinn, Mount Dora city man ager, said the city had concerns about the amount of water being used. Our concern as a city was not only water con servation but the fact (that) over watering was also impacting the road surface, he said of the issue in 2012. Since then, Douglas and other employees have started conserving water by replacing rain sensors, upgrading spray heads, instituting a cycle-and-soak program and training homeowners to con serve water. With those new mea sures in place, there was a 40 percent decrease in residential water use for the 417 homes with in the Country Club of Mount Dora, Douglas said. In addition, 5.66 mil lion gallons of water has been saved in the bou levard and common ar eas, according to Doug las. As a result of their ef forts, the business was honored with the Florida Communities of Ex cellence Award for Wa ter Conservation. Paul Queen, director of marketing for Sen try Management, wrote in a press release the award is the only comprehensive, independent recognition pro gram for community associations in Florida. We are not getting any return on our in vestment, said Doug las. We are being good stewards by spending extra money by conserving water. We want to be an example for Lake County about what a community should look like to save water. Water conservation has been gaining traction in Lake County. County Commissioner Sean Parks hopes to establish a non-prot association that would become a main source of information about water conservation. This is in conjunction with the South Lake Re gional Water Initiative, consisting of the South Lake Chamber of Com merce, the county and the municipalities of Clermont, Groveland, Minneola Mascotte and Montverde. They are working in conjunction with the Central Florida Water Initiative, to nd a cost effective and alternative water source. Further, there are oth er efforts taking place to better conserve water in the county. Irrigation systems are being put in place in new developments that do not use pota ble water, homeowners are beginning to put in Florida-friendly landscaping includ ing adding native species to their landscapes Water conservation efforts gaining traction in Lake BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Brad Hatcher of the Richart Landscape Company adjusts a sprinkler head to make sure that it only sprays water onto grass at the Country Club of Mount Dora. SEE WATER | A9

PAGE 7

Wednesday, May 28, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A7 CHAMBERAWARDS& NEWS www.southlakechamber-fl.com Lake Minneola High School Senior Marcela Sierra-Arce was named the April 2014 Outstanding Student of the Month. Some of Marcelas achievements are Student Class Representative, Service Committee Co-Chair, Key Club Secretary, FBLA Historian/Vice President, NHS member, Varsity Cross Country Team, 300+ hrs of volunteering, 4.66 GPA in honors classes and an AP scholar w/distinction. She has chosen to attend Johns Hopkins University to study Pre-Med. Marcela is pictured holding the award plaque with her parents to her right and award sponsor Wesley Reed from Ameriprise Financial. Minneola Councilor Kelly Price officially opened the new Minneola Community Garden, located on East Chester St. near Grassy Lake Rd. She was joined for the occasion by fellow Minneola Council members, City staff and South Lake Chamber Ambassadors. If you or your organization are interested in participating in this new community initiative by growing fruits and vegetables organically, please contact Mary Jane Lange at (352) 394-3598 x 2225. The Chambers Howard Stockton Memorial Golf Tournament recently took place on a perfect Chamber of Commerce weather day at Sanctuary Ridge Golf Course in Clermont. The annual tournament is held in honor of former Chamber Executive Director Howard Stockton, with a portion of the proceeds going towards a scholarship named in his memory through the Community Foundation of South Lake. Pictured are the teams from the tournaments main sponsors, Schmid Construction & CenturyLink. Many thanks to them and to all of the sponsors, whose support allows this great event to happen every year! Chamber Ambassadors welcomed Kekes Breakfast Caf owners Lya & Pierre de Fabrique along with their restaurant staff to their new location at 2435 South Highway 27 in Clermont (Clermont Landing Shopping Plaza). Keke's provides outstanding meals with fresh, quality ingredients in a consistent manner that is uncommon to find in a casual breakfast and lunch restaurant. They have a wonderful assortment of menu items which you can also see online at www.kekes.com. James Burks from Senninger Irrigation was awarded the April 2014 Chamber "Gem of the Hills" Award at the April Chamber Breakfast. Since arriving in South Lake County in 1996, James has been very active in the Community particularly in regards to water conservation and water sustainability efforts for our area. He has served on the Board of Directors for the Chamber and for Lake Sumter State College, and currently serves on the Boards for New Beginnings and the Community Foundation of South Lake. James is pictured above with his son Matthew and wife Shauna along with Community Relations Chair Michelle Michnoff from BankFIRST. Trilogy by Shea Homes recently hosted a South Lake Chamber Business-After-Hours at their beautiful facility in Groveland. Over 100 South Lake business & community leaders mingled and networked poolside and were treated to drinks and hors doeuvres compliments of Trilogy. For more information about upcoming Chamber business mixers, please go to www.southlakechamber-fl.com or www.facebook.com/SouthLakeChamberFL. The South Lake Chamber in conjunction with the Clermont Police Department recently offered a Lunch n Learn program dealing with Crime Prevention for Local Businesses. Chief of Police Chuck Broadway was in attendance as Police Captains and other Officers from his staff presented to local business owners and bank managers on several topics such as: how to make their businesses less attractive to criminals, how to spot suspicious activities and what to do in such circumstances, and also how to best work with local law enforcement to make our entire South Lake Community a safer place for business. Complimentary lunch was provided by Troys Cuban Deli. Many thanks to the Clermont Police for this informative session and for all that you do in serving and protecting our area! Chamber Ambassadors, City of Minneola officials, and fellow Chamber members welcomed Dean and Tonya Rowe from 4C Print Shop to their new print shop location at 407 S. Disston Ave. in Minneola. They offer direct-to-garment printing (t-shirts, tanks tops, etc.) as well as other types of sublimation printing products (coffee mugs, license plates). See all of the products that they offer online at www.4cprintshop.com or call the directly at 352-6410472. Nancy Muenzmay, the Director of the Lake Sumter State College Business Incubator Program, recently attended the monthly South Lake Young Professionals Coffee Club and presented to them about the innovative business incubator program in Lake County and how it supports innovation and entrepreneurialism. The incubator program offers affordable office space, specialty training, mentoring, and other educational services. The Coffee Club meets every 2nd Friday of the month from 8AM to 9AM, at Cheesers Palace Caf (707 W. Montrose St. Clermont) and all young professionals are invited to attend. For more information on the SLYP, go to www.facebook.com/SouthLakeYP.

PAGE 8

Wednesday, May 28, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A9 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 The Sumter County Chamber of Commerce Invites You to Join Us for theThe Villages Savannah Center1545 Buena Vista Blvd, The VillagesFor More Information Call the Chamber at (352)793-3099 www.sumterchamber.org Join us for a Great Business Networking Opportunity, Prizes & Fun! to reduce the amount of turf grass, and many are purchasing water-efcient appliances. Water policy experts are warning that con servation in combination with nding alter native water sources must take place in the coming years to avoid the price of water increasing and shortages of a resource that used to be abundant. The price will have to go up because it will be scarce, said Ben Chou, water program analyst for the water program at the Natural Resourc es Defense Council, a national environmental action group, where his work has focused on how local and state governments and the federal government are preparing for the wa ter-related impacts of climate change. There will be more water re strictions put in place if there is not conserva tion. Population growth and climate change are contributing factors to the reduction of water supplies, experts said. There will be demand for 300 million additional gallons of water a day in 2035 in Cen tral Florida. The tradi tional source, the Flori dan Aquifer, can meet a demand of only 50 mil lion additional gallons, according to water experts. In the next 40 years we could have over 150,000 people additionally added to our population, Parks said. We cant bury our head in the sand about it. We need to plan to address how our water needs will be met without de terminately affecting our water resources. Parks said he is look ing to the cities and business communiWATER FROM PAGE A6 ties to help fund the non-prot. We are looking for alternative water solu tions, which include reuse and storm water, but a key to the solution clearly rests with conservation, he said. It is imperative that homeowners no longer use potable water for ir rigation, Parks said. The National Climate Assessment, a govern ment report that sum marizes the effects of climate change now and in the future, states population expansion in the (southeast) region is expected to in crease domestic water demand. Such increases in water demand by the energy, agricultural and urban sectors will increase the competition for water, particularly in situations where envi ronmental water needs conict with other uses, states the report, which was prepared by a team of more than 300 experts and reviewed by federal agencies and a panel of the National Academy of Sciences. While Florida has im proved conservation efforts, those efforts are not as widespread as in California, where the total amount of wa ter has decreased even though the population has grown, Chou said. Effective conservation methods include using recycled water and collecting rain water for ir rigation, and updating building codes in using alternative water sources for things that dont require drinking water, Chou said. Putting in native landscaping has prov en benecial in Califor nia and could be implemented successfully in Florida, Chou said. In areas of Florida there are vegetations that can survive and be successful with natural rainfall and dont have to be irrigated, he said. Deirdre Irwin, Flor ida Water Star coordi nator for the St. Johns River Water Management District, said she is seeing more sustainable landscaping that includes native plants. Irwin agreed with Chou that conser vation is a huge part of the solution for wa ter supply in Florida. Outdoor irrigation is considered the low hanging fruit for wa ter conservation, she said. Historically, we have seen poorly designed and inefcient irrigation systems. One way home owners can save water is to look at an ir rigation timer and see how long it is set to run, she said. A common rule of thumb is 20 minutes for spray zones and 40 minutes for rotors, she said, em phasizing every sys tem is different. Irwin also suggested hiring an irrigation professional to nd ways to lower your outdoor water use. The challenge with instituting conservation within new development is the price, Irwin contend ed. When you build a house, landscapers are the last ones to come on the job and at that point mon ey is running out, she said. Oftentimes people dont have the money to pay the ap propriate fee for bet ter irrigation systems. MILLARD K. IVES |Staff Writermillard.ives@dailycommercial.comThe cat-and-mouse game between ofcials and the sellers of synthet ic marijuana and other fake drugs is apparently over in Lake County. A county ordinance banning syn thetic controlled substances to include any batch of ingredients went into effect May 1. The ban comes after county com missioners watched Florida lawmakers struggle with outlawing the ingredients of synthetic marijuana, only for underground chemists to change their formulas and confound law enforcement. County ofcials announced Fri day they are drafting letters to send to smoke shops, convenience stores and other businesses that typically sell synthetic controlled substances to ensure they are aware of the ordi nance and its requirements. There will be a grace period before Lake County Sheriffs deputies start to visit stores. Our initial approach will be to dis tribute the letters, which will serve to notify the business owners of the new ordinance and its contents, said Lt. John Herrell, sheriffs spokes man. It will then be up to them to immediately get rid of anything prohibited by the ordinance before we visit the stores. The citations are $500 for the rst offense and $1,000 for any repeat vi olation within ve years of a previous offense. Commonly marketed as potpour ri, incense or bath salts and pack aged in colorful cellophane wrappers synthetic marijuana is frequent ly sold in convenience stores and smoke shops. Brands appear to tar get children, using such names as Scooby Snacks, Mad Hatter, Mr. Happy and Joker. Also sold are products marketed as bath salts that can be swallowed, snorted, smoked or injected to ob tain a euphoric effect. The sheriffs ofce has warned that the drug has an adverse effect on children, with health experts adding the use of the substances can cause psychotic episodes. We are behind it (the ordinance) 100 percent, said Sgt. Tom Willis, with the special investigation unit of the sheriffs ofce. We just want to keep this stuff out of the kids hands. On Wednesday, two employees of a Minneola smoke shop, The Abyss, were arrested after sheriffs ofcials raided their business looking for synthetic marijuana. Detectives said they found more than 30 packages of suspected synthetic marijuana, which they conscated along with smoking devices, according to an ar rest afdavit. However, the employees were jailed on a state statute that bans cer tain ingredients of synthetic marijuana. In what has been a see-saw game, lawmakers make ingredients that comprise synthetic marijuana illegal only for manufacturers to change the ingredients. This has made law enforcement investigations lengthy, costly and manpower intensive, the county ordinance states. Brian Sheahan, director of community safety and compliance for Lake County, pointed out the ordinance doesnt ban ingredients, but rather any of the synthetics that mimic or simulate the effects of a controlled substance. Herrell added they expect the costs and lengths of investigations to go down in light of similar ordinances in other jurisdictions having been very effective in pushing the substances completely out of stores.TAVARESCrackdown coming on synthetic drugs

PAGE 9

B1SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 28, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTSSPORTS EDITOR . ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE . .............................. 365-8268 FAX . .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL . ......... sports@dailycommercial.comSPORTSandLEISURE PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Harlem Wizards player Dwayne Swoop Simpson dribbles the ball past Lake Minneola High School boys basketball head coach Freddie Cole during a game on Thursday between the Wizards and a group of Lake County educators in The Nestat Lake Minneola High School in Minneola. MINNEOLA FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comEven a basketball can take funny bounces as many found out Thursday when the Harlem Wizards visited Lake Minneola High School to play a team of Lake County educators. The Wizards, a show basketball team, per formed in the Lake Minneola gym in a game that raised money, through ticket sales, for the schools athletic programs. Among the local educators suited up for the game were Lake Minneola boys basketball coach Freddie Cole and Lake Minneola principal Linda Shepherd-Miller. The local team battled against the Wizards showmanship, which included ashy passing and shooting. In addition, fans were able to take part in a si lent auction for a variety of items. The Harlem Wizards were founded in 1962.The Harlem Wizards Lloyd Loonatik Clinton kisses a woman in the audience after losing a bet.Wizards take on Lake County The Harlem Wizards Skywalker pumps up the crowd FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comMark Oates was a football coach when he arrived at Leesburg High School. Hes leaving as the architect of one of Lake Countys most dominant girls basket ball programs. Oates resigned on Monday after 11 seasons and three state seminal appearances with the Yellow Jackets. He compiled a 224-84 mark at the school and produced countless college signees. Oates said he hung up his whistle to return to his native North Carolina and be closer to his mother and other fam ily members. The importance he has al ways placed on family has a great deal to do with Oates success, many former play ers believe. Almost in spite of his winning percentage, Oates has always been about more than wins and losses. He often wrapped up prac tice by talking about life lessons. Former players said he rarely spoke about basketball during his daily rap ses sions conversations that could take as long as 30 min utes to complete. Instead, he used the time to remind his pupils about life off the basketball court. There is no substitute for hard work, said Baylie Bridg es, who graduated from Lees burg in 2012 as the Yellow Oates bids farewell to LHSLEESBURG PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Leesburg head coach Mark Oates talks to his team during the Lake Minneola-Leesburg girls basketball game on Dec. 3. Staff ReportMorgan Penas devotion to dance and her athletic nature have helped the South Lake High senior earn a scholarship to the Uni versity of Louisiana-La fayette. Once she arrives on campus, Pena will join the Ragin Cajun dance team, which performs at many events, includ ing football and basketball games. Pena said she has been dancing for 15 years and considers the scholarship, which is valued at $9,500, a tes tament to years of hard work and dedication she has given to dance. She was honored for her accomplishment during a signing ceremony on Tuesday in the South Lake auditorium. While at Lousiana-Lafayette, Pena said she intends to ma jor in busi ness and minor in dance.South Lake HS senior set to join Ragin CajunsGROVELAND STEPHANIE TIBBETTS / SOUTH LAKE HIGH SCHOOL Morgan Pena models her Ragin Cajun dance team uniform. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comRoger Price never saw his ball go in the hole. Too bad. Thanks to the undulating greens, Price missed out on seeing his rst hole-in-one, which oc curred Tuesday at The Monarch Golf Club in Royal Highlands. Price recorded his ace on the 124-yard, fourth hole, using a ve wood. It was a high shot that landed on the front edge of the green, Price said. It started to roll to ward the hole, but it disappeared from my view because the hole is in a little dip on the green. None of us even knew the ball was in the hole un til we got up there and I looked in the hole. The 78-year old is a longtime golfer. Price said he plays every Tuesday with the Nifty-Niners, a group that plays nine holes on The Monarch, a par-72 layout which measures 6,018 yards from the tips. Price said he didnt remember his score from Tuesday, mainly because the group changes its format on a weekly basis.Local golfer records ace at Monarch GCSEE OATES | B5

PAGE 10

B2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 28, 2014 Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...Bacchus Vino Etcetera Tenth AnniversaryHistoric downtown Clermont is the home of a friendly wine shop where the staff and customers believe that wine is for your enjoyment, not intimidation. Open since 2004 at the corner of Montrose and Seventh, across from City Hall Park, Bacchus Vino Etcetera is commemorating their tenth anniversary with a month long celebration. When it comes to wine education, one should keep an open mind and an open bottle. Owners Keith and Karen Mullins encourage Bacchus customers to explore and savor the vast array of wines available from around the world. Frequent sampling opportunities include evening gatherings featuring wines from a specific area, grape variety, winery or other theme. Often a wine or two is available for sampling as customers drop by to shop. A popular tasting and shopping event are the Wine Walks held six times yearly which feature wines from Bacchus Vino Etcetera being sampled at various merchants throughout the downtown area. The next Wine Walk will take place May 16th from 6:30 until 9:00 and will feature all Italian Wine. Tickets are currently available at Bacchus Vino Etcetera. Bacchus Vino Etcetera is the home of the By the Light of the Moon Lunar Wine Club. Each time there is a full moon members receive a bottle each of specially selected red and white wines at a preset price. Between full moons, club members are eligible for exclusive offers and wine discounts. The club is an excellent way to learn about and try new wines, and is a great gift idea. Bacchus Vino Etcetera currently stocks over 700 wines from 17 countries and 8 states. Wines from many popular wineries can be found along with those from some lesser-known producers. For customers with specific requests Bacchus Vino Etcetera can special order wines not already in stock (subject to availability). For the beer lover in the family Bacchus carries a selection of imported and domestic craft ales and lagers. In addition to the wines and beers, a variety of wine racks, corkscrews, stemware and wine related gifts are available. Stop by soon and learn what Keiths 42 years of experience in the wine business can add to your wine enjoyment. www.bacchusvinoetc.com 692 West Montrose Suite D (352) 394-9805 LOOKING FOR PARTS? SEE JULIE (352) 394-6111 Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! Solution on page B9

PAGE 11

Wednesday, May 28, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B3 www.southlakepress.comCOMMUNITYProudly servingCLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWSSTAFF WRITER . ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE . .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 E-MAIL . .... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com FROM THE FILES | 27 YEARS AGO 1987Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press LOCAL COUPLES BUY FLORISTBill and Patsy Cockcroft and Cecil and Betty Ann Gray are the new owners of Flower Vendor Florist, having pur chased it from Butch and Patsy Godwin. Located in the South Lake Plaza, employees are Judi Well and Nora Rice.TRUSTEES HONOREDTwo members of the South Lake Memorial Board of Trustees who decided not to seek reappointment were honored for their service. Board chairman Har old Roberts presented plaques to Guy Lillard and Millard Coggshall.SCHOLARSHIPS ANNOUNCEDScholarship winners at Groveland High School were Gina Sharpe, Delta Nu; Ger aldine Gaudio, American Business Women; Billie Jo Rozar, Elks and Kiwanis; Robert Rouse, Rotary; Michael Hooten, Kiwanis and Honor Society. Michele Vitter received a Certicate of Appreciation in Industrial Arts and GHS. Donna Brodus received the All Area Sports Award and Grant-inAid from Chipola Junior College.STUDENTS EARN AWARDSGroveland Middle School students who received science awards for highest average and most improved were Chuck Ellinwood, Ronnie Knight, Jenny Allen, Detra Giddens, Manuela Vallejo, Chris Prevatt, Maria Engle, Sylanda Williams, Jane Sheets, Daniel Story and Ambrose Timmons. GMS students who received awards for most improved and highest average were Teresa Varela, James Knight, Rebecca Patterson, Amy Potter, Luis Feliz, Jeffrey Bradham, Katrina Lowe, Patty Morales, Sharon Franklin, Debbie Shine, Amanda Sode and Daniel Story.NICCOLI TAKES OVER EATERYDennis Niccoli is the new owner of Glorias Country Kitchen (cur rent site of Cheesers Palace in downtown Clermont). He and his wife, Jeanne, moved here from Brockton, Mass., with their four children, Dennis Jr., John, Chris and Jennifer.A weekly column that reprints some of the more interesting news stories that have appeared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press. ANN DUPEEREMEMBER WHEN LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comSeveral Lake County commissioners say they had con cerns about how a controver sial sand mine in south Lake would have affected area landowners, farms and trafc on U.S. Highway 27. CEMEX proposed the 1,196-acre sand mine in the center of the planning area of the Wellness Way Sector Plan before withdrawing its application last week under public pressure. The sector plan would transform 16,000 acres in the southeast corner of the county into a hub for high-tech health care jobs and other in dustries, which would attract people who like to bike, walk and enjoy an active, healthy lifestyle. Wellness Way has been called the largest piece of undeveloped property left in Lake County. The tract runs east of US 27 along the Or ange County border, running south from State Road 50 to U.S. Highway 192. Commissioner Sean Parks said he was pleased CEMEX withdrew its application last week. I have had serious con cerns all along about the compatibility with the Well ness Way Sector Plan, he said. There were some trafc and health issues that needed to be addressed. I am concerned about the effects on water resources and some agricultural resources. Additionally, a health ex pert previously said there are questions about mining and its effects on public health because of the particulates it generates. Crispin Pierce, an associate CLERMONTCemex faced uphill battle with sand mine DAILY COMMERCIAL FILE PHOTOThis is a Cemex sand mining facility in Polk County. The company would like to open another one in south Lake.SEE CEMEX | B4WATER SAFETY DAY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIALA mock drowning victim is loaded onto a helicopter. Six Lake County communities took part in a Water Safety Day on May 24, including mock drowning rescues and CPR demonstrations, but Clermont took the event to new heights with a helicopter rescue crew from South Lake Hospital. Two of the people behind the Clermont event, City Councilman Tim Bates and Fire Chief Carle Bishop, nearly drowned as children. Also part of the event were life jacket ttings, safety video presentations and sign-ups for swimming lessons. Water Safety Day was held at Clermont Arts and Recreation Centers swimming pool. Staff ReportA national homebuilder has purchased about 30 acres of vacant land on Steves Road in Clermont, just east of the Clermont Landing retail complex, for $2.6 million. According to Lake County Property Ap praiser Ofce records, the Homer Nicholas Allen Charitable Trust of Clermont sold the tract to Beazer Homes Corp. The Tennessee-based corporation, which has an ofce in Maitland, has built more than 170,000 homes in 17 states, its website notes. According to the city of Clermont, in its an nexation request, Beazer stated it would like to build 104 single-family homes on the tract overlooking stateowned Wilma Lake to the north in unincorpo rated Lake County. Other recent proper ty transactions include: %  en A small shopping center at 628 Cagan View Road in Clermont has been sold for $3 mil lion. Clermont SB Center LLC sold the 60,187 square-foot complex to Paramount Property In vestments. %  en A former Per kins restaurant at 1660 E. Highway 50 in Cl ermont has been sold for $1.72 million. 1660 E. Highway 50 LLC of Lake County sold the 5,784-square-foot CLERMONTClermont Landing may see 104 homesSEE HOMES | B4 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comThe forecast for the 2014 hurricane season, which begins June 1, is expect ed to be below average, accord ing to Thomas Carpenter, Lake County Emergency Manage ment Division manager. Carpenter explained moder ate El Nino conditions typically make tropical cyclone formation unfavorable. Colorado State University has predicted nine named storms, compared to the average of 12; three hurricanes, compared to the average of six; and one major hurricane, compared to the average of two, Carpenters presentation showed. While the hurricane season is expected to be less busy, Car penter said by no means should people be complacent. Even though we are seeing a below normal season, it only takes one, he said. It was also a below average season in 1992, but it did produce Hurricane Andrew, devastating South Florida, Carpenter said. In 1960, Hurricane Donna was the last to strike Lake County, Carpenter conrmed. While acknowledging the number of storms is projected to be below average, Dan Kottlowski, expert senior meteorologist at AccuWeather.com, said it does not mean hurricanes will not make landfall. All it takes is for one large hurricane to make landfall on a given area and it can totally make what may be an inactive season, a very active one for that particular place, he said. It takes one hurricane or one tropical storm to ruin a persons property or their lives. Hurricane conditions are unfavorable, Kottlowski said, because water temperatures are not as warm as they have been and westerly winds dip down into the tropics, decreasing the number of storms. Kottlowski said AccuWeather is projecting two storms to make landfall this year, but he could not yet predict the type of storm. Carpenter advised there are several ways to prepare for hur ricane season including creating a disaster supply kit, knowing shelter locations, taking First Aid/CPR classes, making sure to have a communications plan to notify family, friends and neighbors, and having a NOAA weather radio. You should have a gallon of water per person per day and nonperishable food items, he said.TAVARESUpcoming hurricane season predicted to be below average HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO Damage is shown at a Citrus Street home in South Venice after weather bands from Tropical Storm Andrea whipped through southwest Florida on June 6, 2013.

PAGE 12

B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 28, 2014 Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) professor and program director for the Environmental Public Health Program at the University of Wis consin-Eau Claire, re cently concluded an air quality study at mining sites, which showed higher levels of PM2.5 the particulates min ing generates, including silica than what was reported by the De partment of Natural Resources. Even in digging it out and loading it in a truck you are generating those small particulates (of silica), he previously said. Without monitoring by an indepen dent agency, we dont have the kind of assur ance we need to protect public health. In a letter dated May 13 to County Attor ney Sandy Minkoff, CE MEXs attorney, Roger Sims, wrote the com pany wished to withdraw its application for conditional use ap proval after reviewing a large number of objection letters received which raise concerns about alleged trafc im pacts from the project. CEMEX prefers to understand such concerns, determine their validity and deter mine whether they should be addressed with proactive measures requiring amendments to the application Sims wrote. More than 100 people recently attended a meeting in Clermont to oppose the plans for the sand mine. Many area residents mainly in the Kings Ridge de velopment were con cerned about trafc, noise and dust from the mine. Some residents talked about charter ing buses to the coun ty commission meeting on Tuesday, where the CEMEX request was slated to be heard be fore it was withdrawn. Commissioner Jimmy Conner also expressed concerns. There were legiti mate concerns raised by adjacent landowners and by people who live in Kings Ridge, he said. But Sara Engdahl, director of communications for CEMEX USA, said in a press release, There are rumors and statistics regarding our project that are false. Asked what specically Engdahl was referring to, she cited the trafc concerns. Per an independent trafc study of the po tential impacts of the mine, the trafc im pacts to Highway 27 would be insignicant, less than 1 percent of the highways capacity, she wrote in an email message, stating there would be 300 round trips by sand trucks made per day. There are 21,500 vehicles that travel in that area daily, according to the countys Depart ment of Public Works, which conrmed the sand mine trucks would make up roughly 1.4 percent of the high ways trafc. Even so, county ofcials have said they have concerns about dust being kicked up by the trucks on Schoeld Road, a clay road in the vicinity of the proposed sand mine. A clay road is a dirt road, and if you put 300 trucks on it, it is going to create dust, said Commissioner Tim Sullivan. I think one of the ways to mitigate that is to pave that road. Like Parks, Sullivan said he had concerns about the sand mines impact on agricultural resources. Agriculture is a huge part of the Lake County economy, he said. The sand mine needs to t the character of the community. Commissioner Leslie Campione credited CEMEX for recognizing that issues being raised were genuine and they were of concern to the county commission. Asked if she believed the county had valid concerns regarding the issues raised, Eng dahl wrote: The project has received all oth er permits required to construct and oper ate other than commis sion approval, as well as from the Planning and Zoning Board. But at the same time, Engdahl also wrote, CEMEX believes, however, that taking time to work through these concerns regarding our application is in the best inter est of both Lake County and CEMEX. CEMEX FROM PAGE B3 restaurant most recently a short-lived pizza place to Boon naris Investments of Orlando. %  en The Dollar Gen eral Store at 24150 State Road 40 in As tor has been sold for $1.6 million. Lake Eustis Net Leasing, in care of United South ern Bank in Eustis, sold the property to PTLEA Inc. of Whitestone, NY. The 9,100 square-foot store, recently listed for $1.69 million, was built in 2011 and has an existing 10-year lease, online real estate listings show. %  en The Tuffy Auto Services store at 10742 U.S. Highway 441 in Leesburg has been sold for $1.22 mil lion. The seller was City Enterprises of Or lando and the buy er was GAL Leasing of Baton Rouge. The 4,500-square-foot building was built in 2006. %  en The Super 8 hotel at 1392 North Blvd. in Leesburg has been sold for for $1.2 million. Paras Lodging Inc. of Al exandria, La., sold the property to North Hospitality Group. of Leesburg. The hotel was built in 1989. HOMES FROM PAGE B3 HOWEY-IN-THE-HILLS School board member accused of lying LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comA school board member run ning for re-election has been accused of lying to the public about her voting record on cour tesy busing at a recent candidate forum at the Mission Inn Resort & Club in Howey-in-the-Hills, according to a student safety advocacy group circulating the vid eo of the forum. At the forum on May 8, the moderator asked Kyleen Fischer, school board member for Dis trict 5, whether she supported the cuts in courtesy busing, ac cording to the video. In response, Fischer said: Thank you very much, the question means a lot to me, because I did not vote for the end of courtesy busing. However, district records show the vote to end courtesy busing at a June 24, 2013 County School Board meeting was unanimous. Because of continued shortfalls in revenue, courtesy busing for students within two miles of their home school was eliminated dis trict wide, according to school ofcials. By law, the state of Florida pro vides transportation funding only for traditional education students that live two or more miles from the school, unless it is deemed a dangerous walking condition. The school district continues to also provide courtesy busing for a small number of stu dents at Groveland Elementary and Lake Minneola High School with nancial assistance from the city of Groveland and the county. While stating they do not conduct interviews and try to keep a focus on the facts and the issues of the case, a member from the Lake County Safe Schools Initiative said they feel the video summa ry and raw footage speak for themselves. We want integrity and accountability in the people we elect, and a school board who cares about the safety and well-being of the students that attend the school, the member stated in an email. The school board knows these routes con tain hazardous walking conditions and worked with Representative Metz to introduce some reasonable revisions to these standards. But because the state will not reimburse for doing the right thing, they have only rein stated buses to a small fraction of students who need them. Despite several attempts to reach Fischer via email and phone, she did not return calls for comment. MILLARD IVES | Staff Writermillard.ives@dailycommercial.comPolice ordered a Mc Donalds employee out of his vehicle at gun point after he was accused of taking mon ey from the Groveland restaurant and eeing ofcers who were trying to arrest him. Rajiv Dale Ceasar, 26, was charged with grand theft, fraud and resist ing arrest. He remained in the Lake County Jail Wednesday afternoon in lieu of $6,500 bail. According to an ar rest afdavit, Groveland police responded to the West Broad Street restaurant just before 8 / p.m. Tuesday. A district manager had accused Ceasar of not ringing up food sales and pocketing the customers money, then submitting false receipts to his supervisors at the end of his shift. The manager said she had the thefts, totaling more than $900, on sur veillance video. Ceasar promised to pay the money back, but store ofcials called the police and the suspect allegedly started walking away when of cers arrived. The afdavit adds that Ceasar was ordered to stop but got into his vehicle and drove off. Police gave a brief pur suit that ended back in the McDonalds park ing lot, where ofcers ordered Ceasar out the vehicle at gunpoint and arrested him.McDonalds worker accused of pocketing salesGROVELAND

PAGE 13

Wednesday, May 28, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B5Jackets leading scor er under Oates and a key player in Leesburgs 2011 run to the state seminals. That was always a big point with him. He doesnt believe in taking short cuts. Part of his job as a coach and a teacher was to get us ready to succeed in life and everything he did was done with that goal in mind. Coach Oates wanted to win basketball games when we played, but he was just as concerned may be even more concerned with making sure we had the tools to win in the game of life. Said Pearl Johnson, a former All-State point guard for the Yellow Jackets, He has been a father gure in my life since high school not only on the basket ball court, but as much off the court. He never gave up on me and al ways led me in the right direction of success. I love him as if he was my dad. Johnson might be Oates most-decorated player for multiple reasons. Not only did she lead the Yellow Jackets to back-to-back state seminal appearances (2007, 2008), but she also put her playing ca reer on hold in college and enlisted in the U.S. Army. She eventually served in Iraq. Ive always been proud of Pearl, Oates said. Oates stressed that his mufns and rock heads the nicknames he gave his play ers were the most important people to him, outside of his im mediate family. Partly because of his devotion to his players, Oates didnt marry until last summer, when he star tled many by announc ing on Facebook that he had gotten married. I knew he had a girlfriend, but I never saw her until they got mar ried, Johnson said. It wasnt uncommon for Oates to make evening drives to support a former player competing at the college level. When the Florida Col lege Systems Activi ties Association held its state tournament at the College of Central Flor ida in Ocala, Oates was in attendance to watch four of his former play ers Johnson, Joharra Russell, and Bridges from St. Petersburg Col lege, and Ashley Perry from Northwest Florida State. These girls are my family, Oates said. For a long time, they were the only family I had in Florida. Theyve always meant a lot to me. They did everything I asked of them and my end of the deal was to do ev erything I could to sup port them. Leesburg enjoyed tremendous success on the basketball court during Oates ten ure. The Yellow Jackets reached the Final Four state seminals in 2007, 2008 and 2011. No other Lake County girls program advanced to the state semi nals while Oates was in Leesburg. Still, just reaching the biggest stage for girls basketball in Flor ida wasnt enough for Oates. He said the in ability to deliver a state championship continues to gnaw at him and likley will for the rest of his coaching career. We had teams capable of winning state championships,Oates said. In 2008, I thought we were the best team in the state. For whatever reason, we just never got over the hump when we got to Lakeland (site of the Florida High School Athletic As sociation state champi onships). While the lack of a state title is a blemish in Oates eyes, the lime light he helped to shine on girls basketball in Lake County is some thing for which many coaches believe he should be credited. He put Lake County girls basketball on the map, said Wal ter Banks, former girls coach at South Lake. Its as simple as that. Nobody from around the state really paid at tention to girls basket ball in Lake County un til Mark Oates took over at Leesburg. He turned Leesburg into a powerhouse and did it the right way by working his kids hard and making sure his teams were ready to play. The state of Florida, Lake County and the city of Leesburg are los ing an incredible educator and coach. Banks said he doesnt envy Oates replace ment. He said that per son would be the high school equivalent of stepping in for a legendary and highly success ful coach at the college or professional level. Oates successor would get one benet, however, Banks said. Mark is leaving the program in great shape, Banks said. Nobody will ll his shoes, but theyll have a sol id foundation to build on. I just hope whoever they hire is not a parttime coach looking to supplement his or her salary. It would be a shame to see that program go down because whoever was hired didnt share Marks work ethic or drive. The task of replacing Oates will be a priority for Leesburg Principal Bill Miller. Miller said he will lis ten to any suggestions Oates might have for a new coach and he hopes to make an of cial announcement sometime in June. Regardless, whoever takes Oates seat on the Yellow Jackets bench should share many of the traits as his or her predecessor, Miller said. Mark was much more than a father g ure and a coach to his student-athletes, Miller said. He was always a positive presence, not only to student-athletes on his team, but to oth er students and even members of our faculty. The expectations and demands that he placed on his student-athletes resulted in so much success and not all of it was on the court. He helped so many girls earn scholarships and enjoy a great deal of success beyond high school. Our school and our community is los ing much more than a girls basketball coach. Said Bridges, Im very happy that he gets to go back home, but the Yellow Jacket Nation is los ing a great man. Place your ad here and reach the Local Market!VERY AFFORDABLE!Call today 352-394-2183 PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Leesburgs Keshawn Johnson pats Oates head as they talk on the sideline during the Leesburg-New Smyrna class 6A-Region 2 quarternal game on Feb. 6 at Leesburg High School. OATESFROM PAGE B1

PAGE 14

B6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 28, 2014 Classified IndexLegal Notices....................0001 Notices............................1000 At Your Service................9000 Employment....................2000 Pets/Animals....................6865 Merchandise....................6000 Real Estate/For RENT......3000 Real Estate/For SALE........4000 Recreation........................7000 Transportation..................8000 Cancellations for ads running Wednesday must be made by 4pm Monday.ADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since The Daily Commercial will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error call the classified department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error.TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde

PAGE 15

Wednesday, May 28, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B7

PAGE 16

B8 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 28, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance rt t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital SOMETHING SPECIAL IS COMING... At Orchard Heights Clermonts newest retirement community, we believe PATIENCE, LOYALTY, UNDERSTANDING and HARD WORK are the core components of rewarding lives and careers. If this interests you, come join our team! Orchard Heights, a gracious retirement community for seniors in Clermont, is seeking the folowing positions:Orchard Heights is an Equal Opportunity EmployerAttn:Paul and Martha Johnson Holiday Inn Express near PNC Bank 1810 South Hwy. 27 Clermont, FL 34711 Fax:352-241-9685 Or email:orchardheights.hiring@hawthornret.com passenger endorsements) Shop Operator

PAGE 17

Wednesday, May 28, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B9 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr Crossword puzzle is on page B2. Thank you for reading the local paper!

PAGE 18

B10 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 28, 2014 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 725344767 1318315974 921FREE SPACE5372 216424863 529395268ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N IB O G BINGO B I N G O SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Donna McConnell WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! N 39 FREE N 42 N 31 N 34



PAGE 1

AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com T he venerable peach, long associated with Geor gia, is beginning to nd a place in Central Florida groves as farmers look for a crop more hardy and weather-resistant than citrus. Steve Copeland, who owns Copeland Nurs ery in Clermont, said Monday his u-pick sea son has been going on for about a week and a half and will probably continue into the second week in June, depending on heat and how fast the fruit matures. Copeland said his 50-acre farm has a nursery, citrus, and about four to ve acres of u-pick peaches. He added he has had the farm for 29 years in June and this is the third year with peaches. He said the farm started doing u-pick peaches because every bodys doing blueberries and because citrus greening and cit rus canker has decimated cit rus crops. So, instead of planting citrus trees back we planted peach trees, Copeland said. Benny McLean, a production manager at Uncle Matts Organ ic, also said greening was a mo tivation for him to start growing peaches. We wanted to hedge our bets and get some experience with peaches, McLean said. He said they sell their peaches to Whole Foods and Publix, adding they have been harvesting for about six weeks and will be done at the end of the week. Uncle Matts has approximately 10 acres of peaches in the Clermont area. The farm got its trees from the University of Florida, with their oldest batches being there for ve years in July or August. They also have 1,500 acres of citrus that they own or lease in Lake, Polk, and Highlands counties, McLean said. We were experimenting to see if we could grow peaches organically in the ridge in the sandy soils, McLean said. He said there is a big learning curve to peaches and their background is in citrus. Weve learned a lot. Its all been trial and error. Are you looking to get an edge on your competition? Physiologically, small changes in your metabolism can lead to enhanced phyiscal performance. Experience DNA testing to determine which foods/fuels are ideal for your body. Call today to schedule your evaluation. 352-989-5901 www.marholinmedicalinstitute.com SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | B3 SPORTS: Harlem Wizards take on Lake County WEDNESDAY, MAY 28, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWSTAND INSIDE CLASSIFIED B6 CROSSWORDS B2 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN B3 SPORTS B1 VOICES A3 DEATH NOTICES A5 SO UTH LAKE PRE SS V OLUME 99, NO. 22 3 SECTIO N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reserved www. southlakepress.com PRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID Florida peaches can be smaller but have a very high brix level (the measurement of sugar), meaning they are sweeter than California and Georgia peaches. PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Peaches beginning to find a place in Central Florida ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Dicks Sporting Goods, one of the larg est sporting goods re tailers in the world, will open its newest store on June 27 in Clermont. I think any grow ing community, or any community of stature, needs to have a good sporting goods store and weve got a big one now, said Jim Hitt, Cl ermonts economic de velopment director. Although Hibbit Sports has served Cler mont well, Dicks will increase the availability of merchandise for ath letes and sports enthu siasts locally, Hitt said. Between whats here already, sportswise, and with Dicks opening now, I think weve got it covered, he said of the new store at 1325 Sandy Grove Ave. Personally, Im excit ed because Dicks Sport ing Goods is great, Hitt said. Theyve got a lot more than just sport ing goods. Theyve got a whole bunch of differ ent things and they car ry big things like kayaks and canoes and stuff. Schmidt Construc tion is building the 40,218-square-foot store. According to a press release from the com panys headquarters in Pittsburgh, the store will host three days of grand opening festiv ities with a variety of giveaways and special appearances. Dicks is a fortune 500 company that has more than 550 stores nationwide. Market ing spokesperson Cas sie Eberle said the new store will feature Nike, Adidas and Under Ar mour shops, athletic CLERMONT Dicks Sporting Goods to open soon ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Dicks Sporting Goods is opening a new store in Clermont on June 27 at 1325 Sandy Grove Ave. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Mascotte City Council mem bers agreed last week to con tinue talking about establishing the second domestic partner ship registry in Lake County. Mayor Tony Rosado casually brought up the matter to see if there was any opposition on the board or from residents. No one on council expressed any personal opposition to the registry, but some questioned the need. My concern or comment or question about this is that they say its most useful for hospi tal visits, and medical records, and funeral arrangements and such, but at this time, we have none of those facilities in our city, Councilman Steven Shef eld said. So, what benet are we going to have for our residents or non-residents on this and how much is it going to cost the city to set this up? Do we have a medical facility on its way? I just dont know. The city of Tavares established Lake Countys rst registry 15 months ago. Anyone, not just Tavares residents, can be regis tered as domestic partners on that registry and council mem ber Brenda Brasher questioned the need for Mascotte to have a separate registry. If its available, I would pre fer, instead of the city taking on more of a burden, just letting people know they can just regis ter in Tavares, she said. By the end of the meeting, staff was directed to determine the specics regarding benets and costs for which Mascotte would be responsible. Tavares spokesperson Joyce Ross said there were no set-up MASCOTTE City Council to discuss partnership registry SEE DICKS | A2 SEE REGISTRY | A2 SEE PEACHES | A4

PAGE 2

A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 28, 2014 CLERMONT Police seek publics help identifying thieves The Lake County Sheriffs Ofce is looking for help in identifying two men who allegedly stole cash from a Hess gas station on Tuesday in Clermont. The business is located at 17431 U.S. Highway 192. According to Sgt. James Vachon, sheriffs spokesman, two men entered the gas station at 5:33 p.m. and one walked up to the cash register with an energy drink. While the cash regis ter was open, he grabbed a handful of cash. Both men then ran out of the store and ed the area in a dark blue, early model four-door Toyota either a Corolla or Camry. Vachon said the Sheriffs Ofce be lieves the men also committed a rob bery in Osceola County. Anyone with information on the suspects identities can call the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce at 352-343-2101 or CRIMELINE at 1-800-423-TIPS. CLERMONT June is Caribbean Heritage Month The third annual Taste of the Caribbean and Jerk Festival, pre sented by the Caribbean American Association of Lake County (CAALC), is from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Sat., June 14, at Waterfront Park in Clermont. Admission is $5 for adults, and $2 for children 10 and under. Parking is free. Events include a Jerk cook-off com petition, Caribbean cuisine, live reg gae music, gospel and steel bands, dancers, games, Kids Zone, bounce house, arts and crafts, and more. For information, vendor participa tion, email to: caalc@live.com, go to www.caalc.org, or call 352-978-0813. GROVELAND First Baptist Church welcomes new pastor First Baptist Church of Groveland, 137 East Cherry St., will welcome its new Pastor, Billy Stephens, at the 10:50 a.m. service on June 1. The church will host a a light breakfast reception at 9 a.m. prior to Sunday school. Stephens comes from First Baptist Church of High Springs, where he served for eight years. Prior to that, he served in the United States Navy. Stephens earned his master of arts in religion at Liberty Theological Seminary. For information, call 352-429-2651, or email fbcgroveland@embarqmail. CLERMONT Docs kick off tour for Mens Health Week In recognition of National Mens Health Week June 9-15, two doctors from the PUR Clinic at South Lake Hospital will hit the road to spread the word about mens health issues for the rst-ever Drive for Mens Health, a 24hour road trip from Florida to New York. Dr. Jamin Brahmbhatt and Dr. Sijo Prekattil will drive 1,100 miles in an all-electric TESLA, stopping only to recharge the vehicle and hosting mens health events along the way. Funds raised will benet genetic re search for chronic male conditions and educational scholarships. The duo will depart at 8 a.m. June 12 at South Lake Hospital, 1900 Don Wickham Dr., in Clermont. For information, go to www. Drive4MensHealth.com or call 407-833-9201. CLERMONT D-Day remembrance set at Historic Village The turning point of World War II will be remembered at 11 a.m. June 7, with a D-Day commemoration cere mony at Clermonts Historic Village, 490 West Ave. After the ceremony, hot dogs, apple pie and sodas will be available For information, call 352-593-8496 or go to www.ClermontVillage.org. Area Briefs What south Lake residents are saying about ... THEATER What does community theater mean to you? I enjoy it. My wife and I have gone to it a couple of times. Its a nice outing for adults. We enjoy the closeness, the attachment to the characters, but we do oppose the language at times and have almost walked out. BOB PERRY CLERMONT Community theater is very important to the community and brings in business. It gives the ad vantage of having more things for people to do. It attracts more of the busi ness people, and its just a lot of fun. Its as import ant a music in that in volves participation for the community. FRAN BOHRER LAKELAND Speaking as an artist, community theater is im portant for me to have ex perience working with other artists. For me, I look at it as a learning ex perience. I learn dos and donts. I feel this is the fo rum to professional the ater. LAVONTE ROGERS CLERMONT I love seeing people that I know in business partic ipating in something that expresses so much pas sion and pleasure as the ater. All work and no play thats not good. APRIL SHEPPARD CLERMONT Word on the Street Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 and outdoor footwear and the latest gear for team sports, tness, camping, hunting and shing. The Dicks website is advertising at least a doz en or more jobs at the Cl ermont store, from sig nage coordinators, sales associates and specialists in various departments, to ofce personnel, sales leaders, maintenance workers, supervisors and general manager. The website touts com petitive pay, exible schedules and associate discounts as benets of fered by Dicks. Hitt likes the stores lo cation because it not only lls the gap next to Hob by Lobby in Clermont, but because of its proximity to the National Training Center/LiveWell Fitness Center and the athletes, trainers and coaches who use the facility. People wont have to travel out of south Lake to get what they need be cause its here, Hitt said. DICKS FROM PAGE A1 costs for the registry there. She said city staff created a form and residents have to pay $68.50 to register. Once registered, the record is led with the Lake Coun ty Clerk of Circuit Court so that its accessible on a statewide database and by hospitals and doctors 24 hours a day, she said. The only other expense for residents would be amendments to depen dents, addresses, etc., at a cost of $20 per change. Its getting more and more routine, Ross said. The registry just gives people a little added bit of protection when it comes to a lot of things. Being registered allows you to make certain de cisions having to do with your partner in instanc es such as childcare, chil drens education, parental or other visitation, funeral decisions, notication of family members in case of any accident, visitation in correctional facilities and more. Mascotte City Attorney Virginia Cassady said she would have to look into whether other legal doc uments would serve the same purpose. Why is it needed any way? Because if you are a durable power of attorney, or a designation of health care surrogate, or if you have a living will or a pre need guardian, what does this do? Cassady asked. Mascotte resident Bar bara Krull said she be lieves a living will or pow er of attorney would sufce in most matters of legality when it comes to domestic partners. Krull said she didnt want to see the city hire another per son to set up the registry. During the meeting, City Manager Jim Glea son told council mem bers that he had a gay son whose rights were not protected in Marion County. Rosado said he has a gay daughter and having a registry in Mascotte was a matter of pride for him, to some extent. I wanted to show her and to show people in the city is that we accept peo ple for who they are and for what they are, Rosa do said. The registry would not only protect same-sex couples, but also couples who are in long-term re lationships and are not married, Rosado said. In Florida, more than 30 cities and counties have domestic partnership reg istries, including Gaines ville, Clearwater, Saraso ta, Orlando, Tampa and St. Petersburg, according to Equality Florida. Flor ida ranks third in the na tion with more than 9 million people living in communities that recog nize domestic partner ships, the organizations website states. Its unclear when the city council will discuss the issue again. REGISTRY FROM PAGE A1 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com The petting farm at Red Wing Restaurant, locat ed at 12500 State Road 33 in Groveland, is grow ing but not because the 14 animals that were stolen a couple months ago were returned. According to Patrick Borsey, the restaurants owner, the sole goat left behind when Elvis the fainting goat, his father goat Donald and 11 oth ers, plus two potbellied pigs were stolen had twin kids and a donkey who lives there had a foal. On Wednesday, Bors ey said he is still working with Lake County Sheriffs Ofce investigators to re cover the lot, but only one pig has been returned af ter a picture of him was spotted on Facebook with someone other than his owner kissing him. All 14 animals were tak en on the same night, but when the deputy came out a few days ago, he told me he was working on a warrant for the pigs theft only because the kid (who stole the pig) confessed to taking the pig when he got caught with it, Bors ey said. According to LCSO spokesman Sgt. James Vachon, deputy Brett Ru tzebeck, is preparing the warrant, which will be is sued next week. Vachon said suspects name and other informa tion may be released later. Borsey said he believes that the boy who con fessed to stealing the pig is 17 and a high school drop out, Borsey said the boy is now living out of state with his grandparents. When he does return, I guess therell be a warrant waiting for him, Borsey said. This is the second time in two years ago that Bors ey nds himself appealing to the community for El viss safe return. Elvis had been stolen once before but was returned soon af terwards, he said. Since then, Elvis has been joined by other goats, pigs and animals that Borsey has either res cued or is fostering or that have been born through out the months. Unlike the rst incident, Borsey called law enforce ment to report the theft and is offering a $500 re ward for information leading to the safe return of his animals. Im still just hoping that my animals are returned safely, Borsey said. Anyone with informa tion about the missing animals can call the LCSO at 352-343-2101 or Cen tral Florida Crimeline at 1-800-4236-TIPS, where one may be eligible for a reward for information leading to a felony arrest. Borsey has posted pic tures of his missing ani mals on Facebook on the Red Wing restaurant page. LCSO working on arrest warrant for stolen Groveland pig but no sign of goats SUBMITTED PHOTO Along with Elvis, seen here, and his father, Donald, someone has stolen 13 fainting goats and two pot-bellied pigs from a petting zoo at the Red Wing Restaurant in Groveland.

PAGE 3

Wednesday, May 28, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3 Benghazi is about politics You cant blame the Republicans for trying to have the 16th Congressional hear ing to try to link the attack on Benghazi to the White House after 15 failures to do so. They need something to run on. They had planned on using the failure of the Affordable Care Act as the basis for their 2014 mid-term campaigns. The prob lem is that the Affordable Care Act is a success. Over 8 million people have signed up. Millions more young people under age 26 are covered under their par ents policies. Governor Rick Scott found out in his town hall meeting in South Florida that senior citizens liked Obamacare. The stock market is at alltime highs, and unemployment is down to 6.3 percent, so they cant run on the failed econ omy, especially when the big companies who support the Republican Party are making re cord prots. All the American troops are home from Iraq, and most will be home from Afghanistan by the end of the year. President Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry have been handling numerous international threats without sending in more troops. The U.S. is working with our partners to nd non-military solutions. We tend to forget that while the loss of four brave Americans in Benghazi is tragic, Moammar Gadha was removed after 25 years in power with the loss of four American lives. Regime change in Iraq initiated by President Bush resulted in the deaths of over 4,000 American military. So its our choice. Ill vote for the Obama team. BILL LORSON | Leesburg Moxley should step down The recent crisis in our school system where ctitious, non-ex istent classes were created in an effort to meet class-size require ments for the State was not a re sult of lack of training as a re cent report indicated, but rather it was an indication of a lack of effective and capable leadership right at the top. Superintendent Susan Moxley has indicated that she had no knowledge of the situation. Class size requirements have been front and center with the media since the amendment passed and for the superinten dent to have no knowledge of this critical reporting is just lu dicrous. This is another exam ple of just how out-of-touch she is with what is happening within her organization. Remember a few years ago when a boatload of teachers were sent packing to the RitzCarlton in Orlando for a confer ence. Superintendent Moxley didnt know how many teach ers were going, where they were staying, how much the confer ence cost, or who made the de cision. This boondoggle costs taxpayers almost $150,000. Now I wonder how much the state will ne the county for the classsize misreporting. I am not expecting much ac tion from the School Board ei ther. They even lauded the su perintendent for beginning training at the district level as if that action would correct the situation. And the tenor of the Board appears to be that it just may be too challenging to de cide if anyone should be disci plined or discharged. Superintendent Moxley should do the school system a big favor by just resigning. Lake County Schools simply de serves better and more effective leadership. ROGER D. MIRACLE Fruitland Park Obama violated his oath Really Ron Ivey, you are going to refer to the murder of four Americans for which the then Secretary of State Hillary Clinton joined the rest of this adminis tration in trying to blame it on a video when they knew it wasnt the truth? And the day she left ofce, Hillary Clinton refused to give a true account as to what hap pened on that day. Yet as a U.S. senator from New York, she was among the loudest screaming what did George W. Bush know and when did he know it? She even made a comment at one of the hearings that it didnt matter that those four Americans got killed on her watch. Well, excuse me Ron, but it matters a lot seeing as how this entire administration took an oath to uphold and protect the constitution of this country. It was Hillary Clintons job and her constitutional obligation to keep those people safe. And she could have sent the extra se curity to that embassy, wheth er Ambassador Stevens wanted them or not. But then this entire admin istration has gotten a pass on all the violations of their oaths since they have been in ofce, so whats one more, right? There have been so many impeach able offenses committed by this administration at every level it is pathetic, yet people just contin ue to turn a blind eye to them. I really wonder how much longer it will be before we see great efforts to vacate the entire Constitution and turn us into a completely socialist nation, be cause believe me this admin istration has been leading us down that path since Obama came into ofce GARY A. ZOOK | Fruitland Park T he announcement by the Lake Coun ty Sheriffs Ofce that it is going to crack down on stores that sell synthetic mari juana, also known as K2, has to be a welcome sound for anyone who is familiar with the scourge of this so-called fake pot. As background, the Lake County Commission banned the family of substances, collective ly known as synthetic marijuana, as of May 1. This, after commissioners watched Florida leg islators struggle for years to come up with a law that covers all the possible combinations of in gredients back-room chemists use to make the stuff. The problem is, every time the Legislature wrote a law banning a substance, it had to de scribe in particular the chemical components of the substance it was outlawing. The chemists who made synthetic marijuana simply mod ied their formulas to confound law enforce ment. The County Commission wisely decided not to roll over. It followed the lead of other Flori da communities by passing an ordinance out lawing the sale of any synthetic substances designed to mimic the effects of marijuana, co caine, crystal meth and other illegal drugs. Is it a perfect law? Probably not. Some clever defense attorney will likely argue that any num ber of household cleaners or other legal chem icals can mimic the effects of drugs and would have to be banned under the law. But it gives Sheriff Gary Borders a tool to be gin cracking down on smoke shops, conve nience stores and others who sell this poi son to kids disguised as potpourri or incense and packaged in colorful cellophane wrappers adorned with such harmless-sounding names as Scooby Snacks. And Borders is running with it. Last week, he announced that deputies would deliver warn ings to area stores to clear out their inventory of fake pot or risk arrest. We applaud the County Commission and the sheriff for their aggressive stance on this mat ter because, frankly, synthetic marijuana is tru ly nasty stuff. Dont let the name fool you. Fake pot has little in common with its namesake, ex cept that its leafy form resembles pot. Synthetic marijuana is a different drug al together. Health ofcials warn that it can and often does produce psychotic episodes in those who smoke or ingest it. The effects can differ from packet to packet, too, because batches of fake pot are produced in poorly con trolled environments, and the variations in chemical concentrations can cause unpredict able results. Good for the County Commission, and good for the sheriff. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD ........................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST O PINION WHATS YOUR OPINION? The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Letters to the Editor 732 W. Montrose St. Clermont, FL 34711 By fax to: 352-394-8001 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. GUEST COLUMNS If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@daily commercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OUR VIEW If you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veter ans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to to www.lake vet erans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANS S OUTH LAKE PRESS Your community newspaper for more than 100 years. 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001 The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Florida 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region. All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. YOUR OPINIONS LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Bold crackdown by Lake County Sheriff on K2 Share the road safely Its spring again, and youll be seeing more motorcycles on the roads. The Leesburg Partnerships Bike-Fest as an example attracted over 250,000 motorcyclists riding through our area. Every year sever al motorcyclists here in Lake County are seriously injured or killed in accidents with cars, often because drivers of cars dont share the road safely with them. I would like to thank Mayor Harold S. Turville, Jr. for pro claiming May as Motorcycle Safety and Awareness Month for the city of Clermont. I also want to take this opportuni ty to address both safety and awareness. I would ask all mo torists to be aware of mo torcycles on our highways. Motorcycles are smaller and harder to see. To my fellow motorcyclists, who are responsible for your own safety, proper operation and handling techniques are your best defense against trag ic occurrences on the roads. There are several motorcycle safety courses available locally. These courses are well worth your time and investment. We have many motorcycle riders in this area. The beauti ful weather and hills are a rid ing attraction that may make for more chances of accidents. In addition, motorcycle events are held almost every week end, with groups of bikers rid ing together. Motorcycling is a growing hobby. There may be new riders on the roads whose riding skills and reaction times may not be well-developed. Please, lets all work together to make 2014 a safe and enjoy able riding season. HILARY SPENCELEY | Clermont LETTER of the WEEK

PAGE 4

A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 28, 2014 Everybodys saying, No, no, no way you can grow peaches organi cally, but weve done it, McLean said. In Howey-in-theHills, Tracey Estok, who is a doctor of physi cal therapy at the Re habilitation Institute at Florida Hospital Water man, co-owns a u-pick farm called Valley View Vineyards with her hus band Fred Estok, who is a prosthetist and area practice manager for Hanger Clinic. Were more farm ers when people come here and its kinda nice to just put your day job behind you and talk to people about fruits and vegetables, Trac ey said. Their farm has 26 peach trees, Tracey said. They also have grapes, persimmons, gs, pears and chest nuts, according to a provided list of crops. They have some citrus, which they do not real ly market, Fred said. I think for us and what we do here is more of like a niche farm, Fred said. Peaches are current ly available for $1.50 per pound at the u-pick farm, which is open to the public most Sat urday mornings when fruit is in season, but will not be open for Me morial Day weekend, according to the couple. They also are able to make appointments for the farm at 352-2434032. They said they ex pect to have peaches through the end of May. In addition to doing u-pick, they said they also have started selling their fruit at the Howey Markey. Jos Chaparro, an as sociate professor in the horticultural sciences department and a tree fruit breeder at the Uni versity of Florida, said he is the third peach breeder in the breeding program and has been there 10 years, releasing approximately 10 peach varieties in that time. He said the big in crease in peaches in Florida has been in the last eight years, be cause of a promotion they have been aiming at growers. Farmers are also looking for addi tional crops as greening affects citrus and berry growing sees increased competition. Blueberries are high ly protable and so are strawberries, but the amount of competi tion from overseas is increasing, Chapar ro said Gary England, who is a multi-county exten sion agent in fruit crops for the UF/IFAS exten sion in seven counties, said peaches have be come more common in Florida in the past 20 years with the de velopment of low-chill peaches. He said chill is temperatures between 32 and 45 degrees that the tree gets before owering. In this area oth er than very cold win ters, thats not gonna work out, England said of peaches that needed more chill hours. He said peach trees can grow without those chill hours, but not ower and bear fruit ef ciently. He added Florida peaches have very good taste and run small er, but thinning and the timing of the thin ning will lead to bigger peaches. Thats part of the magic of growing peaches. You learn you actually have to thin. Times, theyll set so many fruit, that you re move anywhere from 70 to 90 percent of the fruit to get the remain ing fruit to size proper ly, England said. He said area farmers are still learning about growing peaches. Peaches require a lot of hand pruning and hand thinning and any time you have a hand operation that runs your grow costs up con siderably, England said. Chaparro also said people are learning as Florida is in the early stages of peach produc tion. This is a blank book, were developing a new crop for Florida, Chap arro said. England added while peaches are a diversi cation, they will not match or replace citrus in Florida. Chaparro agreed. Its my opinion that peaches will never be as large a crop as citrus, theres no way, Chap arro said. The market window is very dened, were talking about a two and half month market window at the most, maybe three months at the most. England said peach season in Florida nor mally comes between Chiles peach season and the start of Geor gias peach season. We came to the con clusion that there was a niche for Florida, es sentially coming in when Chile nishes in February and trying to be in the market before California and Geor gia come into the mar ket in a big way, with large volumes of fruit, Chaparro said. Chaparro said the rst commercial quality subtropical peach was released in the 1970s, which became promi nent around the world, but at the time there was not development in the United States. He dened subtrop ical as south of Inter state 4. Chaparro said they specialize in non-melt ing esh peaches, which have rm esh that al lows the grower to pick ripe peaches and then ship them while re maining rm, allowing the peach to accumu late more sugar from the tree. He explained traditional peaches have to be picked green to remain on the shelf. Rich Shopes of Scripps Howard News Service reported in No vember 2013 there were 15 acres of peaches in Central Florida and now there are 800 to 1,200 acres in central, south and southwest Flori da. There were 532,000 acres of oranges, grape fruit and tangerines, ac cording to that story. The Packer an in dustry news-source, reported in April that Clear Springs Packing of B artow was planning on shipping peaches from a Wildwood grove through mid-June. PEACHES FROM PAGE A1 IF YOU GO Some Lake County farms that produce peaches: Valley View Vineyards, 22310 County Road 455 Howey-in-the-Hills Copeland Nursery, 8335 County Road 561 Cler mont A&A Country Orchard, 2917 Lake Grifn Road Lady Lake Green Acres Fernery, Blueberry and Peach Farm, 8635 High St. Yalaha PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL One-hundred-year-old Myra Downer picks some peaches while daughter Pat Olson and family friend Stella Webb look on.

PAGE 5

Wednesday, May 28, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5 IN MEMORY DEATH NOTICES Rita Barnard Rita Barnard, 91, of Leesburg, died Mon day, May 19, 2014. PageTheus Funerals & Cre mations. Leesburg. Maitland C. Brasher Jr. Maitland C. Brasher, Jr., 69, of Astatula died on Saturday, May 17, 2014. Steverson, Ham lin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tava res, FL. Virginia L. Carroll Virginia L. Carroll, 74, of Bushnell, died Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations. Wildwood. Dawn L. Codewalker Dawn L. Codewalk er, 54, of Tavares, died Sunday, May 17, 2014. Hayes Brothers Funeral Home, Eustis Gary Leroy Edgar Gary Leroy Edgar, 80 of Fruitland Park, died Thursday, May 15, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations, Leesburg. Robert Eugene Emerich Robert Eugene Emer ich, 86, of Leesburg, died Monday, May 19, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg. John Duane Fitch John Duane Fitch, 79, of Leesburg, died Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Page-Theus Fu nerals & Cremations, Leesburg. Clarence Jones Clarence Jones, 95, of Sebring, died Thursday, May 22, 2014. Banks/ Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wild wood. Donald Paul Jones Sr. Donald Paul Jones, Sr., 86, of Oxford, died on Saturday, May 17, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Donald Kelley Donald Kelley, 78, of Astor, died Saturday, May 17, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Astor. Paul Eugene Landis Paul Eugene Landis, 87, of Lady Lake, died Thursday, May 15, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations, Leesburg. Hattie B. Lee Hattie B. Lee, 84, of Cherry Lake, died Fri day, May 16, 2014. Mar vin C. Zanders Funeral Home, Inc. Shirley M. Machliet Shirley M. Machliet, 84, of Lake Placid, died Tuesday, May 20, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Crema Robert Oliver Pickens Robert Oliver Pick ens, 88, of Eustis, died Tuesday, May 20, 2014. Harden/Pauli Funeral Home. Eustis. Herbert E. Rash Herbert E. Rash, 72, of Wildwood, died Mon day, May 19, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Mavis Preston Tapanes Mavis Preston Tap anes, 91, of Orlando died Sunday, May 18, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg. Edward Templin Edward Templin, 73, of Webster, died on Sat urday, May 17, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Martha Lu Walker Martha Lu Walk er, 88, of Tavares, died Tuesday, May 20, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares. Evelyn H. Wojtach Evelyn H. Woitach, 89, of Umatilla, died Friday, May 16, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatil la. Lots of people navigate the classifieds every day and land some great deals on extraordinary merchandise! To sell your unwanted items in the classifieds, call352-787-0902 or log on to www.dailycommercial.comand place your ad today.

PAGE 6

A6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 28, 2014 CLERMONT BLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSAMILYELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time! IRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONTL Many Other Activities each week Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.org LIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLCHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm SOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary); 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.org ST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am (Rite I) 10:00 am (Rite II) 5:00 pm (Praise & Worship) Mens Prayer Breakfast WOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH GODINCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALE ERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for Children Groveland IRSTBAPTISTCHURCH GROVELAND Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pm MT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! MINNEOLA CONGREGATIONSMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club NEWLPRESBYTERIANCHURCH18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am TLIVINGGOD Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce Rowland MONTVERDE WOODLANDSLUTHERAN15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 am OAKLAND PRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforSouth Lake South LakeGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOMErfn tbt352-394-7121806 W. Minneola Ave.,Clermont,FL Cremation ChoicesDirect Cremation$675Plus Container Ron Becker,Director352-394-8228921 S.US Hwy 27,Minneola,FL HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com The problem became noticeable quickly to Mount Dora city of cials and Country Club of Mount Dora employ ers. Utility records showed the country club was consuming a lot of wa ter because the timers were set too high. A lot of water was be ing thrown out onto the boulevard, said Bob by Douglas, communi ty association manag er of the Country Club of Mount Dora. It was causing the boulevard islands to be soggy and drenched with water. Michael Quinn, Mount Dora city man ager, said the city had concerns about the amount of water being used. Our concern as a city was not only water con servation but the fact (that) over watering was also impacting the road surface, he said of the issue in 2012. Since then, Douglas and other employees have started conserv ing water by replacing rain sensors, upgrad ing spray heads, insti tuting a cycle-and-soak program and training homeowners to con serve water. With those new mea sures in place, there was a 40 percent decrease in residential water use for the 417 homes with in the Country Club of Mount Dora, Douglas said. In addition, 5.66 mil lion gallons of water has been saved in the bou levard and common ar eas, according to Doug las. As a result of their ef forts, the business was honored with the Flori da Communities of Ex cellence Award for Wa ter Conservation. Paul Queen, direc tor of marketing for Sen try Management, wrote in a press release the award is the only com prehensive, indepen dent recognition pro gram for community associations in Florida. We are not getting any return on our in vestment, said Doug las. We are being good stewards by spending extra money by con serving water. We want to be an example for Lake County about what a community should look like to save water. Water conservation has been gaining trac tion in Lake County. County Commission er Sean Parks hopes to establish a non-prot association that would become a main source of information about water conservation. This is in conjunction with the South Lake Re gional Water Initiative, consisting of the South Lake Chamber of Com merce, the county and the municipalities of Clermont, Groveland, Minneola Mascotte and Montverde. They are working in conjunction with the Central Florida Water Initiative, to nd a cost effective and alternative water source. Further, there are oth er efforts taking place to better conserve water in the county. Irrigation systems are being put in place in new developments that do not use pota ble water, homeown ers are beginning to put in Florida-friend ly landscaping includ ing adding native spe cies to their landscapes Water conservation efforts gaining traction in Lake BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Brad Hatcher of the Richart Landscape Company adjusts a sprinkler head to make sure that it only sprays water onto grass at the Country Club of Mount Dora. SEE WATER | A9

PAGE 7

Wednesday, May 28, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A7 CHAMBERAWARDS& NEWS www.southlakechamber-fl.com Lake Minneola High School Senior Marcela Sierra-Arce was named the April 2014 Outstanding Student of the Month. Some of Marcelas achievements are Student Class Representative, Service Committee Co-Chair, Key Club Secretary, FBLA Historian/Vice President, NHS member, Varsity Cross Country Team, 300+ hrs of volunteering, 4.66 GPA in honors classes and an AP scholar w/distinction. She has chosen to attend Johns Hopkins University to study Pre-Med. Marcela is pictured holding the award plaque with her parents to her right and award sponsor Wesley Reed from Ameriprise Financial. Minneola Councilor Kelly Price officially opened the new Minneola Community Garden, located on East Chester St. near Grassy Lake Rd. She was joined for the occasion by fellow Minneola Council members, City staff and South Lake Chamber Ambassadors. If you or your organization are interested in participating in this new community initiative by growing fruits and vegetables organically, please contact Mary Jane Lange at (352) 394-3598 x 2225. The Chambers Howard Stockton Memorial Golf Tournament recently took place on a perfect Chamber of Commerce weather day at Sanctuary Ridge Golf Course in Clermont. The annual tournament is held in honor of former Chamber Executive Director Howard Stockton, with a portion of the proceeds going towards a scholarship named in his memory through the Community Foundation of South Lake. Pictured are the teams from the tournaments main sponsors, Schmid Construction & CenturyLink. Many thanks to them and to all of the sponsors, whose support allows this great event to happen every year! Chamber Ambassadors welcomed Kekes Breakfast Caf owners Lya & Pierre de Fabrique along with their restaurant staff to their new location at 2435 South Highway 27 in Clermont (Clermont Landing Shopping Plaza). Keke's provides outstanding meals with fresh, quality ingredients in a consistent manner that is uncommon to find in a casual breakfast and lunch restaurant. They have a wonderful assortment of menu items which you can also see online at www.kekes.com. James Burks from Senninger Irrigation was awarded the April 2014 Chamber "Gem of the Hills" Award at the April Chamber Breakfast. Since arriving in South Lake County in 1996, James has been very active in the Community particularly in regards to water conservation and water sustainability efforts for our area. He has served on the Board of Directors for the Chamber and for Lake Sumter State College, and currently serves on the Boards for New Beginnings and the Community Foundation of South Lake. James is pictured above with his son Matthew and wife Shauna along with Community Relations Chair Michelle Michnoff from BankFIRST. Trilogy by Shea Homes recently hosted a South Lake Chamber Business-After-Hours at their beautiful facility in Groveland. Over 100 South Lake business & community leaders mingled and networked poolside and were treated to drinks and hors doeuvres compliments of Trilogy. For more information about upcoming Chamber business mixers, please go to www.southlakechamber-fl.com or www.facebook.com/SouthLakeChamberFL. The South Lake Chamber in conjunction with the Clermont Police Department recently offered a Lunch n Learn program dealing with Crime Prevention for Local Businesses. Chief of Police Chuck Broadway was in attendance as Police Captains and other Officers from his staff presented to local business owners and bank managers on several topics such as: how to make their businesses less attractive to criminals, how to spot suspicious activities and what to do in such circumstances, and also how to best work with local law enforcement to make our entire South Lake Community a safer place for business. Complimentary lunch was provided by Troys Cuban Deli. Many thanks to the Clermont Police for this informative session and for all that you do in serving and protecting our area! Chamber Ambassadors, City of Minneola officials, and fellow Chamber members welcomed Dean and Tonya Rowe from 4C Print Shop to their new print shop location at 407 S. Disston Ave. in Minneola. They offer direct-to-garment printing (t-shirts, tanks tops, etc.) as well as other types of sublimation printing products (coffee mugs, license plates). See all of the products that they offer online at www.4cprintshop.com or call the directly at 352-6410472. Nancy Muenzmay, the Director of the Lake Sumter State College Business Incubator Program, recently attended the monthly South Lake Young Professionals Coffee Club and presented to them about the innovative business incubator program in Lake County and how it supports innovation and entrepreneurialism. The incubator program offers affordable office space, specialty training, mentoring, and other educational services. The Coffee Club meets every 2nd Friday of the month from 8AM to 9AM, at Cheesers Palace Caf (707 W. Montrose St. Clermont) and all young professionals are invited to attend. For more information on the SLYP, go to www.facebook.com/SouthLakeYP.

PAGE 8

Wednesday, May 28, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A9 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 The Sumter County Chamber of Commerce Invites You to Join Us for theThe Villages Savannah Center1545 Buena Vista Blvd, The VillagesFor More Information Call the Chamber at (352)793-3099 www.sumterchamber.org Join us for a Great Business Networking Opportunity, Prizes & Fun! to reduce the amount of turf grass, and many are purchasing water-ef cient appliances. Water policy experts are warning that con servation in combina tion with nding alter native water sources must take place in the coming years to avoid the price of water in creasing and shortages of a resource that used to be abundant. The price will have to go up because it will be scarce, said Ben Chou, water program analyst for the water program at the Natural Resourc es Defense Council, a national environmen tal action group, where his work has focused on how local and state governments and the federal government are preparing for the wa ter-related impacts of climate change. There will be more water re strictions put in place if there is not conserva tion. Population growth and climate change are contributing factors to the reduction of water supplies, experts said. There will be demand for 300 million addi tional gallons of water a day in 2035 in Cen tral Florida. The tradi tional source, the Flori dan Aquifer, can meet a demand of only 50 mil lion additional gallons, according to water ex perts. In the next 40 years we could have over 150,000 people addi tionally added to our population, Parks said. We cant bury our head in the sand about it. We need to plan to address how our water needs will be met without de terminately affecting our water resources. Parks said he is look ing to the cities and business communi WATER FROM PAGE A6 ties to help fund the non-prot. We are looking for alternative water solu tions, which include re use and storm water, but a key to the solution clearly rests with con servation, he said. It is imperative that homeowners no longer use potable water for ir rigation, Parks said. The National Climate Assessment, a govern ment report that sum marizes the effects of climate change now and in the future, states population expansion in the (southeast) re gion is expected to in crease domestic water demand. Such increases in water demand by the energy, agricultural and urban sectors will in crease the competition for water, particularly in situations where envi ronmental water needs conict with other uses, states the report, which was prepared by a team of more than 300 experts and reviewed by federal agencies and a panel of the National Academy of Sciences. While Florida has im proved conservation ef forts, those efforts are not as widespread as in California, where the total amount of wa ter has decreased even though the population has grown, Chou said. Effective conservation methods include using recycled water and col lecting rain water for ir rigation, and updating building codes in using alternative water sourc es for things that dont require drinking water, Chou said. Putting in native landscaping has prov en benecial in Califor nia and could be imple mented successfully in Florida, Chou said. In areas of Florida there are vegetations that can survive and be successful with natural rainfall and dont have to be irri gated, he said. Deirdre Irwin, Flor ida Water Star coordi nator for the St. Johns River Water Manage ment District, said she is seeing more sustainable landscap ing that includes na tive plants. Irwin agreed with Chou that conser vation is a huge part of the solution for wa ter supply in Florida. Outdoor irrigation is considered the low hanging fruit for wa ter conservation, she said. Historically, we have seen poorly de signed and inefcient irrigation systems. One way home owners can save wa ter is to look at an ir rigation timer and see how long it is set to run, she said. A common rule of thumb is 20 minutes for spray zones and 40 minutes for ro tors, she said, em phasizing every sys tem is different. Irwin also suggest ed hiring an irrigation professional to nd ways to lower your outdoor water use. The challenge with instituting conserva tion within new de velopment is the price, Irwin contend ed. When you build a house, landscapers are the last ones to come on the job and at that point mon ey is running out, she said. Oftentimes people dont have the money to pay the ap propriate fee for bet ter irrigation sys tems. MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millard.ives@dailycommercial.com The cat-and-mouse game between ofcials and the sellers of synthet ic marijuana and other fake drugs is apparently over in Lake County. A county ordinance banning syn thetic controlled substances to include any batch of ingredients went into effect May 1. The ban comes after county com missioners watched Florida lawmak ers struggle with outlawing the ingre dients of synthetic marijuana, only for underground chemists to change their formulas and confound law en forcement. County ofcials announced Fri day they are drafting letters to send to smoke shops, convenience stores and other businesses that typically sell synthetic controlled substances to ensure they are aware of the ordi nance and its requirements. There will be a grace period before Lake County Sheriffs deputies start to visit stores. Our initial approach will be to dis tribute the letters, which will serve to notify the business owners of the new ordinance and its contents, said Lt. John Herrell, sheriffs spokes man. It will then be up to them to immediately get rid of anything pro hibited by the ordinance before we visit the stores. The citations are $500 for the rst offense and $1,000 for any repeat vi olation within ve years of a previous offense. Commonly marketed as potpour ri, incense or bath salts and pack aged in colorful cellophane wrappers synthetic marijuana is frequent ly sold in convenience stores and smoke shops. Brands appear to tar get children, using such names as Scooby Snacks, Mad Hatter, Mr. Hap py and Joker. Also sold are products marketed as bath salts that can be swallowed, snorted, smoked or injected to ob tain a euphoric effect. The sheriffs ofce has warned that the drug has an adverse effect on children, with health experts adding the use of the substances can cause psychotic episodes. We are behind it (the ordinance) 100 percent, said Sgt. Tom Willis, with the special investigation unit of the sheriffs ofce. We just want to keep this stuff out of the kids hands. On Wednesday, two employees of a Minneola smoke shop, The Abyss, were arrested after sheriffs ofcials raided their business looking for syn thetic marijuana. Detectives said they found more than 30 packag es of suspected synthetic marijuana, which they conscated along with smoking devices, according to an ar rest afdavit. However, the employees were jailed on a state statute that bans cer tain ingredients of synthetic marijua na. In what has been a see-saw game, lawmakers make ingredients that comprise synthetic marijuana illegal only for manufacturers to change the ingredients. This has made law enforcement investigations lengthy, costly and manpower intensive, the county ordinance states. Brian Sheahan, director of commu nity safety and compliance for Lake County, pointed out the ordinance doesnt ban ingredients, but rather any of the synthetics that mimic or simulate the effects of a controlled substance. Herrell added they expect the costs and lengths of investigations to go down in light of similar ordinances in other jurisdictions having been very effective in pushing the substances completely out of stores. TAVARES Crackdown coming on synthetic drugs

PAGE 9

B1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 28, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTS SPORTS EDITOR ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE .............................. 365-8268 FAX .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL ......... sports@dailycommercial.com S PORTS and LEISURE PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Harlem Wizards player Dwayne Swoop Simpson dribbles the ball past Lake Minneola High School boys basketball head coach Freddie Cole during a game on Thursday between the Wizards and a group of Lake County educators in The Nestat Lake Minneola High School in Minneola. MINNEOLA FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Even a basketball can take funny bounces as many found out Thurs day when the Harlem Wizards visited Lake Minneola High School to play a team of Lake County educators. The Wizards, a show basketball team, per formed in the Lake Minneola gym in a game that raised money, through ticket sales, for the schools athletic pro grams. Among the local edu cators suited up for the game were Lake Minne ola boys basketball coach Freddie Cole and Lake Minneola principal Linda Shepherd-Mill er. The local team bat tled against the Wizards showmanship, which in cluded ashy passing and shooting. In addition, fans were able to take part in a si lent auction for a variety of items. The Harlem Wizards were founded in 1962. The Harlem Wizards Lloyd Loonatik Clinton kisses a woman in the audience after losing a bet. Wizards take on Lake County The Harlem Wizards Skywalker pumps up the crowd FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Mark Oates was a football coach when he arrived at Leesburg High School. Hes leaving as the archi tect of one of Lake Countys most dominant girls basket ball programs. Oates resigned on Monday after 11 seasons and three state seminal appearanc es with the Yellow Jackets. He compiled a 224-84 mark at the school and p roduced countless college signees. Oates said he hung up his whistle to return to his native North Carolina and be closer to his mother and other fam ily members. The importance he has al ways placed on family has a great deal to do with Oates success, many former play ers believe. Almost in spite of his winning percentage, Oates has always been about more than wins and losses. He often wrapped up prac tice by talking about life les sons. Former players said he rarely spoke about basket ball during his daily rap ses sions conversations that could take as long as 30 min utes to complete. Instead, he used the time to remind his pupils about life off the basketball court. There is no substitute for hard work, said Baylie Bridg es, who graduated from Lees burg in 2012 as the Yellow Oates bids farewell to LHS LEESBURG PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Leesburg head coach Mark Oates talks to his team during the Lake Minneola-Leesburg girls basketball game on Dec. 3. Staff Report Morgan Penas devo tion to dance and her athletic nature have helped the South Lake High senior earn a scholarship to the Uni versity of Louisiana-La fayette. Once she arrives on campus, Pena will join the Ragin Cajun dance team, which performs at many events, includ ing football and basket ball games. Pena said she has been dancing for 15 years and considers the scholarship, which is valued at $9,500, a tes tament to years of hard work and dedication she has given to dance. She was honored for her accomplishment during a signing cere mony on Tuesday in the South Lake auditorium. While at Lousi ana-Lafayette, Pena said she intends to ma jor in busi ness and mi nor in dance. South Lake HS senior set to join Ragin Cajuns GROVELAND STEPHANIE TIBBETTS / SOUTH LAKE HIGH SCHOOL Morgan Pena models her Ragin Cajun dance team uniform. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Roger Price never saw his ball go in the hole. Too bad. Thanks to the undulating greens, Price missed out on seeing his rst hole-in-one, which oc curred Tuesday at The Monarch Golf Club in Royal Highlands. Price recorded his ace on the 124-yard, fourth hole, using a ve wood. It was a high shot that landed on the front edge of the green, Price said. It started to roll to ward the hole, but it disappeared from my view because the hole is in a little dip on the green. None of us even knew the ball was in the hole un til we got up there and I looked in the hole. The 78-year old is a longtime golfer. Price said he plays every Tuesday with the Nifty-Niners, a group that plays nine holes on The Monarch, a par-72 layout which measures 6,018 yards from the tips. Price said he didnt remember his score from Tuesday, mainly because the group changes its format on a weekly basis. Local golfer records ace at Monarch GC SEE OATES | B5

PAGE 10

B2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 28, 2014 Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...Bacchus Vino Etcetera Tenth AnniversaryHistoric downtown Clermont is the home of a friendly wine shop where the staff and customers believe that wine is for your enjoyment, not intimidation. Open since 2004 at the corner of Montrose and Seventh, across from City Hall Park, Bacchus Vino Etcetera is commemorating their tenth anniversary with a month long celebration. When it comes to wine education, one should keep an open mind and an open bottle. Owners Keith and Karen Mullins encourage Bacchus customers to explore and savor the vast array of wines available from around the world. Frequent sampling opportunities include evening gatherings featuring wines from a specific area, grape variety, winery or other theme. Often a wine or two is available for sampling as customers drop by to shop. A popular tasting and shopping event are the Wine Walks held six times yearly which feature wines from Bacchus Vino Etcetera being sampled at various merchants throughout the downtown area. The next Wine Walk will take place May 16th from 6:30 until 9:00 and will feature all Italian Wine. Tickets are currently available at Bacchus Vino Etcetera. Bacchus Vino Etcetera is the home of the By the Light of the Moon Lunar Wine Club. Each time there is a full moon members receive a bottle each of specially selected red and white wines at a preset price. Between full moons, club members are eligible for exclusive offers and wine discounts. The club is an excellent way to learn about and try new wines, and is a great gift idea. Bacchus Vino Etcetera currently stocks over 700 wines from 17 countries and 8 states. Wines from many popular wineries can be found along with those from some lesser-known producers. For customers with specific requests Bacchus Vino Etcetera can special order wines not already in stock (subject to availability). For the beer lover in the family Bacchus carries a selection of imported and domestic craft ales and lagers. In addition to the wines and beers, a variety of wine racks, corkscrews, stemware and wine related gifts are available. Stop by soon and learn what Keiths 42 years of experience in the wine business can add to your wine enjoyment. www.bacchusvinoetc.com 692 West Montrose Suite D (352) 394-9805 LOOKING FOR PARTS? SEE JULIE (352) 394-6111 Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! Solution on page B9

PAGE 11

Wednesday, May 28, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B3 www.southlakepress.com C OMMUNITY Proudly serving CLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWS STAFF WRITER ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 E-MAIL .... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com FROM THE FILES | 27 YEARS AGO 1987 Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press LOCAL COUPLES BUY FLORIST Bill and Patsy Cock croft and Cecil and Bet ty Ann Gray are the new owners of Flower Ven dor Florist, having pur chased it from Butch and Patsy Godwin. Lo cated in the South Lake Plaza, employees are Judi Well and Nora Rice. TRUSTEES HONORED Two members of the South Lake Memorial Board of Trustees who decided not to seek re appointment were hon ored for their service. Board chairman Har old Roberts presented plaques to Guy Lillard and Millard Coggshall. SCHOLARSHIPS ANNOUNCED Scholarship win ners at Groveland High School were Gina Sharpe, Delta Nu; Ger aldine Gaudio, Ameri can Business Women; Billie Jo Rozar, Elks and Kiwanis; Robert Rouse, Rotary; Michael Hoo ten, Kiwanis and Honor Society. Michele Vitter received a Certicate of Appreciation in In dustrial Arts and GHS. Donna Brodus received the All Area Sports Award and Grant-inAid from Chipola Junior College. STUDENTS EARN AWARDS Groveland Middle School students who received science awards for highest average and most improved were Chuck Ellinwood, Ron nie Knight, Jenny Allen, Detra Giddens, Manue la Vallejo, Chris Prevatt, Maria Engle, Sylanda Williams, Jane Sheets, Daniel Story and Am brose Timmons. GMS students who received awards for most improved and highest average were Teresa Varela, James Knight, Rebecca Pat terson, Amy Potter, Luis Feliz, Jeffrey Brad ham, Katrina Lowe, Patty Morales, Sharon Franklin, Debbie Shine, Amanda Sode and Dan iel Story. NICCOLI TAKES OVER EATERY Dennis Niccoli is the new owner of Glorias Country Kitchen (cur rent site of Cheesers Palace in downtown Cl ermont). He and his wife, Jeanne, moved here from Brockton, Mass., with their four children, Dennis Jr., John, Chris and Jenni fer. A weekly column that reprints some of the more interesting news stories that have appeared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press. ANN DUPEE REMEMBER WHEN LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com Several Lake County com missioners say they had con cerns about how a controver sial sand mine in south Lake would have affected area landowners, farms and trafc on U.S. Highway 27. CEMEX proposed the 1,196-acre sand mine in the center of the planning area of the Wellness Way Sector Plan before withdrawing its appli cation last week under public pressure. The sector plan would transform 16,000 acres in the southea st corner of the coun ty into a hub for high-tech health care jobs and other in dustries, which would attract people who like to bike, walk and enjoy an active, healthy lifestyle. Wellness Way has been called the largest piece of un developed property left in Lake County. The tract runs east of US 27 along the Or ange County border, running south from State Road 50 to U.S. Highway 192. Commissioner Sean Parks said he was pleased CEMEX withdrew its application last week. I have had serious con cerns all along about the compatibility with the Well ness Way Sector Plan, he said. There were some traf c and health issues that needed to be addressed. I am concerned about the effects on water resources and some agricultural resources. Additionally, a health ex pert previously said there are questions about mining and its effects on public health because of the particulates it generates. Crispin Pierce, an associate CLERMONT Cemex faced uphill battle with sand mine DAILY COMMERCIAL FILE PHOTO This is a Cemex sand mining facility in Polk County. The company would like to open another one in south Lake. SEE CEMEX | B4 WATER SAFETY DAY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL A mock drowning victim is loaded onto a helicopter. Six Lake County communities took part in a Water Safety Day on May 24, including mock drowning rescues and CPR demonstrations, but Clermont took the event to new heights with a helicopter rescue crew from South Lake Hospital. Two of the people behind the Clermont event, City Councilman Tim Bates and Fire Chief Carle Bishop, nearly drowned as children. Also part of the event were life jacket ttings, safety video presentations and sign-ups for swimming lessons. Water Safety Day was held at Clermont Arts and Recreation Centers swimming pool. Staff Report A national home builder has purchased about 30 acres of vacant land on Steves Road in Clermont, just east of the Clermont Landing retail complex, for $2.6 million. According to Lake County Property Ap praiser Ofce records, the Homer Nicholas Al len Charitable Trust of Clermont sold the tract to Beazer Homes Corp. The Tennessee-based corporation, which has an ofce in Maitland, has built more than 170,000 homes in 17 states, its website notes. According to the city of Clermont, in its an nexation request, Beaz er stated it would like to build 104 single-fam ily homes on the tract overlooking stateowned Wilma Lake to the north in unincorpo rated Lake County. Other recent proper ty transactions include: A small shopping center at 628 Cagan View Road in Clermont has been sold for $3 mil lion. Clermont SB Cen ter LLC sold the 60,187 square-foot complex to Paramount Property In vestments. A former Per kins restaurant at 1660 E. Highway 50 in Cl ermont has been sold for $1.72 million. 1660 E. Highway 50 LLC of Lake County sold the 5,784-square-foot CLERMONT Clermont Landing may see 104 homes SEE HOMES | B4 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com T he forecast for the 2014 hurricane season, which begins June 1, is expect ed to be below average, accord ing to Thomas Carpenter, Lake County Emergency Manage ment Division manager. Carpenter explained moder ate El Nino conditions typical ly make tropical cyclone forma tion unfavorable. Colorado State University has predicted nine named storms, compared to the average of 12; three hurricanes, compared to the average of six; and one ma jor hurricane, compared to the average of two, Carpenters pre sentation showed. While the hurricane season is expected to be less busy, Car penter said by no means should people be complacent. Even though we are seeing a below normal season, it only takes one, he said. It was also a below average season in 1992, but it did pro duce Hurricane Andrew, devas tating South Florida, Carpen ter said. In 1960, Hurricane Don na was the last to strike Lake County, Carpenter conrmed. While acknowledging the number of storms is projected to be below average, Dan Kot tlowski, expert senior meteorol ogist at AccuWeather.com, said it does not mean hurricanes will not make landfall. All it takes is for one large hurricane to make landfall on a given area and it can totally make what may be an inactive season, a very active one for that particular place, he said. It takes one hurricane or one tropical storm to ruin a persons property or their lives. Hurricane conditions are un favorable, Kottlowski said, be cause water temperatures are not as warm as they have been and westerly winds dip down into the tropics, decreasing the number of storms. Kottlowski said AccuWeath er is projecting two storms to make landfall this year, but he could not yet predict the type of storm. Carpenter advised there are several ways to prepare for hur ricane season including creat ing a disaster supply kit, know ing shelter locations, taking First Aid/CPR classes, making sure to have a communications plan to notify family, friends and neighbors, and having a NOAA weather radio. You should have a gallon of water per person per day and nonperishable food items, he said. TAVARES Upcoming hurricane season predicted to be below average HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO Damage is shown at a Citrus Street home in South Venice after weather bands from Tropical Storm Andrea whipped through southwest Florida on June 6, 2013.

PAGE 12

B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 28, 2014 Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) professor and pro gram director for the Environmental Pub lic Health Program at the University of Wis consin-Eau Claire, re cently concluded an air quality study at min ing sites, which showed higher levels of PM2.5 the particulates min ing generate s, includ ing silica than what was reported by the De partment of Natural Re sources. Even in digging it out and loading it in a truck you are generating those small particulates (of silica), he previous ly said. Without mon itoring by an indepen dent agency, we dont have the kind of assur ance we need to protect public health. In a letter dated May 13 to County Attor ney Sandy Minkoff, CE MEXs attorney, Roger Sims, wrote the com pany wished to with draw its application for conditional use ap proval after reviewing a large number of ob jection letters received which raise concerns about alleged trafc im pacts from the project. CEMEX prefers to understand such con cerns, determine their validity and deter mine whether they should be addressed with proac tive measures requiring amendments to the ap plication Sims wrote. More than 100 peo ple recently attended a meeting in Clermont to oppose the plans for the sand mine. Many area residents main ly in the Kings Ridge de velopment were con cerned about trafc, noise and dust from the mine. Some residents talked about charter ing buses to the coun ty commission meet ing on Tuesday, where the CEMEX request was slated to be heard be fore it was withdrawn. Commissioner Jimmy Conner also expressed concerns. There were legiti mate concerns raised by adjacent landowners and by people who live in Kings Ridge, he said. But Sara Engdahl, di rector of communica tions for CEMEX USA, said in a press release, There are rumors and statistics regarding our project that are false. Asked what speci cally Engdahl was re ferring to, she cited the trafc concerns. Per an independent trafc study of the po tential impacts of the mine, the trafc im pacts to Highway 27 would be insignicant, less than 1 percent of the highways capacity, she wrote in an email message, stating there would be 300 round trips by sand trucks made per day. There are 21,500 ve hicles that travel in that area daily, according to the countys Depart ment of Public Works, which conrmed the sand mine trucks would make up roughly 1.4 percent of the high ways trafc. Even so, county of cials have said they have concerns about dust being kicked up by the trucks on Schoeld Road, a clay road in the vicinity of the proposed sand mine. A clay road is a dirt road, and if you put 300 trucks on it, it is going to create dust, said Com missioner Tim Sulli van. I think one of the ways to mitigate that is to pave that road. Like Parks, Sullivan said he had concerns about the sand mines impact on agricultural resources. Agriculture is a huge part of the Lake County economy, he said. The sand mine needs to t the character of the community. Commissioner Les lie Campione credited CEMEX for recognizing that issues being raised were genuine and they were of concern to the county commission. Asked if she believed the county had val id concerns regarding the issues raised, Eng dahl wrote: The proj ect has received all oth er permits required to construct and oper ate other than commis sion approval, as well as from the Planning and Zoning Board. But at the same time, Engdahl also wrote, CE MEX believes, however, that taking time to work through these concerns regarding our applica tion is in the best inter est of both Lake County and CEMEX. CEMEX FROM PAGE B3 restaurant most re cently a short-lived pizza place to Boon naris Investments of Orlando. The Dollar Gen eral Store at 24150 State Road 40 in As tor has been sold for $1.6 million. Lake Eu stis Net Leasing, in care of United South ern Bank in Eustis, sold the property to PTLEA Inc. of Whitestone, NY. The 9,100 square-foot store, recently listed for $1.69 million, was built in 2011 and has an existing 10-year lease, online real estate listings show. The Tuffy Auto Services store at 10742 U.S. Highway 441 in Leesburg has been sold for $1.22 mil lion. The seller was City Enterprises of Or lando and the buy er was GAL Leas ing of Baton Rouge. The 4,500-square-foot building was built in 2006. The Super 8 hotel at 1392 North Blvd. in Leesburg has been sold for for $1.2 million. Pa ras Lodging Inc. of Al exandria, La., sold the property to North Hos pitality Group. of Lees burg. The hotel was built in 1989. HOMES FROM PAGE B3 HOWEY-IN-THE-HILLS School board member accused of lying LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com A school board member run ning for re-election has been accused of lying to the public about her voting record on cour tesy busing at a recent candidate forum at the Mission Inn Resort & Club in Howey-in-the-Hills, according to a student safety ad vocacy group circulating the vid eo of the forum. At the forum on May 8, the moderator asked Kyleen Fischer, school board member for Dis trict 5, whether she supported the cuts in courtesy busing, ac cording to the video. In response, Fischer said: Thank you very much, the question means a lot to me, be cause I did not vote for the end of courtesy busing. However, district records show the vote to end courtesy busing at a June 24, 2013 County School Board meeting was unanimous. Because of continued shortfalls in revenue, courtesy busing for students within two miles of their home school was eliminated dis trict wide, according to school ofcials. By law, the state of Florida pro vides transportation funding only for traditional education students that live two or more miles from the school, unless it is deemed a dangerous walking condition. The school district continues to also provide courtesy bus ing for a small number of stu dents at Groveland Elementary and Lake Minneola High School with nancial assistance from the city of Groveland and the county. While stating they do not conduct interviews and try to keep a focus on the facts and the issues of the case, a member from the Lake Coun ty Safe Schools Initiative said they feel the video summa ry and raw footage speak for themselves. We want integrity and ac countability in the people we elect, and a school board who cares about the safety and well-being of the students that attend the school, the member stated in an email. The school board knows these routes con tain hazardous walking condi tions and worked with Represen tative Metz to introduce some reasonable revisions to these standards. But because the state will not reimburse for doing the right thing, they have only rein stated buses to a small fraction of students who need them. Despite several attempts to reach Fischer via email and phone, she did not return calls for comment. MILLARD IVES | Staff Writer millard.ives@dailycommercial.com Police ordered a Mc Donalds employee out of his vehicle at gun point after he was ac cused of taking mon ey from the Groveland restaurant and eeing ofcers who were trying to arrest him. Rajiv Dale Ceasar, 26, was charged with grand theft, fraud and resist ing arrest. He remained in the Lake County Jail Wednesday afternoon in lieu of $6,500 bail. According to an ar rest afdavit, Grove land police respond ed to the West Broad Street restaurant just before 8 p.m. Tuesday. A district manager had accused Ceasar of not ringing up food sales and pocketing the cus tomers money, then submitting false re ceipts to his supervisors at the end of his shift. The manager said she had the thefts, totaling more than $900, on sur veillance video. Ceasar promised to pay the money back, but store ofcials called the police and the sus pect allegedly started walking away when of cers arrived. The afdavit adds that Ceasar was ordered to stop but got into his vehicle and drove off. Police gave a brief pur suit that ended back in the McDonalds park ing lot, where ofcers ordered Ceasar out the vehicle at gunpoint and arrested him. McDonalds worker accused of pocketing sales GROVELAND

PAGE 13

Wednesday, May 28, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B5 Jackets leading scor er under Oates and a key player in Leesburgs 2011 run to the state seminals. That was always a big point with him. He doesnt believe in taking short cuts. Part of his job as a coach and a teacher was to get us ready to succeed in life and everything he did was done with that goal in mind. Coach Oates want ed to win basketball games when we played, but he was just as con cerned may be even more concerned with making sure we had the tools to win in the game of life. Said Pearl Johnson, a former All-State point guard for the Yellow Jackets, He has been a father gure in my life since high school not only on the basket ball court, but as much off the court. He never gave up on me and al ways led me in the right direction of success. I love him as if he was my dad. Johnson might be Oates most-decorated player for multiple rea sons. Not only did she lead the Yellow Jackets to back-to-back state seminal appearanc es (2007, 2008), but she also put her playing ca reer on hold in college and enlisted in the U.S. Army. She eventually served in Iraq. Ive always been proud of Pearl, Oates said. Oates stressed that his mufns and rock heads the nick names he gave his play ers were the most important people to him, outside of his im mediate family. Partly because of his devotion to his players, Oates didnt marry until last summer, when he star tled many by announc ing on Facebook that he had gotten married. I knew he had a girl friend, but I never saw her until they got mar ried, Johnson said. It wasnt uncommon for Oates to make eve ning drives to support a former player compet ing at the college level. When the Florida Col lege Systems Activi ties Association held its state tournament at the College of Central Flor ida in Ocala, Oates was in attendance to watch four of his former play ers Johnson, Joharra Russell, and Bridges from St. Petersburg Col lege, and Ashley Perry from Northwest Florida State. These girls are my family, Oates said. For a long time, they were the only family I had in Florida. Theyve always meant a lot to me. They did everything I asked of them and my end of the deal was to do ev erything I could to sup port them. Leesburg enjoyed tre mendous success on the basketball court during Oates ten ure. The Yellow Jackets reached the Final Four state seminals in 2007, 2008 and 2011. No other Lake County girls program advanced to the state semi nals while Oates was in Leesburg. Still, just reaching the biggest stage for girls basketball in Flor ida wasnt enough for Oates. He said the in ability to deliver a state championship contin ues to gnaw at him and likley will for the rest of his coaching career. We had teams ca pable of winning state championships,Oates said. In 2008, I thought we were the best team in the state. For whatev er reason, we just nev er got over the hump when we got to Lake land (site of the Florida High School Athletic As sociation state champi onships). While the lack of a state title is a blemish in Oates eyes, the lime light he helped to shine on girls basketball in Lake County is some thing for which many coaches believe he should be credited. He put Lake Coun ty girls basketball on the map, said Wal ter Banks, former girls coach at South Lake. Its as simple as that. Nobody from around the state really paid at tention to girls basket ball in Lake County un til Mark Oates took over at Leesburg. He turned Leesburg into a pow erhouse and did it the right way by working his kids hard and mak ing sure his teams were ready to play. The state of Florida, Lake County and the city of Leesburg are los ing an incredible edu cator and coach. Banks said he doesnt envy Oates replace ment. He said that per son would be the high school equivalent of stepping in for a legend ary and highly success ful coach at the college or professional level. Oates successor would get one benet, however, Banks said. Mark is leaving the program in great shape, Banks said. No body will ll his shoes, but theyll have a sol id foundation to build on. I just hope whoever they hire is not a parttime coach looking to supplement his or her salary. It would be a shame to see that program go down because whoever was hired didnt share Marks work ethic or drive. The task of replacing Oates will be a priority for Leesburg Principal Bill Miller. Miller said he will lis ten to any suggestions Oates might have for a new coach and he hopes to make an of cial announcement sometime in June. Regardless, whoever takes Oates seat on the Yellow Jackets bench should share many of the traits as his or her predecessor, Miller said. Mark was much more than a father g ure and a coach to his student-athletes, Mill er said. He was always a positive presence, not only to student-athletes on his team, but to oth er students and even members of our faculty. The expectations and demands that he placed on his student-athletes resulted in so much success and not all of it was on the court. He helped so many girls earn scholarships and enjoy a great deal of success beyond high school. Our school and our community is los ing much more than a girls basketball coach. Said Bridges, Im very happy that he gets to go back home, but the Yel low Jacket Nation is los ing a great man. Place your ad here and reach the Local Market!VERY AFFORDABLE!Call today 352-394-2183 PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Leesburgs Keshawn Johnson pats Oates head as they talk on the sideline during the Leesburg-New Smyrna class 6A-Region 2 quarternal game on Feb. 6 at Leesburg High School. OATES FROM PAGE B1

PAGE 14

B6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 28, 2014 Classified IndexLegal Notices....................0001 Notices............................1000 At Your Service................9000 Employment....................2000 Pets/Animals....................6865 Merchandise....................6000 Real Estate/For RENT......3000 Real Estate/For SALE........4000 Recreation........................7000 Transportation..................8000 Cancellations for ads running Wednesday must be made by 4pm Monday.ADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since The Daily Commercial will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error call the classified department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error.TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde

PAGE 15

Wednesday, May 28, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B7

PAGE 16

B8 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 28, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance r t t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital SOMETHING SPECIAL IS COMING... At Orchard Heights Clermonts newest retirement community, we believe PATIENCE, LOYALTY, UNDERSTANDING and HARD WORK are the core components of rewarding lives and careers. If this interests you, come join our team! Orchard Heights, a gracious retirement community for seniors in Clermont, is seeking the folowing positions:Orchard Heights is an Equal Opportunity EmployerAttn:Paul and Martha Johnson Holiday Inn Express near PNC Bank 1810 South Hwy. 27 Clermont, FL 34711 Fax:352-241-9685 Or email:orchardheights.hiring@hawthornret.com passenger endorsements) Shop Operator

PAGE 17

Wednesday, May 28, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B9 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr Crossword puzzle is on page B2. Thank you for reading the local paper!

PAGE 18

B10 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 28, 2014 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 7 25 34 47 67 13 18 31 59 74 9 21FREE SPACE53 72 2 16 42 48 63 5 29 39 52 68ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N I B O G BINGO B I N G O SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Donna McConnell WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! N 39 FREE N 42 N 31 N 34