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LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comSen. Alan Hays, R-Umatil la, and Rep. Larry Metz, R-Yalaha said this week they were pleased with the out come of the 2014 Florida leg islative session, which streng htened protections for human trafcking victims, improved transparency for special dis tricts and allowed parents to object to instructional material used in the classroom. But at the same time, the legislators said they were disappointed that several bills they fought for passage did not succeed, from a bill that would identify and correct hazardous walking conditions at local elementary schools to legislation that would designate a school employee or volunteer to carry a concealed weapon on school grounds to a comprehensive bill that would provide protection of the states springs. I am very disappointed the hazardous walking conditions bill did not make it through the Senate, Metz said, noting that the bill was supported by the Florida School Board Association and the Florida Parent Teacher Association. The bill died in the Florida Senate Appropriations Committee. If passed, the bill would have required district school boards and state and local governmental entities to work cooperatively to identify and correct hazardous walking conditions, according to the House of Representatives staff analysis of the bill. School Board members liked that the bill would have lowered the speed limit that makes for a hazardous walking condition from 55 miles per hour to 50 miles per hour or greater, the analysis points out. For example, the Lake County district provides some courtesy busing at Pine Ridge Elementary, where the speed limit is 50 mph. The district would have been reimbursed by the state for busing students at Pine Ridge had the bill passed. SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | B3SPORTS:Rhodes wins NCAA title WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWST AND INSIDE CLASSIFIED B5 CROSSWORDS B4 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN B3 SPORTS B1 VOICES A3WORD ON THE STREE T A2SOUTH LAKE PRESSV OLUME 99, NO. 21 3 SECTIOn N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reservedwww. southlakepress.comPRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID Lawmakers lament lossesSprings, sidewalks and student safety set aside BRAD MCCLENNY / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP Patrons jump off the dock into the spring head at Blue Springs near High Springs.SEE LAWMAKERS | A2 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comCity ofcials are celebrating a new name for its newest acquisition the Clermont Com munity Center. The property, locat ed on U.S. Highway 27, a couple miles south of State Road 50, was for merly Celebration of Praise church until it was purchased along with surrounding land, totaling 45-acres by the city earlier this year for $6.3 million. Plans call for the building itself to be used for fam ily programs, entertain ment and more. Up until now, some people were still calling it the COP Church, Celebration Center and other monikers. But the new facili ty and property actually has two names now. The building itself will be called the Clermont Arts and Recreation Center, while the property will be called the Clermont Community Center. The building has a large stage, meeting rooms and an outdoor pool more suited to an arts and recreation title, while the property also will house the communitys new police sta tion. I think everyone was excited because like when you are naming a baby, it really feels like its yours when you give it a name, City Spokes woman Doris Bloodsworth said, adding that a name promotes an identity. We wanted a name that was descriptive but not limiting, Councilman Keith Mullins said of the community cen ter. As a resident youll know where it is when you hear the name and, for those from out of CLERMONTCommunity center gets not 1 name, but 2 DORIS BLOODSWORTH / SUBMITTED PHOTO The councils pick for a new name matched what residents preferred during an informal poll taken during Clermonts Fitness Palooza last month. People voted with jelly beans.SEE CENTER | A2 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMascotte ofcials are looking at creating a domestic partner registry within the city. Mayor Tony Rosado, who proposed the idea and requested it be placed on the agenda for dis cussion, said he wants to know what board members think about a registry. Im bringing it to the council rst, so that they are not blind-sided by the issue, he said. Rosado said a registry is a step in the right direction for same-sex couples and other long-term couples who live to gether but choose not to mar ry, because it would give them more rights, like hospital visitation privileges, decision-mak ing power when it comes to medical issues without a power of attorney, and the right to make after-death arrangements that traditionally married cou ples now have. I think nowadays, in the year 2014, its important to give equality to everyone and something like this would cover peo ple from all walks of life, Rosado said. John Bradford, a Mascotte resident in a domestic part nership, said that although there is no hospital in Mascotte, protection in regards to visitation or deci sion-making power while at a nearby hospital like Clermont, may not be supported. Howev er, he said that in other instanc es, being registered would be critical. I feel it could help coordinate assistance in some situations when it comes to public safe ty, Bradford said, explaining it would give law enforcement a contact person in case a partner was injured. Law ofcers would know its OK to share personal MASCOTTECity may create domestic partner registrySEE REGISTRY | A2

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 21, 2014 CLERMONT D-Day remembrance set at Historic VillageThe turning point of World War II will be remembered at 11 / a.m. June 7, with a D-Day commemoration ceremony at Clermonts Historic Village, 490 West Ave. All veterans in attendance will have an opportunity to tell their stories as the event honors their service to our country. After the ceremony, hot dogs, apple pie and sodas will be available. For information, call Dodie King at 352-593-8496 or go to www. ClermontVillage.org.CLERMONT National Mens Health Week set for June 9-15In recognition of National Mens Health Week June 9-15, Dr. Jamin Brahmbhatt and Dr. Sijo Prekattil from the PUR Clinic at South Lake Hospital will hit the road to spread the word about mens health issues for the rst-ever Drive for Mens Health. The 24-hour road trip from Florida to New York kicks off at 8 / a.m. June 12 at South Lake Hospital, 1900 Don Wickham Dr., in Clermont. The physicians will drive approximately 1,100 miles in an all-electric TESLA, stopping only to recharge the vehicle, hosting mens health events, educational lectures, patient testimonials and more along the way. Funds raised will benet genetic research for chronic male conditions and educational scholarships. For information, go to www. Drive4MensHealth.com or call 407-833-9201.GROVELAND First Baptist Church to welcome new pastorFirst Baptist Church of Groveland, 137 East Cherry St., will welcome its new pastor, Billy Stephens, at the 10:50 / a.m. service on June 1. The church will host a light breakfast reception at 9 / a.m. prior to Sunday school. Stephens comes from First Baptist Church of High Springs, near Gainesville, where he served for the past eight years. Prior to that, he served in the United States Navy. Stephens earned his masters in religion at Liberty Theological Seminary. For details, call 352-429-2651, or email fbcgroveland@embarqmail.comLAKE COUNTY Quit Smoking Program to begin on May 27The Lake County Health Department will host free, ve-week quit smoking classes on Tuesdays from 5:30 to 6:30 / p.m., beginning on May 27, at the Community Health Center, 225 N. First St., in Leesburg. Classes will also be on Mondays from 6:30 to 8 / p.m., beginning on June 1, at the National Training Center at South Lake Hospital, 1935 Don Wickham Dr., in Clermont. To enroll, call 1-877-252-6094.GROVELAND Waste collection event scheduled for ThursdayLake County residents can dispose of toxic materials in a safe way at an upcoming Household Hazardous Waste Collection event from 9 / a.m. to noon Thursday at Ace Hardware, 1007 State Road 50, in Groveland. Small quantities of unused or unwanted waste products such as lawn and gardening materials, photo and swimming pool chemicals, paint products, cleaning solutions, motor oil, used gas, batteries, uorescent lamps, light bulbs and small propane tanks are eligible for disposal. Infectious waste materials including solvents, chemical laboratory waste and radioactive waste are prohibited. For information, go to www.lakecounty.gov or call 352-343-3776. Area Briefs What south Lake residents are saying about ...PRESIDENTSWho do you think has been the best president in your time?I like Clinton a lot. I think he achieved a lot. He took us from being in debt and brought us forward. I think he continues to be a good person too. BETSY WEATHERBY LAKELAND I think Id have to go with Eisenhower. I was so young I didnt really know much. Since then, the presidents are so beholden to one political party or another. DAVE RUDOLPH CLERMONT Clinton. He and the par ty helped get us out of debt. Too bad he cant run again. KAY JOHNSON CLERMONT Word on theStreet Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 Truman. He didnt take any(thing) from anyone, and he red McAr thur cause he wouldnt do what he was supposed to. He kept us out of China. BOB BERUBE GROVELAND Metz said he would not give up on bringing the bill back next legislative session. I have to try again, he said. I cant let that go. It is dealing with student safety. How can you give up on something so important? Indeed, Metz said he amended the bill and Hays did the same as co-sponsor in the Senate, so the scal impact on local governments was removed. Even with no scal impact, it got bottled up in Senate appropriations, he said. Hays also voiced his disappointment. These hazardous conditions exist and when local ofcials dont act, then state ofcials have to step in and say you must act, Hays said. The K-12 Education Subcommittee, which met in March and indicated support for the bill, heard opposition from Duval County Schools. We have some concerns with some of the scal impact, John Sullivan, lobbyist for the Duval County Schools said at the subcommittee hearing on the bill. Over all, we look forward to working with Rep. Metz. Sullivan said he could not speak on record on Duval County school issues because he is a lobbyist. Speaking of his bills that did not make it through, Hays said his bill to arm designated school employees or volunteers who only had a military or law enforcement background and a clean disciplinary records would have made schools safer. People have such a misunderstanding, he said. We are not talking about having every school teacher armed with a .38 or 9 mm. I am willing to bring it back. But by far one of the most talked about pieces of legislation that did not make it to a vote in the House was the springs legislation, which would have required the establishment of minimum and ows in Outstanding Florida Springs by July 1, 2022, among other protections. It also would have upgraded wastewater treatment plants and onsite sewage treatment and disposal systems, according to the Florida Senate bill analysis. Hays said the bill did not make it through because the House did not have a companion bill. It would have been un wise for the House to rubber stamp what the Senate did, he said. They need to do their due diligence. At the same time, Hays said he is condent next year and the year after there will be signicant legislation, not just for the springs but to address water issues across the state. Within the next two years, we will develop a statewide water poli cy, he said. It is important to note, in order for a statewide policy to be effective, it must be regionalized and must have exibility. We are going to have to tailor our policy to be appropriate for the region. Hays said the list of impaired water bodies is large. One of the things that so many people fail to recognize is the foolishness of cleaning up the water body that you know is being contaminated. You must clean up the source of contamination and then clean up the water body. Other bills that failed included: %  en A bill by Sen. Dorothy Hukill, R-Port Orange, which would have cut the state tax on communications services by 2 percent, resulting in $242 million in tax relief statewide, according to Halifax Media Group. %  en A bill by Hays that would have required counties, cities, school districts and higher education institutions to give preference to Florida companies when pur chasing goods or hiring for construction projects that involve state money, according to Halifax Media Group. %  en HB 7069, which would have upgraded the health, safety and teaching standards of the early learning programs, according The News Service of Florida. %  en HB 7057 would have allowed Lake Technical College to offer college credit certicate programs. LAWMAKERS FROM PAGE A1 town searching for it, it wont be confusing to nd. Mullins said other con siderations involved the word complex in it but after a consensus that it sounded like a me dical facility. In addition, he said hav ing a police center located in the Clermont Arts and Recreation Center was not be suitable, so now with the two names, those issues are solved. It would go something like this: The Clermont Arts & Recreation Center, at the Clermont Commu nity Center, which is what the property as a whole will be called, or the Cler mont Police Department at the Clermont Commu nity Center, Bloodsworth said. A building in down town Clermont cur rently known as the Cler mont Community Center will now be called the Clermont City Center. The councils pick for a new building name matched what residents preferred during an infor mal poll taken during Fitness Palooza, a rst time event the city hosted last month. I was joking with some one and told them, The jelly beans have spoken, Bloodsworth said. CENTER FROM PAGE A1 information with the other partner, as they would with a couple recognized as being legally married. In my own case, I would like my partner to know if something happened to me, but it doesnt necessarily just have to do with samesex partnerships, but those couples who live together and choose not to marry, or with livein caregivers ..., Brad ford said. I don t know what stipulations go along with the registry, but Im hoping it would be something open to any unmarried couple choosing to regis ter. If considered, Mascotte would only be the second city in Lake County along with Tavares to offer the registry. Rosado said both Orange County and Orlando have registries, and got support in doing so from prom inent companies in the Central Florida area like Disney World, Universal Studios and Sea World. Because of that, Ro sado believes a registry would boost economic development in Mas cotte, attracting people and businesses looking for a diverse-minded city to call home. It might help with economic development within the city since wed be one of a few (two) cities in Lake County to offer it, he said. REGISTRY FROM PAGE A1 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comJohn Crescente, 45, was arrested recently on a grand theft charge after repeatedly receiving store credit for items off the shelf he never purchased at the Clermont Home De pot, according to an arrest afdavit. The total loss to Home Depot was $726.73. Police said Crescente got credit for items he nev er purchased on four dif ferent days. He was arrest ed on Saturday when came back to the store. Crescente initially said he did nothing wrong un til he was shown a vid eo, taken by the stores as set protection specialist, of him returning unpur chased items. He later ad mitted to being the person in the video, the afdavit states. Crescente was booked into the Lake County Jail and was released on a $2,000 bond, according to the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce website. Some of the items listed in the afdavit that Crescente returned for store credit included a Birmingham keyed entry lever, a Birmingham SS lock, a Flexico 570 paint sprayer and a power stainer. Crescente was previous ly arrested for retail theft at Walmart on Dec. 4, 2013, according to police.CLERMONTMan repeatedly returns items to Home Depot

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Wednesday, May 21, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3Gouged at the pumpAccording to recent news reports, Florida is noted for another rst. As if identity theft were not enough, now its for the highest gas prices in the Southeast. Gov. Rick Scotts claim to have saved citizens big bucks by reducing vehicle registration is questionable. I will save around $25 for an entire year. Collectively, perhaps millions will be saved statewide, but individually, peanuts. How about real savings for anyone who owns a vehicle? Reduce the excessive state taxes at the gas pump! We are being gouged big time. MICHAEL J. HARRIS | WebsterWalls usually have a purposeA recent letter by Robert Wesolowski, A Party With Many Walls, has again shown his inability to adapt to a changing world, and he would do well to do his research before writing an article full of drivel. The wall between his and many Democrats ears is deeper and wider than even the walls of Jerusalem. The walls he spoke of from the Bible were only brought down when God decided they were to come down. The Berlin wall was very effective by our border/racial standards until Gorbachev decided to take it down to make a united Germany, which has turned out to be a disaster. The already existing socialist society of West Germany got run over by the op pressed people of East Germany and ruined the economy. The wall that the Obama administration has created in this country overshadows even the Great Wall of China. The wall created by the Democrats and Harry Reid between the parties has divided this country more than the racial divide of the 1960s. Can you imagine how many fences or walls could have been built or torn down just with the money the Obamas have wasted prancing around the world on our dime? Thats the Democrat way. The greatest wall of all is between the Democrats and reality. I would suggest that some walls are needed, some required and some due to people like Wesolowski are probably permanent. JOHN COHN | TavaresPay attention to real world problemsAfter reading a recent headline in the Daily Commercial, I am reminded of a comment my college philosophy professor made back in 1960, If you want to become a successful politician, pick a cause that everyone can believe in but no one can x. His example was world hunger. In the 1970s, the issue was world over-population and there was a campaign called Zero Population Growth. I had an associate that believed so much in this philosophy that he and his wife took an oath to limit their family. When in my 80 years, I look back at the world I have known the Depression, World War II, Korea (where I served), Vietnam, Somalia, Iran, Russia, Africa and many more I see a place that cannot nd a way to better the lives and living conditions of the worlds population. And I wonder how successful they can be in affecting the natural elements and cycles of our planet. Recently I saw a very beautiful lm about polar bears narrated by Meryl Streep. Its concern was the effect of global warming on the lives of two polar bear cubs. Yet in the lm, the real life-threatening danger to them was actually a male polar bear that wanted to eat the cubs. And then there was the Russian ship that got frozen in ice in Antarctica and was rescued by China. The ship was there to study the effects of global warming. Perhaps the front page lead should have been about the 200 school girls kidnapped in Africa, something the world might actually do something about. ROBERT M. JOHNSON | Leesburg The Lake Cou nty School Board choked last week. Less than a week after a consultant handed the board a draft report that suggested the school district had intentionally fudged their class-size numbers to avoid state nes, the board whiffed on an opportunity to get to the bottom of the emerging scandal. By way of background, the state limits the size of classes in public schools in hopes that manageable class sizes will result in a better quality education for our children. It can impose nes on schools that violate the limits. When a teacher blew the whistle and told Florida education ofcials that school ofcials here asked her to help manipulate the class sizes to make it appear they were under the limits, Lake County ofcials asked for an audit to determine how far-ranging the problem was. The CPA rm that authored last weeks report indicated the problem was indeed pervasive and recommended some changes, encouraging the district to hire an administrator specically to oversee class sizes, provide training about class size compliance and communicate better with the individual schools. At the same time, 136 teachers told the au ditors they were asked to sign or submit false class-size reports, and 23 percent of administra tors surveyed said they were aware that students were temporarily moved to other classes for the sake of getting under the class-size limits. Additionally, the auditors said they were told of general statements about class sizes emanating from the school district headquarters directing the schools to make it work. In view of these claims, there is ample evidence that there was a concerted effort among district higher-ups to skirt the class size law. If they did so, it wasnt with the students best interests at heart because the law itself was intended to protect their interests. On Monday, the School Board accepted the report virtually without comment, signaling its intention to let the matter die quietly. Only long-time board member Kyleen Fischer spoke up, expressing her concern that district ofcials may have intentionally duped the state. Fischer has called for Superintendent Susan Moxleys contract to be reviewed as a result. The question is, why are the four other School Board members silent on this issue? Had the audit found that the class size reporting problems were the product of a miscalculation, for instance, it would be appropriate to dismiss this as an honest mistake. But one has to wonder why the School Board is not interested in getting to the bottom of this. Its not too late. For the second week in a row, we call on the School Board to launch a full examination of whether district administrators knowingly fudged their numbers. Cheating, after all, isnt permitted in the classroom. It shouldnt be permitted in the school district ofces. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . ........................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTOPINION WHATS YOUR OPINION?The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to: Letters to the Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711By fax to: 352-394-8001EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed.GUEST COLUMNSIf you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OURVIEWIf you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veter-ans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to to www.lakeveterans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANS SOUTH LAKE PRESSYour community newspaper for more than 100 years.732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Florida 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region.All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. YOUROPINIONSLETTERS TO THE EDITOR A case for legalizing potMarijuana is tagged as a factor in accidents if THC is found in the bloodstream at all. That doesnt mean the driver was under its inuence at the time of the accident. Evidence of studies from the National Highway Trafc Safety Administration strongly suggests that alcohol encourages risky driving whereas THC encourages greater caution, and users seem better able to compensate for its adverse effects while driving under the inuence. Revenue from taxation of marijuana sales could reach up to $8.7 billion per year if taxed like alcohol or tobacco, on top of billions in saved law enforcement resources. With 757,969 individuals incarcerated for marijuanarelated cases, at $21,006 a pop, that is $15,921,896,814 that would have to be coughed up by the American taxpayer to keep these individuals imprisoned for one year. We provide their shelter, offer medical, dental and psychiatric care, maintain, transport and educate these individuals and maintain facilities for them to live in. Im pretty sure that the attorneys, ambulance chasers as you call them, stand to lose money if marijuana becomes legal. The esteemed medical journal, The Lancet Neurology, has stated that marijuanas active components inhibit pain in virtually every experimental pain paradigm. Allowing patients legal access to medical marijuana has been endorsed by numerous organizations, including the AIDS Action Council, American Bar Association, American Public Health Association, American Nurses Association, National Association of Attorneys General and the California Medical Association. Anything you ingest has the potential for harm, marijuana included, however some of the pain medications that are already on the market have horrible side effects as well as being extremely addictive. Marijuana is a natural herb that is much healthier than the lab-created substances out there legally. When an activity becomes legal, it becomes regulated removing money from the pockets of street-corner pot dealers all the way up to the drug cartels. Kids would have less access to pot if it was regulated, just like alcohol and tobacco. Ask a kid which is easier to get. The quality of street marijuana being sold to our kids is a scary thought. SANDRA PLATT | Fruitland Park LETTER of the WEEKSchool Board flubs its duty on class-size scandal

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 21, 2014 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 Place your ad here and reach the Local Market!VERY AFFORDABLE!Call today 352-394-2183 HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comThe moments when Ashley Vera felt discour aged about her studies at South Sumter High School, she felt tempted to give up. But her mentor through the Lake & Sumter Take Stock in Children Program continued to encourage her, she said, giving her hope that she could earn her diploma this year. They push you and keep an eye on your grades, she said. They have been a big help. Meeting once a week with her mentor, Vera said she received posi tive reinforcement. As a result, Vera is the fth family member to receive a scholarship to college. She is planning to attend St. Leo Uni versity, where she wants to study biology health sciences. I want to become an occupational therapist, she said. Vera and 25 other students were honored this week at a break fast at Venetian Gar dens for the local program, which statewide has served more than 18,000 students. The mission of the program, which Don Pemberton founded in Pinellas County in 1995, was to end the cycle of poverty through education by providing nancially at risk students the opportunity to earn a college scholarship, according to Take Stock in Children documents. The program is unique, Take Stock in Children ofcials say, because of the support the students receive, the accountability required and the dollar-for-dollar match provided by the state of Florida. To enroll in the program, students must write an essay about why they want to go to college, they must have a 2.5 GPA or higher, and they must demonstrate a nancial need based on USDA In come Guidelines. They also must participate in the Free and Reduced Lunch Program. Beginning their freshman year of high school, students in the pro gram work with a men tor one-on-one for four years, must maintain their GPA and not get into any trouble, pro gram ofcials said. Gail Weidner, pro gram manager for Lake & Sumter Take Stock in Children, said the local program has been successful. She noted that 98 percent of students in the program graduate, compared with 79 percent who are not in the program. It is hard to say where these students would have gone if they were not in the program, she said. They are less like ly to be able to afford college. Vera said it would be much harder to afford college without the program. Katelyn Allen, a senior at Tavares High School, said the program has helped her build a bet ter relationship with people in the commu nity and has taught her to be a leader. Allen credits her men tor, Kim Varnadore, who attends many of her high school events, for pushing her to com plete her education. My mentor encour aged me to do my best in everything and take the next step where I need to be, she said. (She) will send encour aging text messages, keeps me up to date on anything going on and encourages me to do things. Allen will attend Lake Sumter State College in the fall on a scholarship and hopes to pursue a career in teaching. Without the program, Allen said she would not be as motivated to complete school. I wouldnt have the great relationships I have now, she said. Varnadore said she re members meeting Allen four years ago and how quiet she was at rst. I have seen her grow in condence, she said. She took a leadership role in her ag corps at the high school. She ended up co-captain. This program gave students hope for the future, said Rosanne Brandeburg, Lake County School Board member. If they main tained good grades, they had this scholar ship waiting for them when they graduated high school. Varnadore said Al len would always have a plan of action and she would simply serve as her sounding board. Speaking of Allens graduation this spring, Varnadore said it is sad, because she has felt a part of her family. The experience, she said, was valuable to her. It gave me the chance to step back and look at the world through her eyes, she said. She is such a positive, young lady. Of tentimes, I would be thinking of 100 different things. Her attitude was Take Stock widens the path to academic success BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Tavares High School senior Katelyn Allen poses with Lake-Sumter State College president Dr. Charles Mojock at Lake-Sumter State College in Leesburg, on Thursday.SEE SUCCESS | A8

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Wednesday, May 21, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A7 Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...Bacchus Vino Etcetera Tenth AnniversaryHistoric downtown Clermont is the home of a friendly wine shop where the staff and customers believe that wine is for your enjoyment, not intimidation. Open since 2004 at the corner of Montrose and Seventh, across from City Hall Park, Bacchus Vino Etcetera is commemorating their tenth anniversary with a month long celebration. When it comes to wine education, one should keep an open mind and an open bottle. Owners Keith and Karen Mullins encourage Bacchus customers to explore and savor the vast array of wines available from around the world. Frequent sampling opportunities include evening gatherings featuring wines from a specific area, grape variety, winery or other theme. Often a wine or two is available for sampling as customers drop by to shop. A popular tasting and shopping event are the Wine Walks held six times yearly which feature wines from Bacchus Vino Etcetera being sampled at various merchants throughout the downtown area. The next Wine Walk will take place May 16th from 6:30 until 9:00 and will feature all Italian Wine. Tickets are currently available at Bacchus Vino Etcetera. Bacchus Vino Etcetera is the home of the By the Light of the Moon Lunar Wine Club. Each time there is a full moon members receive a bottle each of specially selected red and white wines at a preset price. Between full moons, club members are eligible for exclusive offers and wine discounts. The club is an excellent way to learn about and try new wines, and is a great gift idea. Bacchus Vino Etcetera currently stocks over 700 wines from 17 countries and 8 states. Wines from many popular wineries can be found along with those from some lesser-known producers. For customers with specific requests Bacchus Vino Etcetera can special order wines not already in stock (subject to availability). For the beer lover in the family Bacchus carries a selection of imported and domestic craft ales and lagers. In addition to the wines and beers, a variety of wine racks, corkscrews, stemware and wine related gifts are available. Stop by soon and learn what Keiths 42 years of experience in the wine business can add to your wine enjoyment. www.bacchusvinoetc.com 692 West Montrose Suite D (352) 394-9805 LOOKING FOR PARTS? SEE JULIE (352) 394-6111 Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! IN MEMORY DEATH NOTICESFannie Lee AndersonFannie Lee Anderson, 78, of Leesburg, died Tuesday, May 13, 2014. Marvin C. Zanders Fu neral Home, Inc.Maitland C. Brasher, Jr.Maitland C. Brasher, Jr., 69, of Astatula died on Saturday, May 17, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares, FL.Mary M. CraneMary M. Crane, 85, of Groveland, died Satur day, May 10, 2014. PageTheus Funerals & Cre mations, Leesburg.Jessie M. DarvilleJessie M. Darville, 90, of Eustis, died Sunday, May 11, 2014. Hayes Brothers Funeral Home, Eustis.Gary Leroy EdgarGary Leroy Edgar, 80 of Fruitland Park, died Thursday, May 15, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations, Leesburg.Earlene S. FordEarlene S. Ford, 68, of Bushnell, died Wednesday, May 7, 2014. Mar vin C. Zanders Funeral Home, Inc., Apopka.Penny Sue IviePenny Sue Ivie, 49, of Astor, died Sunday, May 11, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Astor.Donald Paul Jones Sr.Donald Paul Jones, Sr., 86, of Oxford, died on Saturday, May 17, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Willie JonesWillie Jones, 86, of Yalaha, died Wednesday, May 7, 2014. East side Funeral Home, Leesburg.Paul Eugene LandisPaul Eugene Landis, 87, of Lady Lake, died Thursday, May 15, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations, Leesburg.Hattie B. LeeHattie B. Lee, 84, of Cherry Lake, died Friday, May 16, 2014. Mar vin C. Zanders Funeral Home, Inc.Linda Spikes RussellLinda Spikes Russell, 52, of Groveland, died Tuesday, May 13, 2014. Marvin C. Zanders Fu neral Home, Inc.Kenneth Leon StricklandKenneth Leon Strick land, 65, of Leesburg, died Wednesday May 14, 2014. Beyers Funer al Home and Crematory, Leesburg.Edward TemplinEdward Templin, 73, of Webster, died on Saturday, May 17, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.

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A8 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 21, 2014 very encouraging to me. Rep. Marlene OToole, who has ser ved as a mentor for several years and helped found the local program, said it is life changing and mentors play a critical role in the success of the student. They need someone to tell them: If you stay the course, you will be success ful and be able to help your family, said OToole, who is the chief operating of cer of the state program. Lake County Schools Su perintendent Susan Moxley also lauded the program The support of the pro gram sets them up for suc cess, she said. The guid ance that comes from the program puts them in a place of strength and sup port. When they do get to college, the chances of completing college are better. Data from the program show that since 82 percent of students in the Take Stock in Children Program enrolled in college within the rst year of high school graduation as compared to the state average of 56 percent. SUCCESS FROM PAGE A4 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comClermont ofcials have met twice with a team from Wilesmith Advertising & Design, out of West Palm Beach, a company whose exper tise will be used in a reverse branding process for the city. The creative team working on the Clermont branding project includes a design director, researcher, strategic planner, public relations specialist and graphic designers, city ofcials said in a press release. City Manager Darren Gray said out of all the companies his staff looked at, Wilesmith was chosen because of its in sight into and willingness to involve the entire communi ty. (Branding) is much more than a logo or tagline, Gray said. Wilesmith under stands that it is critical to have buy-in from our city council, staff and especially our citizens and business owners. The Wilesmith team is bright and has a talented staff that thinks strategically. They have a terric track record with other Florida cit ies, they had conducted indepth research and created a video that told us imme diately that they understood what an amazing place Cler mont is. According to Public Infor mation Ofcer Doris Blood sworth, Clermonts branding process is being conduct ed differently than most. Instead of the city working with the branding agency rst, then holding community fo rums to get input from residents and businesses, it was done the other way around. Gray said he wanted to make sure the community knows how much their ideas are valued. First, we are fortunate to have a community that is en gaged and showed they are eager to share their ideas, Gray said. They trusted we would listen and we have. Presenting the ideas to Wilesmith has streamlined the branding process, the city manager said. Our consultants have nev er had a city before that came to the table with such a clear sense of its assets and prior ities, Gray said. We will begin our master planning for the next ve to 10 years in a few months. So, the vision that the residents shared last summer will continue to drive the branding and the master planning. Gray said that to him, the branding process will boost the citys economic develop ment and quality of life. We want to make sure that we plan for our future in a smart way that ensures there are good jobs for our chil dren and the families that choose Clermont as their home, Gray said. By iden tifying our assets, we can use our resources wisely. Bloodsworth said the Wilesmith team may soon pres ent suggestions for a logo, motto and promotion plan.CLERMONTCity in the midst of new branding GRAY(Branding) is much more than a logo or tagline. Wilesmith understands that it is critical to have buy-in from our city council, staff and especially our citizens and business owners. The Wilesmith team is bright and has a talented staff that thinks strategically.City Manager Darren Gray

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B1SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 21, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTSSPORTS EDITOR . ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE . .............................. 365-8268 FAX . .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL . ......... sports@dailycommercial.comSPORTSandLEISURE FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comRhodes College led from wireto-wire to win the NCAA Division III Womens Golf Championship on Friday by 24 strokes over Mary Hardin-Baylor in Howey-in-the Hills. The Lynx dominated on the El Campeon course at Mission Inn Resort and Club, clinching the title with the best round of the week, ring a 308 to sew up the championship with a four-round team score of 1,256. Williams College was third, 29 shots behind Rhodes, the Uni versity of Texas-Tyler was fourth at 1,291 and Ithaca College and Methodist University tied for fth place, 42 shots off the pace. Two-time All American Georgiana Salant of Williams grabbed the individual title with a four-round total of 303 after ring a four-over 76. Her 15-over-par total for the tournament brought her in two strokes ahead of Mary Hardin-Bay lors McKenzie Ralston, who strug gled in Fridays windy conditions with a ve-over 77. Rhodes won the title by featuring four golfers who nished in the top 15 among individuals. Jessica Zweifel came in third, four strokes back of the lead, while Nik ki Isaacson came in fourth, nine strokes back. Meg Healy nished tied for 10th, 15 strokes off the pace, while Sarrahanne Vaughan came in 13th for the tournament. Rounding out the individual top 10, Doyle OBrien of St. Thom as (Minn.) came in 11 strokes back in fth, Sewanees Emily Ja vadi nished 12 strokes back in sixth and was the highest nish er to compete solely as an individ ual, Texas-Tylers Laura Lindsey and George Foxs Sydney Maluen da tied for seventh at 13 strokes back and Loretta Giovannettone of Methodist came in ninth at 14 strokes back. Mary Hardin-Baylors Taylor ORear and Methodists Kel sie Carralero tied Healy for 10th. Also on Friday, it was announced the championship will return to Mission Inn in 2015.Rhodes wins NCAA title PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Rhodes College sophomore Meg Healy hits a tee shot on the second hole during the NCAA Division III Womens Golf Championship on the El Campeon course at the Mission Inn Resort in Howey-in-the-Hills, on Friday.HOWEY-IN-THE-HILLS LEESBURG University of Mary Hardin-Baylor junior Taylor ORear hits her ball out of a sand trap. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comLake-Sumter State College soft ball player Kayla Fuller has been a leader in her only season with the Lakehawks. Now that her career at LSSC has come to a close, Fuller is reaping the rewards for her efforts. The power-hitting outelder capped off her sophomore season by helping the Lakehawks to their second state tournament berth in school history. She was named to the All Mid-Florida Conference First Team with a solid all-around season. In addition, Fuller became just the second LSSC player in histo ry to be named to the Florida Col lege Systems Activities Association All State First Team. She also will be a nominee of the National Junior College Athletic Association All-America ballot. Fuller played only one season at LSSC after transferring from South Georgia State College. With the Lakehawks, Fuller led the team with a .378 batting av erage, 11 home runs the second highest single sea son total in school history and 55 RBIs. Kaylas bat was amazing for us all season long, LSSC coach Jill Semento said. She always swings hard and pitchers got to where they didnt want to pitch to her. When they did, she made them pay for it. Id stop short of saying she was a once-in-a-lifetime player, but you dont come across players like Kayla very often and we were very lucky to get her even if it was just for a year. Fuller batted fourth for the Lake hawks in 2014 and helped LSSC to a 26-35 record the best sin gle-season mark in school histo ry. She played in every game and nearly half of her 70 hits went for extra bases (19 doubles one triple, 11 home runs). Semento said Fuller quickly be came a team leader, although she wasnt very vocal. Kayla let her play do the talking for her, Semento said. She had a very loud bat and led by example. Fuller batted .290 as a freshman at South Geor gia State, with three homers and 11 RBIs. She lost her scholar ship with the school after a coach ing change and eventually landed at LSSC for her sophomore year. Semento said Fuller has of fers from a number of four-year schools and is currently weighing her options. Not only is Fuller a standout on the softball eld, but Semento said she excels academi cally as well. Kayla was a role model to oth er teammates in the classroom, Semento said. She was the per fect example of how working hard in the classroom can pay off. Not only do great athletes at our level have to be good at their sport, but they have to be a great student as well in order to move up.LSSCs Fuller earns All-State honors FULLER Staff ReportThe Harlem Wizards will take on a team of Lake County educators for the benet event at 7 / p .m. Thursday at Lake Minneo la High School, 101 N. Hancock Rd. Food trucks will be on site at 5 / p .m. The event also hosts a silent auction with nu merous big ticket items for purchase. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased at www.harlemwizards.com. Cost does not include a $5 parking fee at the school. Funds raised benet the schools athletic teams. For information, call 352-394-9600.MINNEOLAHarlem Wizards roll into Minneola for benefit FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comHost families often are the unsung he roes for the Leesburg Lightning and other franchises in the Florida Collegiate Summer League. Players coming to town for the summer from other parts of the country stay with local families, who provide them with a bed, laundry facilities and meals. At least, thats what the league asks of a host family. Over the years, the program has been the starting point for countless friendships between players and local families. Some players have come back to visit their host family, even after their playing career with the Lightning has ended. Now, with the start of the Lightnings eighth season less than a month away, the team is looking for families willing to open their doors for players needing a place to stay while they represent the community. According to Elizabeth Knowles, the Lightnings host family coordinator, the team currently has 13 local families lined up to house players when they begin ar riving. However, she would like to add four or ve more to the roster. Im not 100 percent sure how many I will need because not all the players have returned their signed contracts yet, Knowles said. They are not ofcially on the roster until the contract is signed and returned to the league. (Coach David Therneau) has asked that all play ers be here by June 1, but many will still be in playoff situations with their college teams. I would like to have 17 or 18 spots for the boys and then maybe a couple more just to be on the safe side. I would be really sad if a kid could not come because he did not have a place to stay. Knowles is in her third year as a host family and her rst as coordinator for the program. Lightning players who live with host families often talk about the bond the develops between them and their sec ond families. Many area host families are older couples with an extra room in their homes, but some host families have younger children who look up to the Lightning players as big brothers. Players and the host-family children often have afternoon games of catch in the back yard, just like any big brother or little brother or sister might do, said John Brandeburg, Lightning general manager. Our host family program has grown into something so much more than just a way to house players. When these kids come to Lake County to play for the Lightning and get taken in by one of our fam ilies, they become part of those families. Not just for that summer, but for as long they want. Its just another thing that separates the Leesburg Lightning from the other teams in the Florida Collegiate Summer League. Anyone interested in learning more about being a host family for the Lees burg Lightning can contact Brandeburg at john@brandeburg.com. The Lightning are set to begin their sea son at 7 / p.m. on June 4 against DeLand at Pat Thomas Stadium-Buddy Lowe Field.Host families needed for Lightning

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Ann DupeeREMEMBER WHENA weekly column that reprints some of the more interesting news stories that have appeared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press.B3SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 21, 2014 www.southlakepress.comCOMMUNITYProudly servingCLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWSSTAFF WRITER . ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE . .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 EMAIL..... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com %  en HOMETOWN: Columbus, Ohio. I moved to Sarasota in 1970. %  en OCCUPATION: Licensed Massage Therapist since 1992 %  en FAMILY: Mother, father (since passed) What do you enjoy most about south Lake County? The intimate community setting, lots of outdoor recreational activities. 1) If you had to summarize your philosophy of life in one sentence, what would it be? Enjoy the moments that make you smile. 2) Name a person or incident youve come across recently thats touched you in some way. Why did this person or incident impress you so much? The Senior Games have really touched me. Each and every one of the senior participants and ath letes expressed a heartfelt appre ciation to not only myself, but to everyone involved in putting these events together. All events so far have brought together a very special group of folks. Its not about the destination; its all about the journey. 3) Name one of your greatest accomplishments so far. This is an easy one to answer. Ive been studying the practice of massage therapy for 22 years. The passion still remains strong to keep up with my studies. There have been many great accomplishments along the way. All equal in greatness. The many folks that have come to me in pain, unable to walk or function in their daily activities who have trusted me with their health care and returned back to quality of life that was once missing. 4) Whats something youve always wanted to do but havent yet? Visit more countries outside the United States. 5) What advice would you give to people who want to help out in the community? Diversify. Give a just little less to help out more than one cause. Its always amazing to meet new people. FROM THE FILES | 27 YEARS AGO 1987Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press Meet YourNEIGHBORGARY E. PERIGO HISTORIC LESTER H. TODD HOUSE ON MARKETClermonts historic Lester H. Todd house at 486 Osceola St. has been placed on the real estate market. The house, which was built in 1885, is prominently featured in Clermonts Centennial book, Clermont, Gem of the Hills. Commencement exer cises held at the Univer sity of Florida included Miss Kathleen Conley, who received a B.S. degree in advertising. Program planners for the Gamma Delta Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma Society Inter nationals meeting were Patty Hamilton, Carolyn McGowan, Sharon Powell and Jacque Wilson. During February, the Clermont Neighbor hood Center served 481 people from 167 families, with 11 volunteers serving 114 hours. The third annual Old Time Country Festival was held at Lake David Park March 28-29 with an arts and crafts show, contests that included baking, shing and casting, checkers, hog calling, a Put Your City Ofcials in Jail auction, horse shoes, tobacco spitting, arm wrestling, tug-o-war, ugliest cowboy hat, egg toss, bubble gum blowing, old-time ddlers, mar bles, Bull Championship arm wrestling and a greased pole plus live country western music and plenty of good food both days. Entertainment included a history display of the pre-Groveland era up to World War II, a water skiing exhibition, demonstrations by the Groveland Squares, SeiPai Karate demonstrations and a ower show by the Groveland Gar den Club. Ultra Precision is another manufacturing business in Clermont. Oakley Seaver of Har old Robert Realty made the sale of the for mer Kometco building on south Grand Highway (just south of and across from the RaceTrac). Ultra Precision manufactures high-precision, close-tolerance tools and dies for such products as transistors, telephones and computers, and has made parts for everything from Timex watches to rotors for large electric motors. Nintey-miles-perhour fastballs, honest-to-goodness Coney dogs and a 16-story ferris wheel known affectionately as The Big Wheel, at Boardwalk and Baseball an Amer ican classic, open April 4 (south of the intersection U.S. Highway 17 and I-4). Paul J. Boylan of the nancial services rm Edward D. Jones & Co. is nalizing plans to open an ofce in Clermont. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comFor the ninth year, students at Cypress Ridge Ele mentary School aided by students at Astatula Elemen tary School for the rst time this year took to quilting as a way to ensure that other students have books to read. The students target schools where libraries have been devastated by Moth er Natures wrath. Led by fourth-grade teacher Starr Olson of Cypress Ridge and second-grade teacher Kellyann Goring of Astatula El ementary who former ly taught at Cypress Ridge when the pair founded the program students design quilt squares based on top ics chosen by each class. Olson and Goring then have the squares sewn into quilts for a fundraiser at Cy press Ridges annual Celebration of Learning night, where people can donate money for their favorites that are given away via a random drawing. The service learning project was dubbed Quilts to Books by Olson and Goring nine years ago. Every child in the school thats about 595 students has made a square that is on one of the 36 quilts our school has on display, said Olson, adding that Gorings students at Astatula Elemen tary also made several quilts they were added to the mix. The money raised is then used to purchase loads of books that Olson and Gor ing personally deliver to the school they are helping. Each book is signed by a stu dent or teacher. Olson and Goring deliver the books themselves as a way of making the donation more personable and to video tape the reactions of the teach ers, students and schools of cials so students locally can see how their hard work paid off and who beneted from it. It makes me feel good to know that we did something that is helping other students in a big way. I know I couldnt live without any books, said fourth-grade student Madi son Carr, 10, just before the fundraiser Thursday. According to Goring, the fundraiser garnered donations of all kinds from people wanting to acquire a cer tain quilt. All the quilts were given away, she said, but the total amount raised has not yet been calculated. The money will pay for books that will be delivered to Briarwood Elementary School in Oklahoma City, Okla., when its rebuilt. The school was destroyed by a tornado last year. Olson said a teacher at Bri arwood told her the school was given about 16-17 minutes notice to cover before the tornado wiped out most of the building. Olson said the students here were shown pictures of the destruction and were awestruck by the damage. Its pretty dramatic when you see the pictures of the destruction at Briarwood, Olson said. It was a big eye opener for our students. They couldnt believe that that could happen, really. I mean the students and teachers went about their tornado drill and when it passed and they came out of it only a few minutes later, everything was gone. That must have been a shock. To date, the Quilts to Books project has creat ed nearly 360 quilts, generat ing $45,000 worth of books to teachers in Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama and New York. Olson said she remembers the rst year the project con sisted of a mere two quilts the teachers classes helped cre ate to help a family affected by Hurricane Ofelia. The proj ect raised $300 that year. Kathryn Powell, 10, said that although she felt very sad after seeing the pictures of Briarwood, she is glad she was a part of the project. It was hard to imagine being there, and I cant even imagine coming out and seeing that everything was destroyed, Kathryn said. But with us helping them and others helping them, they can feel like somebody really cares about them.CLERMONTLocal kids use quilts to help students affected by tornado LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Kody Sevidal points to his name on his classs quilt, which features colorful cancer ribbons.SEE HISTORY | B4

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B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 21, 2014 youreinvited...At Real Life, you can expect biblically relevant teaching, inspired worship, and a friendly face to welcome you home. Were a church for real people! For more info, check us out online at getreallife.com352.394.3553Saturday6:00pSunday 9:30a & 11:15a, 6:00p Fran Campbell is manager of the new business in the Winn-Dixie Plaza, Valu Video. Movies are renting for .99 cents each. Rusty Fox, Sunday special, prime rib, $6.95.47 YEARS AGO 1967Members of the Cler mont High School junior varsity basketball team are Walter Poynter, Steve Watkins, Bobby Gross, Calvin Sanders, Robert Thomas, Ken Osborne, Terry Craig, John Driggers, Alan Schuster, Allen Roane, Jim Turner, Rick Martin, Chuck Konsler and manager Guy Lillard. Peggy Broome, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harper Broome of Minneola, became Little Miss Minneola. She was presented a $50 bond and an engraved bracelet by J.T. Johnson, president of the Minneola Progressive Club, sponsor of Minneola Day. Some of the Minneola Day entertainment was furnished by local high school students David Daw, Steve Ragar, Bruce Kirkland, Clifford Kirkland, Tommie Davis, Jimmy Hunt, Jr., Jer ry Doto, singer Susan Dack and Sherman McGregor and his guitar, Bert Skipper, Ronnie Skipper and Gene Alleman and their bands. John Stokes, Cler mont Chamber of Commerce secretary, has been named to the Lake County Planning and Zoning Commission District 3. HISTORYFROM PAGE B3 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comA few weeks ago, Dave Black realized his cow had given birth on the familys farm on Old Highway 50 in Clermont, a working farm dating back to 1899. The 75-year-old Black, who has nearly 30 years in the cattle business, then realized he was seeing something he never saw before. The cow was nursing not one, but two calves. I couldnt believe she had twins and neither did all the old timers (fellow farmers) around here, he said. Its an exciting thing to have happen. Ive never seen twins born to any cow Ive had or known. You look at the size of those calves and you cant believe she was actually able to carry both of them. Shes not a very big cow. Black also said that in re searching cow births after the fact, he found that only 1 out of every 1,000 cow births result in twins. Megan Brew, who is a live stock agent with the Universi ty of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Ta vares branch, said that cows having twins is a somewhat uncommon in that about 1 to 7 percent of all cow births re sults in twins. Brew also said there are oth er unique things associated with cow births when its twins, including that if the twins are one male and one female, the female will usual ly be sterile. When its two female calves born as twins, they will both be able to reproduce but when its one male and one female, the female usually is sterile, Brew said. It has to do with hormonal interference during total development. The uter us is inuenced by male hor mones, causing an improper imbalance of hormones and what most of the time, ends up meaning sterility. Brew said there are ways cattlemen can check their cows via rectal exams to know whether they are having twins but most, she said, dont because its not too usually threatening for the mom and babies, like it is when the same occurrence happens with horses. With horses, she said, a multiple birth usually ends up killing the mom horse, one or both of the baby fowls or all three, so in the case of hors es, some cattlemen check for twins because of the health related dangers. In Clermont however, per haps the newest set of baby cows in the area, are near ly three weeks old and doing well, as is the mom. Meanwhile, Black, still awestruck, has assumed the role of a doting dad, carrying around pictures and showing them to anyone who will look and listen. A former biology teacher, coach and athletic director of Clermont High School, Black has not named the twins be cause he said he plans on sell ing them at the Webster Flea/ Farmers Market soon.Rare twin calves born on Clermont farm PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVE BLACK Dave Black of Clermont is still in awe that his cow recently gave birth to twins. It only happens once out of every 1,000 births, he said. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comLost Lake Elementary School students got a treat on Multicultural Day last week when Jim Sawgrass, a member of the Flor ida Muskogee Creek Tribe, showed up in native dress with In dian artifacts. Thomas Wooton, who attended the event to support his CLERMONTthird-grade daughter, said he liked that stu dents got to see differ ent things associated with Sawgrass culture and others from around the world. They learn how totally different their lives are from that of some other cultures, he said. Teacher Stephanie Tuesca said she liked how the days demonstrations brought the real world to life. Sawgrass grand nale demo involved the chil dren counting to three in his Native American lan guage before ring one loud blank toward the woods from a musket. Aisha Wooton, 9, said of all the artifacts Saw grass displayed, her favorites were the weap ons. It was fun to watch him throw the spears and learning what each weapon was used for, she said. This is the fourth year the Clermont school has put on Multicultur al Day. School Principal Rhonda Hunt said the purpose is to pro mote diversity and ac ceptance by not only having students learn about the various cul tures that exist among their fellow classmates, but to learn about tradi tions and cultures from all over the world. Fifth-grader Neelam Hari came dressed in her Panjabi, an outt made up of a colorful dress, pants and a scarf, which women often wear for special occasions in the Indian culture. I got a lot of ques tions about it and what its called, she said. In addition to wear ing multicultural clothing, other students performed songs and dances in their native languages and told sto ries about different cul tural traditions they practice at home with their families.Lost Lake students share in multicultural lessons

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Wednesday, May 21, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B5 FOR MOTHERBY PETER A. COLLINS / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZNo. 0511RELEASE DATE: 5/18/2014 ACROSS1 Diamond cover5 Some Arizonans9 Sultans charge14 Mother ___19 Calypso staple21 Pull together22 Quarter-rounded molding23 Agents in blood clotting24 I.Q. test developer25 Minute26 Part of A.P.R.: Abbr.27 Archaeologists discovery29 New Orleans Saint who was the Super Bowl XLIV M.V.P.33 ___ Disraeli, author of Curiosities of Literature35 Like seven Nolan Ryan games36 No kidding!38 Element #2s symbol39 Rodent that burrows near streams41 Prince Harry, for one45 Some West Coast wines47 Resented49 Mother ___50 Joel and Jennifer51 Opposite of neath52 Start the growing season54 With 58-Down, fourtime destination for 56-Down55 Simple storage unit on a farm57 Abbreviation between two names60 Berts mysterysolving twin62 Eye cover for the naive?63 The original It girl64 Whats good in Jerusalem?65 Lock67 ID digits68 Mother ___69 Michael Collinss org.70 Mother ___71 Circular parts?74 Bank of Israel75 Vintners prefix76 800, say78 Cuba libre ingredient81 End of a pickoff82 D.C. player83 Survivor tactic84 Really went for86 Sharks and Jets org.88 Needle-nosed fish90 Montemezzi opera LAmore dei ___ Re91 Mother ___93 Pot pushers vehicle?98 Literally, lion dog100 Second of six?101 Dorothys aunt103 2001 Spielberg scifi film104 Greases106 The Age of Anxiety poet107 Not accidental109 Pointed fence stakes113 Wager of war against Parthia114 Trident alternative115 Ta of The Family Man116 What unicorns dont do118 Not said expressly121 Prodded122 Stick in a school desk123 Smithsonian artifacts124 Mother ___125 Spread out126 Cataract location127 Paris suburb on the Seine DOWN1 Recipe amt.2 Braves, on a sports ticker3 End the growing season4 Purina purveyor5 Good cholesterol, for short6 Some freighter cargo7 Backsliding, to a dieter8 Yeah, right!9 Mother ___10 Singer DiFranco11 Zest12 Forever, in verse13 Astronomical sighting14 Politician who appeared as himself on NBCs Parks and Recreation15 Topples16 Abstainers choice17 Ultimate word of an ultimatum18 Kikkoman sauces20 Umpires cry28 Coming of age30 Hone31 Khans clan32 Goof around34 Coffin nail37 Former chief justice Stone38 Bucolic bundle40 1950s political monogram42 Architect Saarinen43Regarding44 Wonka inventor46 Kind of review48 Words to one whos about to go off53 Subject of a Pittsburgh art museum 55 Windows boxes?56 Seven-time N.B.A. rebounding champ, 1992-9858 See 54-Across59 Pushing the envelope, say61 Actor Sam of The Horse Whisperer66 Bowlers bane71 Education secretary Duncan72 Last month: Abbr.73 Whatd I tell you?74 Most people dont think theyre funny77 Game for which Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday were once dealers78 Jazz musicians79 Then again, in text messages80 Filmmaker Riefenstahl85 Table87 Former defense secretary Aspin89 Through road92 Pound of poetry94 Now I remember!95 Mother ___96 Some kiss-and-tell books97 They dont have fingers99 Milk dispensers102 Much obliged, in Montral103 Baker and Brookner105 Make more alluring108 Simple counters109 Advertise110 Sleek, informally111 Targets target, e.g.112 Flowerpot spot117 Body on a map119 Cozy room120 Happy Mothers ___! 1234 5678 9101112131415161718 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 2728 29 30 31 3233 3435 363738 39 4041 424344 4546 47 4849 50 51 525354 55 56 575859606162 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 717273 74 75 76 77 787980 81 82 83 84 858687 8889 90 91 92939495 96 97 98 99100 101102103 104 105106 107108 109110111 112113 114 115 116 117 118119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Solution on page B7 Classified IndexLegal Notices....................0001 Notices............................1000 At Your Service................9000 Employment....................2000 Pets/Animals....................6865 Merchandise....................6000 Real Estate/For RENT......3000 Real Estate/For SALE........4000 Recreation........................7000 Transportation..................8000 Cancellations for ads running Wednesday must be made by 4pm Monday.ADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since The Daily Commercial will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error call the classified department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error.TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! S OUTH LAKE P RESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde

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B6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 21, 2014 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance rt t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital Call the South Lake Press to get your ad in! 394-2183

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Wednesday, May 21, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B7 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr TARPHOPIHAREMJONES STEELDRUMUNITEOVOLO PLATELETSBINETEENSY PCTTOMBDREWBREES MOMISAACNOHIT OHHENUTRIAREDHEAD NAPASGRUDGEDTERESA GREYSOERSOWNORTH POLEBARNAKANANWOOL CLARABOWTOVTRESS SSNLODEIRASHIPADS LEUMIOENTOLLFREE COLATAGNATALLIANCE ATEUPNHLGARTRE TONGUETEACARTMOM SHIHTZUSHORTIEMAI LARDSAUDENMEANT PALISADESNEROORBIT LEONIEXISTINDICATED URGEDRULERAMERICANA GOOSESPLAYLENSISSY Crossword puzzle is on page B5. Thanks for reading the local paper!

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B8 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 21, 2014 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 725344767 1318315974 921FREE SPACE5372 216424863 529395268ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N IB O G BINGO B I N G O SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Ray Dusseau WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! G 52 G 53 G 59 G 48 G 47



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LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com S en. Alan Hays, R-Umatil la, and Rep. Larry Metz, R-Yalaha said this week they were pleased with the out come of the 2014 Florida leg islative session, which streng htened protections for human trafcking victims, improved transparency for special dis tricts and allowed parents to object to instructional material used in the classroom. But at the same time, the leg islators said they were disap pointed that several bills they fought for passage did not suc ceed, from a bill that would identify and correct hazardous walking conditions at local ele mentary schools to legislation that would designate a school employee or volunteer to carry a concealed weapon on school grounds to a comprehensive bill that would provide protec tion of the states springs. I am very disappointed the hazardous walking conditions bill did not make it through the Senate, Metz said, noting that the bill was supported by the Florida School Board Asso ciation and the Florida Parent Teacher Association. The bill died in the Florida Senate Appropriations Com mittee. If passed, the bill would have required district school boards and state and local governmental entities to work cooperatively to identify and correct hazardous walking conditions, according to the House of Representatives staff analysis of the bill. School Board members liked that the bill would have lowered the speed limit that makes for a hazardous walking condition from 55 miles per hour to 50 miles per hour or greater, the analysis points out. For example, the Lake County district provides some courtesy busing at Pine Ridge Elemen tary, where the speed limit is 50 mph. The district would have been reimbursed by the state for busing students at Pine Ridge had the bill passed. SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | B3 SPORTS: Rhodes wins NCAA title WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWSTAND INSIDE CLASSIFIED B5 CROSSWORDS B4 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN B3 SPORTS B1 VOICES A3 WORD ON THE STREE T A2 SO UTH LAKE PRE SS V OLUME 99, NO. 21 3 SECTIO N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reserved www. southlakepress.com PRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID Lawmakers lament losses Springs, sidewalks and student safety set aside BRAD MCCLENNY / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP Patrons jump off the dock into the spring head at Blue Springs near High Springs. SEE LAWMAKERS | A2 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com City ofcials are cele brating a new name for its newest acquisition the Clermont Com munity Center. The property, locat ed on U.S. Highway 27, a couple miles south of State Road 50, was for merly Celebration of Praise church until it was purchased along with surrounding land, totaling 45-acres by the city earlier this year for $6.3 million. Plans call for the building it self to be used for fam ily programs, entertain ment and more. Up until now, some people were still call ing it the COP Church, Celebration Center and other monikers. But the new facili ty and property actual ly has two names now. The building itself will be called the Clermont Arts and Recreation Center, while the prop erty will be called the Clermont Community Center. The building has a large stage, meeting rooms and an outdoor pool more suited to an arts and recreation title, while the property also will house the commu nitys new police sta tion. I think everyone was excited because like when you are naming a baby, it really feels like its yours when you give it a name, City Spokes woman Doris Blood sworth said, adding that a name promotes an identity. We wanted a name that was descriptive but not limiting, Council man Keith Mullins said of the community cen ter. As a resident youll know where it is when you hear the name and, for those from out of CLERMONT Community center gets not 1 name, but 2 DORIS BLOODSWORTH / SUBMITTED PHOTO The councils pick for a new name matched what residents preferred during an informal poll taken during Clermonts Fitness Palooza last month. People voted with jelly beans. SEE CENTER | A2 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Mascotte ofcials are looking at creating a domestic partner registry within the city. Mayor Tony Rosado, who pro posed the idea and requested it be placed on the agenda for dis cussion, said he wants to know what board members think about a registry. Im bringing it to the coun cil rst, so that they are not blind-sided by the issue, he said. Rosado said a registry is a step in the right direction for same-sex couples and other long-term couples who live to gether but choose not to mar ry, beca use it would give them more rights, like hospital visita tion privileges, decision-mak ing power when it comes to medical issues without a pow er of attorney, and the right to make after-death arrangements that traditionally married cou ples now have. I think nowadays, in the year 2014, its important to give equality to everyone and some thing like this would cover peo ple from all walks of life, Rosa do said. John Bradford, a Mascotte res ident in a domestic part nership, said that although there is no hospital in Mascotte, protection in regards to visitation or deci sion-making power while at a nearby hospital like Clermont, may not be supported. Howev er, he said that in other instanc es, being registered would be critical. I feel it could help coordinate assistance in some situations when it comes to public safe ty, Bradford said, explaining it would give law enforcement a contact person in case a partner was injured. Law ofcers would know its OK to share personal MASCOTTE City may create domestic partner registry SEE REGISTRY | A2

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 21, 2014 CLERMONT D-Day remembrance set at Historic Village The turning point of World War II will be remembered at 11 a.m. June 7, with a D-Day commemoration cere mony at Clermonts Historic Village, 490 West Ave. All veterans in attendance will have an opportunity to tell their stories as the event honors their service to our country. After the ceremony, hot dogs, apple pie and sodas will be available. For information, call Dodie King at 352-593-8496 or go to www. ClermontVillage.org. CLERMONT National Mens Health Week set for June 9-15 In recognition of National Mens Health Week June 9-15, Dr. Jamin Brahmbhatt and Dr. Sijo Prekattil from the PUR Clinic at South Lake Hospital will hit the road to spread the word about mens health issues for the rst-ever Drive for Mens Health. The 24-hour road trip from Florida to New York kicks off at 8 a.m. June 12 at South Lake Hospital, 1900 Don Wickham Dr., in Clermont. The physicians will drive approxi mately 1,100 miles in an all-electric TESLA, stopping only to recharge the vehicle, hosting mens health events, educational lectures, patient testimo nials and more along the way. Funds raised will benet genetic research for chronic male conditions and educa tional scholarships. For information, go to www. Drive4MensHealth.com or call 407-833-9201. GROVELAND First Baptist Church to welcome new pastor First Baptist Church of Groveland, 137 East Cherry St., will welcome its new pastor, Billy Stephens, at the 10:50 a.m. service on June 1. The church will host a light breakfast re ception at 9 a.m. prior to Sunday school. Stephens comes from First Baptist Church of High Springs, near Gainesville, where he served for the past eight years. Prior to that, he served in the United States Navy. Stephens earned his mas ters in religion at Liberty Theological Seminary. For details, call 352-429-2651, or email fbcgroveland@embarqmail.com LAKE COUNTY Quit Smoking Program to begin on May 27 The Lake County Health Department will host free, ve-week quit smoking classes on Tuesdays from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., beginning on May 27, at the Community Health Center, 225 N. First St., in Leesburg. Classes will also be on Mondays from 6:30 to 8 p.m., beginning on June 1, at the National Training Center at South Lake Hospital, 1935 Don Wickham Dr., in Clermont. To enroll, call 1-877-252-6094. GROVELAND Waste collection event scheduled for Thursday Lake County residents can dispose of toxic materials in a safe way at an upcoming Household Hazardous Waste Collection event from 9 a.m. to noon Thursday at Ace Hardware, 1007 State Road 50, in Groveland. Small quantities of unused or un wanted waste products such as lawn and gardening materials, photo and swimming pool chemicals, paint products, cleaning solutions, motor oil, used gas, batteries, uorescent lamps, light bulbs and small propane tanks are eligible for disposal. Infectious waste materials including solvents, chemical laborato ry waste and radioactive waste are prohibited. For information, go to www.lake county.gov or call 352-343-3776. Area Briefs What south Lake residents are saying about ... PRESIDENTS Who do you think has been the best president in your time? I like Clinton a lot. I think he achieved a lot. He took us from being in debt and brought us forward. I think he continues to be a good person too. BETSY WEATHERBY LAKELAND I think Id have to go with Eisenhower. I was so young I didnt really know much. Since then, the presidents are so behold en to one political party or another. DAVE RUDOLPH CLERMONT Clinton. He and the par ty helped get us out of debt. Too bad he cant run again. KAY JOHNSON CLERMONT Word on the Street Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 Truman. He didnt take any(thing) from any one, and he red McAr thur cause he wouldnt do what he was supposed to. He kept us out of China. BOB BERUBE GROVELAND Metz said he would not give up on bringing the bill back next legislative session. I have to try again, he said. I cant let that go. It is dealing with student safety. How can you give up on something so im portant? Indeed, Metz said he amended the bill and Hays did the same as co-sponsor in the Senate, so the scal impact on lo cal governments was re moved. Even with no scal im pact, it got bottled up in Senate appropriations, he said. Hays also voiced his disappointment. These hazardous con ditions exist and when lo cal ofcials dont act, then state ofcials have to step in and say you must act, Hays said. The K-12 Education Subcommittee, which met in March and indi cated support for the bill, heard opposition from Duval County Schools. We have some con cerns with some of the scal impact, John Sulli van, lobbyist for the Du val County Schools said at the subcommittee hearing on the bill. Over all, we look forward to working with Rep. Metz. Sullivan said he could not speak on record on Duval County school is sues because he is a lob byist. Speaking of his bills that did not make it through, Hays said his bill to arm designated school employees or volunteers who only had a military or law enforcement back ground and a clean dis ciplinary records would have made schools safer. People have such a misunderstanding, he said. We are not talking about having every school teacher armed with a .38 or 9 mm. I am willing to bring it back. But by far one of the most talked about pieces of legislation that did not make it to a vote in the House was the springs legislation, which would have required the estab lishment of minimum and ows in Outstanding Florida Springs by July 1, 2022, among other pro tections. It also would have up graded wastewater treat ment plants and onsite sewage treatment and disposal systems, accord ing to the Florida Senate bill analysis. Hays said the bill did not make it through be cause the House did not have a companion bill. It would have been un wise for the House to rub ber stamp what the Sen ate did, he said. They need to do their due dili gence. At the same time, Hays said he is condent next year and the year af ter there will be signi cant legislation, not just for the springs but to ad dress water issues across the state. Within the next two years, we will develop a statewide water poli cy, he said. It is import ant to note, in order for a statewide policy to be effective, it must be re gionalized and must have exibility. We are going to have to tailor our policy to be appropriate for the region. Hays said the list of im paired water bodies is large. One of the things that so many people fail to recognize is the foolish ness of cleaning up the water body that you know is being contaminated. You must clean up the source of contamination and then clean up the water body. Other bills that failed included: A bill by Sen. Dorothy Hukill, R-Port Orange, which would have cut the state tax on communications services by 2 percent, resulting in $242 million in tax relief statewide, according to Halifax Media Group. A bill by Hays that would have required counties, cities, school districts and higher ed ucation institutions to give preference to Florida companies when pur chasing goods or hiring for construction projects that involve state money, according to Halifax Media Group. HB 7069, which would have upgraded the health, safety and teaching standards of the early learning programs, according The News Service of Florida. HB 7057 would have allowed Lake Technical College to offer col lege credit certicate programs. LAWMAKERS FROM PAGE A1 town searching for it, it wont be confusing to nd. Mullins said other con siderations involved the word complex in it but after a consensus that it sounded like a me dical facility. In addition, he said hav ing a police center located in the Clermont Arts and Recreation Center was not be suitable, so now with the two names, those issues are solved. It would go something like this: The Clermont Arts & Recreation Center, at the Clermont Commu nity Center, which is what the property as a whole will be called, or the Cler mont Police Department at the Clermont Commu nity Center, Bloodsworth said. A building in down town Clermont cur rently known as the Cler mont Community Center will now be called the Clermont City Center. The councils pick for a new building name matched what residents preferred during an infor mal poll taken during Fit ness Palooza, a rst time event the city hosted last month. I was joking with some one and told them, The jelly beans have spoken, Bloodsworth said. CENTER FROM PAGE A1 information with the other partne r, as they would with a couple recognized as being le gally married. In my own case, I would like my partner to know if something happened to me, but it doesnt necessarily just have to do with samesex partnerships, but those couples who live together and choose not to marry, or with livein caregivers ..., Brad ford said. I don t know what stipulations go along with the registry, but Im hoping it would be something open to any unmarried couple choosing to regis ter. If considered, Mas cotte would only be the second city in Lake County along with Tavares to offer the registry. Rosado said both Orange County and Orlando have reg istries, and got support in doing so from prom inent companies in the Central Florida area like Disney World, Universal Studios and Sea World. Because of that, Ro sado believes a registry would boost econom ic development in Mas cotte, attracting people and businesses looking for a diverse-minded city to call home. It might help with economic develop ment within the city since wed be one of a few (two) cities in Lake County to offer it, he said. REGISTRY FROM PAGE A1 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com John Crescente, 45, was arrested recently on a grand theft charge after re peatedly receiving store credit for items off the shelf he never purchased at the Clermont Home De pot, according to an arrest afdavit. The total loss to Home Depot was $726.73. Police said Crescente got credit for items he nev er purchased on four dif ferent days. He was arrest ed on Saturday when came back to the store. Crescente initially said he did nothing wrong un til he was shown a vid eo, taken by the stores as set protection specialist, of him returning unpur chased items. He later ad mitted to being the person in the video, the afdavit states. Crescente was booked into the Lake County Jail and was released on a $2,000 bond, according to the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce website. Some of the items listed in the afdavit that Cres cente returned for store credit included a Birming ham keyed entry lever, a Birmingham SS lock, a Flexico 570 paint sprayer and a power stainer. Crescente was previous ly arrested for retail theft at Walmart on Dec. 4, 2013, according to police. CLERMONT Man repeatedly returns items to Home Depot

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Wednesday, May 21, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3 Gouged at the pump According to recent news re ports, Florida is noted for an other rst. As if identity theft were not enough, now its for the highest gas prices in the Southeast. Gov. Rick Scotts claim to have saved citizens big bucks by reducing vehicle registra tion is questionable. I will save around $25 for an entire year. Collectively, perhaps millions will be saved statewide, but in dividually, peanuts. How about real savings for anyone who owns a vehicle? Reduce the excessive state taxes at the gas pump! We are being gouged big time. MICHAEL J. HARRIS | Webster Walls usually have a purpose A recent letter by Robert Wesolowski, A Party With Many Walls, has again shown his in ability to adapt to a changing world, and he would do well to do his research before writing an article full of drivel. The wall between his and many Democrats ears is deep er and wider than even the walls of Jerusalem. The walls he spoke of from the Bible were only brought down when God decid ed they were to come down. The Berlin wall was very effec tive by our border/racial stan dards until Gorbachev decided to take it down to make a unit ed Germany, which has turned out to be a disaster. The already existing socialist society of West Germany got run over by the op pressed people of East Germany and ruined the economy. The wall that the Obama ad ministration has created in this country overshadows even the Great Wall of China. The wall created by the Democrats and Harry Reid be tween the parties has divided this country more than the ra cial divide of the 1960s. Can you imagine how many fences or walls could have been built or torn down just with the money the Obamas have wasted prancing around the world on our dime? Thats the Democrat way. The greatest wall of all is be tween the Democrats and reality. I would suggest that some walls are needed, some required and some due to people like Wesolowski are probably permanent. JOHN COHN | Tavares Pay attention to real world problems After reading a recent headline in the Daily Commercial I am reminded of a comment my college philosophy professor made back in 1960, If you want to become a successful politician, pick a cause that everyone can believe in but no one can x. His example was world hunger. In the 1970s, the issue was world over-population and there was a campaign called Zero Population Growth. I had an associate that believed so much in this philosophy that he and his wife took an oath to limit their family. When in my 80 years, I look back at the world I have known the Depression, World War II, Korea (where I served), Vietnam, Somalia, Iran, Russia, Africa and many more I see a place that cannot nd a way to better the lives and living conditions of the worlds population. And I wonder how successful they can be in affecting the natural elements and cycles of our planet. Recently I saw a very beautiful lm about polar bears narrated by Meryl Streep. Its concern was the effect of global warming on the lives of two polar bear cubs. Yet in the lm, the real life-threatening danger to them was actually a male polar bear that wanted to eat the cubs. And then there was the Russian ship that got frozen in ice in Antarctica and was rescued by China. The ship was there to study the effects of global warming. Perhaps the front page lead should have been about the 200 school girls kidnapped in Africa, something the world might actually do something about. ROBERT M. JOHNSON | Leesburg T he Lake Cou nty School Board choked last week. Less than a week after a consultant hand ed the board a draft report that suggested the school district had intentionally fudged their class-size numbers to avoid state nes, the board whiffed on an opportunity to get to the bottom of the emerging scandal. By way of background, the state limits the size of classes in public schools in hopes that man ageable class sizes will result in a better quality education for our children. It can impose nes on schools that violate the limits. When a teacher blew the whistle and told Florida education ofcials that school ofcials here asked her to help manipulate the class siz es to make it appear they were under the limits, Lake County ofcials asked for an audit to de termine how far-ranging the problem was. The CPA rm that authored last weeks report indicated the problem was indeed pervasive and recommended some changes, encouraging the district to hire an administrator specical ly to oversee class sizes, provide training about class size compliance and communicate better with the individual schools. At the same time, 136 teachers told the au ditors they were asked to sign or submit false class-size reports, and 23 percent of administra tors surveyed said they were aware that students were temporarily moved to other classes for the sake of getting under the class-size limits. Additionally, the auditors said they were told of general statements about class sizes ema nating from the school district headquarters di recting the schools to make it work. In view of these claims, there is ample evi dence that there was a concerted effort among district higher-ups to skirt the class size law. If they did so, it wasnt with the students best in terests at heart because the law itself was in tended to protect their interests. On Monday, the School Board accepted the report virtually without comment, signaling its intention to let the matter die quietly. Only long-time board member Kyleen Fischer spoke up, expressing her concern that district ofcials may have intentionally duped the state. Fisch er has called for Superintendent Susan Moxleys contract to be reviewed as a result. The question is, why are the four other School Board members silent on this issue? Had the audit found that the class size reporting prob lems were the product of a miscalculation, for instance, it would be appropriate to dismiss this as an honest mistake. But one has to won der why the School Board is not interested in getting to the bottom of this. Its not too late. For the second week in a row, we call on the School Board to launch a full ex amination of whether district administrators knowingly fudged their numbers. Cheating, after all, isnt permitted in the class room. It shouldnt be permitted in the school district ofces. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD ........................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST O PINION WHATS YOUR OPINION? The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Letters to the Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711 By fax to: 352-394-8001 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. GUEST COLUMNS If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OUR VIEW If you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veter ans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to to www.lake vet erans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANS S OUTH LAKE PRESS Your community newspaper for more than 100 years. 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001 The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Florida 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region. All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. YOUR OPINIONS LETTERS TO THE EDITOR A case for legalizing pot Marijuana is tagged as a factor in accidents if THC is found in the bloodstream at all. That doesnt mean the driver was under its inuence at the time of the accident. Evidence of studies from the National Highway Trafc Safety Administration strongly suggests that alcohol encourages risky driving whereas THC encourages greater caution, and users seem better able to compensate for its adverse effects while driving under the inuence. Revenue from taxation of marijuana sales could reach up to $8.7 billion per year if taxed like alcohol or tobacco, on top of billions in saved law enforcement resources. With 757,969 individuals incarcerated for marijuanarelated cases, at $21,006 a pop, that is $15,921,896,814 that would have to be coughed up by the American taxpayer to keep these individuals imprisoned for one year. We provide their shelter, offer medical, dental and psychiatric care, maintain, transport and educate these individuals and maintain facilities for them to live in. Im pretty sure that the attorneys, ambulance chasers as you call them, stand to lose money if marijuana becomes legal. The esteemed medical journal, The Lancet Neurology has stated that marijuanas active components inhibit pain in virtually every experimental pain paradigm. Allowing patients legal access to medical marijuana has been endorsed by numerous organizations, including the AIDS Action Council, American Bar Association, American Public Health Association, American Nurses Association, National Association of Attorneys General and the California Medical Association. Anything you ingest has the potential for harm, marijuana included, however some of the pain medications that are already on the market have horrible side effects as well as being extremely addictive. Marijuana is a natural herb that is much healthier than the lab-created substances out there legally. When an activity becomes legal, it becomes regulated removing money from the pockets of street-corner pot dealers all the way up to the drug cartels. Kids would have less access to pot if it was regulated, just like alcohol and tobacco. Ask a kid which is easier to get. The quality of street marijuana being sold to our kids is a scary thought. SANDRA PLATT | Fruitland Park LETTER of the WEEK School Board flubs its duty on class-size scandal

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 21, 2014 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 Place your ad here and reach the Local Market!VERY AFFORDABLE!Call today 352-394-2183 HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com The moments when Ashley Vera felt discour aged about her studies at South Sumter High School, she felt tempted to give up. But her mentor through the Lake & Sumter Take Stock in Children Program con tinued to encourage her, she said, giving her hope that she could earn her diploma this year. They push you and keep an eye on your grades, she said. They have been a big help. Meeting once a week with her mentor, Vera said she received posi tive reinforcement. As a result, Vera is the fth family member to receive a scholarship to college. She is planning to attend St. Leo Uni versity, where she wants to study biology health sciences. I want to become an occupational thera pist, she said. Vera and 25 other stu dents were honored this week at a break fast at Venetian Gar dens for the local pro gram, which statewide has served more than 18,000 students. The mission of the program, which Don Pemberton founded in Pinellas County in 1995, was to end the cycle of poverty through educa tion by providing nan cially at risk students the opportunity to earn a college scholarship, according to Take Stock in Children documents. The program is unique, Take Stock in Children ofcials say, beca use of the support the students receive, the accountability required and the dollar-for-dol lar match provided by the state of Florida. To enroll in the pro gram, students must write an essay about why they want to go to college, they must have a 2.5 GPA or higher, and they must demon strate a nancial need based on USDA In come Guidelines. They also must participate in the Free and Reduced Lunch Program. Beginning their fresh man year of high school, students in the pro gram work with a men tor one-on-one for four years, must maintain their GPA and not get into any trouble, pro gram ofcials said. Gail Weidner, pro gram manager for Lake & Sumter Take Stock in Children, said the local program has been suc cessful. She noted that 98 percent of students in the program gradu ate, compared with 79 percent who are not in the program. It is hard to say where these students would have gone if they were not in the program, she said. They are less like ly to be able to afford college. Vera said it would be much harder to afford college without the pro gram. Katelyn Allen, a senior at Tavares High School, said the program has helped her build a bet ter relationship with people in the commu nity and has taught her to be a leader. Allen credits her men tor, Kim Varnadore, who attends many of her high school events, for pushing her to com plete her education. My mentor encour aged me to do my best in everything and take the next step where I need to be, she said. (She) will send encour aging text messages, keeps me up to date on anything going on and encourages me to do things. Allen will attend Lake Sumter State College in the fall on a scholarship and hopes to pursue a career in teaching. Without the program, Allen said she would not be as motivated to complete school. I wouldnt have the great relationships I have now, she said. Varnadore said she re members meeting Allen four years ago and how quiet she was at rst. I have seen her grow in condence, she said. She took a leadership role in her ag corps at the high school. She ended up co-captain. This program gave students hope for the future, said Rosanne Brandeburg, Lake County School Board member. If they main tained good grades, they had this scholar ship waiting for them when they graduated high school. Varnadore said Al len would always have a plan of action and she would simply serve as her sounding board. Speaking of Allens graduation this spring, Varnadore said it is sad, because she has felt a part of her family. The experience, she said, was valuable to her. It gave me the chance to step back and look at the world through her eyes, she said. She is such a pos itive, young lady. Of tentimes, I would be thinking of 100 different things. Her attitude was Take Stock widens the path to academic success BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Tavares High School senior Katelyn Allen poses with Lake-Sumter State College president Dr. Charles Mojock at Lake-Sumter State College in Leesburg, on Thursday. SEE SUCCESS | A8

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Wednesday, May 21, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5

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A6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 21, 2014

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Wednesday, May 21, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A7 Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...Bacchus Vino Etcetera Tenth AnniversaryHistoric downtown Clermont is the home of a friendly wine shop where the staff and customers believe that wine is for your enjoyment, not intimidation. Open since 2004 at the corner of Montrose and Seventh, across from City Hall Park, Bacchus Vino Etcetera is commemorating their tenth anniversary with a month long celebration. When it comes to wine education, one should keep an open mind and an open bottle. Owners Keith and Karen Mullins encourage Bacchus customers to explore and savor the vast array of wines available from around the world. Frequent sampling opportunities include evening gatherings featuring wines from a specific area, grape variety, winery or other theme. Often a wine or two is available for sampling as customers drop by to shop. A popular tasting and shopping event are the Wine Walks held six times yearly which feature wines from Bacchus Vino Etcetera being sampled at various merchants throughout the downtown area. The next Wine Walk will take place May 16th from 6:30 until 9:00 and will feature all Italian Wine. Tickets are currently available at Bacchus Vino Etcetera. Bacchus Vino Etcetera is the home of the By the Light of the Moon Lunar Wine Club. Each time there is a full moon members receive a bottle each of specially selected red and white wines at a preset price. Between full moons, club members are eligible for exclusive offers and wine discounts. The club is an excellent way to learn about and try new wines, and is a great gift idea. Bacchus Vino Etcetera currently stocks over 700 wines from 17 countries and 8 states. Wines from many popular wineries can be found along with those from some lesser-known producers. For customers with specific requests Bacchus Vino Etcetera can special order wines not already in stock (subject to availability). For the beer lover in the family Bacchus carries a selection of imported and domestic craft ales and lagers. In addition to the wines and beers, a variety of wine racks, corkscrews, stemware and wine related gifts are available. Stop by soon and learn what Keiths 42 years of experience in the wine business can add to your wine enjoyment. www.bacchusvinoetc.com 692 West Montrose Suite D (352) 394-9805 LOOKING FOR PARTS? SEE JULIE (352) 394-6111 Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! IN MEMORY DEATH NOTICES Fannie Lee Anderson Fannie Lee Anderson, 78, of Leesburg, died Tuesday, May 13, 2014. Marvin C. Zanders Fu neral Home, Inc. Maitland C. Brasher, Jr. Maitland C. Brasher, Jr., 69, of Astatula died on Saturday, May 17, 2014. Steverson, Ham lin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tava res, FL. Mary M. Crane Mary M. Crane, 85, of Groveland, died Satur day, May 10, 2014. PageTheus Funerals & Cre mations, Leesburg. Jessie M. Darville Jessie M. Darville, 90, of Eustis, died Sunday, May 11, 2014. Hayes Brothers Funeral Home, Eustis. Gary Leroy Edgar Gary Leroy Edgar, 80 of Fruitland Park, died Thursday, May 15, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations, Leesburg. Earlene S. Ford Earlene S. Ford, 68, of Bushnell, died Wednes day, May 7, 2014. Mar vin C. Zanders Funeral Home, Inc., Apopka. Penny Sue Ivie Penny Sue Ivie, 49, of Astor, died Sunday, May 11, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Astor. Donald Paul Jones Sr. Donald Paul Jones, Sr., 86, of Oxford, died on Saturday, May 17, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Willie Jones Willie Jones, 86, of Yalaha, died Wednes day, May 7, 2014. East side Funeral Home, Leesburg. Paul Eugene Landis Paul Eugene Landis, 87, of Lady Lake, died Thursday, May 15, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations, Leesburg. Hattie B. Lee Hattie B. Lee, 84, of Cherry Lake, died Fri day, May 16, 2014. Mar vin C. Zanders Funeral Home, Inc. Linda Spikes Russell Linda Spikes Russell, 52, of Groveland, died Tuesday, May 13, 2014. Marvin C. Zanders Fu neral Home, Inc. Kenneth Leon Strickland Kenneth Leon Strick land, 65, of Leesburg, died Wednesday May 14, 2014. Beyers Funer al Home and Cremato ry, Leesburg. Edward Templin Edward Templin, 73, of Webster, died on Sat urday, May 17, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood.

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A8 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 21, 2014 very encouraging to me. Rep. Marlene OToole, who has ser ved as a mentor for several years and helped found the local program, said it is life changing and mentors play a critical role in the success of the student. They need someone to tell them: If you stay the course, you will be success ful and be able to help your family, said OToole, who is the chief operating of cer of the state program. Lake County Schools Su perintendent Susan Moxley also lauded the program The support of the pro gram sets them up for suc cess, she said. The guid ance that comes from the program puts them in a place of strength and sup port. When they do get to college, the chances of completing college are bet ter. Data from the program show that since 82 percent of students in the Take Stock in Children Pro gram enrolled in college within the rst year of high school graduation a s com pared to the state average of 56 percent. SUCCESS FROM PAGE A4 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Clermont ofcials have met twice with a team from Wilesmith Advertising & De sign, out of West Palm Beach, a company whose exper tise will be used in a reverse branding process for the city. The creative team work ing on the Clermont brand ing project includes a design director, researcher, strate gic planner, public relations specialist and graphic de signers, city ofcials said in a press release. City Manager Darren Gray said out of all the companies his staff looked at, Wilesmith was chosen because of its in sight into and willingness to involve the entire communi ty. (Branding) is much more than a logo or tagline, Gray said. Wilesmith under stands that it is critical to have buy-in from our city council, staff and especially our citizens and business own ers. The Wile smith team is bright and has a talented staff that thinks strategically. They have a terric track record with other Florida cit ies, they had conducted indepth research and created a video that told us imme diately that they understood what an amazing place Cler mont is. According to Public Infor mation Ofcer Doris Blood sworth, Clermonts branding process is being conduct ed differently than most. In stead of the city working with the branding agency rst, then holding community fo rums to get input from resi dents and businesses, it was done the other way around. Gray said he wanted to make sure the community knows how much their ideas are valued. First, we are fortunate to have a community that is en gaged and showed they are eager to share their ideas, Gray said. They trusted we would listen and we have. Presenting the ideas to Wilesmith has streamlined the branding process, the city manager said. Our consultants have nev er had a city before that came to the table with such a clear sense of its assets and prior ities, Gray said. We will be gin our master planning for the next ve to 10 years in a few months. So, the vision that the residents shared last summer will continue to drive the branding and the master planning. Gray said that to him, the branding process will boost the citys economic develop ment and quality of life. We want to make sure that we plan for our future in a smart way that ensures there are good jobs for our chil dren and the families that choose Clermont as their home, Gray said. By iden tifying our assets, we can use our resources wisely. Bloodsworth said the Wile smith team may soon pres ent suggestions for a logo, motto and promotion plan. CLERMONT City in the midst of new branding GRAY (Branding) is much more than a logo or tagline. Wilesmith understands that it is critical to have buy-in from our city council, staff and especially our citizens and business owners. The Wilesmith team is bright and has a talented staff that thinks strategically. City Manager Darren Gray

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B1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 21, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTS SPORTS EDITOR ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE .............................. 365-8268 FAX .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL ......... sports@dailycommercial.com S PORTS and LEISURE FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Rhodes College led from wireto-wire to win the NCAA Division III Womens Golf Championship on Friday by 24 strokes over Mary Hardin-Baylor in Howey-in-the Hills. The Lynx dominated on the El Campeon course at Mission Inn Resort and Club, clinching the ti tle with the best round of the week, ring a 308 to sew up the cham pionship with a four-round team score of 1,256. Williams College was third, 29 shots behind Rhodes, the Uni versity of Texas-Tyler was fourth at 1,291 and Ithaca College and Methodist University tied for fth place, 42 shots off the pace. Two-time All American Georgia na Salant of Williams grabbed the individual title with a four-round total of 303 after ring a four-over 76. Her 15-over-par total for the tournament brought her in two strokes ahead of Mary Hardin-Bay lors McKenzie Ralston, who strug gled in Fridays windy conditions with a ve-over 77. Rhodes won the title by featuring four golfers who nished in the top 15 among individuals. Jessica Zweifel came in third, four strokes back of the lead, while Nik ki Isaacson came in fourth, nine strokes back. Meg Healy nished tied for 10th, 15 strokes off the pace, while Sarrahanne Vaughan came in 13th for the tournament. Rounding out the individual top 10, Doyle OBrien of St. Thom as (Minn.) came in 11 strokes back in fth, Sewanees Emily Ja vadi nished 12 strokes back in sixth and was the highest nish er to compete solely as an individ ual, Texas-Tylers Laura Lindsey and George Foxs Sydney Maluen da tied for seventh at 13 strokes back and Loretta Giovannettone of Methodist came in ninth at 14 strokes back. Mary Hardin-Baylors Taylor ORear and Methodists Kel sie Carralero tied Healy for 10th. Also on Friday, it was announced the championship will return to Mission Inn in 2015. Rhodes wins NCAA title PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Rhodes College sophomore Meg Healy hits a tee shot on the second hole during the NCAA Division III Womens Golf Championship on the El Campeon course at the Mission Inn Resort in Howey-in-the-Hills, on Friday. HOWEY-IN-THE-HILLS LEESBURG University of Mary Hardin-Baylor junior Taylor ORear hits her ball out of a sand trap. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Lake-Sumter State College soft ball player Kayla Fuller has been a leader in her only season with the Lakehawks. Now that her career at LSSC has come to a close, Fuller is reaping the rewards for her efforts. The power-hitting outelder capped off her sophomore season by helping the Lakehawks to their second state tournament berth in school history. She was named to the All Mid-Florida Conference First Team with a solid all-around season. In addition, Fuller became just the second LSSC player in histo ry to be named to the Florida Col lege Systems Activities Association All State First Team. She also will be a nominee of the National Ju nior College Athletic Association All-America ballot. Fuller played only one season at LSSC after transferring from South Georgia State College. With the Lakehawks, Fuller led the team with a .378 batting av erage, 11 home runs the second highest single sea son total in school history and 55 RBIs. Kaylas bat was amazing for us all season long, LSSC coach Jill Se mento said. She al ways swings hard and pitchers got to where they didnt want to pitch to her. When they did, she made them pay for it. Id stop short of saying she was a once-in-a-lifetime player, but you dont come across players like Kayla very often and we were very lucky to get her even if it was just for a year. Fuller batted fourth for the Lake hawks in 2014 and helped LSSC to a 26-35 record the best sin gle-season mark in school histo ry. She played in every game and nearly half of her 70 hits went for extra bases (19 doubles one triple, 11 home runs). Semento said Fuller quickly be came a team leader, although she wasnt very vocal. Kayla let her play do the talking for her, Semento said. She had a very loud bat and led by example. Fuller batted .290 as a freshman at South Geor gia State, with three homers and 11 RBIs. She lost her scholar ship with the school after a coach ing change and eventually landed at LSSC for her sophomore year. Semento said Fuller has of fers from a number of four-year schools and is currently weighing her options. Not only is Fuller a standout on the softball eld, but Semento said she excels academi cally as well. Kayla was a role model to oth er teammates in the classroom, Semento said. She was the per fect example of how working hard in the classroom can pay off. Not only do great athletes at our level have to be good at their sport, but they have to be a great student as well in order to move up. LSSCs Fuller earns All-State honors FULLER Staff Report The Harlem Wizards will take on a team of Lake County educators for the benet event at 7 p.m. Thursday at Lake Minneo la High School, 101 N. Hancock Rd. Food trucks will be on site at 5 p.m. The event also hosts a silent auction with nu merous big ticket items for purchase. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased at www.harlemwizards.com. Cost does not include a $5 parking fee at the school. Funds raised benet the schools athletic teams. For information, call 352-394-9600. MINNEOLA Harlem Wizards roll into Minneola for benefit FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Host families often are the unsung he roes for the Leesburg Lightning and other franchises in the Florida Collegiate Sum mer League. Players coming to town for the summer from other parts of the country stay with local families, who provide them with a bed, laundry facilities and meals. At least, thats what the league asks of a host family. Over the years, the program has been the starting point for countless friendships between players and local families. Some players have come back to visit their host family, even after their playing career with the Lightning has ended. Now, with the start of the Lightnings eighth season less than a month away, the team is looking for families willing to open their doors for players needing a place to stay while they represent the community. According to Elizabeth Knowles, the Lightnings host family coordinator, the team currently has 13 local families lined up to house players when they begin ar riving. However, she would like to add four or ve more to the roster. Im not 100 percent sure how many I will need because not all the players have returned their signed contracts yet, Knowles said. They are not ofcially on the roster until the contract is signed and returned to the league. (Coach Da vid Therneau) has asked that all play ers be here by June 1, but many will still be in playoff situations with their college teams. I would like to have 17 or 18 spots for the boys and then maybe a couple more just to be on the safe side. I would be really sad if a kid could not come because he did not have a place to stay. Knowles is in her third year as a host family and her rst as coordinator for the program. Lightning players who live with host families often talk about the bond the develops between them and their sec ond families. Many area host families are older couples with an extra room in their homes, but some host families have younger children who look up to the Lightning players as big brothers. Players and the host-family children often have afternoon games of catch in the back yard, just like any big brother or little brother or sister might do, said John Brandeburg, Lightning general manag er. Our host family program has grown into something so much more than just a way to house players. When these kids come to Lake County to play for the Light ning and get taken in by one of our fam ilies, they become part of those families. Not just for that summer, but for as long they want. Its just another thing that separates the Leesburg Lightning from the other teams in the Florida Collegiate Summer League. Anyone interested in learning more about being a host family for the Lees burg Lightning can contact Brandeburg at john@brandeburg.com. The Lightning are set to begin their sea son at 7 p.m. on June 4 against DeLand at Pat Thomas Stadium-Buddy Lowe Field. Host families needed for Lightning

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Ann Dupee REMEMBER WHEN A weekly column that reprints some of the more interesting news stories that have appeared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press. B3 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 21, 2014 www.southlakepress.com C OMMUNITY Proudly serving CLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWS STAFF WRITER ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 EMAIL ..... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com HOMETOWN: Columbus, Ohio. I moved to Sarasota in 1970. OCCUPATION: Licensed Mas sage Therapist since 1992 FAMILY: Mother, father (since passed) What do you enjoy most about south Lake County? The intimate community setting, lots of outdoor recreational activ ities. 1) If you had to summarize your philosophy of life in one sen tence, what would it be? Enjoy the moments that make you smile. 2) Name a person or incident youve come across recently thats touched you in some way. Why did this person or incident impress you so much? The Senior Games have really touched me. Each and every one of the senior participants and ath letes expressed a heartfelt appre ciation to not only myself, but to everyone involved in putting these events together. All events so far have brought together a very spe cial group of folks. Its not about the destination; its all about the journey. 3) Name one of your greatest ac complishments so far. This is an easy one to answer. Ive been studying the prac tice of massage therapy for 22 years. The passion still remains strong to keep up with my stud ies. There have been many great accomplishments along the way. All equal in greatness. The many folks that have come to me in pain, unable to walk or function in their daily activities who have trusted me with their health care and returned back to quality of life that was once missing. 4) Whats something youve al ways wanted to do but havent yet? Visit more countries outside the United States. 5) What advice would you give to people who want to help out in the community? Diversify. Give a just little less to help out more than one cause. Its always amazing to meet new people. FROM THE FILES | 27 YEARS AGO 1987 Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press Meet Your NEIGHBOR GARY E. PERIGO HISTORIC LESTER H. TODD HOUSE ON MARKET Clermonts historic Lester H. Todd house at 486 Osceola St. has been placed on the real es tate market. The house, which was built in 1885, is prominently featured in Clermonts Centen nial book, Clermont, Gem of the Hills. Commencement exer cises held at the Univer sity of Florida included Miss Kathleen Conley, who received a B.S. de gree in advertising. Program planners for the Gamma Delta Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma Society Inter nationals meeting were Patty Hamilton, Caro lyn McGowan, Sharon Powell and Jacque Wil son. During February, the Clermont Neighbor hood Center served 481 people from 167 fami lies, with 11 volunteers serving 114 hours. The third annual Old Time Country Festival was held at Lake David Park March 28-29 with an arts and crafts show, contests that includ ed baking, shing and casting, checkers, hog calling, a Put Your City Ofcials in Jail auction, horse shoes, tobac co spitting, arm wres tling, tug-o-war, ugliest cowboy hat, egg toss, bubble gum blowing, old-time ddlers, mar bles, Bull Champion ship arm wrestling and a greased pole plus live country western music and plenty of good food both days. Entertainment in cluded a history display of the pre-Groveland era up to World War II, a water skiing exhibition, demonstrations by the Groveland Squares, SeiPai Karate demonstra tions and a ower show by the Groveland Gar den Club. Ultra Precision is an other manufacturing business in Clermont. Oakley Seaver of Har old Robert Realty made the sale of the for mer Kometco building on south Grand High way (just south of and across from the Race Trac). Ultra Precision manufactures high-pre cision, close-tolerance tools and dies for such products as transistors, telephones and com puters, and has made parts for everything from Timex watches to rotors for large electric motors. Nintey-miles-perhour fastballs, hon est-to-goodness Co ney dogs and a 16-story ferris wheel known af fectionately as The Big Wheel, at Boardwalk and Baseball an Amer ican classic, open April 4 (south of the intersec tion U.S. Highway 17 and I-4). Paul J. Boylan of the nancial services rm Edward D. Jones & Co. is nalizing plans to open an ofce in Clermont. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com For the ninth year, stu dents at Cypress Ridge Ele mentary School aided by students at Astatula Elemen tary School for the rst time this year took to quilting as a way to ensure that other students have books to read. The students target schools where libraries have been devastated by Moth er Natures wrath. Led by fourth-grade teacher Starr Olson of Cypress Ridge and second-grade teacher Kel lyann Goring of Astatula El ementary who former ly taught at Cypress Ridge when the pair founded the program students design quilt squares based on top ics chosen by each class. Olson and Goring then have the squares sewn into quilts for a fundraiser at Cy press Ridges annual Cele bration of Learning night, where people can donate money for their favorites that are given away via a ran dom drawing. The service learning project was dubbed Quilts to Books by Olson and Goring nine years ago. Every child in the school thats about 595 students has made a square that is on one of the 36 quilts our school has on display, said Olson, adding that Gorings students at Astatula Elemen tary also made several quilts they were added to the mix. The money raised is then used to purchase loads of books that Olson and Gor ing personally deliver to the school they are helping. Each book is signed by a stu dent or teacher. Olson and Goring deliver the books themselves as a way of making the donation more personable and to video tape the reactions of the teach ers, students and schools of cials so students locally can see how their hard work paid off and who beneted from it. It makes me feel good to know that we did something that is helping other students in a big way. I know I couldnt live without any books, said fourth-grade student Madi son Carr, 10, just before the fundraiser Thursday. According to Goring, the fundraiser garnered dona tions of all kinds from peo ple wanting to acquire a cer tain quilt. All the quilts were given away, she said, but the total amount raised has not yet been calculated. The money will pay for books that will be delivered to Briarwood Elementa ry School in Oklahoma City, Okla., when its rebuilt. The school was destroyed by a tornado last year. Olson said a teacher at Bri arwood told her the school was given about 16-17 min utes notice to cover before the tornado wiped out most of the building. Olson said the students here were shown pictures of the destruction and were awestruck by the damage. Its pretty dramatic when you see the pictures of the destruction at Briarwood, Olson said. It was a big eye opener for our students. They couldnt believe that that could happen, really. I mean the students and teachers went about their tornado drill and when it passed and they came out of it only a few minutes later, everything was gone. That must have been a shock. To date, the Quilts to Books project has creat ed nearly 360 quilts, generat ing $45,000 worth of books to teachers in Mississippi, Loui siana, Alabama and New York. Olson said she remembers the rst year the project con sisted of a mere two quilts the teachers classes helped cre ate to help a family affected by Hurricane Ofelia. The proj ect raised $300 that year. Kathryn Powell, 10, said that although she felt very sad after seeing the pictures of Briarwood, she is glad she was a part of the project. It was hard to imagine be ing there, and I cant even imagine coming out and seeing that everything was destroyed, Kathryn said. But with us helping them and others helping them, they can feel like somebody really cares about them. CLERMONT Local kids use quilts to help students affected by tornado LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Kody Sevidal points to his name on his classs quilt, which features colorful cancer ribbons. SEE HISTORY | B4

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B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 21, 2014 youreinvited...At Real Life, you can expect biblically relevant teaching, inspired worship, and a friendly face to welcome you home. Were a church for real people! For more info, check us out online at getreallife.com352.394.3553Saturday6:00pSunday 9:30a & 11:15a, 6:00p Fran Campbell is manager of the new business in the Winn-Dixie Plaza, Valu Video. Movies are rent ing for .99 cents each. Rusty Fox, Sunday special, prime rib, $6.95. 47 YEARS AGO 1967 Members of the Cler mont High School ju nior varsity basketball team are Walter Poynter, Steve Watkins, Bobby Gross, Calvin Sanders, Robert Thomas, Ken Os borne, Terry Craig, John Driggers, Alan Schuster, Allen Roane, Jim Turn er, Rick Martin, Chuck Konsler and manager Guy Lillard. Peggy Broome, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harper Broome of Minneola, became Little Miss Minneo la. She was presented a $50 bond and an en graved bracelet by J.T. Johnson, president of the Minneola Progres sive Club, sponsor of Minneola Day. Some of the Minneola Day entertainment was furnished by local high school students David Daw, Steve Ragar, Bruce Kirkland, Clifford Kirk land, Tommie Davis, Jimmy Hunt, Jr., Jer ry Doto, singer Susan Dack and Sherman Mc Gregor and his guitar, Bert Skipper, Ronnie Skipper and Gene Alle man and their bands. John Stokes, Cler mont Chamber of Commerce secretary, has been named to the Lake County Planning and Zoning Commis sion District 3. HISTORY FROM PAGE B3 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com A few weeks ago, Dave Black realized his cow had given birth on the familys farm on Old Highway 50 in Clermont, a working farm dating back to 1899. The 75-year-old Black, who has nearly 30 years in the cat tle business, then realized he was seeing something he never saw before. The cow was nursing not one, but two calves. I couldnt believe she had twins and neither did all the old timers (fellow farmers) around here, he said. Its an exciting thing to have happen. Ive never seen twins born to any cow Ive had or known. You look at the size of those calves and you cant believe she was actually able to carry both of them. Shes not a very big cow. Black also said that in re searching cow births after the fact, he found that only 1 out of every 1,000 cow births result in twins. Megan Brew, who is a live stock agent with the Universi ty of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Ta vares branch, said that cows having twins is a somewhat uncommon in that about 1 to 7 percent of all cow births re sults in twins. Brew also said there are oth er unique things associat ed with cow births when its twins, including that if the twins are one male and one female, the female will usual ly be sterile. When its two female calves born as twins, they will both be able to reproduce but when its one male and one female, the female usually is sterile, Brew said. It has to do with hormonal interference during total development. The uter us is inuenced by male hor mones, causing an improper imbalance of hormones and what most of the time, ends up meaning sterility. Brew said there are ways cattlemen can check their cows via rectal exams to know whether they are hav ing twins but most, she said, dont because its not too usu ally threatening for the mom and babies, like it is when the same occurrence happens with horses. With horses, she said, a multiple birth usually ends up killing the mom horse, one or both of the baby fowls or all three, so in the case of hors es, some cattlemen check for twins because of the health related dangers. In Clermont however, per haps the newest set of baby cows in the area, are near ly three weeks old and doing well, as is the mom. Meanwhile, Black, still awe struck, has assumed the role of a doting dad, carrying around pictures and showing them to anyone who will look and listen. A former biology teacher, coach and athletic director of Clermont High School, Black has not named the twins be cause he said he plans on sell ing them at the Webster Flea/ Farmers Market soon. Rare twin calves born on Clermont farm PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVE BLACK Dave Black of Clermont is still in awe that his cow recently gave birth to twins. It only happens once out of every 1,000 births, he said. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Lost Lake Elemen tary School students got a treat on Multi cultural Day last week when Jim Sawgrass, a member of the Flor ida Muskogee Creek Tribe, showed up in native dress with In dian artifacts. Thomas Wooton, who attended the event to support his CLERMONT third-grade daughter, said he liked that stu dents got to see differ ent things associated with Sawgrass culture and others from around the world. They learn how to tally different their lives are from that of some other cultures, he said. Teacher Stephanie Tuesca said she liked how the days demon strations brought the real world to life. Sawgrass grand nale demo involved the chil dren counting to three in his Native American lan guage before ring one loud blank toward the woods from a musket. Aisha Wooton, 9, said of all the artifacts Saw grass displayed, her fa vorites were the weap ons. It was fun to watch him throw the spears and learning what each weapon was used for, she said. This is the fourth year the Clermont school has put on Multicultur al Day. School Princi pal Rhonda Hunt said the purpose is to pro mote diversity and ac ceptance by not only having students learn about the various cul tures that exist among their fellow classmates, but to learn about tradi tions and cultures from all over the world. Fifth-grader Neelam Hari came dressed in her Panjabi, an outt made up of a colorful dress, pants and a scarf, which women often wear for special occasions in the Indian culture. I got a lot of ques tions about it and what its called, she said. In addition to wear ing multicultural cloth ing, other students performed songs and dances in their native languages and told sto ries about different cul tural traditions they practice at home with their families. Lost Lake students share in multicultural lessons

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Wednesday, May 21, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B5 FOR MOTHERBY PETER A. COLLINS / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZNo. 0511RELEASE DATE: 5/18/2014 ACROSS1 Diamond cover5 Some Arizonans9 Sultans charge14 Mother ___19 Calypso staple21 Pull together22 Quarter-rounded molding23 Agents in blood clotting24 I.Q. test developer25 Minute26 Part of A.P.R.: Abbr.27 Archaeologists discovery29 New Orleans Saint who was the Super Bowl XLIV M.V.P.33 ___ Disraeli, author of Curiosities of Literature35 Like seven Nolan Ryan games36 No kidding!38 Element #2s symbol39 Rodent that burrows near streams41 Prince Harry, for one45 Some West Coast wines47 Resented49 Mother ___50 Joel and Jennifer51 Opposite of neath52 Start the growing season54 With 58-Down, fourtime destination for 56-Down55 Simple storage unit on a farm57 Abbreviation between two names60 Berts mysterysolving twin62 Eye cover for the naive?63 The original It girl64 Whats good in Jerusalem?65 Lock67 ID digits68 Mother ___69 Michael Collinss org.70 Mother ___71 Circular parts?74 Bank of Israel75 Vintners prefix76 800, say78 Cuba libre ingredient81 End of a pickoff82 D.C. player83 Survivor tactic84 Really went for86 Sharks and Jets org.88 Needle-nosed fish90 Montemezzi opera LAmore dei ___ Re91 Mother ___93 Pot pushers vehicle?98 Literally, lion dog100 Second of six?101 Dorothys aunt103 2001 Spielberg scifi film104 Greases106 The Age of Anxiety poet107 Not accidental109 Pointed fence stakes113 Wager of war against Parthia114 Trident alternative115 Ta of The Family Man116 What unicorns dont do118 Not said expressly121 Prodded122 Stick in a school desk123 Smithsonian artifacts124 Mother ___125 Spread out126 Cataract location127 Paris suburb on the Seine DOWN1 Recipe amt.2 Braves, on a sports ticker3 End the growing season4 Purina purveyor5 Good cholesterol, for short6 Some freighter cargo7 Backsliding, to a dieter8 Yeah, right!9 Mother ___10 Singer DiFranco11 Zest12 Forever, in verse13 Astronomical sighting14 Politician who appeared as himself on NBCs Parks and Recreation15 Topples16 Abstainers choice17 Ultimate word of an ultimatum18 Kikkoman sauces20 Umpires cry28 Coming of age30 Hone31 Khans clan32 Goof around34 Coffin nail37 Former chief justice Stone38 Bucolic bundle40 1950s political monogram42 Architect Saarinen43Regarding44 Wonka inventor46 Kind of review48 Words to one whos about to go off53 Subject of a Pittsburgh art museum 55 Windows boxes?56 Seven-time N.B.A. rebounding champ, 1992-9858 See 54-Across59 Pushing the envelope, say61 Actor Sam of The Horse Whisperer66 Bowlers bane71 Education secretary Duncan72 Last month: Abbr.73 Whatd I tell you?74 Most people dont think theyre funny77 Game for which Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday were once dealers78 Jazz musicians79 Then again, in text messages80 Filmmaker Riefenstahl85 Table87 Former defense secretary Aspin89 Through road92 Pound of poetry94 Now I remember!95 Mother ___96 Some kiss-and-tell books97 They dont have fingers99 Milk dispensers102 Much obliged, in Montral103 Baker and Brookner105 Make more alluring108 Simple counters109 Advertise110 Sleek, informally111 Targets target, e.g.112 Flowerpot spot117 Body on a map119 Cozy room120 Happy Mothers ___! 1234 5678 9101112131415161718 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 2728 29 30 31 3233 3435 363738 39 4041 424344 4546 47 4849 50 51 525354 55 56 575859606162 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 717273 74 75 76 77 787980 81 82 83 84 858687 8889 90 91 92939495 96 97 98 99100 101102103 104 105106 107108 109110111 112113 114 115 116 117 118119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Solution on page B7 Classified IndexLegal Notices....................0001 Notices............................1000 At Your Service................9000 Employment....................2000 Pets/Animals....................6865 Merchandise....................6000 Real Estate/For RENT......3000 Real Estate/For SALE........4000 Recreation........................7000 Transportation..................8000 Cancellations for ads running Wednesday must be made by 4pm Monday.ADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since The Daily Commercial will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error call the classified department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error.TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! S OUTH LAKE P RESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde

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B6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 21, 2014 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance r t t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital Call the South Lake Press to get your ad in! 394-2183

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Wednesday, May 21, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B7 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr T A R P H O P I H A R E M J O N E S S T E E L D R U M U N I T E O V O L O P L A T E L E T S B I N E T E E N S Y P C T T O M B D R E W B R E E S M O M I S A A C N O H I T O H H E N U T R I A R E D H E A D N A P A S G R U D G E D T E R E S A G R E Y S O E R S O W N O R T H P O L E B A R N A K A N A N W O O L C L A R A B O W T O V T R E S S S S N L O D E I R A S H I P A D S L E U M I O E N T O L L F R E E C O L A T A G N A T A L L I A N C E A T E U P N H L G A R T R E T O N G U E T E A C A R T M O M S H I H T Z U S H O R T I E M A I L A R D S A U D E N M E A N T P A L I S A D E S N E R O O R B I T L E O N I E X I S T I N D I C A T E D U R G E D R U L E R A M E R I C A N A G O O S E S P L A Y L E N S I S S Y Crossword puzzle is on page B5. Thanks for reading the local paper!

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B8 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 21, 2014 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 7 25 34 47 67 13 18 31 59 74 9 21FREE SPACE53 72 2 16 42 48 63 5 29 39 52 68ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N I B O G BINGO B I N G O SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Ray Dusseau WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! G 52 G 53 G 59 G 48 G 47