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LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com F our Lake County School Board members said this week they will not ask for a larger share of the penny sales tax that is currently split even ly between the schools, county government and the areas col lective municipalities. While acknowledging the $10 million it receives yearly from the penny sales tax will not be enough to meet at least $1 bil lion worth of needs for build ings, equipment and other cap ital, board members said it was important to work together with the municipalities and the county on the issue. Some School Board mem bers previously suggested that half a cent be allocated for the schools, as the student popula tion is expected to increase. The real difference of a half cent versus a third is about $3 million a year, said Bill Mathi as, board member. While I dont disagree about the needs, I also believe the municipalities and the counties have the same needs. Kyleen Fischer, School Board member, echoed similar senti ments. I would like to work with the cities and the county, she said. Asked how to meet the grow ing needs of the school district, We are currently using genetic (DNA) testing to diagnose and treat diseases. We are focused on preventing illness before it causes major dysfunction. DNA testing is available for weight loss and performance, cardiac prevention, mental health, and cancer risk. www.marholinmedicalinstitute.com SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | B3 SPORTS: Football stars speak about college experience WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWSTAND INSIDE CLASSIFIED B5 CROSSWORDS B4 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN B3 SPORTS B1 VOICES A4 WORD ON THE STREE T A2 SO UTH LAKE PRE SS V OLUME 99, NO. 20 5 SECTIO N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reserved www. southlakepress.com PRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE, BELOW: Construction workers perform road work on County Road 44 in Eustis on Friday. LAKE COUNTY Board members express support for penny sales tax allocation JIM TURNER News Service of Florida When lawmakers re cently handed Gov. Rick Scott a $77.1 billion budget for 2014-15, it in cluded $15.5 million to complete the Coast-toCoast Connector, a bicy cle and pedestrian path that includes both Lake and Sumter counties. The project has been a priority for Incoming Senate President Andy Gardiner, R-Orlando. This is an issue that the Senate has felt very, very strongly about the last couple of years, Gardiner told House members Tuesday. It means a lot to us and especially it means a lot to me personally. The money would be used to start lling in gaps in Central Florida between existing bicy cle and pedestrian tri als on both of Floridas coasts. The largest gap re maining a 30-mile stretch between the end of the Withla coochee State Trail in northern Pasco Coun ty and the beginning of the South Lake Trail in South Lake County. Closing the gap would take the trail from Pasco County through east ern Hernando County, through Sumter County near Webster, and east through Lake County to Clermont, where the South Lake Trail contin ues east to Orlando and beyond. The connector is to eventually link the Pi nellas Trail in St. Pe tersburg with the Space Coast. The 38.2-mile Pinel las Trail runs north from Budget provides $15.5M to finish pedestrian path PHOTO COURTESY OF LAKE COUNTY The Lake Minneola Scenic Trail connects to the South Lake Trail in Clermont. State money could link trails like these from Floridas east coast to its west coast. MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millard.ives@dailycommercial.com The State Attorneys Ofce reported its rst arrest in Lake Coun ty stemming from the April raid of ve alleged gaming houses here during a statewide law enforcement operation. David Paul Kucharek, 58, alleged operator of P.J.s on County Road 561 in Astatula, was charged May 7 with possession of a slot ma chine and maintain ing a gambli ng house, after ofcials said they seized 33 gam ing machines and more than $7,000 from the operation. He was re leased from the Lake County jail after posting a $4,000 bond. Kucharek, of Cler mont, faces ve years in prison on the charges, according to an of cial with the 5th Judi cial State Attorneys Of ce in Marion County, a circuit that includes Lake County. On April 3, ve alleged area In ternet cafes were raided, two by the Lake Coun ty Sheriffs Of ce P.J.s and The Grand on U.S. Highway 27 in Cl ermont, according to a sheriffs spokesman. The raids were part of a three-month investi gation into illegal gam ing houses, sparked by complaints. No arrests have been reported from The Grand, where detec tives said they seized 85 gaming machines and more than $5,000 in April while patrons watched. The sheriffs ofce raids fell on the same day as a statewide op eration by the Florida Department of Law En forcement that served a number of search war rants at Internet cafes through ve counties in Florida, including three more in Lake County The Hilltop in Clermont and Lucky Joes and Lucky Stars in Leesburg. TAVARES Clermont man arrested after Internet cafe raid KUCHAREK SEE TAX | A2 SEE TRAIL | A2

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 14, 2014 GROVELAND Kindergarten registration ongoing through June 12 Register for kindergarten at Groveland Elementary School for the 2014-2015 school year from 9 a.m. to noon by ap pointment only through June 12. Children must turn 5 years old by Sept. 1 to enroll. Parents/guardians should bring a birth certicate, updat ed shots record, recent physical, proof of address and Social Security card. Call 352-429-2472 for information. MASCOTTE Can You See Me Now Ride set for Saturday ABATE of Florida Inc., Lake County Chapter, will offer the Can You See Me Now Ride supported by Lucky U Cycles, C&C Pumping Inc. and Eagles Aerie No. 4273. The ride begins at 9:45 a.m. Saturday at Rainbow Restaurant, State Road 50, in Mascotte. Registration is $10 prepaid and the rst 75 registered riders get a free T-shirt. The ride ends at Damn Smoker Barbecue, 36721 State Road 19A, in Eustis. For information, call 352-302-4783. CLERMONT Faith Neighborhood Center to host benefit for new home The Faith Neighborhood Center needs to relocate to a new facility and will host a wine, cheese, coffee and dessert event to raise funds from 7 to 9 p.m. Wednesday at the Clermont Community Center, 685 W. Montrose St. Prepaid tickets are $30 for individu als and $50 per couple. For information, email Terry Krier at Pastork@c.rr.com or go to www. faithneighborhoodcenter.com. CLERMONT Spring Art Show on exhibit through May 31 The public can enjoy the South Lake Art League Members Spring Art Show on exhibit from 5 to 7 p.m. through May 31 at the art gallery, 776 W. Montrose St., in Clermont. For information, go to www.south lakeartleague.com. CLERMONT Hollywood Nights dance scheduled for Friday The Hollywood Nights Spring Dance is an evening in the spotlight for adults with developmental or other dis abilities, hosted by Building Blocks Ministries Inc. The event is open to all adults with developmental disabilities and their guests from 7 to 9 p.m. Friday at the Clermont Community Center, 620 W. Montrose St., in Clermont. Tickets for the event are $5 per per son and are on sale through Friday at the Building Blocks Learning Center, 548 S. U.S. Highway 27, Suites B-C in Minneola. For information, call 352-536-9264. MONTVERDE Open enrollment at Woodlands Lutheran school Woodlands Lutheran Church Early Learning Center is currently enroll ing for the 2014-2015 school year for the 2-, 3and 4-year-old preschool programs. The school is at 15333 County Road 455, in Montverde. For information, call 407-469-2525 or email schoolofce@woodland schurch.com. LAKE COUNTY Health department to offer school immunizations The Department of Health in Lake County will offer immunizations at Lake County schools on an ongo ing basis for students who will enter the seventh grade during the 2014-15 school year. Immunizations will be given at Clermont Middle School on Thursday and Cecil E. Gray Middle School in Groveland on May 20. For information, call 352-771-5500 or go to www.lakechd.com. Area Briefs What south Lake residents are saying about ... AGRICULTURE What do you see as the biggest threat to agriculture in this area at this time? I think the biggest thing is growth. It keeps moving this way. Theres less and less land to farm. SUNNY NEWTON CLERMONT For me its the uncertain ty of farming. You dont know what the weathers going to be, what the mar kets gonna be. JOHN ADAMS CLERMONT The biggest challenge with the citrus is the greening disease. This is my last year if they dont come up with a cure. DAVE BLACK MINNEOLA I dont think theres that big a challenge. The weath er is wonderful for the most part and theres plen ty of land. We can grow just about anything here. NANCY DOUGAN CLERMONT Word on the Street Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 which is still $200 million in debt, she said the dis trict would have to be cre ative. We discussed gen eral obligation bonds and other ways of fund ing, she said. We have to look to service schools that would come up and put their own private schools. General obligation bonds are backed by the issuers full faith credit and taxing authority. The one-cent sales tax for infrastructure gener ated $34.8 million in to tal revenue last year. That money was divid ed equally between the cities, county and school district, with each receiv ing a third of the alloca tion. The 14 cities then must divide their alloca tion proportionately. Revenue from the tax goes toward infrastruc ture capital needs such as road work, construction of buildings and the pur chase of public safety ve hicles. The revenue, however, cannot be used for opera tional costs. The tax is set to expire in 2017, but the Lake Coun ty Commission said at a board workshop in Feb ruary that they would like residents to vote on whether to renew the tax in 2015. In the last ve years, the school district has lost more than $67 million in property tax revenue be cause the stagnant econ omy has kept property values low and the Florida Legislature cut the max imum tax rate by 25 per cent. While in support of the current sales tax distribu tion formula, Board Mem ber Rosanne Brandeburg said more funding needs to go into education. I can support the third of the penny sales tax, but I want to make sure the county is going to support the growth that we are be ginning to see, she said. A consultant for the school district in Novem ber projected that by 2020 there will be an increase of about 2,297 students, particularly in the south ern part of the county. Brandeburg said school impact fees, which can only be designated for new growth, should be raised to 100 percent from 25 percent. My fear is that we are going to have great needs, no funds and it is going to put this board and future boards in the same situation that pri or boards were in when all the growth hit in 2000. We have got to have a uni ed front and we need to be able to fund education in Lake County. With the current reve nue from impact fees at $2,500 a home, Brande burg said it would take 8,000 homes to build a new elementary school. There are at least six schools in the district that need to be rebuilt or re placed, board member Tod Howard said. They are Clermont Elementary, Cypress Ridge, Clermont Middle, Treadway Ele mentary, Beverly Shores Elementary and Fruitland Park Elementary. We are going to have to prioritize our needs and do the most we can with the dollars we have, he said. Commissioner Tim Sul livan, who serves as a li aison to the Lake County League of Cities, said the cities and the county have come together to support the same allocation of the penny sales tax. Based on conversa tions with them, they think it is something vi tal to their economic well-being and would like to continue it as is, he said. We are kind of wait ing on the school board. The school board has not formally come to a decision or informed the County Commission yet. But if they do come to gether with the county and municipalities, Sul livan said it would be a positive thing. If the municipalities, county and school board go forward with a uni ed front to show why we need to continue this tax since it is not a new tax, I think that it would go a long way in showing the people that we are be ing conscientious on how we spend our dollars, he said. TAX FROM PAGE A1 St. Petersburg through Gulfport, Largo, Clearwa ter, Dunedin and Tarpon Springs. Pinellas County estimates that 70,000 peo ple use the trail monthly and support at least 13 bi cycle and rental shops lo cated along the trail. Connector propo nents cite the econom ic benets to communi ties that have bike trails, saying 75 percent of Flor idas tourists participate in nature-based activi ties during their visits. In addition to renting bikes to use these trails, tour ists will naturally gravi tate to restaurants, stores, shops and accommoda tions near the trails, sup porters say. Dale Allen, president of the Florida Greenways & Trails Foundation, said the trail will help draw eco-tourists year-round and dispel some of Flor idas image as not being bicycle and pedestrian friendly. Its known in the tour ist community that were dangerous state. This will help us change that dy namic, Allen said. This will give the state of Flor ida something major to advertise. DOT Ofce of Poli cy Planning Director Jim Wood said Thursday that while the trails provide strong recreational val ue, the DOT supports the connector and simi lar pedestrian proposals because of their role in transportation. Pinellas Trail, one of the most used trails in the country, rough ly two-thirds of its use is for non-recreational use, Wood said. So its for people trying to get from place to place. TRAIL FROM PAGE A1 LIVI STANFORD| Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com One hundred thirty six Lake County teachers re ported that a supervi sor asked them to sign or submit inaccurate re ports about their class siz es, a district-wide review of class size compliance found last week. Those were among sev eral ndings present ed to the Lake County School Board last week by Carr, Riggs & Ingram LLC, which was paid $20,000 to audit the school districts compliance with state class size requirements. The 136 teachers who reported that they were asked to sign false reports represents roughly 10 per cent of teachers surveyed, with 60 percent coming from elementary schools, 14 percent from middle schools and 24 percent from high schools, the re port found. Surveys were sent to teachers, administrators and data processing staff, the review stated. Out of 2,818 surveys, 1,518 re sponses were returned. General statements from the district ofce such as we will make class size and be creative and make it work may have put perceived pres sure on staff to meet class size requirements, the re view stated. I feel the schools may have perceived some pressure to meet those requirements based on that, said Sara Apple white, CPA, who conduct ed the review. At the same time, Ap plewhite cautioned against reading too much into the survey responses concerning the teachers asked to sign a report they knew was false. We dont know what drove those yes respons es, she said, explaining many surveyed may not have taught core courses. The statute requires only core courses to meet class-size requirements. Even so, the survey found 71 percent of re spondents do teach core courses. Lake County Superin tendent Susan Moxley previously said no one in her ofce knowingly co erced school principals to lie about their class sizes to skirt state rules. Moxley called for the re view after nding that six principals broke the law by inaccurately reporting Review: Lake County teachers asked to sign inaccurate reports SEE SCHOOLS | A6

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Wednesday, May 14, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3 Place your ad here and reach the Local Market!VERY AFFORDABLE!Call today 352-394-2183 HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millard.ives@dailycommercial.com Blue Rhino contends that any unsafe condi tions that led to a mas sive explosion at its Ta vares plant last summer resulted from unpre ventable and unfore seeable employee and or supervisor miscon duct, according to the companys challenge of federal workplace-safe ty violations made available last week. In its written re sponse to the Occu pation al Safety and Health Administra tions claim that Blue Rhino violated 26 fed eral workplace rules, citations issued in Jan uary that resulted in the $73,000 in nes, lawyers for Ferrell gas, Blue Rhinos par ent company, went on to state that the al leged violations were the result of isolated and unauthorized ac tions by certain em ployees and/or super visors which resulted in the conditions. A hearing for Blue Rhino to contest the ci tations in front of OS HAs review commis sion is set for Sept. 10 in Houston and law yers for the facility said it may assert addition al defenses as OSHA claries the violations. The violations in cluded exposing em ployees to re hazards from propane cyl in ders during a process in which the 20-pound metal cylinders were bled or drained of leftover gas in the stor age yard in back of the Blue Rhino facility late at night on July 29. State re investi gators believe sparks from a forklift being turned on ignited a propane cloud at the County 448 plant lat er that night, which set off an explosion that turned many of the es timated 50,000 cylin ders into aming mis siles that lit the night sky and caused $3.5 million in damage. The blast also dam aged several area prop erties and left ve em ployees with severe burns, one in a coma and one struck by a ve hicle in his attempts to ee from the re. OSHA also cited the plant for allowing em ployees to drive fork lifts without required training, failing to en sure that gas or liquid was not vented to the air and failing to de velop and implement written operating pro cedures that provided clear instructions for safely conducting ac tivities as well as the lack of clear instruc tions for emergency shutdowns and for em ployees not wearing protective clothing. OSHA revealed in March that Blue Rhino had appealed some of the violations, but de tails of the appeal were not available a t that time. No criminal charges were led in the case. TAVARES Blue Rhino says July explosion was unpreventable Staff Report A Mascotte man was killed Tuesday morning af ter his tractor-trailer hauling fertilizer overturned off the Florida Turnpike in Orange County. Chad Stewart, 43, was pronounced dead on the scene, according to the Florida Highway Patrol. The crash occurred about 5:25 a.m. as Stew arts 1971 truck was traveling south on State Road 429, also known as the Daniel Webster Western Beltway or Western Expressway, and was head ing onto the eastbound ramp of the Turnpike. Sgt. Kim Montes, said for unknown reasons Stewart lost control of the vehicle and it over turned onto the ramp, spilling fertilizer onto the road. The crash remains under investigation. Man hauling fertilizer dies after crashing truck MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millard.ives@dailycommercial.com I n a profession where 150 of their comrades die every year in the United States, law en forcement ofcers throughout Lake Coun ty took part in a nation al memorial service last week to honor those who have made the ul timate sacrice. What looked like at least 300 ofcers in dress uniforms on horses and motorcy cles, in helicopters and gleaming squad cars, with many on foot took part in the event May 6 in front of the Lake County Histor ic Courthouse in Tava res. They gathered with friends and families of deceased ofcers. According to a cere mony program, 10 of cers have died in the line of duty throughout Lake County since 1919. Keynote speaker for the event was State At torney Brad King, who oversees the 5th Judi cial Circuit, including Marion County, where a Florida Highway Pa trol trooper was killed last week in a roadside crash. King told the crowd that law enforce ment ofcers frequent ly put themselves in harms way while work ing with violent crimi nals, or responding to natural disasters and rescues. Every day they walk out that door, they put themselves in the path of all dangers, said King, perched at the po dium. According to the Na tional Law Enforce ment Ofcers Memori al Fund, a total of 1,501 law enforcement of cers died in the line of duty during the past 10 Lake County honors officers who died in the line of duty MILLARD K. IVES/DAILY COMMERCIAL Amber Koester, the daughter of slain Lake County sheriffs deputy Wayne Koester, clasps her hands in front of his wreath during a Law Enforcement Ofcer Memorial ceremony at the Lake County Historic Courthouse late Tuesday evening. The deputys sister, Paula Cassella, stands behind Koester as she prepares to place a rose on the wreath. ULTIMATE SACRIFICE Ten Lake County law enforcement ofcers have died in the line of duty. Their lives and service were celebrated Wednesday at the memorial. CHIEF DEPUTY BOB C. WILCOX Lake County Sheriffs Ofce, July 4, 1919, gun re. CHIEF OF POLICE JAMES LEE HUX Lees burg Police Department, Feb. 13, 1924, gunre. TOWN MARSHAL ROBERT L. SMITHWICK Groveland Police Department, April 2, 1929, gunre POLICE CHIEF BISHOP W. HANEY Lees burg Police Department, Oct. 10, 1937, car accident. POLICE OFFICER JESSE F. BEERBOWER Leesburg Police Department, Feb. 13, 1944, gunre. OFFICER CLINTON MURPHY HYDE Mount Dora Police Department, Dec. 1, 1959, gunre. DEPUTY JEAN ESTELLE DAUGHARTY Lake County Sheriffs Ofce, Jan. 24, 1993, car accident. DEPUTY WILLIAM JAMES BILL MARIE Lake County Sheriffs Ofce, March 19, 1994, aircraft accident. DEPUTY WAYNE J. KOESTER Lake County Sheriffs Ofce, Feb. 9, 2005, gunre. SHERIFF CHRISTOPHER COOPER DANIELS SR. Lake County Sheriffs Ofce, Oct. 14, 2006, bus accident. SEE OFFICERS | A5

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 14, 2014 Stand up for faith I believe the time has come for all Christians to stand up for their faith in Christ. We have been inundated with political correctness and inclusiveness, including the greeting happy holidays instead of merry Christmas and the disappear ance of Christmas lights at any store in Leesburg. Laws have been passed against prayer in public plac es and institutions, especial ly public schools and at athletic events. Regulations by the mili tary that do not allow the name of Jesus to be mentioned in Christian church services. The collection for Christian missions that certain stores forbid during Christmas season. It seems that all Christian traditions nation wide are being scrapped in the name of political correctness. This is one Christian that is proud of my faith and believes that it is time for Christians to stand up against this bigotry. How, you ask? By boycot ting the stores that refuse to honor Christian traditions during the Christmas season by not displaying Christmas lights or using the greeting happy holidays instead of merry Christmas. During the Christmas season many stores and other businesses show the only prot they make the whole year. We could peacefully demon strate against any and all an ti-Christian bias on the part of government or business. Churches could preach against any anti-Christian speech or acts by the public or the media. The reason given for not taking this action by the church is the law against po litical speech from the pul pit would deprive the church of their tax-exempt positions. There had been no action ever taken against the church for speaking out politically about anything because the First Amendment forbids such an act by the federal government. If there are enough Christian bodies showing up to take a stance against these abomi nations, both businesses and the government will listen and change their attitudes about the subject. WILLIAM KRUEGER | Leesburg Ignoring a real tragedy Amazing isnt it, the attention span of the American public? All the attention and press time spent on some too-rich per son (Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling) who made rac ist comments. Listen to either of the Reverends Sharpton or Jackson and you will hear racist com ments, but they get a pass while this ignorant fool is held up as the poster boy for racism in America. Amazing isnt it, that all this crap turned into a tornado, swept the media and complete ly obscured any reporting on the Phoenix VAMC. It seems that at least 40 vet erans, dependent on the VA for health care, were denied the treatments to save their lives. Vets were signed in, told to wait for an appointment and signed out by the clerks so the bot tom line looked better; more vets seen, more vets treated, more bonus checks written. These vets were black, white, hispanic and all variations. These vets, these heroes, at one time swore an oath to pre serve, protect and defend the re public, and this is how the re public pays them back? Someone needs to go to jail for this. Somebody will be thrown under the bus for this, just not the right one perhaps. The rest will scatter like roach es in the light. I wonder who will be the scapegoat? Meanwhile, the veterans are still dead in Phoenix, while the media foams at the mouth be cause an 80-year-old white, male billionaire dislikes blacks. Why is this more fun, more so cially acceptable to the public than boring old fraud, malfea sance or possibly murder? Just keep in mind that the VA system and Native American health care are both federal ly run health care systems. This becomes relevant to the av erage American when health care costs rise too high to pay, and the average American is forced to have federally run, sin gle-payer systems, along with the VA system and the Native American system. You see how well those are run. Those who pay attention will remember that Obam a, Pelosi and Reid wanted the sin gle-payer system anyway. Amazing, isnt it? DAVID F. GOODMAN | Eustis I t wasnt lon g ago that the Lake County School Board learned some of its schools had under reported their class sizes in apparent viola tion of the states class-size law. School Superintendent Susan Moxley hired an auditing rm to examine the extent of the problem, determine why it happened and pro pose solutions. The auditors released their draft report to the School Board last week, and although it pro vided some new details, it frankly raises more questions than it answers about why schools were turning in inaccurate enrollment gures and whether district ofcials intentionally tried to skirt the law. The report points to a number of reasons school ofcials couldnt or didnt provide accurate counts to the state Department of Education. Au ditors noted a lack of training on how to comply with the law, recommended that there be an ad ministrator in the district who oversees class-size issues, and lamented that the state Department of Education does not provide any written poli cies or guidelines spelling out how school districts should comply with the mandate. They even blamed the law itself, which they said is vague and open to interpretation apparently ignoring the fact that most of Floridas 67 counties manage to make sense of the law. In their summary, the auditors chalked the problem up to misunderstandings and misin terpretation. In other words, its no ones fault. The problem with the report is that it treads lightly barely at all on the possibility that school district administrators intentionally skirted the law, despite mounting evidence that this may have occurred. The report contains a brief mention of a sur vey sent to more than 2,000 school employ ees. At least 136 teachers said they were asked to sign or submit class-size reports they knew to be inaccurate. The report also mentions without elaborating general statements made by the district ofce about class sizes di recting schools to be creative and make it work. Further, the head of the Lake County teachers union says teachers have complained about be ing asked to sign inaccurate class rosters. Were the numbers fudged deliberately? We dont know. The audit doesnt delve into the subject and, as yet, its unclear whether district ofcials are interested in nding out. But they must. School ofcials cannot dismiss this problem as an innocent mistake. The class size law has been in place more than a decade and 66 other counties in Florida are able to ac curately report class sizes without tripping over the sort of misinterpretations referred to by the auditor. We urge the School District to nish the job. Do a complete and thorough examination of class-size reporting problems. The public has a right to answers. O PINION WHATS YOUR OPINION? The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Letters to the Editor 732 W. Montrose St. Clermont, FL 34711 By fax to: 352-394-8001 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. GUEST COLUMNS If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@daily commercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OUR VIEW If you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veter ans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to to www.lake vet erans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANS S OUTH LAKE PRESS Your community newspaper for more than 100 years. 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001 The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Florida 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region. All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. YOUR OPINIONS LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Class-size report light on answers, accountability Why was help rejected? After reading Russ Sloans column en titled Unanswered questions regarding Benghazi, I have one more question to add. According to re tired Army Gen. Carter Ham, then the head of the U.S. Africa Command in August 2012, a month before the attack, he phoned Ambassador Stevens and offered to send a detachment of troops from the U.S. mili tary. Stevens told Ham he did not need them. Weeks later, Stevens traveled to Germany for an already sched uled meeting with Ham at AFRICOM headquarters. During that meeting, Ham again offered addition al military assets, and Stevens again said no. He didnt say why. He just turned it down. The offers of aid and Stevens rejection of them have not been revealed in either the State Departments Administrative Review Board investigation of the Benghazi events or during any of the con gressional hearings and reports that have been issued into what took place there. No one has ever answered the simple question of why did Ambassador Stevens turn down the generals offer even though he had already made multiple re quests for more secu rity forces to the State Department? Representative Darrell Issa stated that some members of Congress may have been aware of the Ham/Stevens conver sations. Is there some thing they are not tell ing us? Of course, it has nothing to do with Hillary Clinton and the great Benghazi non-scandal so who wants to read that, right? RON IVEY | LEESBURG LETTER of the WEEK FILE PHOTO

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Wednesday, May 14, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5 years, an average of one death every 58 hours or 150 per year. The Tavares ceremony blocked off the section of downtown Main Street in front of the courthouse and included a Mount Dora re truck hoisting a giant American ag into the sky. With a bright sun beaming down on the crowd, the event was marked with various speakers, prayers, a mo ment of silence, a bag pipe salute, the playing of Taps and helicopters ying above. There also was a Volley of Three in which seven ofcers red a modied ver sion of the 21-gun sa lute that had small chil dren covering their ears. This is a rededica tion to their loved ones that they do in fact live on, King said. Ofcers and family members afliated with each fallen ofcer in the county placed roses on wreaths erected in their memories. One wreath w as dedi cated to sheriffs Deputy Wayne Koester, who was shot to death by Jason Wheeler in 2005 during an ambush in Lake Kathryn while the of cer was responding to a domestic dispute. Sever al of his family members attended the ceremo ny, including his daugh ter, Amber Koester, and his sister Paula Cassel la, who could be seen with tears in their eyes as they walked up to the deputys wreath. Cassella said after the ceremony they have at tended every ceremony as well as every appeal hearing for Wheeler, who is on death row. She said they wont be close to closure until Wheeler is executed. Then it (closure) will be done, Cassella said. Lake County commis sioner Jimmy Conner also presented a procla mation during the cer emony honoring the countys fallen ofcers. National Police Week runs through May 17, which pays special rec ognition to those law enforcement ofcers who have lost their lives in the line of duty. The 33rd annual National Peace Ofcers Memori al Day Services will take place May 15 in front of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. OFFICERS FROM PAGE A3 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com Born prematurely in South Africa and un able to stand on his weak hind legs, a baby elephant received cus tom leg braces made by a Bushnell compa ny, which also has t ted numerous horses, alpacas, donkeys, and a goose with prosthetic devices and limbs. Its a pretty incred ible feeling to help an animal who somebody says has to be put down because of a leg issue, said Ronnie Graves, 59, president and owner of VIP Veterinary Inclusive Prosthetics and Orthot ics, who helped Moses, the baby elephant, from b ecoming prey to pred ators. And while many peo ple have followed an other Sumter County story that has gone vi ral about Chris P. Bacon, the pot-bellied pig who has a wheeled device to get around, Graves has been creating a wide ar ray of prosthetic devices for 35 years for people and the past 17 years for 120 animals. He once made a ex ible bucket for Hoppy, a goose, to sit in. Vel cro straps came over in front of the gooses wing and behind it to hold her in place. A wa terproof plastic roller blade was attached and the height was adjust ed so that Hoppy could push herself along and go wherever her heart desired. She could swim in it, too. The goose never re ceived the notoriety like Chris P. Bacon, who has his own website, childrens books and T-shirts. Its my fault. Im not one to go out and toot my own horn, said Graves, whose passion for his work goes be yond his training and expertise to a more per sonal level. Graves is an amputee who lost his left leg below the k nee at age 20 after a train ac cident in Council Bluff, Iowa, on May 15, 1975. I would have nev er gotten into pros thetics and orthotics if I had not lost my own leg, Graves said. It was most denitely a bless ing. His began in the pros thetics eld by working in an Orlando prosthet ics lab. I started growing in the business, learning from a lot of my peers, he said. I think it has made it easier for peo ple to relate to me. They feel like I know what Im talking about and what Im feeling. Graves understands the range of emotions some people feel in the beginning in adjusting to life as an amputee. Its tough to get over the hurdle, he said. Most adults are angry and upset that this has happened, so youve got to get past the an ger, then you have to get them to realize, Hey, I can do anything I want to do, and once you get to that point, you can do miracles with them. You can get them running and get them dancing. He was dancing on the dance oor for four hours with his own prosthetic leg when he met the love of his life. Graves and his wife, Linda, have been mar ried for 32 years. I have learned from my husband, that in many cases, disability is a state of mind, Linda said. Together we built a business and started a non-prot organization that we are passionate about. We love animals and helping people; we believe in sharing our blessings and through our love of animals and passion for helping peo ple, we have been fortu nate to successfully ac complish both. Linda runs the dayto-day operations, per sonnel and account ing functions of the business, while Graves handles the fabrica tion, patient care and the creative side of the company. Graves developed a working protocol in helping animals, and he only does his work un der requests from veter inarians. There is a mindset somewhere that you can make a device for an an imal stick it on the horse and turn him out to pas ture and forget about it, and you cant, he said. You dont do this with humans and you cant do it with animals. His process has in volved having a device worn and taken off ev ery two hours for sev en days for the animal t o get acclimated, along with being given treats such as food or atten tion. One special case was working with Sitka and Belmont, two horses that belonged to Jill and Tony Curtis, the late ac tor. Graves stayed at the couples home as he t ted the horses. Sitka could not get up and walk when I met her, said Graves, who was pleased the horse took right away to wear ing the device. Belmont had suffered from an old knee fracture and arthritis, and he was videotaped as he happi ly wagged his tail as he limped to a hay pile. It brought tears to my eyes, Graves said. Some of the animals that he has helped can be seen on Facebook, and one of Graves fa vorite photos shows him standing nex t to Luigi, a miniature don key, as they both show their prosthetic legs. BUSHNELL Vet goes out on a limb to help animals THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Ronnie Graves shows a cast of a horse leg at his Bushnell company, VIP Veterinary Inclusive Prosthetics and Orthotics. He has been helping animals for the past 17 years, and has been in the prosthetics business for 35 years.

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A6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 14, 2014 Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) their class sizes to the state. Simone Maduro-Fer guson, a teacher at Lake Minneola High School, recently tipped off the Florida Department of Education (FLDOE) about the class-size vi olations. In her complaint, she states she was asked to remove kids from her class roster during FTE counting week, where schools are required to provide an accurate count of student enroll ment to the state. School district of cials subsequent ly launched an inves tigation and found additional reporting problems in ve other schools. Principals at Mount Dora High School, Tav ares Elementary School, Sawgrass Bay Elemen tary in Clermont, Sor rento Elementary, Lake Minneola High School and Grassy Lake Ele mentary in Minneola, reported to the FLDOE that their average class sizes were smaller than was actually the case. According to the sur veys, 206 teachers 15 percent of respon dents said they have had students remain in the classroom while as signed to another class, while 84 percent said they did not. The review presented at a school board meet ing Monday did not cite specics, but pointed to lack of training and the vague Florida stat ute regarding classsize compliance as ma jor contributors to the problem districtwide. By Florida law, pub lic schools are not per mitted to exceed cer tain class-size limits: 18 students per class in pre-kindergar ten through grade 3, 22 per class in grades 4 through 8 and 25 in grades 9 through 12. Schools that violate those limits are subject to nes. You have to be sure all of your staff gets training annually, so they will understand what their requirements are and give them spe cic examples of what is acceptable and not acceptable, said Apple white. Applewhite said there is no individual at the district level that is as signed responsibility for class size requirements compliance or to assist schools in meeting the requirements. As a result, she rec ommended the district create an administra tive position that has that responsibility. Board Chairwom an Debbie Stivender asked Applewhite how she would address dis ciplinary action if she were superintendent. Applewhite said it would be hard to single out any individual or one school. The misunderstand ings were widespread, she said. There is a sort of continuum. Moxley noted that she was concerned that 136 teachers surveyed were asked to sign something which was inaccurate. Both Tod Howard and Kyleen Fischer, board members, said they would have liked the re port to have cited spe cic errors as opposed to a broad overview. We are going to be asked about those and we are not going to be able to communicate to the public from an out side source, Howard said. In her summary, Ap plewhite said: Misun derstandings and mis interpretation of the rules exist through out the district. Re porting inconsistencies could have been ques tioned at every level but the widespread nature of these practices ap peared to have provid ed a false sense of ac ceptability. SCHOOLS FROM PAGE A2

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Wednesday, May 14, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A7

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Wednesday, May 14, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A9 Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...Bacchus Vino Etcetera Tenth AnniversaryHistoric downtown Clermont is the home of a friendly wine shop where the staff and customers believe that wine is for your enjoyment, not intimidation. Open since 2004 at the corner of Montrose and Seventh, across from City Hall Park, Bacchus Vino Etcetera is commemorating their tenth anniversary with a month long celebration. When it comes to wine education, one should keep an open mind and an open bottle. Owners Keith and Karen Mullins encourage Bacchus customers to explore and savor the vast array of wines available from around the world. Frequent sampling opportunities include evening gatherings featuring wines from a specific area, grape variety, winery or other theme. Often a wine or two is available for sampling as customers drop by to shop. A popular tasting and shopping event are the Wine Walks held six times yearly which feature wines from Bacchus Vino Etcetera being sampled at various merchants throughout the downtown area. The next Wine Walk will take place May 16th from 6:30 until 9:00 and will feature all Italian Wine. Tickets are currently available at Bacchus Vino Etcetera. Bacchus Vino Etcetera is the home of the By the Light of the Moon Lunar Wine Club. Each time there is a full moon members receive a bottle each of specially selected red and white wines at a preset price. Between full moons, club members are eligible for exclusive offers and wine discounts. The club is an excellent way to learn about and try new wines, and is a great gift idea. Bacchus Vino Etcetera currently stocks over 700 wines from 17 countries and 8 states. Wines from many popular wineries can be found along with those from some lesser-known producers. For customers with specific requests Bacchus Vino Etcetera can special order wines not already in stock (subject to availability). For the beer lover in the family Bacchus carries a selection of imported and domestic craft ales and lagers. In addition to the wines and beers, a variety of wine racks, corkscrews, stemware and wine related gifts are available. Stop by soon and learn what Keiths 42 years of experience in the wine business can add to your wine enjoyment. www.bacchusvinoetc.com 692 West Montrose Suite D (352) 394-9805 LOOKING FOR PARTS? SEE JULIE (352) 394-6111 Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! IN MEMORY DEATH NOTICES Laura Ann Aponik Laura Ann Aponik, 48, of Astor, died Tuesday, May 6, 2014. Beyers Fu neral Home, Astor. Juanita W. Ball Juanita W. Lillian Ball, 97, of Eustis, died Sunday, May 4, 2014. Hamlin & Hilbish Fu neral Directors, Eustis. Rosemary B. Dunwoody Rosemary B. Dun woody, 91, of Gaines ville, died Tuesday,May 6, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Anita Fletcher Anita Fletcher, 67, of Astor, died Thursday, May 8, 2014. Beyers Fu neral Home, Astor. William R. Fultz William R. Fultz, 85, of Sebring, died Thursday, May 8, 2014. Banks/ Page Funerals and Cre mations, Wildwood. Brian Christopher Gibson Brian Christopher Gibson, 30, of Ocala, died on Saturday, May 10, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Arthur K. Glahn Arthur K. Glahn, 86, of Mount Dora, died Thursday, May 1, 2014. National Cremation So ciety, Fruitland Park. Lorinda Pace Lorinda Pace, 63, of Fruitland Park, died Tuesday, May 6, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatilla. THANKS FOR READING THE SOUTH LAKE PRESS LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com Myra Woods voice becomes quiet and drops almost to a whisper when she mentions her son, Adam Hunter. It is still tough for Wood to speak about the 22-year-old, who was killed in 2002. But her work as director of the Christian Care Center Childrens Shelter has helped her to cope with her grief and channel it into serving others. Family and coworkers de scribe Wood as the moth er to children in the shelter, taking care of all their needs, from medical to emotional to the daily necessities of life. The shelter averages 16 chil dren a month. The job has been lifesav ing, she said.. Each one of these children has become special to me. It is kind of like a really sweet remembrance of Hunter. This gave me a pur pose that was the reason to get up and keep going. It gave me a reason to cope. I could step outside myself. The center is an emergency placement shelter for abused, neglected, abandoned or ex ploited children who have been removed from their homes by the Florida Department of Children and Families. Wood has served as direc tor for the last 13 years and re members the faces of many of the 2,500 children who came through the shelter. As a provider, director and professional she goes above and beyond and is extremely involved, said Nicole Pulci ni Mason, director of commu nity affairs for Kids Central, a nonprot that provides care for abused, neglected and abandoned children and their families. A lot of profession als may not have the time to be directly involved in the day-to-day operations. She is very involved and knows all the children they care for. The children share their struggles with Wood and she arrives at the shelter as ear ly as 6 a.m. to see them off to school. She is also there to greet them when they get home at the end of the school day. I am protective of them, she said, pointing to the pic tures many of them made for her and a pottery bowl one child made that holds her pa per clips. I dont want anyone trying to exploit them or take advantage of them. Angela Harris, a staff worker of Woods, said she takes the children shopping and makes sure the girls are able to get their hair cut and have time to do normal things. They go swimming at the YMCA, she said, explain ing Wood will take them to Walmart, skating, the movies and out to eat. She is always asking them what they need, Harris said. She teaches them table man ners. They have to say their prayers every time they eat. Wood also is not afraid to set boundaries or offer disci pline when needed. They all become my kids, she said. Sometimes they talk about how strict I am. I have their best interest at heart. I cant step back and let them behave the way they want to behave without boundaries. The children are instructed on personal hygiene and are ordered to keep their rooms clean. The older children learn to do their own laundry. Most important, Wood en courages them to come to her with any problems they have. Shelter director loses son but becomes mom to hundreds of troubled children LEESBURG BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Myra Wood hugs a boy on Saturday at the Christian Care Center Childrens Shelter in Leesburg. This is a lifesaving job, Wood said about helping the sheltered children.It gave me a purpose, a reason to live. SEE SHELTER | A10

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A10 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 14, 2014 I encourage them to open up and talk to me and let me know what is bothering them, she said. I want them to communicate with me about what they need. Wood said she is also honest with them. If something is not going right in here, the children ask can I call Ms. Myra? Harris said. Woods job is not 9 to 5, as she often receives and makes calls in the evening when she has left the shelter. She is pretty much on duty 24 hours a day, seven days a week, said Chester Wood, Myras husband who is director of the Samaritan Inn, a ministry for homeless children and their fam ilies. It is more than a full-time job. It is a way of life. Chester Wood said his wifes work with the children has had a heal ing effect. There are certain op portunities in life that her son was not able to experience because he was killed, he said. She seems like she wants to channel that energy in helping these kids receive the benets her son was not able to benet from. When she comes home Myra often speaks of the children in her shelter, which she describes as a sanctuary where the children are safe and secure. Her dedication is seeing these abused children are provid ed for appropriately, Chester said. She al ways encourages them to understand that God loves them and has a purpose for their lives. Pastor Cliff Lea of the First Baptist Church in Leesburg, where the Christian Care Cen ter is based, said he has watched many children run up to her to give Wood a hug. She is loving toward them and affectionate, he said. Lea believes her own loss helps her to understand the pain many children are feel ing as a result of being abused or neglected. Wood said the job has its tense and dif cult moments, especial ly when it can be hard to get through to a child. It can be very ex hausting, she said. You feel like you want to give up, but it is the one kid that is worth all the effort, the sleepless nights and the worry. Children generally stay up to 60 days, al though some stay lon ger. When they leave the shelter, Wood makes sure they have a good place to go, Lea said. What is rewarding for Wood is to see the chil dren many years lat er after they leave the shelter and have gone on to successful careers or have become loving and caring mothers and fathers, Wood said. Wood recalled one young man in her shel ter years ago who was a handful. We had to be strict and consistent, she said. He gave us a t and then one day he stopped by and said, You dont recognize me do you? He then told me who he was. He wanted to say thank you for ev erything I had done. Wood continued: He thanked me for being tough, and he was on his way to Afghanistan to serve his country. SHELTER FROM PAGE A9 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com Lake County Animal Ser vices lead veterinarian re opened the county shelter last week after a recent out break of parvovirus in dogs there. The shelter reopened May 5 after shutting down for sev eral days because of an out break of parvovirus resulting in 16 dogs being put down. That outbreak sparked an audit of intake and vaccina tion policies, county ofcials said. Julie-Anne Corda, lead vet erinarian at the shelter, said the entire facility inlcud ing the front desk, the bath rooms and the viewing areas was steam cleaned and disinfected. The grass has been diluted with bleach water, she said. I am condent we are OK. Does it mean we couldnt get parvo in two months? No. While county staff made the decision to close the shel ter, Corda said it could have remained opened. It was not a medical ne cessity, she said of the clo sure, explaining the proto cols specify if the cleaning is done within 24 hours the shelter could go back to run ning normally. Elisha Pappacoda, a coun ty public information of cer, said shelter management chose to err on the side of caution and close the shelter to the public while following veterinary protocols for dis infecting the building, sur rounding areas and transport vehicles. Corda said she worries about the higher number of animals coming into the shelter since it closed. The closure affected not only dog adoptions, but also cat adop tions, as well as all intake and night-drop kennels. The parvo outbreak is fairly common in shelters, accord ing to Corda. This is an infection that every shelter in this country is at risk of acquiring, said Cynda Crawford, clinical as sistant professor of shelter medicine at the University of Florida, who Corda contact ed for advice on how to man age parvo. Crawford said the incuba tion period for parvovirus in dogs can last for as many as 14 days, but more common ly seven days before the ani mal starts showing common symptoms of what the Ameri can Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals denes as an often life-threatening viral disease in dogs that af fects the intestinal tract. Symptoms include lethar gy, severe vomiting, diarrhea and loss of appetite. Half the dogs they brought in were likely infected in the community and brought the virus with them, Crawford said. We have been working with Corda and she did reach out to us and she is following industry recommendations. Crawford said it can take anywhere from seven to 10 days for adult dogs to devel op full protection from par vovirus. Corda said of 16 dogs that had to be euthanized at the shelter, all were given vac cinations for parvo, but had not developed full protection from the disease, because it requires a follow up vaccina tion two weeks later. The animals that come into the facility are vaccinat ed on intake, she said. The problem is if some animals are stressed out they dont re spond great to the vaccine. They needed the second vac cine to complete the immu nity. Even so, County Manag er David Heath recently re quested the inspector gener al with the Lake County Clerk of Courts ofce to audit the shelters intake and vaccina tion procedures to ensure that we are adequately pro tecting our animal shelter population. Bob Melton, inspector gen eral with the Lake County Clerk of Courts ofce, said his ofce would conduct a special review auditing the intake process for animals at Animal Services to include reviewing the vaccination process and the deworming process. As part of this audit we are going to be reviewing what has been done in the past, what is being done now and making recommendations about what should be done in the future if any changes are needed, he said. The review will include any adverse things that have happened in the recent past for the purpose of determin ing whether their current process is adequate or not. The parvo outbreak is the latest in what has become a growing list of problems at the shelter. Earlier this month, six pup pies adopted from the shelter received no treatment and all later died as a result of what a veterinarian could conrm in one puppy as a case of hookworm. Two other pup pies adopted from the same litter were also found to have hookworm, but were saved through blood transfusions and intravenous drips, said Allison Zachary, a member of Plenty of Pitbulls, a res cue organization that adopt ed the animals. Animal shelter reopens after virus outbreak

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B1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 14, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTS SPORTS EDITOR ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE .............................. 365-8268 FAX .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL ......... sports@dailycommercial.com S PORTS and LEISURE FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Roberto Aguayo and Nick Waisome are na tional champions, and Marcell Harris plays for one of the most suc cessful college football programs in the past 25 years. None of them has forgotten where they came from or the peo ple who helped them achieve their dreams. Aguayo, Waisome teammates at Florida State University and Harris a defensive back at the University of Florida spoke for 90 minutes on Thurs day to student-athletes at Lake Minneola High School. They chose Lake Minneola because Wal ter Banks, their football coach at South Lake, and Robyn Campos, their NCAA coordinator at South Lake, now work at Lake Countys newest high school. This is the only high school Ill speak at in Lake County, Aguayo said. Its an honor to come here and give a little bit of advice and answer some ques tions. It wasnt that long ago when I was a stu dent-athlete in high school and I had ques tions and needed an swers. Lots of people helped me get to where I am, like Coach Banks and Mrs. Campos, so now its my turn to give something back to them. Aguayo is the win ner of the Lou Groza award, given annually to the top placekicker in college football. A red shirt freshman, Aguayo set a national record for points by a kicker with 157 in Florida States un defeated season in 2013. He outscored eight of FSUs 14 opponents by himself, taking into account eld goals made and extra points. Aguayo converted 94of-94 extra-point at tempts and 21-of-22 eld goals. Forty-ve of his 120 kickoffs went for touch backs. Waisome, a defen sive back, had 11 tack les for FSU in 2013 and started every game on the punt return unit. During his three-year career, Waisome has played in 37 games and recorded one intercep tion against Atlantic Coast Conference rival Clemson. Harris was redshirted last year as a freshman and still has four years of eligibility left with the Gators. Aguayo, Waisome and Harris discussed a va riety of topics, includ ing a day in the life of a college student-ath lete, along with the importance of main taining grades and physical conditioning. Many topics allowed the trio an opportunity to be self-depracating, allowing for laughter, while turning serious when the need arose. Local football stars give back to high school mentors PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Left to right, Florida State kicker Roberto Aguayo, Florida defensive back Marcell Harris and Florida State defensive back Nick Waisome speak to students at Lake Minneola High School in Minneola on May 8. TOP: Students listen to Aguayo, Harris and Waisome talk about what it takes to succeed in high school and college, both academically and athletically. ABOVE: Aguayo shows off national championship ring. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Ofcials at Mont verde Academy have announced that swim ming coach Arilson Champam De Almeida also will be the director of the schools aquatics program. School Headmas ter Dr. Kasey Kessel ring said Champam De Almeida is the rst coach at Montverde Academy to hold both titles. A native of So Paulo, Brazil, Champam De Almeida has previous ly coached swimming at the Alberta Marlin Aquatic Club in Cana da and with Clube Cu ritibano in So Pau lo. All told, Champam De Almeida has more than 20 years of coach ing experience at all levels, including age group, masters, nation al and international, with stints at Princeton University in Prince ton, N.J., and Sea Bees Swimming Club in Montverde names new director of aquatics PHOTO COURTESY OF MONTVERDE ACADEMY Arilson Champam De Almeida, Montverde Academys new swim coach, poses with swimmers he coached to medalwinning performances prior to arriving in Lake County. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com If John Bomm has his wish, Minneola might eventually become the center of racing for fu ture Memorial Day weekends. Bomm is hoping the inaugural event for Cler mont-Minneola Box Car Racing on May 24 and 25 will attract enough local interest to boost the organizations mem bership and bring more visibility to the sport. Often better known as soap-box cars, racing on both days will begin at 8:30 a.m. on Mountain Club Drive in Minneo la and is expected to be completed by the mid dle of the afternoon, said Bomm. Each driver will race twice each day, Bomm said, and admis sion is free. Anyone can bring their chairs or cano pies and sit on the side of the road to watch the children race down the hill, Bomm said. The race is on Sugar loaf Mountain, which Bomm said is one of the highest spots in Flor ida. He said it is a sub division that was never completed. Weve had a few test runs on Mountain Club Drive and got up to about 40 miles per hour on the downhill runs, Bomm said. The course is smooth and its a quiet neighborhood, so I think its going to be a very nice Area box car racers look to promote sport FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Lake County Rowing Associa tion is starting to make waves in the rowing community. The areas only competitive row ing club competed on Saturday at the Florida Masters and Youth Rowing Regatta at Lake Fairview in Orlando and left with eight medals in 10 races. Rowers competed on a course 1,000-meters long on a waterway that has been a longtime favorite for area water enthusiasts. Rac es of that distance are considered sprints, according to Wendy Bur kett, membership director for the LCRA. The daylong event was held un der cloudy skies with intermittent rain. While no member of the LCRA walked away with a gold medal, Burkett said the regatta was a suc cess. Lake County teams picked up ve silver medals and three bronze. The LCRA won silver medals in: Womens Masters Novice, Mens High School (four-man crew), Womens High School (four-wom an crew), Womens Masters (four-woman crew), Mixed Mas ters (four-person crew plus cox swain) and High School (eight-per son crew plus coxswain). The bronze-medal winning teams were: Mens Masters Nov ice, Womens Masters (eight-wom an crew plus a coxswain) and Mixed Masters and High School (eight-person crew plus a cox swain). Menss and Womens Novice are one-person sculls, which are boats that require their crews to use oars on the left and right sides of the vessels. All other boats included a cox swain to oversee the crew. A cox swain sits in the bow or stern and controls the vessels steering, speed, timing and uidity, pri marily by calling a rhythmic ca dence for the crew. Danielle Holmquist rowed the Womens Masters Novice, cover ing the 1,000-meter course in 6 minutes, 38.10 seconds. Steel Templin powered the LCRAs Mens Masters Novice ves sel, stopping the clock in 4:33.90. The crew for Womens Masters boat, which nished in 4:14.10, was Debbie Kiely, Stacey Jackson, Patty Berk, Linda Hopkins, Alis Jordan, Betty Green, Deanna Cue vas and Giana Gattuso-Espinel. Holmquist was coxswain. LCRAs Mens High School team nished in 4:49.80. The boats crew was Templin, Marcel Mon roy, Jacob Franklin and Nick Pal ka, with Holmquist as coxswain. The Mixed Masters were Jordan, John Bell, Paul McPherson and Local rowing teams making waves with eight medals in 10 contests PHOTO COURTESY OF WENDY BURKETT Members of the Lake County Rowing Association get together for a team-unifying cheer before a race on Saturday at the Florida Masters and Youth Rowing Regatta at Lake Fairview in Orlando. SEE STARS | B2 SEE RACERS | B2 SEE SWIM | B2 SEE ROWING | B2

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B2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 14, 2014 Outdoors Fishing 352-365-8268 sports@dailycommercial.com www.dailycommercial.com SOUTHERN TACKLEWORKS | TAVARES S hellcracker are hitting hard on yellow tail and red worms in ad dition to grass shrimp in the pads on Haynes Creek and Dead River. Bluegill have picked up. They are biting on grass shrimp and crick ets around docks. Bass are up in the canals and are hitting on Texas rigged slow roll worms like Houdi ni watermelon red, chartreuse and white chatter baits and other baits worked slowly in cover. Sandys next regular bass tournament will be an open tournament on Satur day. This tournament will usher in a new season. The weigh in will be at Buzzard Beach at 2:30 p.m.; any questions about either tour nament call the shop at 352-7420036. PINE ISLAND CAMP | FRUITLAND PARK Shellcracker are being caught on grass shrimp and minnows. Cat fish are being caught on minnows and grass shrimp. Pine Island has a full supply of live baits including grass shrimp as well as a variety of artificial baits. RV sites, camp sites boats and slips are available for rental. Check out the restaurant before going out or coming off the lake. PALM GARDENS | TAVARES Bream are being caught on grass shrimp and worms in the riv er. Shellcracker are biting also. The Layne Park area at the south east corner of Lake Harris be hind the island is a popular spot. A few striper are being caught at the mouth of the river on sil ver spoons and salt water shrimp. Palm Gardens has pontoon boats available to rent. NELSONS FISH CAMP | WEIRSD ALE Crawdad colored worms are working well on the area bass. BLACK BASS RESORT AND FISH CAMP | LEESBURG Some serious bass were caught over the weekend in Haynes Creek. Brent and Vickie caught several on minnows, lures and night crawl ers. Check out the improvements at BBR. Minnow, red worm and night crawlers sales have been strong. SORRENTO BAIT & TACKLE | SORRENTO Big bass are being caught in open water. Most recently a 4.5 and a 5 pound bass were caught. Con gratulations to local anglers Bil ly Taylor and John Cox Winners of a fully rigged bass boat courtesy of Fishers of Men Tournament. Blue gill and shell cracker are biting on red worms. Bass are biting on Plas tic worms and shiners. Producto Hot Rods with no weights and Gam bler Big EZ in watermelon color are popular choices. Check the areas where runoff from feeder creeks are channeling run off especially with the recent afternoon rains try a RatL-Trap, shiner or ipping a June bug worm. High Banks where the Weki va River runs into the Saint Johns River is a good spot. Huge catsh are being caught by conventional and bow fishermen. LAKES REPORT a weekly update from CHERYL STALEY-ARCHER rfffn tbrrfrr bbnfrf t nffnff nffr trff trf trrrffnf nff tbffrfn ffrf t r fr f fr r tr tfrfrrfrfn rf f rf f tnrfn nnnr tbnnrr n n t nn f f nnfn tnrrn t nrf The lighthearted na ture of the program, of ten driven by the jo vial personalities of the speakers, helped to keep the interest of ev eryone in attendance. In fact, the size of the audience grew as the program went on as more coaches at Lake Minneola found a way to sneak in and listen. Despite never playing for South Lake at the same time Aguayo was teammates with Waisome and Harris, but Waisome and Har ris never played to gether the trio clear ly enjoyed each others company. Waisome and Aguayo playfully nee dled Harris about Flor idas 4-8 season in 2013. To emphasize the Sem inoles success, Aguayo and Waisome ashed their diamond-studded national championship rings for all to see. Sorry Marcell, Waisome said as he panned his nger from side-to-side so every one could see his bling. The trio talked about ways college coaches keep track of their play ers grades and their at tendance in classes. Campos used the op portunity to empha size the importance of maintaining a solid academy standing. One of the rst things that college coaches ask about when they start looking at potential re cruits is their grades, Campos said. They dont want kids who are struggling in the class room. Coaches dont care how good you are if you cant keep your grades up. You are student-ath letes, even in college. Campos, who or ganized the program as a way of showing her student-athletes that anything is possi ble for those who work in all aspects of their lives, praised Aguayo, Waisome and Har ris. She said her chil dren wear jerseys with Aguayos num ber, Waisomes number and Harris number on them, instead of profes sional athletes. These guys are real role models, Cam pos said. They do the things theyre supposed to do. I want my daugh ters to follow and ad mire these guys. They have such great char acter. I am so proud to see them going on to do great things and be ing willing to share their successes with others. Nick and Rober to may be the only two with championships on the eld, but all three of them are champions off the eld. STARS FROM PAGE B1 location for our races. In addition, Bomm said an empty building at the top of Mountain Club Drive a for mer country club has been donated to the CMBCR to use as a storage facility for cars and equipment. During the racing weekend, Bomm said the club will be ac cepting donations for the Wound ed Warrirors Project, a veterans service organization that offers a variety of programs, services and events for wounded veterans of military actions since 9/11. Bomm said the CMBCR will hold another race on Sept. 13 on Mountain Club Drive. Named Scouting Forever, it will be open only to Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts and Cub Scouts. Boy and Girl Scouts, Bomm said, will race each other and Cubs will have their own division. Then, on Oct. 4 and 5, the CM BCR will hold a Breast Cancer Awareness event. Were also working hard to put together a special race in March for special-needs kids in the area, Bomm said. Weve pur chased two two-seat cars to ac commodate children with spe cial needs. This will be our Super Kids Race. The cars will be driven by an experienced driver, with a special-needs child in the car. The winner will have a chance to go to a national event in Akron, Ohio. Bomm said, like all forms of racing, sponsorship is import ant to his organizations suc cess. He is looking for car spon sors and event sponsors. Any business interested in helping the club reach its goals of providing area youngsters with an opportunity to race can con tact Bomm at 352-708-4207. To see the clubs schedule of events, go to www.cmboxcarracing.com. RACERS FROM PAGE B1 Nassau, Bahamas. He has coached numerous swimmers who represented ju nior and senior Brazilian nation al teams at international compe titions, according to Montverde Academy Director of Commu nications George Karos, and has several U.S. national high school championships as well. My goal has always been to provide every swimmer I coach with an opportunity to improve their skills and achieve success at his or her level of ability, Champam De Almeida said. It doesnt matter if they are begin ners or compete at the interna tional level. Champam De Almeida will have one of the areas top swim ming facilities at his dispos al. Montverde Academy cut the ribbon on its aquatics cen ter on April 17, a state-of-theart swimming pool that will be come the training facility for the schools boys and girls swim teams. Located on the east side of The Nest, the Montverde Acad emy Center for Sportsmanship and Wellness, the pool is 84 feet long and 62 feet wide. It is 6 feet deep at each end and 4 feet deep in the middle. Champam De Almeida has a bachelors degree in physi cal education from Piracica ba Methodist University in So Paulo and did postgraduate studies in the physiology of ex ercise with a swimming special ization from Faculdades Met ropolitanas Unidas (United Metropolitan Colleges), also in So Paulo. SWIM FROM PAGE B1 Wendy Burkett. Aaron Hosman was coxswain. The crew nished in 4:22.30. The Womens High School team was Alex Bodzioch, Skylar Berk, Sarah Coleman and Bailey Mazezka. Cox swain Karen Dorr di rected the crew to a n ishing time of 5:03.90. Brandon Rich was the coxswain for the LCRAs Womens Masters team, which nished in 4:36.60. Crew for the boat was Dorr, Kiely, Jackson and Green. The Mixed Mas ters and High School crew, which nished in 4:18.50, was Templin, Franklin, Palka, Val Linday, Mazezka, Col man, Skylar Berk and Bodzioch. Holmquist was coxswain. Anyone interested in rowing or those who have questions about the sport can contact Kiely at info@lakecoun tyrowing.org or Burkett at wendy@lakecounty rowing.org. ROWING FROM PAGE B1

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Ann Dupee REMEMBER WHEN A weekly column that reprints some of the more interesting news stories that have appeared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press. B3 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 14, 2014 www.southlakepress.com C OMMUNITY Proudly serving CLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWS STAFF WRITER ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 EMAIL ..... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com HOMETOWN: Odessa OCCUPATION: I work for the Social Security Administration. FAMILY: My husband, Ryan, and my sons, Cameron, 16, and Matthew, 12 What do you enjoy most about south Lake County? South Lake County is a wonderful place to raise a family. The peo ple sincerely care about each oth er. We moved here in 1996 and feel truly blessed to live in an area with access to such an abun dance of natural beauty and re sources. 1) If you had to summarize your philosophy of life in one sen tence, what would it be? In all that you do, always give your best, for your character is who you are when no one is looking. 2) Name a person or incident youve come across recently thats touched you in some way. Why did this person or incident impress you so much? My younger sister has a special needs child named Grace. Grace wasnt expected to live past her rst birthday. She is now 9. My sister has to be one of the stron gest people I have ever known. Be cause Grace requires round-theclock care, and insurance wont cover this, my sister has had to learn to be Graces nurse for 12 hours of the day, seven days a week. Graces smiling face is a testament to the care my sister provides. When I feel like com plaining about my long work week, all I have to do is think about them and remind myself that after be ing Graces nurse for 84 hours a week, my sister still is a great wife and mom to her two other chil dren. 3) How does what you do contrib ute to the welfare of the area? Professionally, I assist senior cit izens and the disabled in gaining access to much needed resourc es. On a personal level, I am work ing to provide our community with access to sailing opportunities. Its a lifelong sport that teaches condence, self-reliance, discipline and yet still values teamwork. It would be such a positive impact on our local community, and our youth especially. FROM THE FILES | 25 YEARS AGO 1989 Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press Meet Your NEIGHBOR STACEY UPTAIN HISTORY OF JAYCEE BEACH The sand at Jaycee Beach at Lake Minne ola was refurbished 25 years ago. Florida Rock Industries of Astatu la donated 700 tons of sand. Dale DeWitt, owner of DeWitt Exca vating of Winter Gar den, greatly reduced the hauling costs of 13 dump trucks that dumped 40 loads of white sand, from $35 a truckload to $15. A little history of Jay cee Beach is quoted from the book, Cler mont, Gem of the Hills by Miriam W. Johnson and Rosemary Y. Young, and includes informa tion gleaned from old issues of the South Lake Press It had been general ly agreed in 1950 that Clermont should de velop and maintain a public dock and beach. The lakefront on Lake Minneola from 4th to 2nd Streets was the chosen site. Lead ing promoter was Fred Wolfe with the usual backing of this news paper. The Jaycees (Cler mont Junior Cham ber of Commerce) took on the project, agree ing to raise the neces sary funds and to do as much labor as possible themselves. Norris N. Jones was president. Surveying was done and a plan drawn up that includ ed a dock 259 feet long and 10 feet wide, a boat ramp, beach house and restaurant space, dress ing rooms and toilets, a small adjoining out door dance oor and parking space for 150 cars. About 50 Jaycees worked on the beach for almost a year. One weekend grass and weeds were cleaned the full length of the 1,000foot beach. Workers were Curtis Reid, Fred Hayes, George Nagel, Newel Harper, Albia Sheldon and Don Mc Caffrey. On July 4, 1950, 30 men built the dock. Among them were H.L. Clay, Jr., Travis Cork, Ray Coon, Fred Hayes, Norris Jones, Charles Lane, John Lynn, Paul Meyerhoff, Axel Oliven baum, Otis Sickler, Reg Saunders, Jon Middle ton, Morgan Norris and Fred Wolfe. Fritz Addi son, Talmadge Todd, Harold and Gene Farm er, Don Mattioda, Tom Brantley and Bert Orr, although not mem bers of the Jaycees, also helped. Later the Jaycees worked weekends building a beach house. During the weekdays they button-holed the rest of the townspeople soliciting funds. Before the project was entirely completed, George Na gel put an announce ment in the paper: Those who are waiting LINDA CHARLTON Special to the Daily Commercial Senior archers gathered in south Lake County on Satur day to play their part in the rst ever Lake Senior Games. A total of 20 archers from around Central Florida com peted in the 900 tournament at Off Road Revolution, a few miles north of the Lake-Polk county line. As Kevin Murphy, winner in the compound-release ages 65-69 category said, It is a beautiful setup here. Denitely be here next year. Speaking at contests end, Mary Ann Hartman (one of three women competing) said, It was a good day. I didnt break any arrows and I didnt lose any. In the 900 format, archers shoot ve ends of six arrows each with a maximum score of 10 points per arrow. Ar chers on Saturday ranged in age from 52 to 79. They came from as far away as Homo sassa and Fort Meade, but al most half came from The Vil lages Archery Club. Frank Skvarek, 78, is per haps typical of one of the Villagers, though better at shooting than most. Hes been using bows and arrows for about 12 years, and holds or has held multiple state and national records. I used to be a gun shoot er, Skvarek says. I did it for a lot of years. I didnt want to shoot guns anymore, so I thought another challenge would be archery. Skvarek started with a compound bow, but then saw a man shooting a tradi tional recurve. (Compound bows incorporate pulleys that will mechanically assist the archer.) That just looked like ar chery to me, Svarek says. I shot Olympic style for a while, but then I took the sight off. When I look at the compound bows, that doesnt even look like ar chery to me. Hartman, 79, instructs at The Villages Archery Club ve days a week. She also came to the sport relatively late in life. I always wanted to do it, Hartman says. My boys shot at home but I never had time to do it. I moved out here and I saw the archery range and I said, This is the time. Archery is a great sport for women be cause it is a mind sport. The playing eld is level. Theres no age limit for archery. High scorers on Saturday were Rick Hardman on com pound bow and Larry Mi chael on recurve. All of the competitors are eligible to compete in the state senior games, set for this Decem ber in Lee County. The next scheduled event in the Lake County games is bowling, set for May 14-15 at Bowling Tri angle in Mount Dora. The state games are sched uled for Dec. 6-24 in Lee County. Senior games coordinator Gary Perigo said the archers are happy the senior games have come to Lake County. Were promoting the ac tive, healthy lifestyle for se niors, he said. Archery instructor Joseph Steed, who ran the archery competition, made similar comments. We are trying to drive the brand that South Lake Coun ty is the center for health, wellness and tness, he said. Thats the brand we are pushing in South Lake County. There has not been a venue specically for seniors until now. CLERMONT Senior archers compete in south Lake PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Stan Oles, left, and Don Driscoll retrieve arrows and record scores after one end of the competition. Archers shot 15 ends of six arrows each. BELOW: Seventy-eight-year-old Frank Skvarek of the Villages Archery Club takes a shot during the Lake Senior Games competition held Saturday at Off Road Revolution, south of Clermont. SEE HISTORY | B4 SEE NEIGHBOR | B4

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B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 14, 2014 JOINED SIDESBY MARY LOU GUIZZO / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZNo. 0504RELEASE DATE: 5/11/2014 ACROSS1 Like many shotguns9 Mole14 Back-to-back games20 Singer Christina21 ___ gin fizz22 Twelfth Night lover23 Oil and gasoline giant24 Very vexed25 Leonardo ___, a.k.a. Fibonacci26 ___-pitch softball27 What a detective tries to reconstruct29 Platoon setting30 Sommeliers prefix31 Flavor32 Lozenge brand34 Platoon director37 Suckling site38 The Man Who Mistook His Wife for ___ (1985 best seller)42 Old Baby Bell based in the Big Apple43 Assents45 Stretch out47 Neuter50 Literary inits.52 Jai alai basket53 Water checker?56 Going out for the afternoon?60 The Whos My Generation, e.g.64 Pelvic parts66 Musicians practice with four sharps68 Former Obama social secretary Rogers69 Over70 Like some swords or a hint to this puzzles theme72 Balkan native75 Old Jewish villages77 Start of a Beatles refrain78 Old Highlands dagger79 Thelma and Louise, e.g.82 Davis and Midler84 Cover some ground?85 Dizzy86 Bit88 ___ put it another way 90 Persevered94 Spurs98 Landmark tech product of 1981102 Latin to be103 Biblical name of ancient Syria105 Dispel differences108 CSI setting110 Coal or pine product111 Melted chocolate, e.g.112 Kind of algebra116 Is it in you? sloganeer118 Write-___119 Renters dream, maybe120 Lhasa ___ (dogs)121 Some sheet fabrics124 Nothing, in Napoli125 Tuscany town126 Sign-up127 Classic London transport128 Genetic structure129 Source of some discrimination DOWN1 Wind instrument pitched an octave lower than its smaller cousin2 How ballerinas move3 Enter quickly!4 Rocks Ocasek5 Pipe fitting6 Renter7 Heath evergreens8 Thinks maybe one can9 Huffington of the Huffington Post10 Teri of Tootsie11 Subject of some computer settings12 Closeted13 Lao-___14 Enter quickly15 Native New Yorkers16 ___ D.A.17 Primatologist Fossey18 Sicilian city19 Hotel accommodation for more than one28 Kindle competitor29 ___ chops31 Battle of the ___33 Letter thats also a name35 Chillax36 Art appreciation38 Forever young39 Dimmed stars?40 Aleutian isle41 Gang up on, as in basketball44 How ___46 Tar Heels state: Abbr.48 German musical entertainment49 Auto sponsor of Groucho Marxs You Bet Your Life51 Hawk53 Commit a chipeating faux pas54 King lead-in55 Boo-boos57 Shell seen around water58 Formatting feature on a typewriter 59 Totality61 Sired62 Unfazed by63 Better at picking things up?65 Jock67 Job listing inits.71 Descent73 Old car make thats a homophone of a modern car model74 Relative of a twin76 Anatomical tissue79 Reaction of surprise80 Ticks off81 Need a lift?83 Brand of power tools87 Vet, e.g.89 Queens honour: Abbr.91 Brightly colored bird92 Country whose flag says God is great 22 times93 Chess champ Mikhail95 Part of a jazz combo96 Precious97 Mexican shawls99 ___ Gorilla, 1960s TV cartoon character100 First of a kind101 Betrayed104 Raucous bird106 Squirrel, e.g.107 South American land108 Al ___109 Swiss city on the Rhine112 Attraction in a carbon dioxide molecule113 Babys boo-boo114 Equivalent of 20 fins115 Something clickable117 Collette of United States of Tara120 Blond shade122 Bamboozle123 City council rep. 12345678 910111213141516171819 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 3233 34 35 3637 38394041 42 43 4445 46 474849 5051 52 53545556 57585960616263 64 6566 6768 69 70 71 727374 7576 77 78 7980 8182 8384 85 8687 88 89 90 91929394959697 9899100101 102 103 104105 106107 108 109110 111 112113114115 116117 118 119 120 121 122123 124 125 126 127 128 129 Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Solution on page B9 to inspect the beach before send ing in their donations are invited to do so. Webb Dredging Company was hired to pump sand out of the lake onto the beach. They pumped 2,416 cubic yards in 20 days. An addition al 400 yards were hauled in by truck. Myron Pierce loaned 300 feet of pipe during the pumping operation. Vic Oswalts Grove Service and Sup ply drove pilings for the dock. The beach was dedicated Sep tember 10, 1950. The ceremony had been planned for Labor Day but was delayed because of a severe storm. In recent years the beach complex became a city-owned and main tained project. 25 YEARS AGO 1989 The Burger King morning Coffee Club will never be the same. One of its most faithful members, Fred H. Adkinson, 78, of County Road 561A, in Minneola, died May 4. Adkinson was a member of the Lake County School Board for four, full four-year terms (1952-1968,) plus being ap pointed by Gov. Reubin Askew twice to ll vacated terms of now Senator Richard Langley and retired teacher Dru Rambo. In 1961 the School Board au thorized the establishment of Lake-Sumter Community College. Fred supported the college in many ways including site selection in Leesburg, personnel and programs. LSCC was under the school boards jurisdiction until the state Legisla ture passed a law in 1968 to place the community colleges under their own governing boards. He was also an Associate Trust ee for many years for the private Howey Academy, located in Howeyin-the-Hills. Fred served 18 years on the Flor ida Citrus Mutual board of direc tors. He was president of the Citrus and Industrial Council for two years and a member of the governors task force for migrant labor. He came to Florida in 1925 and was a member of the rst class to graduate from Orlando High School in 1928. He brought the Coffee Club a picture taken at the 60th class re union. In 1933 the Adkinson fami ly moved to the north side of Lake Minneola where it had purchased the old boom-time golf and country club, The Palisades. The grove was sold in 1977 and plans are currently underway (1989) to develop the area into a new 18-hole golf and country cub, to be called The Palisades. Some other regulars of the Coffee Club are Jimmy Hunt, Don Meeker, Harold Roberts and Ann Dupee. HISTORY FROM PAGE B3 4) Name one of your greatest accomplishments so far. I have lived such a full life and have had many great experi ences: scuba diving the grave yard of the Atlantic, traveling throughout Europe with my fa ther, barefoot water skiing, run ning a marathon and even sail ing through a hurricane on a passage from South Carolina to the Caribbean. But I would have to say my greatest ac complishment would be moth erhood and raising two won derful sons. Its an ongoing journey and sometimes a bat tle to help shape my sons into men who will make a positive impact on the world and future generations, even if that is just through a kind word, a genuine smile or a thoughtful heart. 5) Whats something youve always wanted to do but hav ent yet? For the community, I would love to establish a sailing center in the Clermont area and provide our youth an opportunity to ex perience the wonderful sport of sailing. For my family, I dream of spending a summer, or even a year, living aboard a sailboat and cruising throughout the Ca ribbean or the Mediterranean, introducing them to other peo ple and cultures. What an ed ucational experience of a life time that would be. 6) What advice would you give to people who want to help out in the community? Just step out and get started. You will nd plenty of people who will be happy to help along the way. NEIGHBOR FROM PAGE B3 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Moonlight Theater is stag ing Ernest Thompsons On Golden Pond, a play about how life and love change with the passage of years. The play reminds au diences, however, that change plays a role in each life. Its a story about family dynamics, about a couple in their winter years. They have a wonderful relation ship but the husband has been talking about dy ing forever. She keeps tell ing him lighten up, said actress Jan Sheldon, who plays the lead role of wife Ethel Thayer. Dan Martin plays her husband, Nor man Thayer, an aging man in his 80s who is losing his memory, his sense of self and his zeal for life. The story takes place during their 48th summer to visit their summer home by the pond and he keeps saying its his last summer, Sheldon said. But then their estranged daughter shows up, creating a twist that changes everything. Thats because the daughter, Chelsea, played by Tonya Denmark, ac companied by her ance Bill Ray, played by Shelly Whittle, ask her parents to watch son Billy Ray, played by James Bentley, while the pair travels to Europe for the summer. The Thayers reluctant ly agree, and thats when things change especially for Norman, Sheldon said. That young boy kind of stirs something in this man (Norman). He makes him remember what it is to be alive and reminds him of his own youth; about shing, reading and enjoy ing his childhood, enjoying life, Sheldon said. The play happens over three to four months of sum mer and by the end, Nor man kind of changes his attitude about life, death, family and everything. Denmark said for her, playing the daughter to the couple in the play has giv en her some insight about what her own parents are going through in their own lives. Sheldon, who has been married for 40 years, said she could relate to the long-married characters. In addition, she said she and Martin were comfort able playing their roles to gether since they have been friends for 10 years. And because the plot works in a medical scare having to do with Norman, Denmark said she thinks audiences might be re minded to appreciate their loved ones. It kind of makes you think twice about your re lationships with people and enjoying them while you can because you nev er know when youll have to face losing someone, Denmark said. Denise Truscott, a long time stage actress and di rector with the Moonlight Players Warehouse Theatre in Clermont, is directing the play. Hood Roberts plays Charlie the mailman, who is the comic relief in the show. Hes the lightest charac ter; hes a comic relief. He has a relationship with the Thayers because hes not only delivered their mail for years, but has gotten to know them and what they are going through. Sheldon said On Gold en Pond is not a sad play, even though the underly ing topic is touching. Instead, Sheldon said its one of the funniest plays shes done. Its really a very funny show with some wonderful lines. Weve had some peo ple actually slapping their leg and laughing out loud in some parts, she said. The play at the Moon light, located at 732B West Montrose Street in Cler mont, continues through May 25 at 8 p.m. on Fri day and Saturday evenings, with 2 p.m. matinees every Sunday. Ticket are $15 for adults and $12 for students. For information or reser vations, call 352-319-1116. On Golden Pond full of laughs, tears PHOTO COURTESY OF MOONLIGHT THEATER Jan Sheldon and Dan Martin star as Ethel and Norman, respectively, in On Golden Pond. Its a story about family dynamics, about a couple in their winter years. They have a wonderful relationship but the husband has been talking about dying forever. Jan Sheldon, actress EUSTIS

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Wednesday, May 14, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B5 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance r t t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital Classified IndexLegal Notices....................0001 Notices............................1000 At Your Service................9000 Employment....................2000 Pets/Animals....................6865 Merchandise....................6000 Real Estate/For RENT......3000 Real Estate/For SALE........4000 Recreation........................7000 Transportation..................8000 Cancellations for ads running Wednesday must be made by 4pm Monday.ADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since The Daily Commercial will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error call the classified department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error.TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! S OUTH LAKE P RESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde

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B6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 14, 2014 A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services rfnfftbrftb f Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Home Improvement Irrigation Services Sprinkler Repairsrfntbr rfff f rfffn tn b rfffn tnrrnr rrnbf Landscaping Services r fntbb Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Painting Services Pool Services Pressure Cleaning Shower Doors Service Enclosure Screening Window Services Handyman Services BOYDSYou call it, We haul it!352-460-7186Grading, Loading, etc. Marine Services Cleaning Services Affordable Home Repair, LLCttf bbrbf tbbb nb 352-551-6073 Electrical Services Roofing Services Tree Service Plumbing Services rfntb frrnff rfnftbnr rffnrffrntrrbbfbr tn rfffnn ntbtrrr nbt Land Clearing Services BrocksLAWN SERVICEr fr nr Geneva DeleonPRO CLEANAsk about a$30.00 Special352-250-2498 nnt nnnnttfbf Beauty Services rffrntbfrfntbrtf Hauling Services Lawn Services ff tftff tff Elite Pool Service352-617-0939 rf Concrete Services tb rbrrff ff trf Handyman Services HAULING!nnn bbfb fb Concrete Services nff rfbt rnf ttnfb tbf Lawn Services nbt ft bfbrnf btrf nfb bbrtbbf

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Wednesday, May 14, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B7 Thank you for reading the local newspaper, the South Lake Press

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B8 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 14, 2014

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Wednesday, May 14, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B9 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr B A R R E L E D A G E N T H E A D E R A G U I L E R A R A M O S O R S I N O S I N C L A I R I R A T E P I S A N O S L O S C E N A R I O V I E T N A M O E N S E A S O N L U D E N S O L I V E R S T O N E T E A T A H A T N Y N E X O K A Y S E L O N G A T E G E L D E A P C E S T A D A M S I E S T A D E B U T A L B U M I L I A E S C A L E D E S I R E E P A S T D O U B L E E D G E D S E R B S H T E T L S O B L A D I S N E E T I T L E R O L E S B E T T E S S O D A R E E L T A D O R T O K E P T A T I T G O A D S I B M P C E S S E A R A M C L E A R T H E A I R D N A L A B T A R O I L G O O B O O L E A N G A T O R A D E I N S O W N I N G A P S O S P E R C A L E S N I E N T E S I E N A E N R O L L E E D E C K E R H E L I X S T A N D A R D Solution to puzzle on B4 Thank you for reading the local paper!



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LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comFour Lake County School Board members said this week they will not ask for a larger share of the penny sales tax that is currently split even ly between the schools, county government and the areas col lective municipalities. While acknowledging the $10 million it receives yearly from the penny sales tax will not be enough to meet at least $1 billion worth of needs for buildings, equipment and other capital, board members said it was important to work together with the municipalities and the county on the issue. Some School Board members previously suggested that half a cent be allocated for the schools, as the student population is expected to increase. The real difference of a half cent versus a third is about $3 million a year, said Bill Mathias, board member. While I dont disagree about the needs, I also believe the municipalities and the counties have the same needs. Kyleen Fischer, School Board member, echoed similar senti ments. I would like to work with the cities and the county, she said. Asked how to meet the growing needs of the school district, We are currently using genetic (DNA) testing to diagnose and treat diseases. We are focused on preventing illness before it causes major dysfunction. DNA testing is available for weight loss and performance, cardiac prevention, mental health, and cancer risk. www.marholinmedicalinstitute.com SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | B3SPORTS: Football stars speak about college experience WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWST AND INSIDE CLASSIFIED B5 CROSSWORDS B4 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN B3 SPORTS B1 VOICES A4WORD ON THE STREE T A2SOUTH LAKE PRESSV OLUME 99, NO. 20 5 SECTIOn N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reservedwww. southlakepress.com PRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE, BELOW: Construction workers perform road work on County Road 44 in Eustis on Friday. LAKE COUNTY Board members express support for penny sales tax allocation JIM TURNERNews Service of FloridaWhen lawmakers re cently handed Gov. Rick Scott a $77.1 billion budget for 2014-15, it included $15.5 million to complete the Coast-toCoast Connector, a bicy cle and pedestrian path that includes both Lake and Sumter counties. The project has been a priority for Incoming Senate President Andy Gardiner, R-Orlando. This is an issue that the Senate has felt very, very strongly about the last couple of years, Gardiner told House members Tuesday. It means a lot to us and especially it means a lot to me personally. The money would be used to start lling in gaps in Central Florida between existing bicy cle and pedestrian trials on both of Floridas coasts. The largest gap re maining a 30-mile stretch between the end of the Withlacoochee State Trail in northern Pasco County and the beginning of the South Lake Trail in South Lake County. Closing the gap would take the trail from Pasco County through eastern Hernando County, through Sumter County near Webster, and east through Lake County to Clermont, where the South Lake Trail contin ues east to Orlando and beyond. The connector is to eventually link the Pinellas Trail in St. Petersburg with the Space Coast. The 38.2-mile Pinellas Trail runs north from Budget provides $15.5M to finish pedestrian path PHOTO COURTESY OF LAKE COUNTY The Lake Minneola Scenic Trail connects to the South Lake Trail in Clermont. State money could link trails like these from Floridas east coast to its west coast. MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillard.ives@dailycommercial.comThe State Attorneys Ofce reported its rst arrest in Lake County stemming from the April raid of ve alleged gaming houses here during a statewide law enforcement operation. David Paul Kucharek, 58, alleged operator of P.J.s on County Road 561 in Astatula, was charged May 7 with possession of a slot ma chine and maintaining a gambli ng house, after ofcials said they seized 33 gam ing machines and more than $7,000 from the operation. He was released from the Lake County jail after posting a $4,000 bond. Kucharek, of Cler mont, faces ve years in prison on the charges, according to an ofcial with the 5th Judi cial State Attorneys Ofce in Marion County, a circuit that includes Lake County. On April 3, ve alleged area In ternet cafes were raided, two by the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce P.J.s and The Grand on U.S. Highway 27 in Cl ermont, according to a sheriffs spokesman. The raids were part of a three-month investigation into illegal gam ing houses, sparked by complaints. No arrests have been reported from The Grand, where detec tives said they seized 85 gaming machines and more than $5,000 in April while patrons watched. The sheriffs ofce raids fell on the same day as a statewide op eration by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement that served a number of search war rants at Internet cafes through ve counties in Florida, including three more in Lake County The Hilltop in Clermont and Lucky Joes and Lucky Stars in Leesburg.TAVARESClermont man arrested after Internet cafe raid KUCHAREKSEE TAX | A2SEE TRAIL | A2

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 14, 2014 GROVELAND Kindergarten registration ongoing through June 12Register for kindergarten at Groveland Elementary School for the 2014-2015 school year from 9 / a.m. to noon by ap pointment only through June 12. Children must turn 5 years old by Sept. 1 to enroll. Parents/guardians should bring a birth certicate, updated shots record, recent physical, proof of address and Social Security card. Call 352-429-2472 for information.MASCOTTE Can You See Me Now Ride set for SaturdayABATE of Florida Inc., Lake County Chapter, will offer the Can You See Me Now Ride supported by Lucky U Cycles, C&C Pumping Inc. and Eagles Aerie No. 4273. The ride begins at 9:45 / a.m. Saturday at Rainbow Restaurant, State Road 50, in Mascotte. Registration is $10 prepaid and the rst 75 registered riders get a free T-shirt. The ride ends at Damn Smoker Barbecue, 36721 State Road 19A, in Eustis. For information, call 352-302-4783.CLERMONT Faith Neighborhood Center to host benefit for new homeThe Faith Neighborhood Center needs to relocate to a new facility and will host a wine, cheese, coffee and dessert event to raise funds from 7 to 9 / p.m. Wednesday at the Clermont Community Center, 685 W. Montrose St. Prepaid tickets are $30 for individuals and $50 per couple. For information, email Terry Krier at Pastork@c.rr.com or go to www. faithneighborhoodcenter.com.CLERMONT Spring Art Show on exhibit through May 31The public can enjoy the South Lake Art League Members Spring Art Show on exhibit from 5 to 7 / p.m. through May 31 at the art gallery, 776 W. Montrose St., in Clermont. For information, go to www.southlakeartleague.com.CLERMONT Hollywood Nights dance scheduled for FridayThe Hollywood Nights Spring Dance is an evening in the spotlight for adults with developmental or other disabilities, hosted by Building Blocks Ministries Inc. The event is open to all adults with developmental disabilities and their guests from 7 to 9 / p .m. Friday at the Clermont Community Center, 620 W. Montrose St., in Clermont. Tickets for the event are $5 per per son and are on sale through Friday at the Building Blocks Learning Center, 548 S. U.S. Highway 27, Suites B-C in Minneola. For information, call 352-536-9264.MONTVERDE Open enrollment at Woodlands Lutheran schoolWoodlands Lutheran Church Early Learning Center is currently enrolling for the 2014-2015 school year for the 2-, 3and 4-year-old preschool programs. The school is at 15333 County Road 455, in Montverde. For information, call 407-469-2525 or email schoolofce@woodlandschurch.com.LAKE COUNTY Health department to offer school immunizationsThe Department of Health in Lake County will offer immunizations at Lake County schools on an ongoing basis for students who will enter the seventh grade during the 2014-15 school year. Immunizations will be given at Clermont Middle School on Thursday and Cecil E. Gray Middle School in Groveland on May 20. For information, call 352-771-5500 or go to www.lakechd.com. Area Briefs What south Lake residents are saying about ...AGRICULTUREWhat do you see as the biggest threat to agriculture in this area at this time?I think the biggest thing is growth. It keeps moving this way. Theres less and less land to farm. SUNNY NEWTON CLERMONT For me its the uncertain ty of farming. You dont know what the weathers going to be, what the mar kets gonna be. JOHN ADAMS CLERMONT The biggest challenge with the citrus is the greening disease. This is my last year if they dont come up with a cure. DAVE BLACK MINNEOLA I dont think theres that big a challenge. The weather is wonderful for the most part and theres plen ty of land. We can grow just about anything here. NANCY DOUGAN CLERMONT Word on theStreet Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 which is still $200 million in debt, she said the dis trict would have to be creative. We discussed general obligation bonds and other ways of funding, she said. We have to look to service schools that would come up and put their own private schools. General obligation bonds are backed by the issuers full faith credit and taxing authority. The one-cent sales tax for infrastructure gener ated $34.8 million in to tal revenue last year. That money was divided equally between the cities, county and school district, with each receiv ing a third of the alloca tion. The 14 cities then must divide their alloca tion proportionately. Revenue from the tax goes toward infrastructure capital needs such as road work, construction of buildings and the pur chase of public safety ve hicles. The revenue, however, cannot be used for opera tional costs. The tax is set to expire in 2017, but the Lake Coun ty Commission said at a board workshop in February that they would like residents to vote on whether to renew the tax in 2015. In the last ve years, the school district has lost more than $67 million in property tax revenue be cause the stagnant econ omy has kept property values low and the Florida Legislature cut the maximum tax rate by 25 per cent. While in support of the current sales tax distribu tion formula, Board Member Rosanne Brandeburg said more funding needs to go into education. I can support the third of the penny sales tax, but I want to make sure the county is going to support the growth that we are beginning to see, she said. A consultant for the school district in Novem ber projected that by 2020 there will be an increase of about 2,297 students, particularly in the south ern part of the county. Brandeburg said school impact fees, which can only be designated for new growth, should be raised to 100 percent from 25 percent. My fear is that we are going to have great needs, no funds and it is going to put this board and future boards in the same situation that pri or boards were in when all the growth hit in 2000. We have got to have a uni ed front and we need to be able to fund education in Lake County. With the current reve nue from impact fees at $2,500 a home, Brande burg said it would take 8,000 homes to build a new elementary school. There are at least six schools in the district that need to be rebuilt or replaced, board member Tod Howard said. They are Clermont Elementary, Cypress Ridge, Clermont Middle, Treadway Elementary, Beverly Shores Elementary and Fruitland Park Elementary. We are going to have to prioritize our needs and do the most we can with the dollars we have, he said. Commissioner Tim Sullivan, who serves as a li aison to the Lake County League of Cities, said the cities and the county have come together to support the same allocation of the penny sales tax. Based on conversa tions with them, they think it is something vital to their economic well-being and would like to continue it as is, he said. We are kind of waiting on the school board. The school board has not formally come to a decision or informed the County Commission yet. But if they do come together with the county and municipalities, Sullivan said it would be a positive thing. If the municipalities, county and school board go forward with a unied front to show why we need to continue this tax since it is not a new tax, I think that it would go a long way in showing the people that we are being conscientious on how we spend our dollars, he said. TAX FROM PAGE A1 St. Petersburg through Gulfport, Largo, Clearwater, Dunedin and Tarpon Springs. Pinellas County estimates that 70,000 people use the trail monthly and support at least 13 bicycle and rental shops lo cated along the trail. Connector proponents cite the econom ic benets to communities that have bike trails, saying 75 percent of Flor idas tourists participate in nature-based activities during their visits. In addition to renting bikes to use these trails, tour ists will naturally gravitate to restaurants, stores, shops and accommodations near the trails, sup porters say. Dale Allen, president of the Florida Greenways & Trails Foundation, said the trail will help draw eco-tourists year-round and dispel some of Flor idas image as not being bicycle and pedestrian friendly. Its known in the tour ist community that were dangerous state. This will help us change that dy namic, Allen said. This will give the state of Flor ida something major to advertise. DOT Ofce of Poli cy Planning Director Jim Wood said Thursday that while the trails provide strong recreational value, the DOT supports the connector and simi lar pedestrian proposals because of their role in transportation. Pinellas Trail, one of the most used trails in the country, roughly two-thirds of its use is for non-recreational use, Wood said. So its for people trying to get from place to place. TRAIL FROM PAGE A1 LIVI STANFORD| Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comOne hundred thirty six Lake County teachers reported that a supervi sor asked them to sign or submit inaccurate re ports about their class sizes, a district-wide review of class size compliance found last week. Those were among several ndings presented to the Lake County School Board last week by Carr, Riggs & Ingram LLC, which was paid $20,000 to audit the school districts compliance with state class size requirements. The 136 teachers who reported that they were asked to sign false reports represents roughly 10 per cent of teachers surveyed, with 60 percent coming from elementary schools, 14 percent from middle schools and 24 percent from high schools, the re port found. Surveys were sent to teachers, administrators and data processing staff, the review stated. Out of 2,818 surveys, 1,518 re sponses were returned. General statements from the district ofce such as we will make class size and be creative and make it work may have put perceived pressure on staff to meet class size requirements, the review stated. I feel the schools may have perceived some pressure to meet those requirements based on that, said Sara Apple white, CPA, who conducted the review. At the same time, Ap plewhite cautioned against reading too much into the survey responses concerning the teachers asked to sign a report they knew was false. We dont know what drove those yes responses, she said, explaining many surveyed may not have taught core courses. The statute requires only core courses to meet class-size requirements. Even so, the survey found 71 percent of respondents do teach core courses. Lake County Superin tendent Susan Moxley previously said no one in her ofce knowingly coerced school principals to lie about their class sizes to skirt state rules. Moxley called for the re view after nding that six principals broke the law by inaccurately reporting Review: Lake County teachers asked to sign inaccurate reportsSEE SCHOOLS | A6

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Wednesday, May 14, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3 Place your ad here and reach the Local Market!VERY AFFORDABLE!Call today 352-394-2183 HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillard.ives@dailycommercial.comBlue Rhino contends that any unsafe conditions that led to a mas sive explosion at its Tavares plant last summer resulted from unpreventable and unforeseeable employee and or supervisor miscon duct, according to the companys challenge of federal workplace-safety violations made available last week. In its written response to the Occupational Safety and Health Administrations claim that Blue Rhino violated 26 fed eral workplace rules, citations issued in January that resulted in the $73,000 in nes, lawyers for Ferrellgas, Blue Rhinos par ent company, went on to state that the alleged violations were the result of isolated and unauthorized ac tions by certain employees and/or super visors which resulted in the conditions. A hearing for Blue Rhino to contest the citations in front of OSHAs review commis sion is set for Sept. 10 in Houston and law yers for the facility said it may assert additional defenses as OSHA claries the violations. The violations included exposing employees to re hazards from propane cylinders during a process in which the 20-pound metal cylinders were bled or drained of leftover gas in the stor age yard in back of the Blue Rhino facility late at night on July 29. State re investi gators believe sparks from a forklift being turned on ignited a propane cloud at the County 448 plant later that night, which set off an explosion that turned many of the estimated 50,000 cylinders into aming missiles that lit the night sky and caused $3.5 million in damage. The blast also dam aged several area prop erties and left ve em ployees with severe burns, one in a coma and one struck by a vehicle in his attempts to ee from the re. OSHA also cited the plant for allowing em ployees to drive forklifts without required training, failing to en sure that gas or liquid was not vented to the air and failing to de velop and implement written operating procedures that provided clear instructions for safely conducting ac tivities as well as the lack of clear instruc tions for emergency shutdowns and for employees not wearing protective clothing. OSHA revealed in March that Blue Rhino had appealed some of the violations, but de tails of the appeal were not available a t that time. No criminal charges were led in the case.TAVARESBlue Rhino says July explosion was unpreventable Staff ReportA Mascotte man was killed Tuesday morning after his tractor-trailer hauling fertilizer overturned off the Florida Turnpike in Orange County. Chad Stewart, 43, was pronounced dead on the scene, according to the Florida Highway Patrol. The crash occurred about 5:25 / a.m. as S tew arts 1971 truck was traveling south on State Road 429, also known as the Daniel Webster Western Beltway or Western Expressway, and was head ing onto the eastbound ramp of the Turnpike. Sgt. Kim Montes, said for unknown reasons Stewart lost control of the vehicle and it over turned onto the ramp, spilling fertilizer onto the road. The crash remains under investigation.Man hauling fertilizer dies after crashing truck MILLARD K. IVES |Staff Writermillard.ives@dailycommercial.comI n a profession where 150 of their comrades die every year in the United States, law enforcement ofcers throughout Lake County took part in a nation al memorial service last week to honor those who have made the ul timate sacrice. What looked like at least 300 ofcers in dress uniforms on horses and motorcy cles, in helicopters and gleaming squad cars, with many on foot took part in the event May 6 in front of the Lake County Histor ic Courthouse in Tavares. They gathered with friends and families of deceased ofcers. According to a ceremony program, 10 of cers have died in the line of duty throughout Lake County since 1919. Keynote speaker for the event was State At torney Brad King, who oversees the 5th Judi cial Circuit, including Marion County, where a Florida Highway Pa trol trooper was killed last week in a roadside crash. King told the crowd that law enforcement ofcers frequent ly put themselves in harms way while working with violent crimi nals, or responding to natural disasters and rescues. Every day they walk out that door, they put themselves in the path of all dangers, said King, perched at the po dium. According to the Na tional Law Enforce ment Ofcers Memori al Fund, a total of 1,501 law enforcement ofcers died in the line of duty during the past 10 Lake County honors officers who died in the line of duty MILLARD K. IVES/DAILY COMMERCIAL Amber Koester, the daughter of slain Lake County sheriffs deputy Wayne Koester, clasps her hands in front of his wreath during a Law Enforcement Ofcer Memorial ceremony at the Lake County Historic Courthouse late Tuesday evening. The deputys sister, Paula Cassella, stands behind Koester as she prepares to place a rose on the wreath. ULTIMATE SACRIFICETen Lake County law enforcement ofcers have died in the line of duty. Their lives and service were celebrated Wednesday at the memorial. %  en CHIEF DEPUTY BOB C. WILCOX, Lake County Sheriffs Ofce, July 4, 1919, gunre. %  en CHIEF OF POLICE JAMES LEE HUX, Leesburg Police Department, Feb. 13, 1924, gunre. %  en TOWN MARSHAL ROBERT L. SMITHWICK, Groveland Police Department, April 2, 1929, gunre %  en POLICE CHIEF BISHOP W. HANEY, Leesburg Police Department, Oct. 10, 1937, car accident. %  en POLICE OFFICER JESSE F. BEERBOWER, Leesburg Police Department, Feb. 13, 1944, gunre. %  en OFFICER CLINTON MURPHY HYDE, Mount Dora Police Department, Dec. 1, 1959, gunre. %  en DEPUTY JEAN ESTELLE DAUGHARTY, Lake County Sheriffs Ofce, Jan. 24, 1993, car accident. %  en DEPUTY WILLIAM JAMES BILL MARIE, Lake County Sheriffs Ofce, March 19, 1994, aircraft accident. %  en DEPUTY WAYNE J. KOESTER, Lake County Sheriffs Ofce, Feb. 9, 2005, gunre. %  en SHERIFF CHRISTOPHER COOPER DANIELS SR., Lake County Sheriffs Ofce, Oct. 14, 2006, bus accident.SEE OFFICERS | A5

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 14, 2014Stand up for faithI believe the time has come for all Christians to stand up for their faith in Christ. We have been inundated with political correctness and inclusiveness, including the greeting happy holidays instead of merry Christmas and the disappear ance of Christmas lights at any store in Leesburg. Laws have been passed against prayer in public places and institutions, especially public schools and at athletic events. Regulations by the military that do not allow the name of Jesus to be mentioned in Christian church services. The collection for Christian missions that certain stores forbid during Christmas season. It seems that all Christian traditions nationwide are being scrapped in the name of political correctness. This is one Christian that is proud of my faith and believes that it is time for Christians to stand up against this bigotry. How, you ask? By boycotting the stores that refuse to honor Christian traditions during the Christmas season by not displaying Christmas lights or using the greeting happy holidays instead of merry Christmas. During the Christmas season many stores and other businesses show the only prot they make the whole year. We could peacefully demonstrate against any and all anti-Christian bias on the part of government or business. Churches could preach against any anti-Christian speech or acts by the public or the media. The reason given for not taking this action by the church is the law against political speech from the pulpit would deprive the church of their tax-exempt positions. There had been no action ever taken against the church for speaking out politically about anything because the First Amendment forbids such an act by the federal government. If there are enough Christian bodies showing up to take a stance against these abominations, both businesses and the government will listen and change their attitudes about the subject. WILLIAM KRUEGER | LeesburgIgnoring a real tragedyAmazing isnt it, the attention span of the American public? All the attention and press time spent on some too-rich per son (Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling) who made racist comments. Listen to either of the Reverends Sharpton or Jackson and you will hear racist comments, but they get a pass while this ignorant fool is held up as the poster boy for racism in America. Amazing isnt it, that all this crap turned into a tornado, swept the media and completely obscured any reporting on the Phoenix VAMC. It seems that at least 40 veterans, dependent on the VA for health care, were denied the treatments to save their lives. Vets were signed in, told to wait for an appointment and signed out by the clerks so the bottom line looked better; more vets seen, more vets treated, more bonus checks written. These vets were black, white, hispanic and all variations. These vets, these heroes, at one time swore an oath to preserve, protect and defend the republic, and this is how the republic pays them back? Someone needs to go to jail for this. Somebody will be thrown under the bus for this, just not the right one perhaps. The rest will scatter like roaches in the light. I wonder who will be the scapegoat? Meanwhile, the veterans are still dead in Phoenix, while the media foams at the mouth because an 80-year-old white, male billionaire dislikes blacks. Why is this more fun, more socially acceptable to the public than boring old fraud, malfeasance or possibly murder? Just keep in mind that the VA system and Native American health care are both federally run health care systems. This becomes relevant to the average American when health care costs rise too high to pay, and the average American is forced to have federally run, single-payer systems, along with the VA system and the Native American system. You see how well those are run. Those who pay attention will remember that Obama, Pelosi and Reid wanted the single-payer system anyway. Amazing, isnt it? DAVID F. GOODMAN | EustisIt wasnt lon g ago that the Lake County School Board learned some of its schools had under reported their class sizes in apparent viola tion of the states class-size law. School Superintendent Susan Moxley hired an auditing rm to examine the extent of the problem, determine why it happened and propose solutions. The auditors released their draft report to the School Board last week, and although it provided some new details, it frankly raises more questions than it answers about why schools were turning in inaccurate enrollment gures and whether district ofcials intentionally tried to skirt the law. The report points to a number of reasons school ofcials couldnt or didnt provide accurate counts to the state Department of Education. Auditors noted a lack of training on how to comply with the law, recommended that there be an administrator in the district who oversees class-size issues, and lamented that the state Department of Education does not provide any written policies or guidelines spelling out how school districts should comply with the mandate. They even blamed the law itself, which they said is vague and open to interpretation apparently ignoring the fact that most of Floridas 67 counties manage to make sense of the law. In their summary, the auditors chalked the problem up to misunderstandings and misinterpretation. In other words, its no ones fault. The problem with the report is that it treads lightly barely at all on the possibility that school district administrators intentionally skirted the law, despite mounting evidence that this may have occurred. The report contains a brief mention of a sur vey sent to more than 2,000 school employ ees. At least 136 teachers said they were asked to sign or submit class-size reports they knew to be inaccurate. The report also mentions without elaborating general statements made by the district ofce about class sizes directing schools to be creative and make it work. Further, the head of the Lake County teachers union says teachers have complained about being asked to sign inaccurate class rosters. Were the numbers fudged deliberately? We dont know. The audit doesnt delve into the subject and, as yet, its unclear whether district ofcials are interested in nding out. But they must. School ofcials cannot dismiss this problem as an innocent mistake. The class size law has been in place more than a decade and 66 other counties in Florida are able to accurately report class sizes without tripping over the sort of misinterpretations referred to by the auditor. We urge the School District to nish the job. Do a complete and thorough examination of class-size reporting problems. The public has a right to answers. O PINION WHATS YOUR OPINION?The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Letters to the Editor 732 W. Montrose St. Clermont, FL 34711By fax to: 352-394-8001EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed.GUEST COLUMNSIf you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@daily commercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OURVIEWIf you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veter-ans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to to www.lakeveterans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANS SOUTH LAKE PRESSYour community newspaper for more than 100 years.732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Florida 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region.All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. YOUROPINIONSLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Class-size report light on answers, accountabilityWhy was help rejected?After reading Russ Sloans column entitled Unanswered questions regarding Benghazi, I have one more question to add. According to retired Army Gen. Carter Ham, then the head of the U.S. Africa Command in August 2012, a month before the attack, he phoned Ambassador Stevens and offered to send a detachment of troops from the U.S. military. Stevens told Ham he did not need them. Weeks later, Stevens traveled to Germany for an already scheduled meeting with Ham at AFRICOM headquarters. During that meeting, Ham again offered additional military assets, and Stevens again said no. He didnt say why. He just turned it down. The offers of aid and Stevens rejection of them have not been revealed in either the State Departments Administrative Review Board investigation of the Benghazi events or during any of the congressional hearings and reports that have been issued into what took place there. No one has ever answered the simple question of why did Ambassador Stevens turn down the generals offer even though he had already made multiple requests for more security forces to the State Department? Representative Darrell Issa stated that some members of Congress may have been aware of the Ham/Stevens conver sations. Is there something they are not telling us? Of course, it has nothing to do with Hillary Clinton and the great Benghazi non-scandal so who wants to read that, right? RON IVEY | LEESBURG LETTER of the WEEK FILE PHOTO

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Wednesday, May 14, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5 years, an average of one death every 58 hours or 150 per year. The Tavares ceremony blocked off the section of downtown Main Street in front of the courthouse and included a Mount Dora re truck hoisting a giant American ag into the sky. With a bright sun beaming down on the crowd, the event was marked with various speakers, prayers, a moment of silence, a bag pipe salute, the playing of Taps and helicopters ying above. There also was a Volley of Three in which seven ofcers red a modied ver sion of the 21-gun sa lute that had small children covering their ears. This is a rededica tion to their loved ones that they do in fact live on, King said. Ofcers and family members afliated with each fallen ofcer in the county placed roses on wreaths erected in their memories. One wreath w as dedicated to sheriffs Deputy Wayne Koester, who was shot to death by Jason Wheeler in 2005 during an ambush in Lake Kathryn while the of cer was responding to a domestic dispute. Sever al of his family members attended the ceremo ny, including his daugh ter, Amber Koester, and his sister Paula Cassella, who could be seen with tears in their eyes as they walked up to the deputys wreath. Cassella said after the ceremony they have attended every ceremony as well as every appeal hearing for Wheeler, who is on death row. She said they wont be close to closure until Wheeler is executed. Then it (closure) will be done, Cassella said. Lake County commis sioner Jimmy Conner also presented a proclamation during the cer emony honoring the countys fallen ofcers. National Police Week runs through May 17, which pays special recognition to those law enforcement ofcers who have lost their lives in the line of duty. The 33rd annual National Peace Ofcers Memori al Day Services will take place May 15 in front of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. OFFICERS FROM PAGE A3 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comBorn prematurely in South Africa and un able to stand on his weak hind legs, a baby elephant received cus tom leg braces made by a Bushnell compa ny, which also has t ted numerous horses, alpacas, donkeys, and a goose with prosthetic devices and limbs. Its a pretty incredible feeling to help an animal who somebody says has to be put down because of a leg issue, said Ronnie Graves, 59, president and owner of VIP Veterinary Inclusive Prosthetics and Orthot ics, who helped Moses, the baby elephant, from b ecoming prey to predators. And while many people have followed an other Sumter County story that has gone vi ral about Chris P. Bacon, the pot-bellied pig who has a wheeled device to get around, Graves has been creating a wide ar ray of prosthetic devices for 35 years for people and the past 17 years for 120 animals. He once made a ex ible bucket for Hoppy, a goose, to sit in. Velcro straps came over in front of the gooses wing and behind it to hold her in place. A wa terproof plastic roller blade was attached and the height was adjusted so that Hoppy could push herself along and go wherever her heart desired. She could swim in it, too. The goose never received the notoriety like Chris P. Bacon, who has his own website, childrens books and T-shirts. Its my fault. Im not one to go out and toot my own horn, said Graves, whose passion for his work goes beyond his training and expertise to a more per sonal level. Graves is an amputee who lost his left leg below the knee at age 20 after a train accident in Council Bluff, Iowa, on May 15, 1975. I would have nev er gotten into pros thetics and orthotics if I had not lost my own leg, Graves said. It was most denitely a bless ing. His began in the pros thetics eld by working in an Orlando prosthet ics lab. I started growing in the business, learning from a lot of my peers, he said. I think it has made it easier for people to relate to me. They feel like I know what Im talking about and what Im feeling. Graves understands the range of emotions some people feel in the beginning in adjusting to life as an amputee. Its tough to get over the hurdle, he said. Most adults are angry and upset that this has happened, so youve got to get past the an ger, then you have to get them to realize, Hey, I can do anything I want to do, and once you get to that point, you can do miracles with them. You can get them running and get them dancing. He was dancing on the dance oor for four hours with his own prosthetic leg when he met the love of his life. Graves and his wife, Linda, have been mar ried for 32 years. I have learned from my husband, that in many cases, disability is a state of mind, Linda said. Together we built a business and started a non-prot organization that we are passionate about. We love animals and helping people; we believe in sharing our blessings and through our love of animals and passion for helping peo ple, we have been fortu nate to successfully ac complish both. Linda runs the dayto-day operations, per sonnel and account ing functions of the business, while Graves handles the fabrication, patient care and the creative side of the company. Graves developed a working protocol in helping animals, and he only does his work un der requests from veter inarians. There is a mindset somewhere that you can make a device for an animal stick it on the horse and turn him out to pas ture and forget about it, and you cant, he said. You dont do this with humans and you cant do it with animals. His process has involved having a device worn and taken off ev ery two hours for sev en days for the animal t o get acclimated, along with being given treats such as food or atten tion. One special case was working with Sitka and Belmont, two horses that belonged to Jill and Tony Curtis, the late ac tor. Graves stayed at the couples home as he tted the horses. Sitka could not get up and walk when I met her, said Graves, who was pleased the horse took right away to wear ing the device. Belmont had suffered from an old knee fracture and arthritis, and he was videotaped as he happi ly wagged his tail as he limped to a hay pile. It brought tears to my eyes, Graves said. Some of the animals that he has helped can be seen on Facebook, and one of Graves favorite photos shows him standing next to Luigi, a miniature donkey, as they both show their prosthetic legs.BUSHNELLVet goes out on a limb to help animals THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Ronnie Graves shows a cast of a horse leg at his Bushnell company, VIP Veterinary Inclusive Prosthetics and Orthotics. He has been helping animals for the past 17 years, and has been in the prosthetics business for 35 years.

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A6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 14, 2014 Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) their class sizes to the state. Simone Maduro-Fer guson, a teacher at Lake Minneola High School, recently tipped off the Florida Department of Education (FLDOE) about the class-size violations. In her complaint, she states she was asked to remove kids from her class roster during FTE counting week, where schools are required to provide an accurate count of student enrollment to the state. School district ofcials subsequently launched an investigation and found additional reporting problems in ve other schools. Principals at Mount Dora High School, Tav ares Elementary School, Sawgrass Bay Elementary in Clermont, Sor rento Elementary, Lake Minneola High School and Grassy Lake Ele mentary in Minneola, reported to the FLDOE that their average class sizes were smaller than was actually the case. According to the sur veys, 206 teachers 15 percent of respon dents said they have had students remain in the classroom while as signed to another class, while 84 percent said they did not. The review presented at a school board meet ing Monday did not cite specics, but pointed to lack of training and the vague Florida stat ute regarding classsize compliance as ma jor contributors to the problem districtwide. By Florida law, public schools are not per mitted to exceed cer tain class-size limits: 18 students per class in pre-kindergar ten through grade 3, 22 per class in grades 4 through 8 and 25 in grades 9 through 12. Schools that violate those limits are subject to nes. You have to be sure all of your staff gets training annually, so they will understand what their requirements are and give them spe cic examples of what is acceptable and not acceptable, said Applewhite. Applewhite said there is no individual at the district level that is as signed responsibility for class size requirements compliance or to assist schools in meeting the requirements. As a result, she rec ommended the district create an administrative position that has that responsibility. Board Chairwoman Debbie Stivender asked Applewhite how she would address dis ciplinary action if she were superintendent. Applewhite said it would be hard to single out any individual or one school. The misunderstandings were widespread, she said. There is a sort of continuum. Moxley noted that she was concerned that 136 teachers surveyed were asked to sign something which was inaccurate. Both Tod Howard and Kyleen Fischer, board members, said they would have liked the report to have cited spe cic errors as opposed to a broad overview. We are going to be asked about those and we are not going to be able to communicate to the public from an outside source, Howard said. In her summary, Applewhite said: Misunderstandings and misinterpretation of the rules exist throughout the district. Reporting inconsistencies could have been ques tioned at every level but the widespread nature of these practices appeared to have provid ed a false sense of ac ceptability. SCHOOLS FROM PAGE A2

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Wednesday, May 14, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A7

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Wednesday, May 14, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A9 Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...Bacchus Vino Etcetera Tenth AnniversaryHistoric downtown Clermont is the home of a friendly wine shop where the staff and customers believe that wine is for your enjoyment, not intimidation. Open since 2004 at the corner of Montrose and Seventh, across from City Hall Park, Bacchus Vino Etcetera is commemorating their tenth anniversary with a month long celebration. When it comes to wine education, one should keep an open mind and an open bottle. Owners Keith and Karen Mullins encourage Bacchus customers to explore and savor the vast array of wines available from around the world. Frequent sampling opportunities include evening gatherings featuring wines from a specific area, grape variety, winery or other theme. Often a wine or two is available for sampling as customers drop by to shop. A popular tasting and shopping event are the Wine Walks held six times yearly which feature wines from Bacchus Vino Etcetera being sampled at various merchants throughout the downtown area. The next Wine Walk will take place May 16th from 6:30 until 9:00 and will feature all Italian Wine. Tickets are currently available at Bacchus Vino Etcetera. Bacchus Vino Etcetera is the home of the By the Light of the Moon Lunar Wine Club. Each time there is a full moon members receive a bottle each of specially selected red and white wines at a preset price. Between full moons, club members are eligible for exclusive offers and wine discounts. The club is an excellent way to learn about and try new wines, and is a great gift idea. Bacchus Vino Etcetera currently stocks over 700 wines from 17 countries and 8 states. Wines from many popular wineries can be found along with those from some lesser-known producers. For customers with specific requests Bacchus Vino Etcetera can special order wines not already in stock (subject to availability). For the beer lover in the family Bacchus carries a selection of imported and domestic craft ales and lagers. In addition to the wines and beers, a variety of wine racks, corkscrews, stemware and wine related gifts are available. Stop by soon and learn what Keiths 42 years of experience in the wine business can add to your wine enjoyment. www.bacchusvinoetc.com 692 West Montrose Suite D (352) 394-9805 LOOKING FOR PARTS? SEE JULIE (352) 394-6111 Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! IN MEMORY DEATH NOTICESLaura Ann AponikLaura Ann Aponik, 48, of Astor, died Tuesday, May 6, 2014. Beyers Fu neral Home, Astor.Juanita W. BallJuanita W. Lillian Ball, 97, of Eustis, died Sunday, May 4, 2014. Hamlin & Hilbish Funeral Directors, Eustis.Rosemary B. DunwoodyRosemary B. Dunwoody, 91, of Gaines ville, died Tuesday,May 6, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Anita FletcherAnita Fletcher, 67, of Astor, died Thursday, May 8, 2014. Beyers Fu neral Home, Astor.William R. FultzWilliam R. Fultz, 85, of Sebring, died Thursday, May 8, 2014. Banks/ Page Funerals and Cre mations, Wildwood.Brian Christopher GibsonBrian Christopher Gibson, 30, of Ocala, died on Saturday, May 10, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Arthur K. GlahnArthur K. Glahn, 86, of Mount Dora, died Thursday, May 1, 2014. National Cremation Society, Fruitland Park.Lorinda PaceLorinda Pace, 63, of Fruitland Park, died Tuesday, May 6, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatilla. THANKS FOR READING THE SOUTH LAKE PRESS LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comMyra Woods voice becomes quiet and drops almost to a whisper when she mentions her son, Adam Hunter. It is still tough for Wood to speak about the 22-year-old, who was killed in 2002. But her work as director of the Christian Care Center Childrens Shelter has helped her to cope with her grief and channel it into serving others. Family and coworkers describe Wood as the moth er to children in the shelter, taking care of all their needs, from medical to emotional to the daily necessities of life. The shelter averages 16 chil dren a month. The job has been lifesav ing, she said.. Each one of these children has become special to me. It is kind of like a really sweet remembrance of Hunter. This gave me a pur pose that was the reason to get up and keep going. It gave me a reason to cope. I could step outside myself. The center is an emergency placement shelter for abused, neglected, abandoned or ex ploited children who have been removed from their homes by the Florida Department of Children and Families. Wood has served as director for the last 13 years and re members the faces of many of the 2,500 children who came through the shelter. As a provider, director and professional she goes above and beyond and is extremely involved, said Nicole Pulcini Mason, director of commu nity affairs for Kids Central, a nonprot that provides care for abused, neglected and abandoned children and their families. A lot of profession als may not have the time to be directly involved in the day-to-day operations. She is very involved and knows all the children they care for. The children share their struggles with Wood and she arrives at the shelter as ear ly as 6 / a.m. to see them off to school. She is also there to greet them when they get home at the end of the school day. I am protective of them, she said, pointing to the pic tures many of them made for her and a pottery bowl one child made that holds her pa per clips. I dont want anyone trying to exploit them or take advantage of them. Angela Harris, a staff worker of Woods, said she takes the children shopping and makes sure the girls are able to get their hair cut and have time to do normal things. They go swimming at the YMCA, she said, explain ing Wood will take them to Walmart, skating, the movies and out to eat. She is always asking them what they need, Harris said. She teaches them table man ners. They have to say their prayers every time they eat. Wood also is not afraid to set boundaries or offer disci pline when needed. They all become my kids, she said. Sometimes they talk about how strict I am. I have their best interest at heart. I cant step back and let them behave the way they want to behave without boundaries. The children are instructed on personal hygiene and are ordered to keep their rooms clean. The older children learn to do their own laundry. Most important, Wood encourages them to come to her with any problems they have.Shelter director loses son but becomes mom to hundreds of troubled childrenLEESBURG BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Myra Wood hugs a boy on Saturday at the Christian Care Center Childrens Shelter in Leesburg. This is a lifesaving job, Wood said about helping the sheltered children.It gave me a purpose, a reason to live. SEE SHELTER | A10

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A10 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 14, 2014 I encourage them to open up and talk to me and let me know what is bothering them, she said. I want them to communicate with me about what they need. Wood said she is also honest with them. If something is not going right in here, the children ask can I call Ms. Myra? Harris said. Woods job is not 9 to 5, as she often receives and makes calls in the evening when she has left the shelter. She is pretty much on duty 24 hours a day, seven days a week, said Chester Wood, Myras husband who is director of the Samaritan Inn, a ministry for homeless children and their families. It is more than a full-time job. It is a way of life. Chester Wood said his wifes work with the children has had a heal ing effect. There are certain op portunities in life that her son was not able to experience because he was killed, he said. She seems like she wants to channel that energy in helping these kids receive the benets her son was not able to benet from. When she comes home Myra often speaks of the children in her shelter, which she describes as a sanctuary where the children are safe and secure. Her dedication is seeing these abused children are provided for appropriately, Chester said. She al ways encourages them to understand that God loves them and has a purpose for their lives. Pastor Cliff Lea of the First Baptist Church in Leesburg, where the Christian Care Cen ter is based, said he has watched many children run up to her to give Wood a hug. She is loving toward them and affectionate, he said. Lea believes her own loss helps her to understand the pain many children are feel ing as a result of being abused or neglected. Wood said the job has its tense and difcult moments, especially when it can be hard to get through to a child. It can be very ex hausting, she said. You feel like you want to give up, but it is the one kid that is worth all the effort, the sleepless nights and the worry. Children generally stay up to 60 days, al though some stay lon ger. When they leave the shelter, Wood makes sure they have a good place to go, Lea said. What is rewarding for Wood is to see the children many years lat er after they leave the shelter and have gone on to successful careers or have become loving and caring mothers and fathers, Wood said. Wood recalled one young man in her shelter years ago who was a handful. We had to be strict and consistent, she said. He gave us a t and then one day he stopped by and said, You dont recognize me do you? He then told me who he was. He wanted to say thank you for ev erything I had done. Wood continued: He thanked me for being tough, and he was on his way to Afghanistan to serve his country. SHELTER FROM PAGE A9 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comLake County Animal Ser vices lead veterinarian re opened the county shelter last week after a recent out break of parvovirus in dogs there. The shelter reopened May 5 after shutting down for sev eral days because of an out break of parvovirus resulting in 16 dogs being put down. That outbreak sparked an audit of intake and vaccina tion policies, county ofcials said. Julie-Anne Corda, lead vet erinarian at the shelter, said the entire facility inlcud ing the front desk, the bath rooms and the viewing areas was steam cleaned and disinfected. The grass has been diluted with bleach water, she said. I am condent we are OK. Does it mean we couldnt get parvo in two months? No. While county staff made the decision to close the shel ter, Corda said it could have remained opened. It was not a medical necessity, she said of the clo sure, explaining the proto cols specify if the cleaning is done within 24 hours the shelter could go back to run ning normally. Elisha Pappacoda, a coun ty public information ofcer, said shelter management chose to err on the side of caution and close the shelter to the public while following veterinary protocols for dis infecting the building, sur rounding areas and transport vehicles. Corda said she worries about the higher number of animals coming into the shelter since it closed. The closure affected not only dog adoptions, but also cat adop tions, as well as all intake and night-drop kennels. The parvo outbreak is fairly common in shelters, according to Corda. This is an infection that every shelter in this country is at risk of acquiring, said Cynda Crawford, clinical assistant professor of shelter medicine at the University of Florida, who Corda contacted for advice on how to manage parvo. Crawford said the incuba tion period for parvovirus in dogs can last for as many as 14 days, but more common ly seven days before the ani mal starts showing common symptoms of what the Ameri can Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals denes as an often life-threatening viral disease in dogs that af fects the intestinal tract. Symptoms include lethar gy, severe vomiting, diarrhea and loss of appetite. Half the dogs they brought in were likely infected in the community and brought the virus with them, Crawford said. We have been working with Corda and she did reach out to us and she is following industry recommendations. Crawford said it can take anywhere from seven to 10 days for adult dogs to devel op full protection from par vovirus. Corda said of 16 dogs that had to be euthanized at the shelter, all were given vac cinations for parvo, but had not developed full protection from the disease, because it requires a follow up vaccination two weeks later. The animals that come into the facility are vaccinated on intake, she said. The problem is if some animals are stressed out they dont re spond great to the vaccine. They needed the second vaccine to complete the immunity. Even so, County Manager David Heath recently requested the inspector gener al with the Lake County Clerk of Courts ofce to audit the shelters intake and vaccina tion procedures to ensure that we are adequately pro tecting our animal shelter population. Bob Melton, inspector gen eral with the Lake County Clerk of Courts ofce, said his ofce would conduct a special review auditing the intake process for animals at Animal Services to include reviewing the vaccination process and the deworming process. As part of this audit we are going to be reviewing what has been done in the past, what is being done now and making recommendations about what should be done in the future if any changes are needed, he said. The review will include any adverse things that have happened in the recent past for the purpose of determin ing whether their current process is adequate or not. The parvo outbreak is the latest in what has become a growing list of problems at the shelter. Earlier this month, six puppies adopted from the shelter received no treatment and all later died as a result of what a veterinarian could conrm in one puppy as a case of hookworm. Two other pup pies adopted from the same litter were also found to have hookworm, but were saved through blood transfusions and intravenous drips, said Allison Zachary, a member of Plenty of Pitbulls, a res cue organization that adopt ed the animals.Animal shelter reopens after virus outbreak

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B1SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 14, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTSSPORTS EDITOR . ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE . .............................. 365-8268 FAX . .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL . ......... sports@dailycommercial.comSPORTSandLEISURE FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comRoberto Aguayo and Nick Waisome are national champions, and Marcell Harris plays for one of the most suc cessful college football programs in the past 25 years. None of them has forgotten where they came from or the peo ple who helped them achieve their dreams. Aguayo, Waisome teammates at Florida State University and Harris a defensive back at the University of Florida spoke for 90 minutes on Thurs day to student-athletes at Lake Minneola High School. They chose Lake Minneola because Walter Banks, their football coach at South Lake, and Robyn Campos, their NCAA coordinator at South Lake, now work at Lake Countys newest high school. This is the only high school Ill speak at in Lake County, Aguayo said. Its an honor to come here and give a little bit of advice and answer some ques tions. It wasnt that long ago when I was a stu dent-athlete in high school and I had ques tions and needed an swers. Lots of people helped me get to where I am, like Coach Banks and Mrs. Campos, so now its my turn to give something back to them. Aguayo is the win ner of the Lou Groza award, given annually to the top placekicker in college football. A red shirt freshman, Aguayo set a national record for points by a kicker with 157 in Florida States un defeated season in 2013. He outscored eight of FSUs 14 opponents by himself, taking into account eld goals made and extra points. Aguayo converted 94of-94 extra-point at tempts and 21-of-22 eld goals. Forty-ve of his 120 kickoffs went for touchbacks. Waisome, a defensive back, had 11 tack les for FSU in 2013 and started every game on the punt return unit. During his three-year career, Waisome has played in 37 games and recorded one interception against Atlantic Coast Conference rival Clemson. Harris was redshirted last year as a freshman and still has four years of eligibility left with the Gators. Aguayo, Waisome and Harris discussed a variety of topics, including a day in the life of a college student-athlete, along with the importance of main taining grades and physical conditioning. Many topics allowed the trio an opportunity to be self-depracating, allowing for laughter, while turning serious when the need arose.Local football stars give back to high school mentors PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIALLeft to right, Florida State kicker Roberto Aguayo, Florida defensive back Marcell Harris and Florida State defensive back Nick Waisome speak to students at Lake Minneola High School in Minneola on May 8. TOP: Students listen to Aguayo, Harris and Waisome talk about what it takes to succeed in high school and college, both academically and athletically. ABOVE: Aguayo shows off national championship ring. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comOfcials at Mont verde Academy have announced that swimming coach Arilson Champam De Almeida also will be the director of the schools aquatics program. School Headmaster Dr. Kasey Kesselring said Champam De Almeida is the rst coach at Montverde Academy to hold both titles. A native of So Paulo, Brazil, Champam De Almeida has previous ly coached swimming at the Alberta Marlin Aquatic Club in Canada and with Clube Cu ritibano in So Pau lo. All told, Champam De Almeida has more than 20 years of coach ing experience at all levels, including age group, masters, nation al and international, with stints at Princeton University in Prince ton, N.J., and Sea Bees Swimming Club in Montverde names new director of aquatics PHOTO COURTESY OF MONTVERDE ACADEMYArilson Champam De Almeida, Montverde Academys new swim coach, poses with swimmers he coached to medalwinning performances prior to arriving in Lake County. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comIf John Bomm has his wish, Minneola might eventually become the center of racing for fu ture Memorial Day weekends. Bomm is hoping the inaugural event for Cler mont-Minneola Box Car Racing on May 24 and 25 will attract enough local interest to boost the organizations mem bership and bring more visibility to the sport. Often better known as soap-box cars, racing on both days will begin at 8:30 / a.m. on M ountain Club Drive in Minneo la and is expected to be completed by the middle of the afternoon, said Bomm. Each driver will race twice each day, Bomm said, and admission is free. Anyone can bring their chairs or cano pies and sit on the side of the road to watch the children race down the hill, Bomm said. The race is on Sugar loaf Mountain, which Bomm said is one of the highest spots in Flor ida. He said it is a sub division that was never completed. Weve had a few test runs on Mountain Club Drive and got up to about 40 miles per hour on the downhill runs, Bomm said. The course is smooth and its a quiet neighborhood, so I think its going to be a very nice Area box car racers look to promote sport FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comLake County Rowing Associa tion is starting to make waves in the rowing community. The areas only competitive row ing club competed on Saturday at the Florida Masters and Youth Rowing Regatta at Lake Fairview in Orlando and left with eight medals in 10 races. Rowers competed on a course 1,000-meters long on a waterway that has been a longtime favorite for area water enthusiasts. Rac es of that distance are considered sprints, according to Wendy Bur kett, membership director for the LCRA. The daylong event was held un der cloudy skies with intermittent rain. While no member of the LCRA walked away with a gold medal, Burkett said the regatta was a suc cess. Lake County teams picked up ve silver medals and three bronze. The LCRA won silver medals in: Womens Masters Novice, Mens High School (four-man crew), Womens High School (four-woman crew), Womens Masters (four-woman crew), Mixed Mas ters (four-person crew plus cox swain) and High School (eight-per son crew plus coxswain). The bronze-medal winning teams were: Mens Masters Nov ice, Womens Masters (eight-wom an crew plus a coxswain) and Mixed Masters and High School (eight-person crew plus a cox swain). Menss and Womens Novice are one-person sculls, which are boats that require their crews to use oars on the left and right sides of the vessels. All other boats included a coxswain to oversee the crew. A coxswain sits in the bow or stern and controls the vessels steering, speed, timing and uidity, pri marily by calling a rhythmic ca dence for the crew. Danielle Holmquist rowed the Womens Masters Novice, cover ing the 1,000-meter course in 6 minutes, 38.10 seconds. Steel Templin powered the LCRAs Mens Masters Novice vessel, stopping the clock in 4:33.90. The crew for Womens Masters boat, which nished in 4:14.10, was Debbie Kiely, Stacey Jackson, Patty Berk, Linda Hopkins, Alis Jordan, Betty Green, Deanna Cue vas and Giana Gattuso-Espinel. Holmquist was coxswain. LCRAs Mens High School team nished in 4:49.80. The boats crew was Templin, Marcel Mon roy, Jacob Franklin and Nick Pal ka, with Holmquist as coxswain. The Mixed Masters were Jordan, John Bell, Paul McPherson and Local rowing teams making waves with eight medals in 10 contests PHOTO COURTESY OF WENDY BURKETT Members of the Lake County Rowing Association get together for a team-unifying cheer before a race on Saturday at the Florida Masters and Youth Rowing Regatta at Lake Fairview in Orlando.SEE STARS | B2SEE RACERS | B2SEE SWIM | B2SEE ROWING | B2

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B2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 14, 2014OutdoorsFishing352-365-8268 sports@dailycommercial.com www.dailycommercial.com %  %  SOUTHERN TACKLEWORKS | TAVARESS hellcracker are hitting hard on yellow tail and red worms in addition to grass shrimp in the pads on Haynes Creek and Dead River. Bluegill have picked up. They are biting on grass shrimp and crick ets around docks. Bass are up in the canals and are hitting on Texas rigged slow roll worms like Houdini watermelon red, chartreuse and white chatter baits and other baits worked slowly in cover. Sandys next regular bass tournament will be an open tournament on Satur day. This tournament will usher in a new season. The weigh in will be at Buzzard Beach at 2:30 p.m.; any questions about either tour nament call the shop at 352-7420036. %  %  PINE ISLAND CAMP | FRUITLAND PARKShellcracker are being caught on grass shrimp and minnows. Catfish are being caught on minnows and grass shrimp. Pine Island has a full supply of live baits including grass shrimp as well as a variety of artificial baits. RV sites, camp sites boats and slips are available for rental. Check out the restaurant before going out or coming off the lake. %  %  PALM GARDENS | TAVARESBream are being caught on grass shrimp and worms in the river. Shellcracker are biting also. The Layne Park area at the southeast corner of Lake Harris behind the island is a popular spot. A few striper are being caught at the mouth of the river on silver spoons and salt water shrimp. Palm Gardens has pontoon boats available to rent. %  %  NELSONS FISH CAMP | WEIRSD ALECrawdad colored worms are working well on the area bass. %  %  BLACK BASS RESORT AND FISH CAMP | LEESBURGSome serious bass were caught over the weekend in Haynes Creek. Brent and Vickie caught several on minnows, lures and night crawlers. Check out the improvements at BBR. Minnow, red worm and night crawlers sales have been strong. %  %  SORRENTO BAIT & TACKLE | SORRENTOBig bass are being caught in open water. Most recently a 4.5 and a 5 pound bass were caught. Congratulations to local anglers Billy Taylor and John Cox Winners of a fully rigged bass boat courtesy of Fishers of Men Tournament. Bluegill and shell cracker are biting on red worms. Bass are biting on Plastic worms and shiners. Producto Hot Rods with no weights and Gambler Big EZ in watermelon color are popular choices. Check the areas where runoff from feeder creeks are channeling run off especially with the recent afternoon rains try a RatL-Trap, shiner or ipping a June bug worm. High Banks where the Wekiva River runs into the Saint Johns River is a good spot. Huge catsh are being caught by conventional and bow fishermen. LAKES REPORT a weekly update fromCHERYL STALEY-ARCHER rfffn tbrrfrr bbnfrf tnffnff nffr trff trf trrrffnf nff tbffrfn ffrf trfrffr r tr tfrfrrfrfn rffrff tnrfn nnnr tbnnrr nn tnnff nnfn tnrrn tnrf The lighthearted na ture of the program, often driven by the jo vial personalities of the speakers, helped to keep the interest of ev eryone in attendance. In fact, the size of the audience grew as the program went on as more coaches at Lake Minneola found a way to sneak in and listen. Despite never playing for South Lake at the same time Aguayo was teammates with Waisome and Harris, but Waisome and Har ris never played together the trio clear ly enjoyed each others company. Waisome and Aguayo playfully needled Harris about Flor idas 4-8 season in 2013. To emphasize the Sem inoles success, Aguayo and Waisome ashed their diamond-studded national championship rings for all to see. Sorry Marcell, Waisome said as he panned his nger from side-to-side so every one could see his bling. The trio talked about ways college coaches keep track of their play ers grades and their at tendance in classes. Campos used the opportunity to emphasize the importance of maintaining a solid academy standing. One of the rst things that college coaches ask about when they start looking at potential re cruits is their grades, Campos said. They dont want kids who are struggling in the classroom. Coaches dont care how good you are if you cant keep your grades up. You are student-athletes, even in college. Campos, who or ganized the program as a way of showing her student-athletes that anything is possible for those who work in all aspects of their lives, praised Aguayo, Waisome and Har ris. She said her chil dren wear jerseys with Aguayos number, Waisomes number and Harris number on them, instead of professional athletes. These guys are real role models, Cam pos said. They do the things theyre supposed to do. I want my daugh ters to follow and admire these guys. They have such great char acter. I am so proud to see them going on to do great things and be ing willing to share their successes with others. Nick and Rober to may be the only two with championships on the eld, but all three of them are champions off the eld. STARS FROM PAGE B1 location for our races. In addition, Bomm said an empty building at the top of Mountain Club Drive a for mer country club has been donated to the CMBCR to use as a storage facility for cars and equipment. During the racing weekend, Bomm said the club will be accepting donations for the Wound ed Warrirors Project, a veterans service organization that offers a variety of programs, services and events for wounded veterans of military actions since 9/11. Bomm said the CMBCR will hold another race on Sept. 13 on Mountain Club Drive. Named Scouting Forever, it will be open only to Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts and Cub Scouts. Boy and Girl Scouts, Bomm said, will race each other and Cubs will have their own division. Then, on Oct. 4 and 5, the CM BCR will hold a Breast Cancer Awareness event. Were also working hard to put together a special race in March for special-needs kids in the area, Bomm said. Weve pur chased two two-seat cars to accommodate children with special needs. This will be our Super Kids Race. The cars will be driven by an experienced driver, with a special-needs child in the car. The winner will have a chance to go to a national event in Akron, Ohio. Bomm said, like all forms of racing, sponsorship is import ant to his organizations suc cess. He is looking for car spon sors and event sponsors. Any business interested in helping the club reach its goals of providing area youngsters with an opportunity to race can con tact Bomm at 352-708-4207. To see the clubs schedule of events, go to www.cmboxcarracing.com. RACERS FROM PAGE B1 Nassau, Bahamas. He has coached numerous swimmers who represented junior and senior Brazilian nation al teams at international compe titions, according to Montverde Academy Director of Commu nications George Karos, and has several U.S. national high school championships as well. My goal has always been to provide every swimmer I coach with an opportunity to improve their skills and achieve success at his or her level of ability, Champam De Almeida said. It doesnt matter if they are begin ners or compete at the interna tional level. Champam De Almeida will have one of the areas top swim ming facilities at his dispos al. Montverde Academy cut the ribbon on its aquatics cen ter on April 17, a state-of-theart swimming pool that will be come the training facility for the schools boys and girls swim teams. Located on the east side of The Nest, the Montverde Acad emy Center for Sportsmanship and Wellness, the pool is 84 feet long and 62 feet wide. It is 6 feet deep at each end and 4 feet deep in the middle. Champam De Almeida has a bachelors degree in physi cal education from Piracicaba Methodist University in So Paulo and did postgraduate studies in the physiology of ex ercise with a swimming special ization from Faculdades Metropolitanas Unidas (United Metropolitan Colleges), also in So Paulo. SWIM FROM PAGE B1 Wendy Burkett. Aaron Hosman was coxswain. The crew nished in 4:22.30. The Womens High School team was Alex Bodzioch, Skylar Berk, Sarah Coleman and Bailey Mazezka. Coxswain Karen Dorr di rected the crew to a n ishing time of 5:03.90. Brandon Rich was the coxswain for the LCRAs Womens Masters team, which nished in 4:36.60. Crew for the boat was Dorr, Kiely, Jackson and Green. The Mixed Masters and High School crew, which nished in 4:18.50, was Templin, Franklin, Palka, Val Linday, Mazezka, Colman, Skylar Berk and Bodzioch. Holmquist was coxswain. Anyone interested in rowing or those who have questions about the sport can contact Kiely at info@lakecoun tyrowing.org or Burkett at wendy@lakecounty rowing.org. ROWING FROM PAGE B1

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Ann DupeeREMEMBER WHENA weekly column that reprints some of the more interesting news stories that have appeared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press.B3SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 14, 2014 www.southlakepress.comCOMMUNITYProudly servingCLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWSSTAFF WRITER . ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE . .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 EMAIL..... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com %  en HOMETOWN: Odessa %  en OCCUPATION: I work for the Social Security Administration. %  en FAMILY: My husband, Ryan, and my sons, Cameron, 16, and Matthew, 12 What do you enjoy most about south Lake County? South Lake County is a wonderful place to raise a family. The people sincerely care about each other. We moved here in 1996 and feel truly blessed to live in an area with access to such an abun dance of natural beauty and resources. 1) If you had to summarize your philosophy of life in one sentence, what would it be? In all that you do, always give your best, for your character is who you are when no one is looking. 2) Name a person or incident youve come across recently thats touched you in some way. Why did this person or incident impress you so much? My younger sister has a special needs child named Grace. Grace wasnt expected to live past her rst birthday. She is now 9. My sister has to be one of the stron gest people I have ever known. Be cause Grace requires round-theclock care, and insurance wont cover this, my sister has had to learn to be Graces nurse for 12 hours of the day, seven days a week. Graces smiling face is a testament to the care my sister provides. When I feel like complaining about my long work week, all I have to do is think about them and remind myself that after being Graces nurse for 84 hours a week, my sister still is a great wife and mom to her two other children. 3) How does what you do contribute to the welfare of the area? Professionally, I assist senior cit izens and the disabled in gaining access to much needed resources. On a personal level, I am work ing to provide our community with access to sailing opportunities. Its a lifelong sport that teaches condence, self-reliance, discipline and yet still values teamwork. It would be such a positive impact on our local community, and our youth especially. FROM THE FILES | 25 YEARS AGO 1989Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press Meet YourNEIGHBORSTACEY en UPTAIN HISTORY OF JAYCEE BEACHThe sand at Jaycee Beach at Lake Minneola was refurbished 25 years ago. Florida Rock Industries of Astatula donated 700 tons of sand. Dale DeWitt, owner of DeWitt Excavating of Winter Gar den, greatly reduced the hauling costs of 13 dump trucks that dumped 40 loads of white sand, from $35 a truckload to $15. A little history of Jay cee Beach is quoted from the book, Cler mont, Gem of the Hills by Miriam W. Johnson and Rosemary Y. Young, and includes information gleaned from old issues of the South Lake Press. It had been generally agreed in 1950 that Clermont should develop and maintain a public dock and beach. The lakefront on Lake Minneola from 4th to 2nd Streets was the chosen site. Leading promoter was Fred Wolfe with the usual backing of this newspaper. The Jaycees (Cler mont Junior Chamber of Commerce) took on the project, agreeing to raise the necessary funds and to do as much labor as possible themselves. Norris N. Jones was president. Surveying was done and a plan drawn up that included a dock 259 feet long and 10 feet wide, a boat ramp, beach house and restaurant space, dressing rooms and toilets, a small adjoining outdoor dance oor and parking space for 150 cars. About 50 Jaycees worked on the beach for almost a year. One weekend grass and weeds were cleaned the full length of the 1,000foot beach. Workers were Curtis Reid, Fred Hayes, George Nagel, Newel Harper, Albia Sheldon and Don McCaffrey. On July 4, 1950, 30 men built the dock. Among them were H.L. Clay, Jr., Travis Cork, Ray Coon, Fred Hayes, Norris Jones, Charles Lane, John Lynn, Paul Meyerhoff, Axel Olivenbaum, Otis Sickler, Reg Saunders, Jon Middleton, Morgan Norris and Fred Wolfe. Fritz Addison, Talmadge Todd, Harold and Gene Farmer, Don Mattioda, Tom Brantley and Bert Orr, although not members of the Jaycees, also helped. Later the Jaycees worked weekends building a beach house. During the weekdays they button-holed the rest of the townspeople soliciting funds. Before the project was entirely completed, George Nagel put an announcement in the paper: Those who are waiting LINDA CHARLTONSpecial to the Daily CommercialSenior archers gathered in south Lake County on Satur day to play their part in the rst ever Lake Senior Games. A total of 20 archers from around Central Florida competed in the 900 tournament at Off Road Revolution, a few miles north of the Lake-Polk county line. As Kevin Murphy, winner in the compound-release ages 65-69 category said, It is a beautiful setup here. Denitely be here next year. Speaking at contests end, Mary Ann Hartman (one of three women competing) said, It was a good day. I didnt break any arrows and I didnt lose any. In the 900 format, archers shoot ve ends of six arrows each with a maximum score of 10 points per arrow. Ar chers on Saturday ranged in age from 52 to 79. They came from as far away as Homo sassa and Fort Meade, but al most half came from The Villages Archery Club. Frank Skvarek, 78, is per haps typical of one of the Villagers, though better at shooting than most. Hes been using bows and arrows for about 12 years, and holds or has held multiple state and national records. I used to be a gun shoot er, Skvarek says. I did it for a lot of years. I didnt want to shoot guns anymore, so I thought another challenge would be archery. Skvarek started with a compound bow, but then saw a man shooting a traditional recurve. (Compound bows incorporate pulleys that will mechanically assist the archer.) That just looked like ar chery to me, Svarek says. I shot Olympic style for a while, but then I took the sight off. When I look at the compound bows, that doesnt even look like ar chery to me. Hartman, 79, instructs at The Villages Archery Club ve days a week. She also came to the sport relatively late in life. I always wanted to do it, Hartman says. My boys shot at home but I never had time to do it. I moved out here and I saw the archery range and I said, This is the time. Archery is a great sport for women be cause it is a mind sport. The playing eld is level. Theres no age limit for archery. High scorers on Saturday were Rick Hardman on com pound bow and Larry Michael on recurve. All of the competitors are eligible to compete in the state senior games, set for this Decem ber in Lee County. The next scheduled event in the Lake County games is bowling, set for May 14-15 at Bowling Tri angle in Mount Dora. The state games are sched uled for Dec. 6-24 in Lee County. Senior games coordinator Gary Perigo said the archers are happy the senior games have come to Lake County. Were promoting the ac tive, healthy lifestyle for se niors, he said. Archery instructor Joseph Steed, who ran the archery competition, made similar comments. We are trying to drive the brand that South Lake County is the center for health, wellness and tness, he said. Thats the brand we are pushing in South Lake County. There has not been a venue specically for seniors until now.CLERMONTSenior archers compete in south Lake PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Stan Oles, left, and Don Driscoll retrieve arrows and record scores after one end of the competition. Archers shot 15 ends of six arrows each. BELOW: Seventy-eight-year-old Frank Skvarek of the Villages Archery Club takes a shot during the Lake Senior Games competition held Saturday at Off Road Revolution, south of Clermont. SEE HISTORY | B4SEE NEIGHBOR | B4

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B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 14, 2014 JOINED SIDESBY MARY LOU GUIZZO / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZNo. 0504RELEASE DATE: 5/11/2014 ACROSS1 Like many shotguns9 Mole14 Back-to-back games20 Singer Christina21 ___ gin fizz22 Twelfth Night lover23 Oil and gasoline giant24 Very vexed25 Leonardo ___, a.k.a. Fibonacci26 ___-pitch softball27 What a detective tries to reconstruct29 Platoon setting30 Sommeliers prefix31 Flavor32 Lozenge brand34 Platoon director37 Suckling site38 The Man Who Mistook His Wife for ___ (1985 best seller)42 Old Baby Bell based in the Big Apple43 Assents45 Stretch out47 Neuter50 Literary inits.52 Jai alai basket53 Water checker?56 Going out for the afternoon?60 The Whos My Generation, e.g.64 Pelvic parts66 Musicians practice with four sharps68 Former Obama social secretary Rogers69 Over70 Like some swords or a hint to this puzzles theme72 Balkan native75 Old Jewish villages77 Start of a Beatles refrain78 Old Highlands dagger79 Thelma and Louise, e.g.82 Davis and Midler84 Cover some ground?85 Dizzy86 Bit88 ___ put it another way 90 Persevered94 Spurs98 Landmark tech product of 1981102 Latin to be103 Biblical name of ancient Syria105 Dispel differences108 CSI setting110 Coal or pine product111 Melted chocolate, e.g.112 Kind of algebra116 Is it in you? sloganeer118 Write-___119 Renters dream, maybe120 Lhasa ___ (dogs)121 Some sheet fabrics124 Nothing, in Napoli125 Tuscany town126 Sign-up127 Classic London transport128 Genetic structure129 Source of some discrimination DOWN1 Wind instrument pitched an octave lower than its smaller cousin2 How ballerinas move3 Enter quickly!4 Rocks Ocasek5 Pipe fitting6 Renter7 Heath evergreens8 Thinks maybe one can9 Huffington of the Huffington Post10 Teri of Tootsie11 Subject of some computer settings12 Closeted13 Lao-___14 Enter quickly15 Native New Yorkers16 ___ D.A.17 Primatologist Fossey18 Sicilian city19 Hotel accommodation for more than one28 Kindle competitor29 ___ chops31 Battle of the ___33 Letter thats also a name35 Chillax36 Art appreciation38 Forever young39 Dimmed stars?40 Aleutian isle41 Gang up on, as in basketball44 How ___46 Tar Heels state: Abbr.48 German musical entertainment49 Auto sponsor of Groucho Marxs You Bet Your Life51 Hawk53 Commit a chipeating faux pas54 King lead-in55 Boo-boos57 Shell seen around water58 Formatting feature on a typewriter 59 Totality61 Sired62 Unfazed by63 Better at picking things up?65 Jock67 Job listing inits.71 Descent73 Old car make thats a homophone of a modern car model74 Relative of a twin76 Anatomical tissue79 Reaction of surprise80 Ticks off81 Need a lift?83 Brand of power tools87 Vet, e.g.89 Queens honour: Abbr.91 Brightly colored bird92 Country whose flag says God is great 22 times93 Chess champ Mikhail95 Part of a jazz combo96 Precious97 Mexican shawls99 ___ Gorilla, 1960s TV cartoon character100 First of a kind101 Betrayed104 Raucous bird106 Squirrel, e.g.107 South American land108 Al ___109 Swiss city on the Rhine112 Attraction in a carbon dioxide molecule113 Babys boo-boo114 Equivalent of 20 fins115 Something clickable117 Collette of United States of Tara120 Blond shade122 Bamboozle123 City council rep. 12345678 910111213141516171819 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 3233 34 35 3637 38394041 42 43 4445 46 474849 5051 52 53545556 57585960616263 64 6566 6768 69 70 71 727374 7576 77 78 7980 8182 8384 85 8687 88 89 90 91929394959697 9899100101 102 103 104105 106107 108 109110 111 112113114115 116117 118 119 120 121 122123 124 125 126 127 128 129 Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Solution on page B9 to inspect the beach before sending in their donations are invited to do so. Webb Dredging Company was hired to pump sand out of the lake onto the beach. They pumped 2,416 cubic yards in 20 days. An additional 400 yards were hauled in by truck. Myron Pierce loaned 300 feet of pipe during the pumping operation. Vic Oswalts Grove Service and Supply drove pilings for the dock. The beach was dedicated September 10, 1950. The ceremony had been planned for Labor Day but was delayed because of a severe storm. In recent years the beach complex became a city-owned and main tained project.25 YEARS AGO 1989The Burger King morning Coffee Club will never be the same. One of its most faithful members, Fred H. Adkinson, 78, of County Road 561A, in Minneola, died May 4. Adkinson was a member of the Lake County School Board for four, full four-year terms (1952-1968,) plus being appointed by Gov. Reubin Askew twice to ll vacated terms of now Senator Richard Langley and retired teacher Dru Rambo. In 1961 the School Board authorized the establishment of Lake-Sumter Community College. Fred supported the college in many ways including site selection in Leesburg, personnel and programs. LSCC was under the school boards jurisdiction until the state Legislature passed a law in 1968 to place the community colleges under their own governing boards. He was also an Associate Trustee for many years for the private Howey Academy, located in Howeyin-the-Hills. Fred served 18 years on the Flor ida Citrus Mutual board of directors. He was president of the Citrus and Industrial Council for two years and a member of the governors task force for migrant labor. He came to Florida in 1925 and was a member of the rst class to graduate from Orlando High School in 1928. He brought the Coffee Club a picture taken at the 60th class reunion. In 1933 the Adkinson family moved to the north side of Lake Minneola where it had purchased the old boom-time golf and country club, The Palisades. The grove was sold in 1977 and plans are currently underway (1989) to develop the area into a new 18-hole golf and country cub, to be called The Palisades. Some other regulars of the Coffee Club are Jimmy Hunt, Don Meeker, Harold Roberts and Ann Dupee. HISTORY FROM PAGE B3 4) Name one of your greatest accomplishments so far. I have lived such a full life and have had many great experiences: scuba diving the graveyard of the Atlantic, traveling throughout Europe with my father, barefoot water skiing, running a marathon and even sailing through a hurricane on a passage from South Carolina to the Caribbean. But I would have to say my greatest accomplishment would be motherhood and raising two wonderful sons. Its an ongoing journey and sometimes a battle to help shape my sons into men who will make a positive impact on the world and future generations, even if that is just through a kind word, a genuine smile or a thoughtful heart. 5) Whats something youve always wanted to do but havent yet? For the community, I would love to establish a sailing center in the Clermont area and provide our youth an opportunity to experience the wonderful sport of sailing. For my family, I dream of spending a summer, or even a year, living aboard a sailboat and cruising throughout the Caribbean or the Mediterranean, introducing them to other people and cultures. What an educational experience of a lifetime that would be. 6) What advice would you give to people who want to help out in the community? Just step out and get started. You will nd plenty of people who will be happy to help along the way. NEIGHBORFROM PAGE B3 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMoonlight Theater is staging Ernest Thompsons On Golden Pond, a play about how life and love change with the passage of years. The play reminds audiences, however, that change plays a role in each life. Its a story about family dynamics, about a couple in their winter years. They have a wonderful relation ship but the husband has been talking about dy ing forever. She keeps tell ing him lighten up, said actress Jan Sheldon, who plays the lead role of wife Ethel Thayer. Dan Martin plays her husband, Nor man Thayer, an aging man in his 80s who is losing his memory, his sense of self and his zeal for life. The story takes place during their 48th summer to visit their summer home by the pond and he keeps saying its his last summer, Sheldon said. But then their estranged daughter shows up, creating a twist that changes everything. Thats because the daughter, Chelsea, played by Tonya Denmark, ac companied by her ance Bill Ray, played by Shelly Whittle, ask her parents to watch son Billy Ray, played by James Bentley, while the pair travels to Europe for the summer. The Thayers reluctantly agree, and thats when things change especially for Norman, Sheldon said. That young boy kind of stirs something in this man (Norman). He makes him remember what it is to be alive and reminds him of his own youth; about shing, reading and enjoy ing his childhood, enjoying life, Sheldon said. The play happens over three to four months of sum mer and by the end, Nor man kind of changes his attitude about life, death, family and everything. Denmark said for her, playing the daughter to the couple in the play has giv en her some insight about what her own parents are going through in their own lives. Sheldon, who has been married for 40 years, said she could relate to the long-married characters. In addition, she said she and Martin were comfort able playing their roles to gether since they have been friends for 10 years. And because the plot works in a medical scare having to do with Norman, Denmark said she thinks audiences might be re minded to appreciate their loved ones. It kind of makes you think twice about your re lationships with people and enjoying them while you can because you nev er know when youll have to face losing someone, Denmark said. Denise Truscott, a longtime stage actress and di rector with the Moonlight Players Warehouse Theatre in Clermont, is directing the play. Hood Roberts plays Charlie the mailman, who is the comic relief in the show. Hes the lightest charac ter; hes a comic relief. He has a relationship with the Thayers because hes not only delivered their mail for years, but has gotten to know them and what they are going through. Sheldon said On Gold en Pond is not a sad play, even though the underly ing topic is touching. Instead, Sheldon said its one of the funniest plays shes done. Its really a very funny show with some wonderful lines. Weve had some people actually slapping their leg and laughing out loud in some parts, she said. The play at the Moonlight, located at 732B West Montrose Street in Cler mont, continues through May 25 at 8 / p .m. on Fri day and Saturday evenings, with 2 / p.m. matinees every Sunday. Ticket are $15 for adults and $12 for students. For information or reser vations, call 352-319-1116.On Golden Pond full of laughs, tears PHOTO COURTESY OF MOONLIGHT THEATER Jan Sheldon and Dan Martin star as Ethel and Norman, respectively, in On Golden Pond.Its a story about family dynamics, about a couple in their winter years. They have a wonderful relationship but the husband has been talking about dying forever. Jan Sheldon, actressEUSTIS

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Wednesday, May 14, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B5 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance rt t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital Classified IndexLegal Notices....................0001 Notices............................1000 At Your Service................9000 Employment....................2000 Pets/Animals....................6865 Merchandise....................6000 Real Estate/For RENT......3000 Real Estate/For SALE........4000 Recreation........................7000 Transportation..................8000 Cancellations for ads running Wednesday must be made by 4pm Monday.ADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since The Daily Commercial will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error call the classified department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error.TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! S OUTH LAKE P RESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde

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B6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 14, 2014 A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services rfnfftbrftb f Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Home Improvement Irrigation Services Sprinkler Repairsrfntbr rfff f rfffn tn b rfffn tnrrnr rrnbf Landscaping Services r fntbb Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Painting Services Pool Services Pressure Cleaning Shower Doors Service Enclosure Screening Window Services Handyman Services BOYDSYou call it, We haul it!352-460-7186Grading, Loading, etc. Marine Services Cleaning Services Affordable Home Repair, LLCttf bbrbf tbbb nb 352-551-6073 Electrical Services Roofing Services Tree Service Plumbing Services rfntb frrnff rfnftbnr rffnrffrntrrbbfbr tn rfffnn ntbtrrr nbt Land Clearing Services BrocksLAWN SERVICEr fr nr Geneva DeleonPRO CLEANAsk about a$30.00 Special352-250-2498 nnt nnnnttfbf Beauty Services rffrntbfrfntbrtf Hauling Services Lawn Services ff tftff tff Elite Pool Service352-617-0939 rf Concrete Services tb rbrrff ff trf Handyman Services HAULING!nnn bbfb fb Concrete Services nff rfbt rnf ttnfb tbf Lawn Services nbt ft bfbrnf btrf nfb bbrtbbf

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Wednesday, May 14, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B7 Thank you for reading the local newspaper, the South Lake Press!

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B8 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 14, 2014

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Wednesday, May 14, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B9 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr BARRELEDAGENTHEADER AGUILERARAMOSORSINO SINCLAIRIRATEPISANO SLOSCENARIOVIETNAM OENSEASONLUDENS OLIVERSTONETEATAHAT NYNEXOKAYSELONGATE GELDEAPCESTA DAMSIESTADEBUTALBUM ILIAESCALEDESIREE PASTDOUBLEEDGEDSERB SHTETLSOBLADISNEE TITLEROLESBETTESSOD AREELTADORTO KEPTATITGOADSIBMPC ESSEARAMCLEARTHEAIR DNALABTAROILGOO BOOLEANGATORADEINS OWNINGAPSOSPERCALES NIENTESIENAENROLLEE DECKERHELIXSTANDARD Solution to puzzle on B4 Thank you for reading the local paper!