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ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com D ick Adams, 74, practiced law in Central Florida for more 30 years before de ciding to go into a different eld agriculture. Throughout his retire ment, he has been involved in cat tle operations in Florida and Uruguay. In 1991, Ad ams bought Green Swamp Ranch in Cler mont, property he vowed to use only for nature-friendly pur poses. On that land is a gopher tortoise refuge, a year-round honey bee farm, bumble bee condos and a cattle camp. About six years ago, a con versation with his brother John Adams, about nding a way for the farm to be self-sustaining, gave rise to another venture growing blueberries. That was the beginning of Blueberry Hill Farms. My brother is always look ing for something to do with the farm, but he has never wanted it to be a subdivision, co-partner John Ad ams said of what is one of Lake Coun tys newest U-Pick blueberry operations at 5000 Berry Groves Road. Blueberry Hill Farms, SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | B2 SPORTS: Eustis loses in regional nal WEDNESDAY, MAY 7, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWSTAND INSIDE CLASSIFIED B5 CROSSWORDS B3 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN B2 SPORTS B1 VOICES A3 WORD ON THE STREE T A2 SO UTH LAKE PRE SS V OLUME 99, NO. 19 3 SECTIO N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reserved www. southlakepress.com PRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Blueberries are ready for picking at Blueberry Hill Farms in Clermont. Pickers are given a bucket that can hold up to six pounds of blueberries. PHOTO COURTESY OF BLUEBERRY HILL FARM Ready, ripe and blue Its pickin time at Clermonts newest U-Pick blueberry farm SEE BERRIES | A2 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com The Leapfrog Group, a national leader and ad vocate in hospital trans parency, has released its spring 2014 Hospi tal Safety Score Report with Florida Hospital Waterman receiving an A, The Villages Region al Hospital receiving an A, Leesburg Regional Medical C enter receiv ing a B and South Lake Hospital receiving a C. The report shows Leesburg Region al Medical Center im proved its rating from a C in both the fall and spring of 2013. The Vil lages Regional Hospital also saw an improvement from a B in the fall and spring of 2013. Two of your hospitals have an A, thats good. You have a very nice re cord in your commu nity, said Leah Binder, the president and CEO of Leapfrog Group. You denitely see a pattern of improvement in the other two and thats also good n ews. Binder said the C grade does raise con cerns about South Lake Hospital. A C grade is very dis turbing, she said. The people in the com munity have a right to some answers to why this hospital isnt doing more to protect its pa tients. At South Lake Hos pital, Binder noted in fection rates in cen tral lines, UTI infection rates, their rate of falls, tears from medical treatment, blood clots, breathing failures, col lapsed lungs and colon surgical site infections. She said the collapsed lung measure was only slightly below the na tional average. In a number of the sort of terrible events that can happen in a hospital, we look at 13 of those terrible events, and a good number of those this hospital is South Lake Hospital receives low safety grade PHOTO COURTESY OF SOUTH LAKE HOSPITAL South Lake Hospital, shown above, received a C on the Leapfrog Groups 2014 Hospital Safety Score Report. SEE GRADE | A2 PROPOSED PIPELINEA proposed 465 mile-long natural gas pipeline from Alabama to Osceola County in Florida could pass through sections of Sumter and Lake counties. WHITNEY WILLARD / STAFF GRAPHIC N 27 27 50 75 91LAKE SUMTER Proposed pipeline path SUMTER BILL THOMPSON Halifax Media Group Federal environmental regu lators want more details about a proposed natural gas pipeline that will pass through Lake and Sumter counties, including a full er explanation about why the project is needed in the rst place. In its initial review of Sabal Trail Transmission LLCs project, the U.S. Environmental Protec tion Agency questions wheth er alternatives exist to delivering natural gas to a South Florida power plant besides a 3-footwide pipe that stretches for 465 miles across three states. Some project maps show it cutting straight across Sumter County and the southwestern corner of Lake County. The EPA also wants the Fed eral Energy Regulatory Com mission, or FERC, to explain the projects effects on air and water quality along the route. The 18-page letter, issued last week, was directed to the FERC because the latter agency is re sponsible for drafting an envi ronmental impact statement about the $3 billion pipeline EPA questioning proposed gas pipeline through Lake and Sumter counties SEE GAS | A7

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 7, 2014 LAKE COUNTY Health department to offer school immunizations The Department of Health in Lake County will offer immunizations at local Lake County schools on an on going basis for students who will enter the seventh grade during the 2014-15 school year. Immunizations will be given at East Ridge Middle School in Clermont on Thursday, Clermont Middle School on May 15 and Cecil E. Gray Middle School in Groveland on May 20. For information, call the Department of Health in Lake County at 352-771-5500 or go to www.lake chd.com. CLERMONT Hollywood Nights dance schedule for May 16 The Hollywood Nights Spring Dance is an evening in the spotlight for adults with developmental or other dis abilities hosted by Building Blocks Ministries Inc. The event is open to all adults with developmental disabilities and their guests from 7 to 9 p.m. May 16 at the Clermont Community Center, 620 W. Montrose St., in Clermont. Tickets for the event are $5 per person and are currently on sale through May 16 at the Building Blocks Learning Center, 548 S. U.S. Highway 27, Suites B-C in Minneola. For information, call 352-536-9264. CLERMONT Spring Art Show on exhibit through May 31 The public can enjoy the South Lake Art League Members Spring Art Show on exhibit from 5 to 7 p.m. through May 31 at the art gallery, 776 W. Montrose St., in Clermont. For information go to, www.south lakeartleague.com. MONTVERDE Open enrollment ongoing at Woodlands Lutheran school Woodlands Lutheran Church Early Learning Center is currently enroll ing for the 2014-2015 school year for the 2, 3, and 4-year-old preschool programs. The school is at 15333 County Road 455, in Montverde. For information, call 407-469-2525 or email schoolofce@woodland schurch.com. MINNEOLA South Lake High School class of 1994 reunion set South Lake High School Class of 1994 graduates are invited to the 20 year class reunion taking place July 26. Join classmates for an informal gathering at Grafti Junction at 7 p.m. July 25. A semi-formal dinner with dancing will be from 7 to 10 p.m. July 26 at Gabbys Banquet and Event Facility. Cost is $45 per person. Go to www.facebook.com/ SLH20yrreunion, or go to www.south lakehighschoolclassof199420yearre union.yolasite.com for information. Tickets are available by mail ing Chastity Lafferty, P.O. Box 581 Minneola, 34755. Include contact in formation and email address with your payment. CLERMONT Faith Neighborhood Center benefit for new home The Faith Neighborhood Center needs to relocate to a new facility and will host a wine, cheese, coffee and des sert event to raise funds from 7 to 9 p.m. May 14 at the Clermont Community Center, 685 W. Montrose St. Tickets are $30 prepaid and $50 for a couple. For information, email Terry Krier at Pastork@c.rr.com or go to www. faithneighborhoodcenter.com. Area Briefs What South Lake residents are saying about ... GRANDPARENTS Whats the best thing you learned from your grandparents? Dedication to family. They didnt speak much English, but from how they lived their lives, you knew what was most im portant. Whats important in their lives was family. RAY VILLEGAS CLERMONT I would say from my grandmother the most important thing she ever taught me was the impor tance of education. She said They can take away your car, your house, your kids, your investments, but they can never take away your education. If you are a doctor, you will always be a doctor. MARLENA NOLAND BRANDON They gave me a great gift of humor, and dont take things too seriously. TOBY POE CLERMONT My grandparents nev er had words. They both believed if you said it you meant it. They didnt ar gue. It didnt matter if my grandma said it was $10 and he knew it was $12.99. They were amazing. POLLY STRAWBRIDGE GROVELAND Word on the Street Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 in its 5th picking sea son, actually started out as a commercial pick ing operation and it still is but has turned into a U-Pick operation as well because the Ad ams brothers and partner John Gray hated to see berries going to waste af ter the commercial pick was over. The U-Pick side of the business has been up and running for only a few weeks. To me, whats been a totally gratifying ex perience is seeing peo ple, families and espe cially children, learning and having fun picking and eating blueberries, John Adams said. We try to make it fun for the kids and, while here, they learn where their food comes from. While John Adams rec ognizes that Blueberry Hill Farms is just one of many such farms in the county, the partners do things a little differently. Two of the things he said they are most proud of is that only recycled water is used for watering the crop and, as of 14 months ago, they started using or ganic farming methods. Over the years, Ive heard a lot of people say its hard to work with the water district and oth er environmental groups like the Department of Agriculture, but its been a pleasure for us, actual ly, John Adams said. The farm carries ve varieties of blueberries, Farthing and Meadowlark in the organic variety, and Emerald, Jewel and Wind sor in the conventional variety. All ve varieties, John Adams said, were developed by the Univer sity of Floridas blueberry breeding program. Adams also said they took on the challenge of planting 13 acres of or ganic bushes in March 2013, in addition to the 11 acres of conventional bushes, to give people the choice of acquiring her bicideand pesticide-free blueberries, if thats what they feel more comfort able eating. The group of peo ple who pick organic are even more unique than everyday U-Pickers, be cause they are in it for the health benets of it, Farm Manager Randy Holland said. Money is not an issue for them be cause, regardless, theyre going to pick organic. All pickers are given a bucket that can hold up to six pounds of blueber ries, tted with a rope that can be tied around the waist to leave both hands free for faster picking. Gray said in his opinion, the best time for picking is earlier or later in the day. The farm is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thurs days through Sundays. Prices are $4 per pound for conventional berries and $8 for organic ber ries. The farm also sells already picked berries for $5 and $10 per pound for the conventional and or ganic varieties. The season usually ends in late May or ear ly June. Luis Ramirez, a former picker who, for the past three years, has been em ployed at Blueberry Hill maintaining weeds and spraying, said to him, there is nothing like fresh blue berries right off the bush. I think they (blueber ries) taste better picked fresh, he said. They may be good when you get them at a store, but it takes so long for them to get from one place to another that the avor changes. For information on up coming events, hours, directions and weath er condition reports call 863-944-1401, nd Blue berry Hill Farm on Face book or go to www.blue berryhillfarm.net. BERRIES FROM PAGE A1 LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Erasmo Lopez drops off his bucket of blueberries at a weigh station at Blueberry Hill Farms. either below the nation al average or much worse than the national aver age, Binder said. So, theres some concerns here. Dr. Julie Holland, the chief quality ofcer for South Lake Hospital, said Leapfrog Group looks at processes and outcomes, and South Lake Hospi tal is working and com mitted to improving the processes. She said the outcomes are soon to fol low. Obviously, were well aware of what a C means, but at this point, giv en where we started and where we are now, weve improved processes im mensely so I think were well on our way to achiev ing much higher than a C and I think well see that in the future, Hol land said. Were certainly condent that what weve been doing will improve our score. Currently, we are in the process of implement ing TeamSTEPPS, which is basically a program for nurses and physicians to improve processes, and quality, and communica tion and working togeth er, Holland said. Holland said teamwork training and skill build ing are areas the Leapfrog Group looks at and that teamwork is important for patient safety. At this point, every bodys kind of learned that, you know, we need to work together, so that each of us are helping each other, catching each others mistakes and ba sically just build a good team, Holland said. Holland said South Lake Hospital participat ed in the Leapfrog survey portion of the evaluation for the rst time last year and Binder said there has been progress there. Theres a variety of measures here that show a consistent investment by this hospital in im proving their safety... so I am cautiously optimis tic that they will continue to see an improvement in their scores, she said. Binder said Florida Hos pital Waterman getting As in spring 2013, fall 2013 and spring 2014 shows it is safer than most of its peers and prioritizes safety. Dianna Liebnitzky, the director of quality and the patient safety ofcer with Florida Hospital Wa terman, said the hospital understands the rankings are very important and patient safety is essential for its success. It really proves to us that the concept of safe ty culture is really hardwired in the foundation of what we do, Liebnitz ky said. It also shows to the community that they can trust the care that we deliver is going to be op timal and always in their best interest. It also, to me, shows that they know that were continually moni toring this on an ongoing, day-to-day basis, its not a one-time effort, its just what we do, always. GRADE FROM PAGE A1

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Wednesday, May 7, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3 Applause for states Living Healthy initiative I was pleased to read in a St. Petersburg blog that Adam Putnam (Florida Agriculture Commissioner) is join ing a group of state lawmakers and agen cy leaders in an am bitious attempt to get Floridians to eat and live healthier. Their program, Living Healthy in Florida, in cludes education on how to buy and prepare healthier meals and common health and wellness messages. This aligns with First Lady Michelle Obamas Lets Move program, which, in addition to promoting exercise, also educates kids, teachers and families about nutrition. Diet alone is not the answer. Kids and adults must move, even if you walk to the corner and back. We keep hearing that obesity is the major health concern that we have to face and for most of us, the cure is in our own hands. Helpful tips and stepby-step strategies for families, schools and communities to help kids be more active, eat better and grow up healthy can be found on the Lets Move web site, www.letsmove.gov. The goal of Living Healthy in Florida, says Putnam, is to make the most of the well-es tablished link between proper nutrition and academic success. I am sure the First Lady couldnt agree more! NANCY HURLBERT Leesburg Grateful for the kindness of a stranger I am writing in the hope that the Good Samaritan of Leesburg will read this and know how grateful we are for his help earlier this month. I left a cold and snowy Michigan and was enjoying a visit with my brother and his wife in sunny, warm Florida. While returning from visiting relatives in nearby Tavares we experienced car prob lems, which to we three seniors seemed very serious. Suddenly, we could not shift gears. This friendly gentleman, seeing our dilemma, rushed over, had us pop the car hood and in moments diagnosed it as a transmission cable that had come loose. To our benet, we soon discovered he was a knowledgeable auto mechanic, with the necessary tools in his vehicle that enabled him to Band-aid the sit uation enough so we could get back on the road. Thanks to this car ing man we were able to drive the 150 miles back home and the next day had the cable replaced. While we seem to live in an era of I dont want to get involved, I am so grateful that this man didnt agree with that philosophy. I am sorry we didnt get his name but we are also very, very grateful to him for his kindness in helping out three strangers. To us, he will always be the Good Samaritan of Leesburg. FLO THOMPSON Trenton, Mich. Goodwill is up and running At Goodwill Industries of Central Florida were cele brating 13 years serv ing Leesburg residents. Thanks to generous do nations from our com munity, were able to provide opportunities that help people nd meaningful work reaching 32,500 Central Floridians last year alone. In 2013, Goodwills economic impact in Leesburg was nearly $8.5 million. Recently, our Leesburg Retail Store and Job Connection Center at 10601 U.S. Highway 441, experi enced a service disrup tion to our phone lines. During this outage some of our donors and shoppers had difculty reaching us by phone, although our store and Job Connection Center remained open. Fortunately, phone service has since been restored, and our stores phone number re mains the same, 352728-3488, and our Job Connection Center can be reached by calling 352-323-1847. I want to reassure the residents of Leesburg that our store and Job Connection Center are still here and thriving in our community. And in June, well be moving across U.S. Highway 441 to a new, bigger lo cation where well con tinue to serve you. I invite you to visit us! Bring your donations and shop in our stores to help make a differ ence right here in Lake County. Bill Oakley, president and CEO of Goodwill Industries of Central Florida. T he recent history of Lake County Animal Services is an inglorious one. Last year, two separate audits of the county animal shelter turned up a total of 45 problems. Among them were lapses in recordkeeping that left auditors wonder whether shelter workers knew how many animals they were taking in, how many they were adopting out and whether the ones in the facility had proper immunizations. The audits forced the resignation of one Animal Service director, and last month, another one announced her resignation, citing the lack of resources to do the job correctly and pressure from animal activists. Two recent developments further suggest that Animal Services is in trouble. In one case, six puppies adopted from the shelter died of hookworm, and two others from the same litter survived after receiving aggressive treatment. Then this week, county ofcials closed the shelter until further notice after 16 dogs con tracted parvov irus and had to be put down. That means they will not accept any more an imals and will not adopt any to the public un til they feel condent that the parvo outbreak is under control. County ofcials are quick to point out that a parvo outbreak can, and does, happen at any animal shelter. And while that may be true, taken together, these events suggest a troubling lack of organization or oversight at Lake County Animal Services. Sheriff Gary Borders recently came forward and said he would be willing to consider taking over Animal Services. The idea of a sheriffs department running animal services is not unique; a number of other Florida sheriffs do it effectively, largely because they can draw on inmate labor to hold down costs. The Lake County Commission is considering Borders offer, and after the shelter closed this week, their interest has grown. We agree. Clearly, the problems that plague Animal Services are stubborn, and it make take new leadership to x them. Its time to give Sheriff Borders a shot at doing what the county cannot. At the same time, we hope the County Commission will use this moment to examine its own leadership. We have heard their lament about lack of revenue caused by the lingering effects of the recession. And while that is true, political expediency alone has kept them from making some tough decisions namely, raising taxes to shore up some of the departments and services that are starved for funding. So to commissioners we say, go ahead and push this problem to the sheriff. But unless you squarely address your budget problems, its only a matter of time until failures in another county service jump up and bite you. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD ........................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST O PINION WHATS YOUR OPINION? The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Letters to the Editor 732 W. Montrose St. Clermont, FL 34711 By fax to: 352-394-8001 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. GUEST COLUMNS If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@daily commercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OUR VIEW S OUTH LAKE PRESS Your community newspaper for more than 100 years. 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001 The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Florida 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region. All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. YOUR OPINIONS LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Time for change at Animal Services Bikefest was a blast Tom Zaklukiewiczs April 27 letter caused me to respond immediately. I am not a biker. I have been to one other Bikefest, where I walked around a couple of hours and was not impressed. This year is very different. I was there every day and had a blast despite the intense heat. I can honestly say there is no way I saw everything this year. I dont go to major sporting events, but I would guess that a beer costs more than the $2 Zaklukiewicz remembers pay ing. Beers were $4, and I didnt nd that unreasonable. I loved the huge variety of food choic es. Sure, it costs a bit more than going to McDonalds, but the food was good and the at mosphere was a big plus. As for parking, I cannot un derstand why anyone would drive to Bikefest with the great transportation available from LakeXpress. The parking bene ts area nonprots anyway so who can complain? I really hope the vendors made a lot of money because I want to see them again. Every single vendor was helpful and pleasant despite the huge crowds. I do agree that the hotels should be ashamed of them selves, but I think that happens at every major event anywhere. The only complaint I had was the fact that the Ms. Budweiser contest was almost an hour late getting started. Mr. Luckyman did a great job keeping the crowd entertained, but it was hard standing in the heat for an hour waiting. At least I had a nice conversation with a fellow veteran. The Leesburg Partnership should be proud of what they have accomplished. I will cer tainly be looking forward to next year. BEN LARSON | Leesburg LETTER of the WEEK BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 7, 2014 Offering classes in Trampoline, Tumbling and Group Gymnastics in a fun, kid friendly environment. Both recreational and team options Bring this ad in for $25.00 off annual registration. Good through May 15th, 2014. Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) Staff report Eleven businesses, orga nizations and individuals were honored in Mount Dora Wednesday night with 2014 Lake County Community Service Awards. Sponsored by the Florida League of Cities, the awards recognize companies, groups and people whose dedication and selessness have made the county a better place to live. Receiving awards at a ban quet at Lake Receptions were: John B. Smith of Lake Mechanical Contractors Lake County Business Hall of Fame. Smith is a former Na tional Contractor of the Year and charter member of the Central Florida chapter of the Associated Builders and Contractors. He has twice been named to the states Construction Industry Li censing Board and served on the Lake County Economic Development Board. Kevin J. Robson of BusinessMasters.Net Small-Size Community Ser vice Business Achievement Award. Robson has received the Sam Walton Business Leader Award, a Small Busi ness Achievement Award from the Lake Eustis Area Chamber of Commerce and has served as president of that organization. Vinnie Vittoria of Cous in Vinnies Family Sports Restaurant Medium-Size Community Service Business Award. Vittoria won the Tav ares Chamber of Commerces Medium Business of the Year last year and he supplies food for many local groups and fundraisers. He also donates business proceeds and mon ey won in chicken wing chal lenges to charity. Silver Springs Citrus Large-Size Community Ser vice Business Award. Found ed in 1921, the 250-employee rm provides ongoing sup port to Howey-in-the-Hills, including manpower, mate rials and trucks during the renovation of the Marianne Beck Memorial Library. Tom Hofmeister of Os pry Lodge Community Service Entrepreneur Award. Hofmesiter has more than 30 years of experience in land acquisition and development in the community. His newest venture, Osprey Lodge in Ta vares, has been hailed as hav ing great economic develop ment impact in the city. Cathy Green of Lake-Sumter State College Art and Culture Commu nity Service Award. Green. Thanks to her brainchild, Kids College, thousands of children have been given the opportunity to engage in en richment programs from the arts and sciences to athletic programs. Michael Holland Lake County Community Ser vice Leadership Award. Hol land serves on the Eustis City Commission, has been vice mayor and mayor, is rst vice president of the local muse um board, is president of the Lake County League of Cit ies, and a member of the lo cal chamber. He also vol unteers for numerous local events. Tommy Lee Gamble of Fruitland Park Fire Rescue Community service Award for Public Service. Gamble has served the community as a reghter for more than half a century. He also has worked for Lake County Fire Rescue and the Oxford Fire Department. Capt. Todd English of the Lake County Sheriffs Of ce Lake County Com munity Service Chris Dan iels Memorial Public Safety Award. English co-found ed the Lake County Human Trafcking Task Force. Dr. Mary Jo Rager of Lake-Sumter State College Lake County Community Service Award for Education. Rager has worked for 35 years at LSSC and currently serves as associate vice president for Baccalaureate and Work force Programs there. Mike Perry of the Lake County Water Authori ty Lake County Commu nity Service Special Judges Award. Perry has served on the board of Leadership Lake County since 2002, volun teers with the Tavares Youth Football League, the March of Dimes and Marianne Beck Memorial Library. MOUNT DORA Lake County Community Service Awards presented HOLLARD ENGLISH GAMBLE HOFMEISTER GREEN SMITH ROBSON PERRY VITTORIA RAGER LINDA CHARLTON Special to The Daily Commercial Saturday was race day at Lake Louisa State Park, only this time the racers werent on foot they were on long boards. The Clermont Chal lenge Races, sponsored by the Ian Tilmann Foundation and Sector 9 Skateboard Company, hosted approximately 25 racers in the events. Competitors ranged in age from 10 to 50-plus and used boards lon ger than typical skate boards. The slalom race was curtailed due to rain, but the 5K and 10K dis tance races and the free style dance competition went on as planned. Marcus Acevedo, of Gainesville, came out on top in the mens divi sion, placing second in the 5K, rst in the 10K and rst (by 3 seconds) overall. This one was actual ly very challenging, he said. I actually ran this race last year and came in second in both. This year they changed the course. It was awful. Awful in a good way. Richard Prine of Mi ami Beach came out on top in the junior divi sion and was also one of the skaters who signed the foundations prom ise to wear a helmet. I came up for this, Prine said. I love com ing up for the rac es. I had a helmet but I needed a better one. Ten-year-old An ton McCampbell would have won the 12-and-under division, except he was the only one in it. So he raced in the 17-and-under ju nior division and n ished third. Its fun. I like to be outdoors and I nev er use up my energy, McCampbell said of his longboarding passion. The foundation do nated 29 helmets to re cipients who mere ly had to sign a pledge stating they will wear them. For every $20 the foundation receives, it is able to buy a helmet, said Marcy Tilmann, di rector of the organiza tion. Tilmanns son, Ian, died in 2005 from a skateboard fall while not wearing a helmet. Our son was a Ma rine, she said. He was a good marine. And he died from a skateboard. Over 100 skateboarders a year die because they dont wear helmets. CLERMONT Foundation sponsors longboard competition, promotes safety LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL From left, William Frank and Marcus Acevedo race in the 10K during the Clermont Challenge.

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Wednesday, May 7, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5 Place your ad here and reach the Local Market!VERY AFFORDABLE!Call today 352-394-2183 IN MEMORY DEATH NOTICES David E. Beitz David E. Beitz, 81, of Leesburg, died Wednes day, April 30, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals & Cre mations, Tavares. Jayonna Amani Brown Jayonna Amani Brown, 3, of Leesburg, died Thursday, April 24, 2014. Eastside Funeral Home. Leesburg. Evelyn Marie Conover Evelyn Marie Con over, 87, of Eustis, died Thursday, May 1, 2014. Allen J. Harden Funeral Home, Mount Dora. Canelia A. Dyer Canelia A. Dyer, 51, of Centerhill, died Sat urday, April 26, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations, Leesburg. Billy Ray Fisher Billy Ray Fisher, 64, of Eustis, died Wednesday, April 30, 2014. Allen J. Harden Funeral Home, Mount Dora. Dennis L. Goodman Dennis L. Goodman, 90, of Tavares, died Tuesday, April 29, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares. Alice M. Kissinger Alice M. Kissing er, 85, of Orlando, died Thursday, May 1, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Bettye J. Jackson-Larry Bettye J. Jackson-Lar ry, 78, of Minneola, died Thursday, May 1, 2014. Marvin C. Zanders Fu neral Home, Inc. Lola Larsen Lola Larsen, 90, of Wildwood, died Thurs day, May 1, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Robert A. Lowinski Robert A. Lowinski, 91, of Wildwood, died Thursday, May 1, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Gladys Schuchat Gladys Schuchat, 87, of Tavares, died Friday, April 25, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatil la. Betty J. Stalter Betty J. Stalter, 88, of Leesburg, died Satur day, May 3, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home and Cre matory, Leesburg, Robert Franklin Wade Robert Franklin Wade, 88, of Bushnell, died Thursday, May 1, 2014. Purcell Funeral Home, Bushnell. Jack Weinkauf Jack Weinkauf, 74, of Umatilla, died Thurs day, May 1, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatil la. Daphne Lynn Hart-Woods Daphne Lynn HartWoods, 47, of Bushnell, died Friday, April 25, 2014. Eastside Funeral Home, Leesburg. Evie L. Wyatt Evie L. Wyatt, 97, of The Villages, died Sun day, April 27, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Lots of people navigate the classifieds every day and land some great deals on extraordinary merchandise! To sell your unwanted items in the classifieds, call352-787-0902 or log on to www.dailycommercial.comand place your ad today.

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A6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 7, 2014 Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...Bacchus Vino Etcetera Tenth AnniversaryHistoric downtown Clermont is the home of a friendly wine shop where the staff and customers believe that wine is for your enjoyment, not intimidation. Open since 2004 at the corner of Montrose and Seventh, across from City Hall Park, Bacchus Vino Etcetera is commemorating their tenth anniversary with a month long celebration. When it comes to wine education, one should keep an open mind and an open bottle. Owners Keith and Karen Mullins encourage Bacchus customers to explore and savor the vast array of wines available from around the world. Frequent sampling opportunities include evening gatherings featuring wines from a specific area, grape variety, winery or other theme. Often a wine or two is available for sampling as customers drop by to shop. A popular tasting and shopping event are the Wine Walks held six times yearly which feature wines from Bacchus Vino Etcetera being sampled at various merchants throughout the downtown area. The next Wine Walk will take place May 16th from 6:30 until 9:00 and will feature all Italian Wine. Tickets are currently available at Bacchus Vino Etcetera. Bacchus Vino Etcetera is the home of the By the Light of the Moon Lunar Wine Club. Each time there is a full moon members receive a bottle each of specially selected red and white wines at a preset price. Between full moons, club members are eligible for exclusive offers and wine discounts. The club is an excellent way to learn about and try new wines, and is a great gift idea. Bacchus Vino Etcetera currently stocks over 700 wines from 17 countries and 8 states. Wines from many popular wineries can be found along with those from some lesser-known producers. For customers with specific requests Bacchus Vino Etcetera can special order wines not already in stock (subject to availability). For the beer lover in the family Bacchus carries a selection of imported and domestic craft ales and lagers. In addition to the wines and beers, a variety of wine racks, corkscrews, stemware and wine related gifts are available. Stop by soon and learn what Keiths 42 years of experience in the wine business can add to your wine enjoyment. www.bacchusvinoetc.com 692 West Montrose Suite D (352) 394-9805 LOOKING FOR PARTS? SEE JULIE (352) 394-6111 Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Having had a chance to become acclimat ed since his arrival in Groveland on Jan. 6, City Manager Redmond Jones has reached out to all employees, ofcials, residents and business owners for help in tak ing the city to a new lev el. Jones created The Premier City Cam paign, an initiative hes dubbed: Team Grov eland Dare to be Great. The campaign was rst introduced in midMarch and so far has generated feedback from internal directors and city employees. Now, he wants to hear more. Greatness starts in ternally and like a seed, it grows. Your thoughts, ideas and suggestions are those seeds that are going to make this city grow! Jones wrote in a public letter. I want to hear from you. I know the employees and res idents have a great amount of pride for the city so I am asking ev ery employee, resident, business owner, traveler and city council mem ber to bring an idea or suggestion to the city managers ofce that will improve an and all aspects of the city of Groveland. Jones drew inspira tion for the campaign from a top-10 list pub lished by CNN/CNN Money list of the top 10 most livable, well gov erned cities. Jones said that as he read the article, he thought, What are you guys doing to make that list and be identied as such and what things can we do, or what can we piggyback on, to steer us in that direc tion? Jones released the names of every city on the list and included the phone number of each town so that peo ple can request infor mation from ofcials there or research what makes each city unique. The top three cities on the list are Sharon, Mass., Louisville, Colo., and Vienna, Va. No city in Florida made the list. I told them we should be using those cities as a benchmark, Jones said. Some city coun cil members have taken it upon themselves to call ofcials of some of the cities on the list and pick their brains. Jones said he person ally reached out to the city manager in Papil lion, Neb., No. 8 on the list. Jones said hed met the manager at an exec utive training program he attended at Har vards school of govern ment. Knowing where were situated and knowing our growth pattern, its really clear we have a lot of growth coming our way, he said. Shannon Ferrell, Jones executive assis tant, said some staffers have suggested bring ing a splash pad park to the city, incorporat ing uniforms in local schools, getting a web site host and posting applications for various things on the city web site. Jones said other sug gestions have included incorporating drug test ing, creating a city well ness program, having more employee gather ings and morale-boost ing activities, develop ing recreation and park opportunities, and up dating the website more often. A top wish by council members was building an amphithe ater. Jones said he not only will continued re searching why other cit ies made the CNN list, but will look at success stories in Clermont, Mascotte, Minneola, Montverde and other nearby towns. Jones will provide up dates on the campaigns progress during his re port time at city coun cil meetings. He is also in the pro cess of planning town halls and Meet the Manager get-togethers throughout Groveland and will share details of his ndings during his rst 100-day evaluation in July. Jones said he is asking people to jot their ideas down and drop them by City Hall, 156 S. Lake Ave., or to email him at redmond.jones@grove land-.gov. Groveland set to launch improvement campaign Greatness starts internally and like a seed, it grows. Your thoughts, ideas and suggestions are those seeds that are going to make this city grow! I want to hear from you. I know the employees and residents have a great amount of pride for the city so I am asking every employee, resident, business owner, traveler and city council member to bring an idea or suggestion to the city managers office that will improve an and all aspects of the city of Groveland. City Manager Redmond Jones

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Wednesday, May 7, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A7 CLERMONT BLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSAMILYELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time! IRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONTL Many Other Activities each week Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.org LIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLCHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm SOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary); 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.org ST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am (Rite I) 10:00 am (Rite II) 5:00 pm (Praise & Worship) Sunday School Youth Group Nursery Adult Bible Study Womens Bible Study Mens Prayer Breakfast WOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH GODINCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALE ERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for Children Groveland IRSTBAPTISTCHURCH GROVELAND Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pm MT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! MINNEOLA CONGREGATIONSMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club NEWLPRESBYTERIANCHURCH18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am TLIVINGGOD Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce Rowland MONTVERDE WOODLANDSLUTHERAN15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 am OAKLAND PRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforSouth Lake South LakeGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOMErfn tbt352-394-7121806 W. Minneola Ave.,Clermont,FL Cremation ChoicesDirect Cremation$675Plus Container Ron Becker,Director352-394-8228921 S.US Hwy 27,Minneola,FL project. The ag ency is also the ultimate approval au thority. Representatives for Sabal Trail said they were working to answer the EPAs concerns. The extent and nature of their comments were what we had expected for a proj ect of this size, which cov ers three states, company spokeswoman Andrea Gro ver said in a statement. Sabal Trail has met with and discussed the project with EPA ofcials on several occasions, so we are aware of their concerns and have been working to address them since before these comments were led. Grover added that Sabal Trail would respond to the is sues raised by the EPA in re source reports the compa ny will le with FERC in June, and that the commission would also deal with them in the draft environmental im pact statement, which is an ticipated to be completed next spring. Sabal Trail, a joint venture of Juno Beach-based Next Era Energy Corp. which owns Florida Power & Light, the states largest electrical utility and Spectra Energy in Houston, says the pipeline would diversify the states sources of natural gas and would provide a delivery sys tem secure from weather-re lated disruptions in the Gulf of Mexico. To accomplish that, energy companies have developed a three-pronged approach. In order to serve Sabal Trails pipeline, Williams Part ners, owner of a pipeline net work spanning more than 10,000 miles across the coun try, seeks permission from the FERC to expand 43 miles of its lines that cross Alabama. Sabal Trail proposes to tie its pipe into Williams facility in Alexander City, in east cen tral Alabama. From there, Sabal Trail pro poses to lay an underground pipeline through part of Al abama, southwest Georgia and on to the Orlando area, covering about 460 miles. FPL then would construct a 126-mile pipeline stretch ing from that Orlando hub to its plant in Indiantown. Taking up the assertion of diversifying sources, EPA reg ulators note in their letter to the FERC that two com panies, Williams and Kind er Morgan, which feeds the Florida Gas Transmission Co. owner of an existing pipeline in Marion County through the Ocala National Forest, al ready pumps natural gas to the region from the northern part of the country. Williams and Spectra also partner in a 745-mile pipe line that runs beneath the Gulf to deliver natural gas from Mobile to Tampa, where it is piped to other points in Central Florida. EPA ofcials also point out that another project, a Spec tra partnership with Center Point Energy, came on line in 2011. That effort expanded a 274-mile pipeline from east ern Louisiana to Mobile. Looking offshore, the EPA observes that Port Dolphin has been cleared for develop ment, and the FERC should discuss that as an alternative. Port Dolphin involves a specialized ship that sits about 30 miles off the coast of Tampa. The vessel would convert liquid natural gas into vaporized natural gas and pump that to Port Mana tee for distribution elsewhere in the state. At peak, that project could provide about 1.3 billion cu bic feet of natural gas a day or roughly the amount that Sabal Trail says its pipe line would carry. It appears this alternative would give Florida Power & Light access to diverse sourc es from other countries, if plans for exporting the na tions natural-gas supplies to other countries realize in creased prices for the na tions consumers, the EPAs letter states. The report should also spell out other alternatives to the pipeline, the EPA recom mends. For instance, the agen cy calls attention to FPLs own reports, which indicate the power company has re alized signicant energy savings through compliance with three federal policies that have been adopted since 2005. A fourth measure, which could pass this year, would likely boost that efciency even more, EPA ofcials write. Moreover, FPL could re duce the demand for elec tricity by expanding a home weatherization program for low-income customers which was a provision in the companys goals for energy conservation that were pro vided to the state Public Ser vice Commission. The EPA cited a similar ini tiative launched in the Pacic Northwest 30 years ago. The utility that managed the pro gram found that energy sav ings over the years amount ed to the equivalent needed to power the state of Oregon, and that the utility found it was cheaper to retrot hous es than build new generation capacity. Such success, the EPA con tinued, compels the FERC to demonstrate in its report the necessity (of the Sa bal Trail pipeline) versus the convenience of the proposed preferred alternative in con text to the impacts upon Al abama and Georgia commu nities, property owners and ecosystems who will bear the risk and impacts but do not appear to benet from the proposed actions construc tion. Aside from the potential of other sources of energy, the EPA recommends or requests that the FERC put the Sa bal Trail pipeline in the con text of existing environmen tal regulations. For instance, the EPA asks that energy regulators nar row the proposed right-ofway needed for the proj ect from 100 feet to 75 feet through upland forests, in order to protect that habitat, and scrap a proposed route that shows the pipe travers ing a closed landll in Lown des County, Ga. The agency also wants as surance that the Sabal Trail pipeline adheres to the fed eral Clean Water Act because portions of it will be laid alongside a 10-inch-wide line that was installed by an other company in the 1950s, long before the water-quality law was passed. And in light of the tragicFi nally, the EPA wants the re port to incorporate the proj ects compliance with the federal Clean Air Act. That would be a concern for resi dents near Dunnellon. Environmental regula tors seek to learn how much greenhouse gases and poten tially hazardous pollutants will be emitted at such sites. GAS FROM PAGE A1

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A8 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 7, 2014

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B1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 7, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTS SPORTS EDITOR ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE .............................. 365-8268 FAX .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL ......... sports@dailycommercial.com S PORTS and LEISURE FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Kaylin Whitney and Terry Jernigan seemed immune to the ele ments. The East Ridge High School runners deed rainy conditions and blistered the track at the University of North Florida on Saturday to win state champion ships in the boys and girls 100-meter dash es at the Florida High School Athletic Associ ation state track-andeld nals. Despite coming into the nals with the fth-fastest qualifying time, Whitney record ed the fastest time in the preliminary heats, stop ping the clock in 11.64 seconds. The sophomore was more than 3/10ths of a second faster than the next-fastest runner during preliminaries. In the nals, Whitney started in the middle of the track and bolt ed from the blocks. She maintained an advan tage throughout and won in 11.48, beating Krystal Sparling from St. Thomas Aquinas by .16 seconds. In the boys race, Jernigan set the stan dard with a 10.53 time in the preliminaries. He got out fast in the nals and nished in 10.51 to beat Pipers Andre Ew ers, who stopped the clock in 10.67. Whitney and Jernigan posted the only wins by Lake and Sumter Coun ty competitors in all four classes. A large contingent of local student-athletes competed in the Class 1A and Class 2A meets on Friday. In Class 2A, Mont verde Academys boys team nished in a tie for 22nd place with 10 points. In the boys Class 2A 800-meter event, Mont verde Academys Jes se Wear sparkled with a second-place nish with a time of 1:54.97. Pine Crest senior John Decker nipped Wear by 2/10ths of a second. Montverde Academys Tahj Malone nished seventh in the boys high jump with a leap of 6-0. Wakullas Corion Knight had the winning jump of 6-4. In the girls Class 2A 3200, Montverde Acad emys Ciara Hopkins was 13th with a time of 12:12.48. East Ridge sprinters win state championships FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Freddie Cole knows what it takes to win. The only coach the Lake Minneola boys basketball program has ever had, Cole built the Hawks from scratch and in three years, he has transformed them into one of the top teams in the state. During his tenure, Lake Minneola is 60-22, including a 28-4 mark this season and an ap pearance in the Flor ida High School Ath letic Association Class 6A state champion ship game. Cole played college basketball at Bethune-Cookman Col lege (now University) in the 1990s and went overseas for a time to play professio nally. Coles reputation as a player was that of a hard-nosed competitor, who left everything on the oor whenever he played. Thats the same atti tude he will take to the court on May 22 when a team of Lake County educators host the Har lem Wizards show team at The Nest the Lake Minneola gym. Were not going to lay down for them, Cole said, tongue in cheek. There are some teach ers in the county who have played college basketball and some who have even played professionally. Theres a competitive drive in all of us. Were going out to win. The game is to ben et the Lake Minneo la athletic program. In addition to the game, there will food trucks on hand, along with a silent auction with items up for grabs such as tickets to Walt Dis ney World, aut ographed memorabilia, rounds of golf and more. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased from any Lake Minneola stu dent-athlete or online at www.harlemwizards. com. There will be a parking fee of $5. In addition to Cole, other area educators expected to play in clude Lake Minneola Principal Linda Shep herd-Miller, East Ridge Principal Julie Robin son-Lueallen and Grov eland Elementary Prin cipal Kimberly Sneed Jarvis. Cole said the ros ter is still being com piled and will not be nalized for another week or two. The Harlem Wizards were founded in 1962 and have provided bas ketball fans with oncourt comedy, along with athleticism, team work and ball-han dling wizardry. Accord ing to Wizards President Todd Davis, the organi zation has built a repu tation over the past 50plus years of creating awe-inspiring fund raiser events for schools and nonprots. Davis said the team expects to play more than 300 games this season and believes it will help raise more than $1 million. We look to push the envelope on fun, com bining pre-planned acts that fans of all ages will nd laugh-out-loud funny, Davis said. Our halftime show, which often involves having many kids from the au dience on the oor, plus our postgame interac tion, with the Wizards staying on the oor to sign autographs un til every fan who wants one gets one, is our cherry on top. Lake Minneola High School is at 101 N. Han cock Road in Minneola. For information, call 352-394-9600. Harlem Wizards scheduled to visit Lake Minneola DEDE SMITH / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP University of Floridas Greg Williams drives around BethuneCookmans Freddie Cole in a 1996 game. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com The Eustis High School soft ball team played for its rst re gional championship in school history on Saturday. A 12-1 loss to Plantation American Heritage likely will take some of the sizzle out of the accomplishment for the Pan thers, but it also marked the be ginnings of a program. Eustis never led in the game, falling behind 2-0 before Ni cole Caruso scored to make it 2-1. While Carusos score might seem insignicant in the nal outcome, it did mark the rst scored against Plantation Amer ican Heritage in the regional playoffs. The Patriots had outscored two opponents 24-0 in the games leading up to Saturdays title tilt. The game remained a 2-1 af fair until the fth when a light rain began to fall on the already soaked eld and Plantation American Heritage put together a ve-run outburst to put a lit tle space between itself and the Panthers. The Patriots put even more heat on Eustis in the sixth inning, extending the lead with three more runs. In the seventh, Plantation American Heritage sealed the win with the nal margin of vic tory. Plantation American Her itage, which travelled near ly 250 miles to play Eustis on Friday only to have the game postponed until Saturday be cause of heavy rains, will make a much shorter trip for the Flor ida High School Athletic Asso ciation Class 5A state semi nals on Friday at Dodgertown in Vero Beach. The Patriots will play at either 6:05 p.m. or 7:20 p.m. against an opponent to be determined. Panthers fall in regional final BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Eustis Erynn Brisson (33) catches a throw to put out American Heritage freshman Brooke Langston (1) during Saturdays class 5A regional nal between Eustis High School and Plantation American Heritage at Eustis High School. EUSTIS MOUNT DORA FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Zac Ward has earned every thing he gets. That was the feeling expressed by Mount Dora Bible boys bas ketball coach Stephen Hayes as he watched Ward sign a national letter of intent on Monday with Harding University, an NCAA Division II school in Searcy, Ark. Zac has such a bright future, Hayes said. Hes so mature and he knows what a work ethic is all about. Hes denitely getting what he deserves and I think ev eryone at this school is proud of him and happy for him. Ward has played for Hayes for four years and is the school re cord holder for 3-point shots at tempted and made. As a senior, he helped the Bulldogs to a 22-7 record and the Class 3A-District 5 championship. He scored an average of 23.1 points per game as a senior and totalled 18.3 ppg for his career. Ward scored 1,926 points in his career, good for fth on the schools alltime list. Effective from all areas of the oor, but particu larly lethal from behind the, Ward established a new school record with 267 3-pointers in his career. Thats a record that might not be broken, Hayes said. Mount Dora Bible won 79 games during Wards four years in a Bulldogs uniform. We accomplished what we did because of Zacs leadership, on and off the court, Hayes said. Were denitely going to miss having him around the campus. Hes such a wonder ful inuence on everyone who comes into contact with him. Hes a complete class act and you cant say that about a lot of kids his age. Harding University is a pri vate school afliated with the Churches of Christ. It has 6,295 students and competes in a variety of sports, includ ing mens and womens basketball, baseball, foot ball, mens and womens golf, and many others. The Bisons are mem bers of the Great Amer ican Conference except for womens soccer, which com petes in the Mid-America Inter collegiate Athletics Association. Among its notable alumni are Willie and Korie Robertson from the reality show, Duck Dynasty. The Bisons are coached by Jeff Morgan, who will enter his 22nd season as coach in 2014-15. He has a career record of 381-247, including a 364-237 mark at Harding. In 2013-14, the mens basket ball team at Harding University was 15-15. Hayes said Ward received ve full-ride offers, including two Divison I deals, but he chose Harding because, he wanted to stay in a Christian school. MDB basketball standout signs letter of intent WARD

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Wednesday, May 7, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B3 PREDICTABLE PARTINGS By JOHN LAMPKIN / Edited by Will ShortzNo. 0427RELEASE DATE: 5/4/2014 ACROSS1 Docks6 Fill10 Where auto racers retire?14 Bayonets, say19 That Old Black Magic composer20 Bit of riding gear21 Big acronym in energy22 Actress Parker23 The paparazzo 26 Da de San Valentn flowers27 Catchy pop ditties28 Back from vacation, say30 Santa Baby singer31 New York Citys ___ River32 Bad points33 Division in biology35 The demolitionist 40 Fund-raising event41 Simple tune42 Roll in a disaster supply kit44 Christmas wrapper?45 High-toned49 U.P.S. driver assignments: Abbr.50 Knock down a peg52 Knock over55 The civil engineer 57 Grab (onto)58 One heading to the cape?59 Kitchen tool60 The lingerie manufacturer 63 Queen, e.g.66 Emulate Harry Connick Jr.68 ___ City, 1939 film locale69 The chicken farmer 71 ___ around around around around (repeated line in Dion and the Belmonts The Wanderer)72 Suffers73 Supporting force74 The sound technician 79 Scale part80 The Jungle Book bear82 Gala83 Fund for a third party84 Whew!85 Faultless88 Dubais federation: Abbr.89 Maximally hip92 The film director 96 Range of understanding97 Pranksters patsy98 Between continents, say99 Magazine founder Eric100 Execute perfectly102 Motivates106 Some hibernators108 The soda jerk 111 Instruct112 Twosome113 Comics sidekick114 Free-for-all115 Trial figure116 Houston pro, informally117 Just118 Showplace? DOWN1 Pet door opener2 Roman of wrath3 Lohengrin lady4 Greened up, perhaps5 Winter vehicle6 Like many candles7 Xeric8 Commercial tigers name9 Oil-spill-monitoring org.10 Cornmeal dish11 Not for me12 Trial13 Word with color or rhyme14 Origin of a stream: Abbr.15 The ecdysiast 16 Birthplace of the Franciscan order17 The percussionist 18 Operating procedures: Abbr.24 Poet who wrote So Thomas Edison / Never drank his medicine25 Leads, as a band29 More than snacks32 In a footnote, say34 Prefix with -port35 St. John Passion composer36 Actress Taylor of Mystic Pizza37 Quod ___ faciendum38 Panel member39 Twice tetra-40 Monks grooves43 America by Heart author, 201046 Drawn things47 Polo, e.g.48 Exclamation said before sticking out the tongue51 Current amount52 Prime seating area53 Kind of tradition54 William who played Hopalong Cassidy56 Mend after further injury57 Mops commercial partner58 Place for a touchdown60 Bribe61 Hardly be deadpan62 Little angels63 Pratt Institute degs.64 Bunch of stuff65 Dickens orphan66 Two points67 Baseball great Campanella70 Political muscle71 PIN part: Abbr.74 Basis for promotion75 Going ___76 Mtley ___77 Paradox to be meditated on78 Little ___ Pea80 Hindu part of Indonesia81 Have ___ for82 Tutti-___84 The van driver 86 Capable of handling87 Horrifying89 The paper doll maker 90 Baroque91 Some canap picks93 Spot94 Tremors95 Cover completely96 Short strokes97 Big boo-boo101 Not relaxed102 Religious figure: Var.103 Simon of Broadway104 That seorita105 Victory, to Wagner107 Hit show sign109 Fiscal exec110 One may have a ball at the country club 12345 6789 101112131415161718 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 2930 31 32 3334 353637 3839 40 41 42 43 44 45 46474849 5051 525354 55 56 57 58 59 60 6162 636465 6667 68 69 70 71 72 73 7475 767778 79 8081 82 83 84 8586 87 88 8990 91 92 939495 96 97 98 99 100101 102103 104105 106 107108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118For any three answers, call from a touch-tone phone: 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Solution on page B8 COLLEGE GRADUATION The 4th annual com mencement exercises of Lake-Sumter Com munity College took place on April 28 at the Leesburg High School auditorium. Local grad uates are Clara Cath erine Caughell, Kar en Ann Clay, Stephen Dudley Duncan, Vir ginia Helen Hunt, An drew Jackson Knight, Carl Howard Olson and Donna Rorabaugh, all of Clermont; Lin da Rozar of Groveland; and Charles Blackburn, Jr., Minneola. HISTORY FROM PAGE B2 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Clermont city council members next week are ex pected to discuss possible names for the former Cel ebration of Praise Church property the city recently ac quired. A ribbon-cutting ceremony is scheduled for June 5 and city spokesperson Doris Blood sworth said it would be nice to have a name before then. This will be the second dis cussion on the naming af ter more than 100 suggest ed names were submitted to the city. According to Blood sworth, the eld now has been narrowed to three names. They are: The Clermont Arts and Recreation Center, The Clermont Complex and The Clermont Community Center. The last name, however, is already taken but, if chosen, the current Community Cen ter in downtown Clermont which just celebrated its rst year anniversary would be renamed. At the last council meeting, board member Van Wagner made the suggestion for the name switch, appealing to fellow council members and residents in attendance, tell ing them the name Commu nity Center encompasses all that the new building rep resents in one short name. The now Community Center is more of an event place, said Bloodsworth, adding that a change in its name from Community Cen ter would be tting since the new building will be more of a community center, while the downtown building is more of an events venue. Another thing about the new building council mem bers will be discussing is the community fee schedule for use of the pool and oth er amenities, including the events hall, which features a stage for performances. Currently, the city is hiring new staff for the center, since it will be open seven days per week with several shifts per day. Lifeguards to man the swimming pools are just one of many jobs available. At the last council meeting, Recreation Director Dave Teske presented the council with a preliminary fee sched ule based on what similar centers charge. A daily membership fee could be $1, weekly passes could be $5, monthly pass es could be $15 and individ ual season pass could be $40. A family pass (for as many as ve) on a seasonal basis could be $120 for six months, other center ofcials told Teske. Tentatively, Teske said the season for the pool would probably be June 7 to Sep tember 28. The center is scheduled to open on June 7 with an of cial ribbon-cutting celebra tion on June 6. Council members will meet at 7 p.m. on May 13 to discuss the matter. Community center name could be picked next week CLERMONT THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com Salvation Army leaders and other speakers came to gether on Wednesday to give God glory during the ground breaking of the Salvation Ar mys future home at 2605 West South St., in Leesburg. Lt. Matt Hedgren, corps of cer for the Salvation Army of Lake and Sumter coun ties, praised past leaders for having the vision for the 27,000-square-foot facility to be constructed by Signa ture Enterprises. Site work on the $4 million project is set to begin Monday. The project is expected to be nished by summer 2015. Hedgren said the new facil ity was specically designed for the Salvation Army to meet the physical, emotion al and the spiritual needs of this community. Amen, several in the crowd replied. When you think about whats going to happen at this site over the next year, over the next two years, over the next 10 to 30 years, its amaz ing to think of the transforma tion that is going to happen, Hedgren said. Whenever you come to this site in the fu ture you will see lives being changed. Youll see hope and youll see love, and we do all of that in Gods love. Board member Reggie Caruthers recalled the Sal vation Army rst began the groundwork for the project in 2009. I think that this site is really going to glorify God in a way that we can be proud of and serve him, he said. Architect Bob Blaise re called watching ofcers in action as he waited in the lobby area before his job in terview for the construction project. I watched a bunch of staff people from the Salvation Army being the most gracelled people taking care of ev erybody, Blaise said. I was being treated great, but ev erybody else coming in was being treated honorably. LEESBURG Salvation Army breaks ground on $4 million new home

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B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 7, 2014 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 7 25 34 47 67 13 18 31 59 74 9 21FREE SPACE53 72 2 16 42 48 63 5 29 39 52 68ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N I B O G BINGO B I N G O SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Raymond Nivarel WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! B 13 B 2 B 5 B 9 B 7

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Wednesday, May 7, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B5 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 6 X 3.2 Black Untitled art#: order#: 3 X 10.6 Black 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance r t t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital SEIZETHE DA Y SLOCAL AREANEWS.www .dailycommer cial.com

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B6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 7, 2014

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Wednesday, May 7, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B7 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 6 X 10.7 Black 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr Classified IndexLegal Notices....................0001 Notices............................1000 At Your Service................9000 Employment....................2000 Pets/Animals....................6865 Merchandise....................6000 Real Estate/For RENT......3000 Real Estate/For SALE........4000 Recreation........................7000 Transportation..................8000 Cancellations for ads running Wednesday must be made by 4pm Monday.ADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since The Daily Commercial will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error call the classified department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error.TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde

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B8 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 7, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 3 X 5.75 Black P I E R S S A T E P I T S S T A B S A R L E N C R O P O P E C P O S E Y W A S G O N E I N A F L A S H R O S A S E A R C A N D Y R E S T E D K I T T E A S T C O N S M I T O S I S B L E W T H E J O I N T B E N E F I T A I R D U C T T A P E E L F C L A S S Y R T E S A B A S E R O B H I T T H E R O A D G L O M T O R O R I C E R S L I P P E D A W A Y M O N A R C H C R O O N E M E R A L D F L E W T H E C O O P I R O A M A I L S A L L Y M A D E T R A C K S S O L B A L O O F E T E E S C R O W M A N U N E R R I N G U A E C O O L E S T Q U I T T H E S C E N E P U R V I E W B U T T A S E A U T N E D O T O A T I N S P I R E S T O A D S R A N L I C K E T Y S P L I T T U T O R D U E T F O I L M E L E E S T E N O S T R O O N L Y S T A G E Solution to puzzle on page B3 SEIZETHE DA Y SSPOR TSNEWS.www .dailycommer cial.com



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ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comDick Adams, 74, practiced law in Central Florida for more 30 years before de ciding to go into a different eld agriculture. Throughout his retirement, he has been involved in cattle operations in Florida and Uruguay. In 1991, Adams bought Green Swamp Ranch in Cler mont, property he vowed to use only for nature-friendly pur poses. On that land is a gopher tortoise refuge, a year-round honey bee farm, bumble bee condos and a cattle camp. About six years ago, a conversation with his brother John Adams, about nding a way for the farm to be self-sustaining, gave rise to another venture growing blueberries. That was the beginning of Blueberry Hill Farms. My brother is always looking for something to do with the farm, but he has never wanted it to be a subdivision, co-partner John Adams said of what is one of Lake Countys newest U-Pick blueberry operations at 5000 Berry Groves Road. Blueberry Hill Farms, SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | B2SPORTS:Eustis loses in regional nal WEDNESDAY, MAY 7, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWST AND INSIDE CLASSIFIED B5 CROSSWORDS B3 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN B2 SPORTS B1 VOICES A3WORD ON THE STREE T A2SOUTH LAKE PRESSV OLUME 99, NO. 19 3 SECTIOn N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reservedwww. southlakepress.com PRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Blueberries are ready for picking at Blueberry Hill Farms in Clermont. Pickers are given a bucket that can hold up to six pounds of blueberries.PHOTO COURTESY OF BLUEBERRY HILL FARMReady, ripe and blueIts pickin time at Clermonts newest U-Pick blueberry farmSEE BERRIES | A2 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comThe Leapfrog Group, a national leader and ad vocate in hospital transparency, has released its spring 2014 Hospital Safety Score Report with Florida Hospital Waterman receiving an A, The Villages Region al Hospital receiving an A, Leesburg Regional Medical C enter receiving a B and South Lake Hospital receiving a C. The report shows Leesburg Regional Medical Center improved its rating from a C in both the fall and spring of 2013. The Villages Regional Hospital also saw an improvement from a B in the fall and spring of 2013. Two of your hospitals have an A, thats good. You have a very nice re cord in your commu nity, said Leah Binder, the president and CEO of Leapfrog Group. You denitely see a pattern of improvement in the other two and thats also good news. Binder said the C grade does raise concerns about South Lake Hospital. A C grade is very dis turbing, she said. The people in the com munity have a right to some answers to why this hospital isnt doing more to protect its pa tients. At South Lake Hospital, Binder noted infection rates in cen tral lines, UTI infection rates, their rate of falls, tears from medical treatment, blood clots, breathing failures, col lapsed lungs and colon surgical site infections. She said the collapsed lung measure was only slightly below the national average. In a number of the sort of terrible events that can happen in a hospital, we look at 13 of those terrible events, and a good number of those this hospital is South Lake Hospital receives low safety grade PHOTO COURTESY OF SOUTH LAKE HOSPITAL South Lake Hospital, shown above, received a C on the Leapfrog Groups 2014 Hospital Safety Score Report.SEE GRADE | A2 PROPOSED PIPELINEA proposed 465 mile-long natural gas pipeline from Alabama to Osceola County in Florida could pass through sections of Sumter and Lake counties. WHITNEY WILLARD / STAFF GRAPHIC N 27 27 50 75 91LAKE SUMTER Proposed pipeline path SUMTER BILL THOMPSONHalifax Media GroupFederal environmental regu lators want more details about a proposed natural gas pipeline that will pass through Lake and Sumter counties, including a full er explanation about why the project is needed in the rst place. In its initial review of Sabal Trail Transmission LLCs project, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency questions wheth er alternatives exist to delivering natural gas to a South Florida power plant besides a 3-footwide pipe that stretches for 465 miles across three states. Some project maps show it cutting straight across Sumter County and the southwestern corner of Lake County. The EPA also wants the Fed eral Energy Regulatory Com mission, or FERC, to explain the projects effects on air and water quality along the route. The 18-page letter, issued last week, was directed to the FERC because the latter agency is re sponsible for drafting an envi ronmental impact statement about the $3 billion pipeline EPA questioning proposed gas pipeline through Lake and Sumter countiesSEE GAS | A7

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 7, 2014 LAKE COUNTY Health department to offer school immunizationsThe Department of Health in Lake County will offer immunizations at local Lake County schools on an ongoing basis for students who will enter the seventh grade during the 2014-15 school year. Immunizations will be given at East Ridge Middle School in Clermont on Thursday, Clermont Middle School on May 15 and Cecil E. Gray Middle School in Groveland on May 20. For information, call the Department of Health in Lake County at 352-771-5500 or go to www.lakechd.com.CLERMONT Hollywood Nights dance schedule for May 16The Hollywood Nights Spring Dance is an evening in the spotlight for adults with developmental or other disabilities hosted by Building Blocks Ministries Inc. The event is open to all adults with developmental disabilities and their guests from 7 to 9 / p.m. May 16 at the Clermont Community Center, 620 W. Montrose St., in Clermont. Tickets for the event are $5 per person and are currently on sale through May 16 at the Building Blocks Learning Center, 548 S. U.S. Highway 27, Suites B-C in Minneola. For information, call 352-536-9264.CLERMONT Spring Art Show on exhibit through May 31The public can enjoy the South Lake Art League Members Spring Art Show on exhibit from 5 to 7 / p.m. through May 31 at the art gallery, 776 W. Montrose St., in Clermont. For information go to, www.southlakeartleague.com.MONTVERDE Open enrollment ongoing at Woodlands Lutheran schoolWoodlands Lutheran Church Early Learning Center is currently enrolling for the 2014-2015 school year for the 2, 3, and 4-year-old preschool programs. The school is at 15333 County Road 455, in Montverde. For information, call 407-469-2525 or email schoolofce@woodlandschurch.com.MINNEOLA South Lake High School class of 1994 reunion setSouth Lake High School Class of 1994 graduates are invited to the 20 year class reunion taking place July 26. Join classmates for an informal gathering at Grafti Junction at 7 / p.m. July 25. A semi-formal dinner with dancing will be from 7 to 10 / p.m. July 26 at Gabbys Banquet and Event Facility. Cost is $45 per person. Go to www.facebook.com/ SLH20yrreunion, or go to www.southlakehighschoolclassof199420yearreunion.yolasite.com for information. Tickets are available by mailing Chastity Lafferty, P.O. Box 581 Minneola, 34755. Include contact information and email address with your payment.CLERMONT Faith Neighborhood Center benefit for new homeThe Faith Neighborhood Center needs to relocate to a new facility and will host a wine, cheese, coffee and dessert event to raise funds from 7 to 9 / p .m. May 14 at the Clermont Community Center, 685 W. Montrose St. Tickets are $30 prepaid and $50 for a couple. For information, email Terry Krier at Pastork@c.rr.com or go to www. faithneighborhoodcenter.com. Area Briefs What South Lake residents are saying about ...GRANDPARENTSWhats the best thing you learned from your grandparents?Dedication to family. They didnt speak much English, but from how they lived their lives, you knew what was most important. Whats important in their lives was family. RAY VILLEGAS CLERMONT I would say from my grandmother the most important thing she ever taught me was the impor tance of education. She said They can take away your car, your house, your kids, your investments, but they can never take away your education. If you are a doctor, you will always be a doctor. MARLENA NOLAND BRANDON They gave me a great gift of humor, and dont take things too seriously. TOBY POE CLERMONT My grandparents never had words. They both believed if you said it you meant it. They didnt ar gue. It didnt matter if my grandma said it was $10 and he knew it was $12.99. They were amazing. POLLY STRAWBRIDGE GROVELAND Word on theStreet Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 in its 5th picking season, actually started out as a commercial picking operation and it still is but has turned into a U-Pick operation as well because the Adams brothers and partner John Gray hated to see berries going to waste after the commercial pick was over. The U-Pick side of the business has been up and running for only a few weeks. To me, whats been a totally gratifying experience is seeing people, families and especially children, learning and having fun picking and eating blueberries, John Adams said. We try to make it fun for the kids and, while here, they learn where their food comes from. While John Adams recognizes that Blueberry Hill Farms is just one of many such farms in the county, the partners do things a little differently. Two of the things he said they are most proud of is that only recycled water is used for watering the crop and, as of 14 months ago, they started using or ganic farming methods. Over the years, Ive heard a lot of people say its hard to work with the water district and other environmental groups like the Department of Agriculture, but its been a pleasure for us, actually, John Adams said. The farm carries ve varieties of blueberries, Farthing and Meadowlark in the organic variety, and Emerald, Jewel and Windsor in the conventional variety. All ve varieties, John Adams said, were developed by the Univer sity of Floridas blueberry breeding program. Adams also said they took on the challenge of planting 13 acres of or ganic bushes in March 2013, in addition to the 11 acres of conventional bushes, to give people the choice of acquiring her bicideand pesticide-free blueberries, if thats what they feel more comfortable eating. The group of people who pick organic are even more unique than everyday U-Pickers, because they are in it for the health benets of it, Farm Manager Randy Holland said. Money is not an issue for them because, regardless, theyre going to pick organic. All pickers are given a bucket that can hold up to six pounds of blueber ries, tted with a rope that can be tied around the waist to leave both hands free for faster picking. Gray said in his opinion, the best time for picking is earlier or later in the day. The farm is open from 9 / a.m. to 5 / p.m. Thurs days through Sundays. Prices are $4 per pound for conventional berries and $8 for organic ber ries. The farm also sells already picked berries for $5 and $10 per pound for the conventional and or ganic varieties. The season usually ends in late May or ear ly June. Luis Ramirez, a former picker who, for the past three years, has been employed at Blueberry Hill maintaining weeds and spraying, said to him, there is nothing like fresh blueberries right off the bush. I think they (blueber ries) taste better picked fresh, he said. They may be good when you get them at a store, but it takes so long for them to get from one place to another that the avor changes. For information on upcoming events, hours, directions and weather condition reports call 863-944-1401, nd Blueberry Hill Farm on Facebook or go to www.blueberryhillfarm.net. BERRIES FROM PAGE A1 LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Erasmo Lopez drops off his bucket of blueberries at a weigh station at Blueberry Hill Farms.either below the nation al average or much worse than the national aver age, Binder said. So, theres some concerns here. Dr. Julie Holland, the chief quality ofcer for South Lake Hospital, said Leapfrog Group looks at processes and outcomes, and South Lake Hospi tal is working and com mitted to improving the processes. She said the outcomes are soon to fol low. Obviously, were well aware of what a C means, but at this point, given where we started and where we are now, weve improved processes im mensely so I think were well on our way to achiev ing much higher than a C and I think well see that in the future, Hol land said. Were certainly condent that what weve been doing will improve our score. Currently, we are in the process of implement ing TeamSTEPPS, which is basically a program for nurses and physicians to improve processes, and quality, and communication and working togeth er, Holland said. Holland said teamwork training and skill build ing are areas the Leapfrog Group looks at and that teamwork is important for patient safety. At this point, every bodys kind of learned that, you know, we need to work together, so that each of us are helping each other, catching each others mistakes and ba sically just build a good team, Holland said. Holland said South Lake Hospital participated in the Leapfrog survey portion of the evaluation for the rst time last year and Binder said there has been progress there. Theres a variety of measures here that show a consistent investment by this hospital in improving their safety... so I am cautiously optimis tic that they will continue to see an improvement in their scores, she said. Binder said Florida Hospital Waterman getting As in spring 2013, fall 2013 and spring 2014 shows it is safer than most of its peers and prioritizes safety. Dianna Liebnitzky, the director of quality and the patient safety ofcer with Florida Hospital Wa terman, said the hospital understands the rankings are very important and patient safety is essential for its success. It really proves to us that the concept of safe ty culture is really hardwired in the foundation of what we do, Liebnitz ky said. It also shows to the community that they can trust the care that we deliver is going to be op timal and always in their best interest. It also, to me, shows that they know that were continually moni toring this on an ongoing, day-to-day basis, its not a one-time effort, its just what we do, always. GRADE FROM PAGE A1

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Wednesday, May 7, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3Applause for states Living Healthy initiativeI was pleased to read in a St. Petersburg blog that Adam Putnam (Florida Agriculture Commissioner) is joining a group of state lawmakers and agency leaders in an ambitious attempt to get Floridians to eat and live healthier. Their program, Living Healthy in Florida, includes education on how to buy and prepare healthier meals and common health and wellness messages. This aligns with First Lady Michelle Obamas Lets Move program, which, in addition to promoting exercise, also educates kids, teachers and families about nutrition. Diet alone is not the answer. Kids and adults must move, even if you walk to the corner and back. We keep hearing that obesity is the major health concern that we have to face and for most of us, the cure is in our own hands. Helpful tips and stepby-step strategies for families, schools and communities to help kids be more active, eat better and grow up healthy can be found on the Lets Move website, www.letsmove.gov. The goal of Living Healthy in Florida, says Putnam, is to make the most of the well-established link between proper nutrition and academic success. I am sure the First Lady couldnt agree more! NANCY HURLBERT LeesburgGrateful for the kindness of a strangerI am writing in the hope that the Good Samaritan of Leesburg will read this and know how grateful we are for his help earlier this month. I left a cold and snowy Michigan and was enjoying a visit with my brother and his wife in sunny, warm Florida. While returning from visiting relatives in nearby Tavares we experienced car problems, which to we three seniors seemed very serious. Suddenly, we could not shift gears. This friendly gentleman, seeing our dilemma, rushed over, had us pop the car hood and in moments diagnosed it as a transmission cable that had come loose. To our benet, we soon discovered he was a knowledgeable auto mechanic, with the necessary tools in his vehicle that enabled him to Band-aid the situation enough so we could get back on the road. Thanks to this car ing man we were able to drive the 150 miles back home and the next day had the cable replaced. While we seem to live in an era of I dont want to get involved, I am so grateful that this man didnt agree with that philosophy. I am sorry we didnt get his name but we are also very, very grateful to him for his kindness in helping out three strangers. To us, he will always be the Good Samaritan of Leesburg. FLO THOMPSON Trenton, Mich. Goodwill is up and runningAt Goodwill Industries of Central Florida were celebrating 13 years serving Leesburg residents. Thanks to generous donations from our community, were able to provide opportunities that help people nd meaningful work reaching 32,500 Central Floridians last year alone. In 2013, Goodwills economic impact in Leesburg was nearly $8.5 million. Recently, our Leesburg Retail Store and Job Connection Center at 10601 U.S. Highway 441, experienced a service disruption to our phone lines. During this outage some of our donors and shoppers had difculty reaching us by phone, although our store and Job Connection Center remained open. Fortunately, phone service has since been restored, and our stores phone number remains the same, 352728-3488, and our Job Connection Center can be reached by calling 352-323-1847. I want to reassure the residents of Leesburg that our store and Job Connection Center are still here and thriving in our community. And in June, well be moving across U.S. Highway 441 to a new, bigger location where well continue to serve you. I invite you to visit us! Bring your donations and shop in our stores to help make a differ ence right here in Lake County.Bill Oakley, president and CEO of Goodwill Industries of Central Florida.The recent history of Lake County Animal Services is an inglorious one. Last year, two separate audits of the county animal shelter turned up a total of 45 problems. Among them were lapses in recordkeeping that left auditors wonder whether shelter workers knew how many animals they were taking in, how many they were adopting out and whether the ones in the facility had proper immunizations. The audits forced the resignation of one Animal Service director, and last month, another one announced her resignation, citing the lack of resources to do the job correctly and pressure from animal activists. Two recent developments further suggest that Animal Services is in trouble. In one case, six puppies adopted from the shelter died of hookworm, and two others from the same litter survived after receiving aggressive treatment. Then this week, county ofcials closed the shelter until further notice after 16 dogs contracted parvovirus and had to be put down. That means they will not accept any more animals and will not adopt any to the public until they feel condent that the parvo outbreak is under control. County ofcials are quick to point out that a parvo outbreak can, and does, happen at any animal shelter. And while that may be true, taken together, these events suggest a troubling lack of organization or oversight at Lake County Animal Services. Sheriff Gary Borders recently came forward and said he would be willing to consider taking over Animal Services. The idea of a sheriffs department running animal services is not unique; a number of other Florida sheriffs do it effectively, largely because they can draw on inmate labor to hold down costs. The Lake County Commission is considering Borders offer, and after the shelter closed this week, their interest has grown. We agree. Clearly, the problems that plague Animal Services are stubborn, and it make take new leadership to x them. Its time to give Sheriff Borders a shot at doing what the county cannot. At the same time, we hope the County Commission will use this moment to examine its own leadership. We have heard their lament about lack of revenue caused by the lingering effects of the recession. And while that is true, political expediency alone has kept them from making some tough decisions namely, raising taxes to shore up some of the departments and services that are starved for funding. So to commissioners we say, go ahead and push this problem to the sheriff. But unless you squarely address your budget problems, its only a matter of time until failures in another county service jump up and bite you. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . ........................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTOPINION WHATS YOUR OPINION?The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Letters to the Editor 732 W. Montrose St. Clermont, FL 34711By fax to: 352-394-8001EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed.GUEST COLUMNSIf you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@daily commercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OURVIEW SOUTH LAKE PRESSYour community newspaper for more than 100 years.732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Florida 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region.All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. YOUROPINIONSLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Time for change at Animal Services Bikefest was a blastTom Zaklukiewiczs April 27 letter caused me to respond immediately. I am not a biker. I have been to one other Bikefest, where I walked around a couple of hours and was not impressed. This year is very different. I was there every day and had a blast despite the intense heat. I can honestly say there is no way I saw everything this year. I dont go to major sporting events, but I would guess that a beer costs more than the $2 Zaklukiewicz remembers pay ing. Beers were $4, and I didnt nd that unreasonable. I loved the huge variety of food choices. Sure, it costs a bit more than going to McDonalds, but the food was good and the atmosphere was a big plus. As for parking, I cannot understand why anyone would drive to Bikefest with the great transportation available from LakeXpress. The parking benets area nonprots anyway so who can complain? I really hope the vendors made a lot of money because I want to see them again. Every single vendor was helpful and pleasant despite the huge crowds. I do agree that the hotels should be ashamed of themselves, but I think that happens at every major event anywhere. The only complaint I had was the fact that the Ms. Budweiser contest was almost an hour late getting started. Mr. Luckyman did a great job keeping the crowd entertained, but it was hard standing in the heat for an hour waiting. At least I had a nice conversation with a fellow veteran. The Leesburg Partnership should be proud of what they have accomplished. I will cer tainly be looking forward to next year. BEN LARSON | Leesburg LETTER of the WEEK BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 7, 2014 Offering classes in Trampoline, Tumbling and Group Gymnastics in a fun, kid friendly environment. Both recreational and team options Bring this ad in for $25.00 off annual registration. Good through May 15th, 2014. Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) Staff reportEleven businesses, organizations and individuals were honored in Mount Dora Wednesday night with 2014 Lake County Community Service Awards. Sponsored by the Florida League of Cities, the awards recognize companies, groups and people whose dedication and selessness have made the county a better place to live. Receiving awards at a ban quet at Lake Receptions were: %  en John B. Smith of Lake Mechanical Contractors Lake County Business Hall of Fame. Smith is a former Na tional Contractor of the Year and charter member of the Central Florida chapter of the Associated Builders and Contractors. He has twice been named to the states Construction Industry Li censing Board and served on the Lake County Economic Development Board. %  en Kevin J. Robson of BusinessMasters.Net Small-Size Community Ser vice Business Achievement Award. Robson has received the Sam Walton Business Leader Award, a Small Busi ness Achievement Award from the Lake Eustis Area Chamber of Commerce and has served as president of that organization. %  en Vinnie Vittoria of Cous in Vinnies Family Sports Restaurant Medium-Size Community Service Business Award. Vittoria won the Tavares Chamber of Commerces Medium Business of the Year last year and he supplies food for many local groups and fundraisers. He also donates business proceeds and mon ey won in chicken wing chal lenges to charity. %  en Silver Springs Citrus Large-Size Community Ser vice Business Award. Founded in 1921, the 250-employee rm provides ongoing support to Howey-in-the-Hills, including manpower, mate rials and trucks during the renovation of the Marianne Beck Memorial Library. %  en Tom Hofmeister of Ospry Lodge Community Service Entrepreneur Award. Hofmesiter has more than 30 years of experience in land acquisition and development in the community. His newest venture, Osprey Lodge in Ta vares, has been hailed as having great economic development impact in the city. %  en Cathy Green of Lake-Sumter State College Art and Culture Commu nity Service Award. Green. Thanks to her brainchild, Kids College, thousands of children have been given the opportunity to engage in en richment programs from the arts and sciences to athletic programs. %  en Michael Holland Lake County Community Ser vice Leadership Award. Hol land serves on the Eustis City Commission, has been vice mayor and mayor, is rst vice president of the local muse um board, is president of the Lake County League of Cit ies, and a member of the lo cal chamber. He also vol unteers for numerous local events. %  en Tommy Lee Gamble of Fruitland Park Fire Rescue Community service Award for Public Service. Gamble has served the community as a reghter for more than half a century. He also has worked for Lake County Fire Rescue and the Oxford Fire Department. %  en Capt. Todd English of the Lake County Sheriffs Of ce Lake County Com munity Service Chris Daniels Memorial Public Safety Award. English co-found ed the Lake County Human Trafcking Task Force. %  en Dr. Mary Jo Rager of Lake-Sumter State College Lake County Community Service Award for Education. Rager has worked for 35 years at LSSC and currently serves as associate vice president for Baccalaureate and Workforce Programs there. %  en Mike Perry of the Lake County Water Authority Lake County Commu nity Service Special Judges Award. Perry has served on the board of Leadership Lake County since 2002, volun teers with the Tavares Youth Football League, the March of Dimes and Marianne Beck Memorial Library.MOUNT DORALake County Community Service Awards presented HOLLARD ENGLISH GAMBLE HOFMEISTER GREEN SMITH ROBSON PERRY VITTORIA RAGER LINDA CHARLTONSpecial to The Daily CommercialSaturday was race day at Lake Louisa State Park, only this time the racers werent on foot they were on long boards. The Clermont Challenge Races, sponsored by the Ian Tilmann Foundation and Sector 9 Skateboard Company, hosted approximately 25 racers in the events. Competitors ranged in age from 10 to 50-plus and used boards lon ger than typical skate boards. The slalom race was curtailed due to rain, but the 5K and 10K dis tance races and the freestyle dance competition went on as planned. Marcus Acevedo, of Gainesville, came out on top in the mens divi sion, placing second in the 5K, rst in the 10K and rst (by 3 seconds) overall. This one was actual ly very challenging, he said. I actually ran this race last year and came in second in both. This year they changed the course. It was awful. Awful in a good way. Richard Prine of Mi ami Beach came out on top in the junior divi sion and was also one of the skaters who signed the foundations prom ise to wear a helmet. I came up for this, Prine said. I love coming up for the rac es. I had a helmet but I needed a better one. Ten-year-old Anton McCampbell would have won the 12-and-under division, except he was the only one in it. So he raced in the 17-and-under junior division and n ished third. Its fun. I like to be outdoors and I never use up my energy, McCampbell said of his longboarding passion. The foundation do nated 29 helmets to recipients who mere ly had to sign a pledge stating they will wear them. For every $20 the foundation receives, it is able to buy a helmet, said Marcy Tilmann, director of the organization. Tilmanns son, Ian, died in 2005 from a skateboard fall while not wearing a helmet. Our son was a Ma rine, she said. He was a good marine. And he died from a skateboard. Over 100 skateboarders a year die because they dont wear helmets.CLERMONTFoundation sponsors longboard competition, promotes safety LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL From left, William Frank and Marcus Acevedo race in the 10K during the Clermont Challenge.

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Wednesday, May 7, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5 Place your ad here and reach the Local Market!VERY AFFORDABLE!Call today 352-394-2183 IN MEMORY DEATH NOTICESDavid E. BeitzDavid E. Beitz, 81, of Leesburg, died Wednesday, April 30, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals & Cre mations, Tavares.Jayonna Amani BrownJayonna Amani Brown, 3, of Leesburg, died Thursday, April 24, 2014. Eastside Funeral Home. Leesburg.Evelyn Marie ConoverEvelyn Marie Conover, 87, of Eustis, died Thursday, May 1, 2014. Allen J. Harden Funeral Home, Mount Dora.Canelia A. DyerCanelia A. Dyer, 51, of Centerhill, died Sat urday, April 26, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations, Leesburg.Billy Ray FisherBilly Ray Fisher, 64, of Eustis, died Wednesday, April 30, 2014. Allen J. Harden Funeral Home, Mount Dora.Dennis L. GoodmanDennis L. Goodman, 90, of Tavares, died Tuesday, April 29, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares.Alice M. KissingerAlice M. Kissing er, 85, of Orlando, died Thursday, May 1, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Bettye J. Jackson-LarryBettye J. Jackson-Lar ry, 78, of Minneola, died Thursday, May 1, 2014. Marvin C. Zanders Fu neral Home, Inc.Lola LarsenLola Larsen, 90, of Wildwood, died Thursday, May 1, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Robert A. LowinskiRobert A. Lowinski, 91, of Wildwood, died Thursday, May 1, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Gladys SchuchatGladys Schuchat, 87, of Tavares, died Friday, April 25, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatil la.Betty J. StalterBetty J. Stalter, 88, of Leesburg, died Satur day, May 3, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg,Robert Franklin WadeRobert Franklin Wade, 88, of Bushnell, died Thursday, May 1, 2014. Purcell Funeral Home, Bushnell.Jack WeinkaufJack Weinkauf, 74, of Umatilla, died Thursday, May 1, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatil la.Daphne Lynn Hart-WoodsDaphne Lynn HartWoods, 47, of Bushnell, died Friday, April 25, 2014. Eastside Funeral Home, Leesburg.Evie L. WyattEvie L. Wyatt, 97, of The Villages, died Sunday, April 27, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Lots of people navigate the classifieds every day and land some great deals on extraordinary merchandise! To sell your unwanted items in the classifieds, call352-787-0902 or log on to www.dailycommercial.comand place your ad today.

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A6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 7, 2014 Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...Bacchus Vino Etcetera Tenth AnniversaryHistoric downtown Clermont is the home of a friendly wine shop where the staff and customers believe that wine is for your enjoyment, not intimidation. Open since 2004 at the corner of Montrose and Seventh, across from City Hall Park, Bacchus Vino Etcetera is commemorating their tenth anniversary with a month long celebration. When it comes to wine education, one should keep an open mind and an open bottle. Owners Keith and Karen Mullins encourage Bacchus customers to explore and savor the vast array of wines available from around the world. Frequent sampling opportunities include evening gatherings featuring wines from a specific area, grape variety, winery or other theme. Often a wine or two is available for sampling as customers drop by to shop. A popular tasting and shopping event are the Wine Walks held six times yearly which feature wines from Bacchus Vino Etcetera being sampled at various merchants throughout the downtown area. The next Wine Walk will take place May 16th from 6:30 until 9:00 and will feature all Italian Wine. Tickets are currently available at Bacchus Vino Etcetera. Bacchus Vino Etcetera is the home of the By the Light of the Moon Lunar Wine Club. Each time there is a full moon members receive a bottle each of specially selected red and white wines at a preset price. Between full moons, club members are eligible for exclusive offers and wine discounts. The club is an excellent way to learn about and try new wines, and is a great gift idea. Bacchus Vino Etcetera currently stocks over 700 wines from 17 countries and 8 states. Wines from many popular wineries can be found along with those from some lesser-known producers. For customers with specific requests Bacchus Vino Etcetera can special order wines not already in stock (subject to availability). For the beer lover in the family Bacchus carries a selection of imported and domestic craft ales and lagers. In addition to the wines and beers, a variety of wine racks, corkscrews, stemware and wine related gifts are available. Stop by soon and learn what Keiths 42 years of experience in the wine business can add to your wine enjoyment. www.bacchusvinoetc.com 692 West Montrose Suite D (352) 394-9805 LOOKING FOR PARTS? SEE JULIE (352) 394-6111 Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comHaving had a chance to become acclimated since his arrival in Groveland on Jan. 6, City Manager Redmond Jones has reached out to all employees, ofcials, residents and business owners for help in taking the city to a new lev el. Jones created The Premier City Campaign, an initiative hes dubbed: Team Groveland Dare to be Great. The campaign was rst introduced in midMarch and so far has generated feedback from internal directors and city employees. Now, he wants to hear more. Greatness starts internally and like a seed, it grows. Your thoughts, ideas and suggestions are those seeds that are going to make this city grow! Jones wrote in a public letter. I want to hear from you. I know the employees and res idents have a great amount of pride for the city so I am asking ev ery employee, resident, business owner, traveler and city council mem ber to bring an idea or suggestion to the city managers ofce that will improve an and all aspects of the city of Groveland. Jones drew inspiration for the campaign from a top-10 list published by CNN/CNN Money list of the top 10 most livable, well gov erned cities. Jones said that as he read the article, he thought, What are you guys doing to make that list and be identied as such and what things can we do, or what can we piggyback on, to steer us in that direction? Jones released the names of every city on the list and included the phone number of each town so that peo ple can request infor mation from ofcials there or research what makes each city unique. The top three cities on the list are Sharon, Mass., Louisville, Colo., and Vienna, Va. No city in Florida made the list. I told them we should be using those cities as a benchmark, Jones said. Some city coun cil members have taken it upon themselves to call ofcials of some of the cities on the list and pick their brains. Jones said he person ally reached out to the city manager in Papil lion, Neb., No. 8 on the list. Jones said hed met the manager at an exec utive training program he attended at Har vards school of govern ment. Knowing where were situated and knowing our growth pattern, its really clear we have a lot of growth coming our way, he said. Shannon Ferrell, Jones executive assis tant, said some staffers have suggested bringing a splash pad park to the city, incorporating uniforms in local schools, getting a website host and posting applications for various things on the city web site. Jones said other suggestions have included incorporating drug test ing, creating a city well ness program, having more employee gather ings and morale-boost ing activities, developing recreation and park opportunities, and updating the website more often. A top wish by council members was building an amphithe ater. Jones said he not only will continued researching why other cities made the CNN list, but will look at success stories in Clermont, Mascotte, Minneola, Montverde and other nearby towns. Jones will provide updates on the campaigns progress during his re port time at city coun cil meetings. He is also in the pro cess of planning town halls and Meet the Manager get-togethers throughout Groveland and will share details of his ndings during his rst 100-day evaluation in July. Jones said he is asking people to jot their ideas down and drop them by City Hall, 156 S. Lake Ave., or to email him at redmond.jones@groveland-.gov.Groveland set to launch improvement campaign Greatness starts internally and like a seed, it grows. Your thoughts, ideas and suggestions are those seeds that are going to make this city grow! I want to hear from you. I know the employees and residents have a great amount of pride for the city so I am asking every employee, resident, business owner, traveler and city council member to bring an idea or suggestion to the city managers office that will improve an and all aspects of the city of Groveland.City Manager Redmond Jones

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Wednesday, May 7, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A7 CLERMONT BLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSAMILYELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time! IRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONTL Many Other Activities each week Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.org LIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLCHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm SOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary); 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.org ST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am (Rite I) 10:00 am (Rite II) 5:00 pm (Praise & Worship) Sunday School Youth Group Nursery Adult Bible Study Womens Bible Study Mens Prayer Breakfast WOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH GODINCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALE ERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for Children Groveland IRSTBAPTISTCHURCH GROVELAND Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pm MT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! MINNEOLA CONGREGATIONSMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club NEWLPRESBYTERIANCHURCH18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am TLIVINGGOD Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce Rowland MONTVERDE WOODLANDSLUTHERAN15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 am OAKLAND PRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforSouth Lake South LakeGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOMErfn tbt352-394-7121806 W. Minneola Ave.,Clermont,FL Cremation ChoicesDirect Cremation$675Plus Container Ron Becker,Director352-394-8228921 S.US Hwy 27,Minneola,FL project. The agency is also the ultimate approval au thority. Representatives for Sabal Trail said they were working to answer the EPAs concerns. The extent and nature of their comments were what we had expected for a proj ect of this size, which cov ers three states, company spokeswoman Andrea Gro ver said in a statement. Sabal Trail has met with and discussed the project with EPA ofcials on several occasions, so we are aware of their concerns and have been working to address them since before these comments were led. Grover added that Sabal Trail would respond to the is sues raised by the EPA in re source reports the compa ny will le with FERC in June, and that the commission would also deal with them in the draft environmental im pact statement, which is an ticipated to be completed next spring. Sabal Trail, a joint venture of Juno Beach-based Next Era Energy Corp. which owns Florida Power & Light, the states largest electrical utility and Spectra Energy in Houston, says the pipeline would diversify the states sources of natural gas and would provide a delivery sys tem secure from weather-re lated disruptions in the Gulf of Mexico. To accomplish that, energy companies have developed a three-pronged approach. In order to serve Sabal Trails pipeline, Williams Partners, owner of a pipeline net work spanning more than 10,000 miles across the coun try, seeks permission from the FERC to expand 43 miles of its lines that cross Alabama. Sabal Trail proposes to tie its pipe into Williams facility in Alexander City, in east cen tral Alabama. From there, Sabal Trail proposes to lay an underground pipeline through part of Alabama, southwest Georgia and on to the Orlando area, covering about 460 miles. FPL then would construct a 126-mile pipeline stretching from that Orlando hub to its plant in Indiantown. Taking up the assertion of diversifying sources, EPA regulators note in their letter to the FERC that two com panies, Williams and Kinder Morgan, which feeds the Florida Gas Transmission Co. owner of an existing pipeline in Marion County through the Ocala National Forest, already pumps natural gas to the region from the northern part of the country. Williams and Spectra also partner in a 745-mile pipeline that runs beneath the Gulf to deliver natural gas from Mobile to Tampa, where it is piped to other points in Central Florida. EPA ofcials also point out that another project, a Spec tra partnership with Center Point Energy, came on line in 2011. That effort expanded a 274-mile pipeline from east ern Louisiana to Mobile. Looking offshore, the EPA observes that Port Dolphin has been cleared for develop ment, and the FERC should discuss that as an alternative. Port Dolphin involves a specialized ship that sits about 30 miles off the coast of Tampa. The vessel would convert liquid natural gas into vaporized natural gas and pump that to Port Mana tee for distribution elsewhere in the state. At peak, that project could provide about 1.3 billion cu bic feet of natural gas a day or roughly the amount that Sabal Trail says its pipe line would carry. It appears this alternative would give Florida Power & Light access to diverse sourc es from other countries, if plans for exporting the nations natural-gas supplies to other countries realize increased prices for the nations consumers, the EPAs letter states. The report should also spell out other alternatives to the pipeline, the EPA recom mends. For instance, the agen cy calls attention to FPLs own reports, which indicate the power company has realized signicant energy savings through compliance with three federal policies that have been adopted since 2005. A fourth measure, which could pass this year, would likely boost that efciency even more, EPA ofcials write. Moreover, FPL could re duce the demand for elec tricity by expanding a home weatherization program for low-income customers which was a provision in the companys goals for energy conservation that were pro vided to the state Public Ser vice Commission. The EPA cited a similar ini tiative launched in the Pacic Northwest 30 years ago. The utility that managed the pro gram found that energy savings over the years amount ed to the equivalent needed to power the state of Oregon, and that the utility found it was cheaper to retrot houses than build new generation capacity. Such success, the EPA con tinued, compels the FERC to demonstrate in its report the necessity (of the Sabal Trail pipeline) versus the convenience of the proposed preferred alternative in con text to the impacts upon Al abama and Georgia commu nities, property owners and ecosystems who will bear the risk and impacts but do not appear to benet from the proposed actions construc tion. Aside from the potential of other sources of energy, the EPA recommends or requests that the FERC put the Sa bal Trail pipeline in the con text of existing environmen tal regulations. For instance, the EPA asks that energy regulators nar row the proposed right-ofway needed for the project from 100 feet to 75 feet through upland forests, in order to protect that habitat, and scrap a proposed route that shows the pipe traversing a closed landll in Lowndes County, Ga. The agency also wants assurance that the Sabal Trail pipeline adheres to the federal Clean Water Act because portions of it will be laid alongside a 10-inch-wide line that was installed by an other company in the 1950s, long before the water-quality law was passed. And in light of the tragicFinally, the EPA wants the re port to incorporate the projects compliance with the federal Clean Air Act. That would be a concern for residents near Dunnellon. Environmental regulators seek to learn how much greenhouse gases and potentially hazardous pollutants will be emitted at such sites. GAS FROM PAGE A1

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A8 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 7, 2014

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B1SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 7, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTSSPORTS EDITOR . ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE . .............................. 365-8268 FAX . .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL . ......... sports@dailycommercial.comSPORTSandLEISURE FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comKaylin Whitney and Terry Jernigan seemed immune to the ele ments. The East Ridge High School runners deed rainy conditions and blistered the track at the University of North Florida on Saturday to win state champion ships in the boys and girls 100-meter dash es at the Florida High School Athletic Association state track-andeld nals. Despite coming into the nals with the fth-fastest qualifying time, Whitney recorded the fastest time in the preliminary heats, stop ping the clock in 11.64 seconds. The sophomore was more than 3/10ths of a second faster than the next-fastest runner during preliminaries. In the nals, Whitney started in the middle of the track and bolt ed from the blocks. She maintained an advantage throughout and won in 11.48, beating Krystal Sparling from St. Thomas Aquinas by .16 seconds. In the boys race, Jernigan set the standard with a 10.53 time in the preliminaries. He got out fast in the nals and nished in 10.51 to beat Pipers Andre Ewers, who stopped the clock in 10.67. Whitney and Jernigan posted the only wins by Lake and Sumter County competitors in all four classes. A large contingent of local student-athletes competed in the Class 1A and Class 2A meets on Friday. In Class 2A, Montverde Academys boys team nished in a tie for 22nd place with 10 points. In the boys Class 2A 800-meter event, Mont verde Academys Jesse Wear sparkled with a second-place nish with a time of 1:54.97. Pine Crest senior John Decker nipped Wear by 2/10ths of a second. Montverde Academys Tahj Malone nished seventh in the boys high jump with a leap of 6-0. Wakullas Corion Knight had the winning jump of 6-4. In the girls Class 2A 3200, Montverde Academys Ciara Hopkins was 13th with a time of 12:12.48. East Ridge sprinters win state championships FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comFreddie Cole knows what it takes to win. The only coach the Lake Minneola boys basketball program has ever had, Cole built the Hawks from scratch and in three years, he has transformed them into one of the top teams in the state. During his tenure, Lake Minneola is 60-22, including a 28-4 mark this season and an ap pearance in the Flor ida High School Athletic Association Class 6A state champion ship game. Cole played college basketball at Bethune-Cookman College (now University) in the 1990s and went overseas for a time to play professionally. Coles reputation as a player was that of a hard-nosed competitor, who left everything on the oor whenever he played. Thats the same attitude he will take to the court on May 22 when a team of Lake County educators host the Har lem Wizards show team at The Nest the Lake Minneola gym. Were not going to lay down for them, Cole said, tongue in cheek. There are some teach ers in the county who have played college basketball and some who have even played professionally. Theres a competitive drive in all of us. Were going out to win. The game is to ben et the Lake Minneola athletic program. In addition to the game, there will food trucks on hand, along with a silent auction with items up for grabs such as tickets to Walt Disney World, autographed memorabilia, rounds of golf and more. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased from any Lake Minneola stu dent-athlete or online at www.harlemwizards. com. There will be a parking fee of $5. In addition to Cole, other area educators expected to play in clude Lake Minneola Principal Linda Shepherd-Miller, East Ridge Principal Julie Robin son-Lueallen and Grov eland Elementary Prin cipal Kimberly Sneed Jarvis. Cole said the ros ter is still being com piled and will not be nalized for another week or two. The Harlem Wizards were founded in 1962 and have provided bas ketball fans with oncourt comedy, along with athleticism, team work and ball-han dling wizardry. Accord ing to Wizards President Todd Davis, the organi zation has built a repu tation over the past 50plus years of creating awe-inspiring fundraiser events for schools and nonprots. Davis said the team expects to play more than 300 games this season and believes it will help raise more than $1 million. We look to push the envelope on fun, combining pre-planned acts that fans of all ages will nd laugh-out-loud funny, Davis said. Our halftime show, which often involves having many kids from the au dience on the oor, plus our postgame interac tion, with the Wizards staying on the oor to sign autographs un til every fan who wants one gets one, is our cherry on top. Lake Minneola High School is at 101 N. Han cock Road in Minneola. For information, call 352-394-9600. Harlem Wizards scheduled to visit Lake Minneola DEDE SMITH / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP University of Floridas Greg Williams drives around BethuneCookmans Freddie Cole in a 1996 game. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comThe Eustis High School softball team played for its rst re gional championship in school history on Saturday. A 12-1 loss to Plantation American Heritage likely will take some of the sizzle out of the accomplishment for the Pan thers, but it also marked the beginnings of a program. Eustis never led in the game, falling behind 2-0 before Ni cole Caruso scored to make it 2-1. While Carusos score might seem insignicant in the nal outcome, it did mark the rst scored against Plantation Amer ican Heritage in the regional playoffs. The Patriots had outscored two opponents 24-0 in the games leading up to Saturdays title tilt. The game remained a 2-1 af fair until the fth when a light rain began to fall on the already soaked eld and Plantation American Heritage put together a ve-run outburst to put a lit tle space between itself and the Panthers. The Patriots put even more heat on Eustis in the sixth inning, extending the lead with three more runs. In the seventh, Plantation American Heritage sealed the win with the nal margin of vic tory. Plantation American Her itage, which travelled near ly 250 miles to play Eustis on Friday only to have the game postponed until Saturday because of heavy rains, will make a much shorter trip for the Flor ida High School Athletic Association Class 5A state semi nals on Friday at Dodgertown in Vero Beach. The Patriots will play at either 6:05 / p.m. or 7:20 / p .m. against an opponent to be determined.Panthers fall in regional final BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Eustis Erynn Brisson (33) catches a throw to put out American Heritage freshman Brooke Langston (1) during Saturdays class 5A regional nal between Eustis High School and Plantation American Heritage at Eustis High School.EUSTIS MOUNT DORA FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comZac Ward has earned every thing he gets. That was the feeling expressed by Mount Dora Bible boys bas ketball coach Stephen Hayes as he watched Ward sign a national letter of intent on Monday with Harding University, an NCAA Division II school in Searcy, Ark. Zac has such a bright future, Hayes said. Hes so mature and he knows what a work ethic is all about. Hes denitely getting what he deserves and I think everyone at this school is proud of him and happy for him. Ward has played for Hayes for four years and is the school re cord holder for 3-point shots at tempted and made. As a senior, he helped the Bulldogs to a 22-7 record and the Class 3A-District 5 championship. He scored an average of 23.1 points per game as a senior and totalled 18.3 ppg for his career. Ward scored 1,926 points in his career, good for fth on the schools alltime list. Effective from all areas of the oor, but particu larly lethal from behind the, Ward established a new school record with 267 3-pointers in his career. Thats a record that might not be broken, Hayes said. Mount Dora Bible won 79 games during Wards four years in a Bulldogs uniform. We accomplished what we did because of Zacs leadership, on and off the court, Hayes said. Were denitely going to miss having him around the campus. Hes such a wonder ful inuence on everyone who comes into contact with him. Hes a complete class act and you cant say that about a lot of kids his age. Harding University is a private school afliated with the Churches of Christ. It has 6,295 students and competes in a variety of sports, including mens and womens basketball, baseball, football, mens and womens golf, and many others. The Bisons are mem bers of the Great Amer ican Conference except for womens soccer, which com petes in the Mid-America Inter collegiate Athletics Association. Among its notable alumni are Willie and Korie Robertson from the reality show, Duck Dynasty. The Bisons are coached by Jeff Morgan, who will enter his 22nd season as coach in 2014-15. He has a career record of 381-247, including a 364-237 mark at Harding. In 2013-14, the mens basket ball team at Harding University was 15-15. Hayes said Ward received ve full-ride offers, including two Divison I deals, but he chose Harding because, he wanted to stay in a Christian school.MDB basketball standout signs letter of intent WARD

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Wednesday, May 7, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B3 PREDICTABLE PARTINGS By JOHN LAMPKIN / Edited by Will ShortzNo. 0427RELEASE DATE: 5/4/2014 ACROSS1 Docks6 Fill10 Where auto racers retire?14 Bayonets, say19 That Old Black Magic composer20 Bit of riding gear21 Big acronym in energy22 Actress Parker23 The paparazzo 26 Da de San Valentn flowers27 Catchy pop ditties28 Back from vacation, say30 Santa Baby singer31 New York Citys ___ River32 Bad points33 Division in biology35 The demolitionist 40 Fund-raising event41 Simple tune42 Roll in a disaster supply kit44 Christmas wrapper?45 High-toned49 U.P.S. driver assignments: Abbr.50 Knock down a peg52 Knock over55 The civil engineer 57 Grab (onto)58 One heading to the cape?59 Kitchen tool60 The lingerie manufacturer 63 Queen, e.g.66 Emulate Harry Connick Jr.68 ___ City, 1939 film locale69 The chicken farmer 71 ___ around around around around (repeated line in Dion and the Belmonts The Wanderer)72 Suffers73 Supporting force74 The sound technician 79 Scale part80 The Jungle Book bear82 Gala83 Fund for a third party84 Whew!85 Faultless88 Dubais federation: Abbr.89 Maximally hip92 The film director 96 Range of understanding97 Pranksters patsy98 Between continents, say99 Magazine founder Eric100 Execute perfectly102 Motivates106 Some hibernators108 The soda jerk 111 Instruct112 Twosome113 Comics sidekick114 Free-for-all115 Trial figure116 Houston pro, informally117 Just118 Showplace? DOWN1 Pet door opener2 Roman of wrath3 Lohengrin lady4 Greened up, perhaps5 Winter vehicle6 Like many candles7 Xeric8 Commercial tigers name9 Oil-spill-monitoring org.10 Cornmeal dish11 Not for me12 Trial13 Word with color or rhyme14 Origin of a stream: Abbr.15 The ecdysiast 16 Birthplace of the Franciscan order17 The percussionist 18 Operating procedures: Abbr.24 Poet who wrote So Thomas Edison / Never drank his medicine25 Leads, as a band29 More than snacks32 In a footnote, say34 Prefix with -port35 St. John Passion composer36 Actress Taylor of Mystic Pizza37 Quod ___ faciendum38 Panel member39 Twice tetra-40 Monks grooves43 America by Heart author, 201046 Drawn things47 Polo, e.g.48 Exclamation said before sticking out the tongue51 Current amount52 Prime seating area53 Kind of tradition54 William who played Hopalong Cassidy56 Mend after further injury57 Mops commercial partner58 Place for a touchdown60 Bribe61 Hardly be deadpan62 Little angels63 Pratt Institute degs.64 Bunch of stuff65 Dickens orphan66 Two points67 Baseball great Campanella70 Political muscle71 PIN part: Abbr.74 Basis for promotion75 Going ___76 Mtley ___77 Paradox to be meditated on78 Little ___ Pea80 Hindu part of Indonesia81 Have ___ for82 Tutti-___84 The van driver 86 Capable of handling87 Horrifying89 The paper doll maker 90 Baroque91 Some canap picks93 Spot94 Tremors95 Cover completely96 Short strokes97 Big boo-boo101 Not relaxed102 Religious figure: Var.103 Simon of Broadway104 That seorita105 Victory, to Wagner107 Hit show sign109 Fiscal exec110 One may have a ball at the country club 12345 6789 101112131415161718 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 2930 31 32 3334 353637 3839 40 41 42 43 44 45 46474849 5051 525354 55 56 57 58 59 60 6162 636465 6667 68 69 70 71 72 73 7475 767778 79 8081 82 83 84 8586 87 88 8990 91 92 939495 96 97 98 99 100101 102103 104105 106 107108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118For any three answers, call from a touch-tone phone: 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Solution on page B8COLLEGE GRADUATIONThe 4th annual commencement exercises of Lake-Sumter Community College took place on April 28 at the Leesburg High School auditorium. Local graduates are Clara Catherine Caughell, Kar en Ann Clay, Stephen Dudley Duncan, Vir ginia Helen Hunt, Andrew Jackson Knight, Carl Howard Olson and Donna Rorabaugh, all of Clermont; Linda Rozar of Groveland; and Charles Blackburn, Jr., Minneola. HISTORY FROM PAGE B2 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comClermont city council members next week are ex pected to discuss possible names for the former Cel ebration of Praise Church property the city recently ac quired. A ribbon-cutting ceremony is scheduled for June 5 and city spokesperson Doris Bloodsworth said it would be nice to have a name before then. This will be the second dis cussion on the naming after more than 100 suggested names were submitted to the city. According to Blood sworth, the eld now has been narrowed to three names. They are: The Clermont Arts and Recreation Center, The Clermont Complex and The Clermont Community Center. The last name, however, is already taken but, if chosen, the current Community Cen ter in downtown Clermont which just celebrated its rst year anniversary would be renamed. At the last council meeting, board member Van Wagner made the suggestion for the name switch, appealing to fellow council members and residents in attendance, telling them the name Community Center encompasses all that the new building rep resents in one short name. The now Community Center is more of an event place, said Bloodsworth, adding that a change in its name from Community Center would be tting since the new building will be more of a community center, while the downtown building is more of an events venue. Another thing about the new building council members will be discussing is the community fee schedule for use of the pool and oth er amenities, including the events hall, which features a stage for performances. Currently, the city is hiring new staff for the center, since it will be open seven days per week with several shifts per day. Lifeguards to man the swimming pools are just one of many jobs available. At the last council meeting, Recreation Director Dave Teske presented the council with a preliminary fee sched ule based on what similar centers charge. A daily membership fee could be $1, weekly passes could be $5, monthly passes could be $15 and individ ual season pass could be $40. A family pass (for as many as ve) on a seasonal basis could be $120 for six months, other center ofcials told Teske. Tentatively, Teske said the season for the pool would probably be June 7 to September 28. The center is scheduled to open on June 7 with an of cial ribbon-cutting celebration on June 6. Council members will meet at 7 / p .m. on May 13 to discuss the matter.Community center name could be picked next weekCLERMONT THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comSalvation Army leaders and other speakers came to gether on Wednesday to give God glory during the groundbreaking of the Salvation Ar mys future home at 2605 West South St., in Leesburg. Lt. Matt Hedgren, corps of cer for the Salvation Army of Lake and Sumter counties, praised past leaders for having the vision for the 27,000-square-foot facility to be constructed by Signature Enterprises. Site work on the $4 million project is set to begin Monday. The project is expected to be nished by summer 2015. Hedgren said the new facil ity was specically designed for the Salvation Army to meet the physical, emotion al and the spiritual needs of this community. Amen, several in the crowd replied. When you think about whats going to happen at this site over the next year, over the next two years, over the next 10 to 30 years, its amaz ing to think of the transforma tion that is going to happen, Hedgren said. Whenever you come to this site in the fu ture you will see lives being changed. Youll see hope and youll see love, and we do all of that in Gods love. Board member Reggie Caruthers recalled the Salvation Army rst began the groundwork for the project in 2009. I think that this site is really going to glorify God in a way that we can be proud of and serve him, he said. Architect Bob Blaise re called watching ofcers in action as he waited in the lobby area before his job interview for the construction project. I watched a bunch of staff people from the Salvation Army being the most gracelled people taking care of ev erybody, Blaise said. I was being treated great, but ev erybody else coming in was being treated honorably.LEESBURG Salvation Army breaks ground on $4 million new home

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B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 7, 2014 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 725344767 1318315974 921FREE SPACE5372 216424863 529395268ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N IB O G BINGO B I N G O SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Raymond Nivarel WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! B 13 B 2 B 5 B 9 B 7

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Wednesday, May 7, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B5 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 6 X 3.2 Black Untitled art#: order#: 3 X 10.6 Black 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance rt t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital SEIZETHE DA Y SLOCAL AREANEWS.www.dailycommercial.com

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Wednesday, May 7, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B7 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 6 X 10.7 Black 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr Classified IndexLegal Notices....................0001 Notices............................1000 At Your Service................9000 Employment....................2000 Pets/Animals....................6865 Merchandise....................6000 Real Estate/For RENT......3000 Real Estate/For SALE........4000 Recreation........................7000 Transportation..................8000 Cancellations for ads running Wednesday must be made by 4pm Monday.ADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since The Daily Commercial will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error call the classified department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error.TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde

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B8 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, May 7, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 3 X 5.75 Black PIERSSATEPITSSTABS ARLENCROPOPECPOSEY WASGONEINAFLASHROSAS EARCANDYRESTEDKITT EASTCONSMITOSIS BLEWTHEJOINTBENEFIT AIRDUCTTAPEELF CLASSYRTESABASEROB HITTHEROADGLOMTORO RICERSLIPPEDAWAY MONARCHCROONEMERALD FLEWTHECOOPIROAM AILSALLYMADETRACKS SOLBALOOFETEESCROW MANUNERRINGUAE COOLESTQUITTHESCENE PURVIEWBUTTASEA UTNEDOTOATINSPIRES TOADSRANLICKETYSPLIT TUTORDUETFOILMELEE STENOSTROONLYSTAGE Solution to puzzle on page B3 SEIZETHE DA Y SSPORTSNEWS.www.dailycommercial.com