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SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | C1 SPORTS: Trevor Lloyd becomes FALs rst football signee WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWSTAND INSIDE CLASSIFIED D1 CROSSWORDS C2 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN C1 SPORTS B1 VOICES A4 WORD ON THE STREE T A2 SO UTH LAKE PRE SS V OLUME 99, NO. 18 5 SECTIO N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reserved www. southlakepress.com PRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com T he Lake County Sheriffs Ofce made its rst ar rest two weeks ago for hu man trafcking. Members of the countys Human Trafck ing Task Force s aid it illustrates the organization is trying to address the issue before it be comes a major problem. We want to make sure it does not become a problem in this county, said Capt. Todd English, co-chair of the task force. It is very important to prepare, be aware and trained on how to handle it. The recent undercover oper ation resulted in the rescue of a 14-year-old victim of human trafcking and the arrests of 44 alleged prostitutes, pimps and johns. The suspect, Gregory Lio nel Foster, 28, is accused of ab ducting the 14-year-old from a gas station on April 9 and try ing to force her to have sex with a man for money at an Orlando home and raping her himself before taking her to the motel where he thought another cus tomer awaited, according to an arrest afdavit. The task force is in vestigat ing an estimated 10 possible human trafcking cases in the county, representing a relatively low number in comparison to larger cities such as Orlando. But, English said the presence of I-4 to the east and I-75 to the west increases the potential for human trafcking. The truck stop in Wildwood could also be a catalyst for trafcking. Based on my training expe rience, all truck stops should not be ignored as a potential lo cation where drugs are bought and sold as well as women, he said. Currently, the task force re ceives no federal funding and two detectives in the homicide and special victims unit are in vestigating human trafcking cases as part of the task force. English said he hopes to ap ply for federal funding. It comes with building your task force and the infrastruc ture of your task force that fed eral grants require, he said. At this point we take this task force on essentially as an added job responsibility. Human trafcking is consid ered a form of modern day slav ery by experts. Victims of hu man trafcking are subjected to force, fraud or coercion for the purpose of sexual exploitation or forced labor, according to the Florida state statute 787.06 on human trafcking. TAVARES Cops brace for human trafficking BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Detective Danny Morales poses for a photo at his desk at the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce in Tavares on April 22. STORY HIGHLIGHTS There are 27 million people enslaved worldwide. Florida ranks third in the na tion for trafcking activity. Lake has 10 cases under in vestigation and has seen 10 oth er potential victims in the last three years. Sources: Lake County Human Trafcking Task Force, National Human Trafcking Resource Center and Haven of Lake and Sumter Coun ties Inc. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Nearly two years ago, Patrick Borsey, one of the owners of Red Wing Restaurant in Grove land, found himself ap pealing to the commu nity for the safe return of a baby goat stolen from a fenced-in pet ting farm at the eatery at 12500 State Road 33. Soon after that, and just as mysteriously as hed disappeared, Elvis the goat was returned. Over the past two years, hes been joined by oth er goats, pigs and an imals that Borsey has either rescued, is fos tering or that have been born throughout the months. About a month ago, though, Elvis vanished again, this time with many of his companion animals. I was very upset at rst and thought maybe theyd gotten out some how, but that wasnt the case, Borsey said. They were just gone. Some of the little kids are really upset, too, be cause they like feed ing the animals and the goats are a big part of that. Along with Elvis and his father, Donald, Borsey claims someone GROVELAND Popular goat missing again SUBMITTED PHOTO Along with Elvis, seen here, and his father, Donald, someone has stolen 13 fainting goats and two pot-bellied pigs from a petting zoo at the Red Wing Restaurant in Groveland. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Mascotte ofcials have been sued twice since March over ac tions taken against former of cer Sgt. David Grice before, during and after his termination in January. One suit was led by the Flor ida Police Benevolent Associa tion, alleging that Grices Of cers Bill of Rights was violated as a result of the way the ring process was carried out. Another suit recently led by Eustis Attorney Derek Schroth alleges that city ofcials made false accusations against Grice in retaliation for complaints Grice made about Police Chief Ron aldo Banasco, that he was secretly videotaped with out his knowledge, and was harassed, humiliated and mistreated. The suit seeks damages of at least $15,000. I really feel that Sgt. Grices Ofcers Bill of Rights were abused, said Schroth. Schroth said when the city learned of a pending suit by the FPBA on Grices behalf, city of cials claimed he was never red, but records show no pay ment stubs for Grice since January. Ive never seen any thing like this, Schroth said. Documents obtained from the city show that Mas cotte police red Grice in Jan uary for refusing to cooperate with an internal investigation for allegedly harassing a female ofcer. Grice contends he was the tar get of discrimination by Banas co because of complaints he MASCOTTE Ex-cop files lawsuit against city BANASCO SEE SUIT | A2 SEE MISSING | A2 SEE COPS | A2 We are currently using genetic (DNA) testing to diagnose and treat diseases. We are focused on preventing illness before it causes major dysfunction. DNA testing is available for weight loss and performance, cardiac prevention, mental health, and cancer risk. www.marholinmedicalinstitute.com

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 30, 2014 CLERMONT Harpist Victoria Schultz to perform on Tuesday Music of the Spheres, an af ternoon of soothing and beautiful harp music performed by Victoria Schultz will take place from 4 to 6 p.m., Tuesday as part of the Cooper Memorial Library Concert Series. For information, call Dennis Smolarek at 352-536-2275 or email ds molarek@lakeline.lib..us. CLERMONT Boy Scout collecting lacrosse equipment for project Bailey Zollweg of Scout Troop 784 of Clermont is in pursuit of his Eagle Scout project which includes collect ing new and used lacrosse equipment for kids who couldnt afford the items. A fundraiser car wash event will be held to raise funds and collect items, from noon to 3 p.m., Sunday at Christian Brothers Automotive, 2659 E. State Road 50 in Clermont (across from Target). Items needed are helmets, sticks, cleats, body pads, gloves and acces sories, including balls, new mouth guards and equipment sanitizer. For information, email laxeagleproj ect@gmail.com or call 904-834-1LAX. CLERMONT Congregation Sinai golf tournament registration open Registration is open for this third annual golf tournament sponsored by Congregation Sinai to be held Saturday at the Legends Country Club in Clermont. The fee for the tournament is $75 and includes breakfast, 18 holes of golf, range balls, lunch, contests, priz es and awards. For information, go to www.con gregation-sinai.org, or call Barbara Salsitz at 352-432-6008. CLERMONT Belk seeking charities to sign up for fundraiser Belk can help you raise funds for your favorite nonprot charity, orga nization, school or church by taking part in the semi-annual Charity Day sale on Saturday. Participating charities raise money by selling tickets for $5 each, which enti tles purchasers to attend a private fourhour sale offering discounted prices off rarely discounted brands, plus the at tendee will receive $5 off their rst purchase using their charity ticket. The entire $5 from every ticket sold goes to the participating charity. Tickets can be purchased by calling the Clermont Belk store, 270 Citrus tower Blvd., at 352-243-2227, ext. 210. LAKE COUNTY Health department to offer school immunizations The Department of Health ofce in Lake County will offer immuniza tions at local Lake County schools on an ongoing basis for students who will enter the seventh grade during the 2014-15 school year. Immunizations will be given at Eustis Middle School on May 6, East Ridge Middle School in Clermont on May 8, Clermont Middle School on May 15 and Cecil E. Gray Middle School in Groveland on May 20. For information, call 352-771-5500 or go to www.lakechd.com. CLERMONT Puttin Fore Paws Golf Tournament set for Sunday Help homeless animals in the com munity by participating in the rst annual South Lake Animal Leagues Puttin Fore Paws Golf Tournament Sunday at Kings Ridge Golf Course in Clermont. Check-in and breakfast begin at 7:30 a.m. followed by an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start. Prizes will be given for closest-to-the-pin and longest drive. The event will also feature an auc tion, rafes and 50/50. Lunch will be served following the tournament. For information, go to www.slal.org/ puttinforepaws or email puttinfore paws@slal.org. Area Briefs What south Lake residents are saying about ... HEALTH CARE FINES Individuals without health care coverage are subject to nes collected by the IRS. What do you think should be done with the collected funds? The thing is, if theyre going to ne, and collect it with your tax return, the people who really cant afford it probably wont have a tax return. How do you match it up with them? JOY ENGLISH CLERMONT I guess it will just end up as part of the countrys GDP. But if they want to create a fund, they could pump it back into the health system. ZOE WEATHERBY TAMPA It should be used to pro vide low cost drugs to peo ple who cant afford them. THERESA BOHLER EUSTIS I think in a perfect world, the money would be used to go back in the health care system to pro vide plans for people who need them. KATHY MATHIS CLERMONT Word on the Street Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 made against the chief, including the alleged bug ging of police cars. On Friday, Schroth said that one thing that stands out in his mind is a copy of a video he obtained from a camera Banas co was wearing when he red the ofcer. They made him take his badge off, take his gun out and they made him get into the back of a po lice car to be transport ed back to the police de partment from city hall to get his car, Schroth said, adding that the tape shows Banasco speaking unprofessionally even af ter Grice gets into his car and drives off. It was obvious that an attempt was being made to humiliate Grice in an unprecedented manner, Schroth said. In addition, Schroth said that when Grice was red in January he was not red in accordance with the Ofcers Bill of Rights. Grice would have been entitled to a judi cial hearing and certain protection represen tation by the FPBA and a review of all allegations against him until he could be proven guilty of an of fense. In the suit, Schroth seeks to be reinstated to the same position he held prior to being red in January. He also wants his benets and seniority rights restored, his wages, benets and other losses paid back, and an injunc tion to prevent the city from further retaliating against Grice. He further seeks damages and court and attorney costs he in curred. Banasco could not be reached for comment and no comment could be obtained from the city because its ofces were closed as of Thursday around 5 p.m. SUIT FROM PAGE A1 has stolen 13 of his 14 fainting goats and two pot-bellied pigs. Unlike the rst incident, Borsey called law enforce ment to report the theft and is offering a $500 re ward for information leading to the safe return of his animals. Lake County Sher iffs Ofce spokesman Lt. John Herrell conrmed that Deputy Sheriff Brett Rutzebeck is on the case and actively investigating leads as they come in. I just want them (ani mals) back, Borsey said. I have taken them on and they are like family. Every single one of them. Some have been born on the farm. Im just hoping none of them had made it to anyones dinner ta bles. Since ling the theft re port, one of the two miss ing pigs has been re turned, found through a Facebook posting of someone kissing a pig that looked much like Borseys. Borsey said a friend noticed the posting and showed it to him. Imme diately, Borsey recognized the little fellow and called Rutzebeck, who followed up and got the pig back. No arrest has yet been made however, pend ing further investigation, Herrell said. Were working the case and theyve (Red Wing) also got their own inves tigation going through so cial media, Herrell said, adding that he encour ages anyone who knows anything to call the de partment so the animals can be returned. I am just asking that whoever knows some thing just come forward and step up because I want my animals back, Borsey said. Anyone with informa tion about the missing animals can call the LCSO at 352-343-2101 or Cen tral Florida Crimeline at 1-800-4236-TIPS, where one may be eligible for a reward for information leading to a felony arrest. Borsey has posted pic tures of his missing an imals on Facebook on the Red Wing Restaurant page. MISSING FROM PAGE A1 Ab out 27 million people are enslaved worldwide, according to the Nation al Human Trafcking Re source Center. In 2011, the resource center r anked Florida third in the nation in the number of calls received by the centers human trafcking hotline. Representatives from the Department of Chil dren and Families and Lake County Shared Ser vices Network in 2012 ap proached Sheriff Gary Borders about starting the task force. Lake County is a won derful example of get ting ahead of the curve, being smart and getting prepared, said Kimberly Grabert, statewide human trafcking prevention di rector for the Florida De partment of Children and Families and the task forces chairwoman. We are building a continu um of care. We are work ing closely with leaders, providers and therapists across the state. Grabert said many of the victims of human trafcking ar e desperate to be part of something and to be loved. As a result, they are of ten drawn into sexual or labor exploitation when they meet a pimp who tells the victim she is wonder ful, beautiful and they will provide the clothing and food for them, said LCSO Detective Daniel Morales, an investigator for the task force. The juvenile or adult then goes back with that trafcker and soon after ward becomes hooked on drugs, Morales said. Then, the trafcker will tell the victim they must repay them for provid ing food and clothing through prostitution, he added. What we know about this population is there is a high rate of them be ing exposed to violence in their household, Gra bert said. They are seek ing relationships with people they are lacking in their personal lives. It lls the void for the child and we have to ll that void: sometimes it is their ther apist or child protective investigator. Statewide, Grabert said she is seeing quite a bit of gang activity in which victims are sold by sib lings. The hardest part of many cases is getting vic tims to comply and keep ing them safe, task force ofcials said. When law enforce ment recovers them, they disappear, Grabert said. It is a hard population, but they desperately need our help. The biggest challenge, Morales said, is many dont feel they are victims of human trafcking. A lot of people in that lifestyle dont understand the meaning of human trafcking, he said. English said it is much harder to get victims to come forward. They wont cooperate with us in the interview process to give us what law enforcement needs to have probable cause to hold their trafckers, he said. They can be dif cult cases as far as to in vestigate, bring to con clusion and bring to an arrest. Kelly Smallridge, exec utive director of Haven of Lake and Sumter Coun ties Inc., a shelter, which provides emergency, longterm shelter and counsel ing for victims of domes tic violence, said about 10 potential victims of human trafcking have come through her shelter in the last three years. All of the victims were from southeast Asia and Russia and did not speak English. Smallridge said she would never forget the 21-year-old girl from Asia who was in the hospital for six weeks after being beat en severely by a trafcker. She nally healed and went back to Thailand, she said. Many trafckers take advantage of the fact that the victims often dont speak English, Smallridge said, threatening many with deportation if they do not do what the traf ckers wanted. Morales said he is en couraged that the Flori da Legislature has imple mented stricter penalties for those charged with human trafcking. It is now a felony, he said. It makes it more difcult to get out of jail. Stiffer laws could be on the horizon. If passed, HB 1019 would prohibit mi nors from working in an adult theater, remove the statute of limitations for human trafcking viola tions and increase certain penalties relating to the trafcking of children, among other things. The bond for Foster, who was arrested and charged last week with human trafcking, is $200,000. COPS FROM PAGE A1

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Wednesday, April 30, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3 LINDA CHARLTON Special to The Daily Commercial Come on ladies. Hes worth more than a 100 bucks. He put on a bra for you! With those words, auction eer Laura Mancinelli urged her audience to up the ante for the custom-designed bras (and boxers) up for bid at the Bras for the Cause fundraiser of the Greater Clermont Can cer Found ation Saturday. It was the seventh year the Foundation has held the event, which took place at the Heritage Hills clubhouse in Clermont this year. The new twist was that many of the bras were mod eled by reghters both men and women. As event coordinator Kay Simpson said in her opening remarks, I have learned one thing about reghters. They can run into a burning build ing and rescue people and cats, but they have a hard time wearing a bra. They took a lot of coaxing, but they are here. The rst entry, the Stud ded bra worn by reght er Robert Siegworth went for $175. Tamara Richardson, as Cruella DeVille, got the bid ding into high gear with an ensemble that fetched $500. Fireghter Dak Rakow didnt hit that mark, but he set the tone for many of the reght ers with his campy approach to the runway, as he tossed stufng from his bra into the audience of about 250 people. Fireghter Eric Strange closed out the show, model ing his black kitty bra and do ing his best to act cat-like. The two high bidders for the kit ty bra, with bids of $500 and $525, decided to both pay up, according to Simpson. It was Ann Dupee who, with a $500 bid, got to take the bra home. I will have to see where it ends up, either at the re de partment, or city hall or trav eling around the city, she said. Id like to do something fun with it. Noting that last years event netted close to $25,000, Simp son said she was hoping this one would bring in $30,000. In her opening remarks, Simpson dedicated this years event to longtime Cancer Foundation supporter Kath leen Kelley Brown, whom Simpson described as our Seminole-loving Irish valen tine. Brown died of cancer on Wednesday. Unlike many cancer foun dations, the Clermont orga nization does no research. In stead they give grants to local families who have a hard time dealing with the nancial burden that can come with a diagnosis of cancer. In addition the foundation gives scholarships to high school seniors whose lives have been affected by cancer. In 2013 they gave $76,000 in grants and scholarships, ac cording to Simpson. For more information on the Foundation, go to their website at www.gccf.us. CLERMONT Firefighters model bras, boxers for cancer charity LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Lt. Eric Strange of the Clermont Fire Department displays a black cat bra designed by Sue Joiner and sponsored by Lyns Ice Cream and Sandwich Shoppe. Staff Report A plucky little dog that survived a bear attack in late March has found a new home. When Deana Osenieks 7-year-old son saw Per cival on the news, he knew that the Treeing Walker coonhound would make the perfect addition to the family, Elisha Pappacoda, a county public informa tion ofcer, said in a press release. Percival was picked up as a stray by Lake County an imal control ofcers in the Ocala National Forest. The dog had a grapefruit-size wound on his back. He went to a couple of vets and I think they werent sure exactly what happened to him, but the last vet said bear attack, Pappacoda said. She said denitively it was a bear at tack. The Osenieks family from Volusia County in cluding two kids with three dogs in tow visited Per cival at the Lake Coun ty Animal Services shelter in Tavares and held their breath that Percival would be theirs, Pappacoda said. I had to tell them if its meant to be, its meant to be, Deana said. The family realized Per cival, or Percy, would make an ideal best friend for the familys dog, Shotgun, a redbone coonhound who got his name after suffer ing two bullet wounds, Pappacoda said. Coinci dentally, Shotgun was a Lake County Animal Ser vices shelter dog before being adopted by the Os enieks last year through a local rescue group. TAVARES Dog mauled by bear finds a new home PHOTO COURTESY OF WHITNEY LUCKHART Deana Osenieks and her two sons have adopted Percival, a Treeing Walker coonhound that was mauled by a bear.

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 30, 2014 Oppose corporate greed In the April 6 edition of the Daily Commercial there was a great article by Kevin G. Hall, of the McClatchy Washington Bureau, U.S. companies chip ping away at retiree benets. Employees need to get or ganized and unionize against these companies who only show their support through their stockholders and their CEOs large salaries. The poor and middle class Americans need to boycott these companies. And every one in America needs to vote Democrat in upcoming elec tions for a better Congress who will increase the minimum wage and protect Social Security, allow immigrants who were born here to become U.S. cit izens and also keep womens rights intact. LINDA GREEN | Leesburg The founding fathers would have been pleased Russ Sloan in his diatribe on Easter Sunday on the welfare system wrote, The Preamble to the Constitution reads, provide for the common defense and promote the general welfare, not vice versa. That is absolute ly correct, but he fails to men tion the Preamble has no legal standing when we interpret the Constitution. The Founding Fathers in their great wisdom wrote in Article 1 Section 8, Congress shall have the power to, Provide for the common defense and gener al welfare of the United States ... Sloan has a propensity for not telling the whole story, just what ts his ideological beliefs. The founding fathers also added in Article 1 section 8, to make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carry ing into execution the fore going powers ... In essence, they gave the Congress the power to make any law necessary and proper to provide for the general welfare. Sloan also wrote, We have so distorted the intent of our founding fathers that they would be in shock to see what a welfare mentality we have accepted. I do not have the clairvoy ance Russ seems to claim, but most probably would be pleased to see Congress has used the power they gave them to pro vide for the general welfare. There are some things they probably would be shocked about, like non-property own ers, women and blacks voting, that corporations are people, money is speech and a black man is president. MARVIN JACOBSON | Clermont Not the place of the Supreme Court I am referencing an article on the front page of the Daily Commercial on April 17 by Jim Turner of the News Service of Florida, Amazon to start col lecting sales taxes. The article goes on to say if the entity has a presence in the state that a person is ordering from, then they will be charged sales tax. The Supreme Court ruled some years ago that if the busi ness had a presence in a state that a person orders from then a tax can be collected. This is a classic example of the court legislating from the bench. Article 1 section 9-10, states that no tax can be collect ed from items crossing any state line or from port to port. The proper way to handle it would have been to amend the Constitution but they knew that the amendment would never y. I imagine that political in uence was exercised in this process. I do not pay sales tax on items ordered across state lines. If the shipper hints at charging a tax, I cancel the order. I refuse to be a part of this tax, tax, tax! It is just another way of draining the citi zen of a few more drops of blood in the form of taxes. I would rather do without the product than pay the tax. The state of Florida had to re turn $700 million to people who were charged a tax for bring ing their cars into the state. The person taxed had to make ap plication for it. The state should have been required to purge the archives and see who paid the tax and notify them at their last known address. But then again, they never do the right thing. This ruling by the Supreme Court should have been revisit ed by a more competent Court than made the ruling. I do re member that one of the judges on the ruling court had a stroke at the time the 5 to 4 decision was made. I have no problem with a 6 to 3, or 7 to 2, but a 5 to 4 is no good. D.J. LYNCH | Wildwood W hen the Florida Legislatures annual ses sion ends next month and campaign ing for state ofces begins, incumbents seeking re-election to state ofces will brag how they have kept taxes low. Their claims will be correct. Florida ranked 47th in total per capita taxation heading into this years session. Whats more, leg islators are likely to reduce some revenues this year by, for example, lowering vehicle-registration fees. In this context, Florida TaxWatch, an inde pendent organization that studies state taxation and spending policies, cites these state revenue sources: lottery proceeds, documentary stamps on real estate transactions, a sales tax (6 percent) and taxes on utilities, cellphones, motor fuels, in surance, alcoholic beverages and tobacco. Indeed, Floridas statewide taxes are low com pared with those in other states. But, theres more. Floridas place on the bottom rungs of state-level taxation and total revenue are due in part to an extraordinary reliance on local gov ernments not only to provide services, but to generate dollars. Thanks to the folks at TaxWatch, who recent ly issued their 2014 How Florida Compares re port, we know that: The state has the fth-highest percentage (50 percent) of state and local taxes generated by local governments. Florida has the second-highest percentage (55 percent) of state and local revenue generat ed by local governments. Local revenues include not only property taxes but local-option sales taxes, impact fees, franchise fees for utilities and special assess ments. In general, cities, counties and other local en tities in Florida are assigned and assume dis proportionately greater responsibility for courts, social services, infrastructure, health care for indigent patients and education. Nowhere is the state governments reliance on locals more evident than in public education. The Florida Constitution requires the state to adequately fund high-quality education and also prohibits the state from levying a property tax. Yet, each year, the Legislature requires school boards to levy property taxes at specic rates. Even though local, per capita revenues in Florida rank seventh nationwide and local, per capita taxes rank 22nd, the combined state and local tax burden is below average. Ranked 33rd, Floridas state and local govern ments collect $5,599 per person in total reve nues; the average in the United States is $6,303. In terms of state and local taxes, Florida ranks 37th $3,420 per capita; the national average is $4,287. It would be polite for incumbents in state of ces to thank local governments and their tax payers for making them look good. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD ........................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST O PINION WHATS YOUR OPINION? The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Letters to the Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711 By fax to: 352-394-8001 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. GUEST COLUMNS If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OUR VIEW S OUTH LAKE PRESS Your community newspaper for more than 100 years. 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001 The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Florida 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region. All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. YOUR OPINIONS LETTERS TO THE EDITOR The states pass-the-buck Legislature The generosity of bikers I have lived in Leesburg for 24 years and I have been a biker for more than 50 years. Having said that, here are the good, bad and the ugly sides of Bikefest. I have gone to every Bikefest since the rst one. I even have the original T-shirt. The good is that the Leesburg Partnership puts on a great rally. The bad is that non-bikers hate it. Now the ugly. The Sound of Money. That was the front-page headline on Easter Sunday in the Daily Commercial Bikers are the most generous group of peo ple on the earth. They will as semble in masses to donate to charities. So why does the Partnership and every vendor screw them? Basically, Leesburg is a char ity, a depressed community. Hundreds of thousands of bik ers come to Leesburg each year and bail them out by pour ing millions into the econo my. What do they get for this? Michael Vassell, general m an ager of Holiday Inn Express Hotel & Suites in Tavares, says this, A standard room normally goes for $101 to $125, but during Bikefest that goes up to $150 be cause rates are based on de mand. Dont you really mean greed? I remember when beer cost $2 at Bikefest. It is now $5 to $6, not counting the cost of a commemorative cup. Parking used to be free. Food prices have soared because the ven dors have to pay so much for their spaces. The list goes on, and on and on. Leesburg, think about this: The bikers come here to help, and what do they get? What would happen if Bikefest came and no one showed up? Where are your millions then? Get back to reality before you become Daytona. A lot of bik ers dont go there any more for the same reasons I mentioned above. Be thankful for the bik ers. Dont screw them. THOMAS J. ZAKLUKIEWICZ Leesburg LETTER of the WEEK FILE PHOTO

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Wednesday, April 30, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5 CHAMBERAWARDS& NEWS www.southlakechamber-fl.com Award sponsor Wesley Reed from Ameriprise Financial presented Madison Lynch from South Lake High School the Outstanding Student of the Month award for March 2014. Madison carries a 4.0 GPA in AP & Honors classes, is a member of HOSA and NHS, serves as the Womens Choir President, is the CoCaptain of the Varsity Cheerleading squad, serves as a student aid for Chorus and AVID, and has also received the Leadership Award from the Universal Cheerleading Association. Congratulations to Ms. Lynch, you are a rolemodel to fellow students as well as adults! The Chamber Ambassadors welcomed Insight Credit Union CEO/President George Davis, Branch Manager Steve Hamilton, his staff and many visiting Insight employees to their new location in Clermont (2580 E. Highway 50, NW corner of Hancock Rd. & E. Highway 50 intersection). A catered reception was also served afterwards. See them at www.InsightCreditUnion.com. Chamber Ambassadors welcomed Attorney Karen Rodriguez to her new Law Office located at 1150 Anderson St. Clermont with a ribbon cutting ceremony. Karen is a former prosecutor who deals with criminal law, family law, immigration law, tenancy law, and bankruptcy cases. See her online at www.KarenRodriguezLawFirm.com or call her at 352-404-7881. Chamber Ambassadors recently joined New Beginnings co-founders Linda & Steve Smith, their staff, and many friends to officially Notice the amazing transformation that took place at their Learning & Development Center located at 792 E. Montrose St. in Clermont. Stop by to take a look or see them online at www.newbeginningslake.org. Chamber Ambassadors joined family, friends, and City of Minneola officials in welcoming Heather Monroe to her new store Lighted Memories by Heather located at 200 South US Hwy 27 Suite C in Minneola. Lighted Memories presents a unique alternative to traditional gifts through a selection of decorative lamps which create a lasting and lighted memory to commemorate special occasions. See her beautiful assortment online at www.lightedmemories.com or call her directly at 352-516-6303. The Grand Opening for the first-ever Wawa store in Lake County was celebrated with much fanfare as Chamber Ambassadors, Lake County Dignitaries, the Wawa Management Team, and many excited patrons joined in their ribbon cutting ceremony. The store is located at 1929 S. Highway 27 in Clermont, and offers a large fresh food service selection, including built-to-order hoagies, freshly brewed coffee, hot breakfast sandwiches, specialty beverages, and an assortment of soups, sides and snacks. See www.wawa.com for more information! Chamber Ambassadors welcomed owners Cowboy Jim and Debbie Klingensmith along with their staff to the new location for their mobile trailer at 25029 CR 561 in Astatula (next to the Olive Ingram Community Center). They will be located there every Thursday, Friday, & Saturday from 12PM to 8PM, serving up not only their delicious cookies and desserts, but now also burgers & hotdogs! See them online on Facebook at www.facebook.com/cowboyjimscookies. Friends and Ambassadors were on hand to welcome Mike & Monique Bender from Allstar Cleaning & Enterprises to their new offices located at 720 Almond St. in Clermont. They offer residential & commercial cleaning, new construction cleaning, minor home & business repairs, painting, window washing, and carpet cleaning. Give them a call at 352-708-4200, or online at www.facebook.com/allstareterprisesLLC. Clermont Waterfront Bikes & Boards owners Dawn & Tim Engle officially 'cut the ribbon' while being welcomed to their new location at 15 Second St. in Clermont by the Chamber Ambassadors. They are situated by Clermont Waterfront Park and offer rentals, sales, and service for bicycles, kayaks, & paddleboards as well as other accessories. See them online at www.ClermontWaterfrontBikesandBoards.com or call them at 352-394-0535. The March 2014 Gem of the Hills Award was presented to Aimee Stanley, co-founder of Optima One Realty in Clermont. In addition to running her real estate business, Aimee engages herself in community related non-profit organizations such as the Junior Womans Club, Back to School is COOL Lake County, as well as being involved with the annual Clermont Turkey Trot, Pig on the Pond, and the South Lake Young Professionals. Aimee is pictured receiving the award from Michelle Michnoff from BankFIRST, the Chair of the Community Relations Committee.

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A6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 30, 2014 IN MEMORY DEATH NOTICES Sarah Ruth Brannock Sarah Ruth Bran nock, 81, of Longwood, died Thursday, April 17, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home. Umatilla. Maxine L. Collins Maxine L. Collins, 75, of Eustis, died Tuesday, April 22, 2014. Hayes Brothers Funeral Home, Eustis. Daniel Hubert Drake Daniel Hubert Drake, 86, of Leesburg, died Monday, April 21, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares. Maggie M. Fox Maggie M. Fox, 92, of Wildwood, died Wednesday, April 23, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Charles J.A. Gunasekara Charles J.A. Gunase kara, 78, of Leesburg, died Wednesday, April 23, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Fu nerals and Cremations, Tavares. Anne D. Harp Anne D. Harp, 94, of Winter Park, died Sun day, April 20, 2014. Al len J. Harden Funeral Home, Mount Dora. Peter L. Hubbell Peter L. Hubbell, 76, of Leesburg, died Wednesday, April 23, 2014. Eastside Funeral Home, Leesburg Sammy Lee Inman Sammy Lee Inman, 86, of Leesburg, died Friday, April 18, 2014. Eastside Funeral Home, Leesburg. Joseph W. Knight Joseph W. Bub Knight, 69, of Tavares, dies Tuesday, April 22, 2014. Steverson, Ham lin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tava res. Lucille Martin Lucille Martin, 94, of Oxford, died Thursday, April 24, 2014. Banks/ Page-Theus Funeral Home and Cremation Services, Wildwood. Dorothy F. Mays Dorothy F. Mays, 78, of Leesburg, died Wednesday, April 16, 2014. Eastside Funeral Home, Leesburg. Gloria S. Oliver Gloria S. Oliver, 85, of Tampa, died Saturday, April 5, 2014. Beyers Fu neral Home, Umatilla Paul Ernest Papineau Paul Ernest Papine au, 65, of Leesburg, died on Wednesday, April 23, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Cecelia Skipper Pearson Cecelia Skipper Pear son, 82, of Fruitland Park, died Thursday, April 24, 2014. PageTheus Funerals & Cre mations, Leesburg. Troy Cecil Roberts Troy Cecil Roberts, 62, of Eustis, died Friday, April 18, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatil la. Earl Joseph Schirra Earl Joseph Schirra, 84, of Leesburg, died Tuesday, April 22, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Lees burg. Mike Leo Skiba Mike Leo Skiba, 93, of Tavares passed away on Friday, April 25, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares, FL Wilfred M. Stark Jr. Wilfred M. Stark Jr., 65, of Wildwood, died Friday, April 18, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood, FL. Sandra Fay Stieber Sandra Fay Stieber, 77, of Bushnell, died Tuesday, April 22, 2014. Purcell Funeral Home, Bushnell. Chad Daniel VanProoyen Chad Daniel Van Prooyen, 32, of Lees burg, died Sunday, April 20, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Fu nerals and Cremations, Tavares. Norton Kent Wing Norton Kent Wing, 82, of Umatilla, died Sunday, April 20, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatilla. Thank you for reading the local newspaper, the Daily Commercial

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B1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 30, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTS SPORTS EDITOR ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE .............................. 365-8268 FAX .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL ......... sports@dailycommercial.com S PORTS and LEISURE FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Drew Mendoza scored on a bases-loaded walk in the seventh inning on April 24 to give Lake Minneola a 9-8 win in the Class 6A-District 6 title game at Lake Minneola High School. Mendozas run capped a two-run rally in the seventh inning for the Hawks and earned them a home game in Thursdays regional quarter nal round. Aaron Pandorf picked up the win for the Hawks (1511). The third pitcher used by Lake Minneola coach Mike Smith, Pandorf went one hit less inning and struck out two on eight pitches. Ryan Halstead, the third pitcher used by Leesburg, was tagged with the loss. Halstead allowed two hits and two runs one earned in one inning of work. He walked two and struck out two. Even though the Yellow Jackets lost April 24, they will play in the regional quarter nals. However, Leesburg (1017) will be forced to play on the road. Their opponents were not known at press time, al though both games will played at 7 p.m. Thursday. In the bottom of the sev enth inning, Kevin Lora reached on catchers inter ference and Mendoza laced a single through the left side of the ineld. Jon Hoskinson then doubled down the right eld line, scoring Cameron Recny, who was running for Lora. Brett Coffel was walked in tentionally to bring up Tuck er Rayburn, who was 2-for-3 in the game. A fter falling be hind 1-and-2, Rayburn even tually worked Halstead for a bases-loaded walk that plat ed Mendoza with the walkoff win. Lake Minneola had 13 hits off the Yellow Jackets pitch ing triumvirate of Kyle Bra na, Brendin Perkins and Halstead. The Hawks also beneted from six Leesburg errors. Mendoza and Coffel paced Lake Minneola with three hits. Rayburn and Brandon Hartley had two hits apiece. Rayburn had three RBIs, while Coffel and H artley had two apiece. Mendoza and Hoskinson scored two runs each. Hoskinson started for Lake Minneola and went 4 1/3 in nings, allowing seven hits and seven runs, although only four were earned. Mi chael Tow and Pandorf com bined to pitch 4 2/3 innings of hitless relief. Brana and Jaden Langley had two hits for Leesburg. Tucker Smith had three RBIs and Luis Montalvo had two RBIs. Brian Hepburn and Lang ley scored two runs apiece. MINNEOLA Hawks outlast Yellow Jackets in Class 6A-6 title game FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Tavares High School is home to a state cham pion. Jose Barajas lifted a combined weight of 635 pounds on April 25 to win at 169 pounds in the Florida High School Athletic As sociation Class 1A Boys Weight lifting Finals at the Kissimmee Civic Center. According to Tavares weight lifting coach Chris Gauntlett, Barajas is the second Bulldog to win a state weightlifting title. Barajas outlifted his closest competitor, Althas Tristan Grif n, by 30 pounds. Barajas had 340 pounds in the bench press and 295 pounds in the cleanand-jerk. Grifn lifted 330 pounds in the bench press and 275 pounds in the clean-and-jerk. Barajas was the only local lift er to win a state title. At 119 pounds, South Sum ters Valentino Avant nished seventh with 370 pounds 200 pounds in the bench press and 170 pounds in the clean-andjerk. Avants teammate, Alan Macias, also earned spot in the nals at 119 pounds, but did not record a weight. Eustis Corey Davis nished fourth at 139 pounds and Uma tillas Brett Bush was fth. Bushs teammate, Chris McEntire, was ninth. Davis lifted 480 pounds 220 pounds in the bench press and 260 pounds in the cleanand-jerk to nish 10 pounds ahead of Bush, who had 265 pounds in the bench press and 205 pounds in the clean-andjerk. McEntire had a nal total of 435 pounds 225 pounds in the bench press and 210 pounds in the clean-and-jerk. McEntire was tied with two others in total weight, but was awarded ninth place because he weighed less than the two lifters with whom he nished in a tie. At 199 pounds, South Sum ters Joey Mohler nished eighth with 605 pounds 310 pounds in the bench press and 290 pounds in the clean-and-jerk. South Sumters Caleb Sim mons was seventh at 219 pounds following a bench press of 355 pounds and a clean-and-jerk of TAVARES Barajas wins state title PHOTO COURTESY OF CHRIS GAUNTLETT Tavares High School weightlifter Jose Barajas, right, poses with Tavares coach Chris Gauntlett on April 25 after winning the 169-pound classication at the FHSAA Boys Weightlifting Finals in Kissimmee. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Trevor Lloyd is typi cal of many students at First Academy of Lees burg. Hes respectful, par ticularly towards adults, always looking others in the eyes when speak ing to them and is quick to offer a greeting and a rm handshake. One thing, however, sets Lloyd apart from all other students who have attended the small Leesburg private school he is the rst stu dent-athlete in school history to sign a Na tional Letter of Intent to play football at the next level. Lloyd inked a deal on April 22 to attend Meth odist University, a pri vate school in Fayette ville, N.C., where he is expected to be a receiv er for the Division III in stitution. He hopes to help the Monarchs im prove on their 8-2 over all record in 2013, which included 6-1 mark in USA South Athletic Conference. This is a great feeling for me, Lloyd said after a signing ceremony in the library at First Acad emy of Leesburg. Lloyd, like many play ers at First Academy of Leesburg, played mul tiple positions for the Eagles. On offense, he was primarily a receiver, while on the other side of the ball, he was a de fensive back and a line backer. He played an inte gral role in leading First Academy to the Sun shine State Athletic Conference champion ship in 2013. Lloyd av eraged 21.5 yards per catch, with three of his 13 grabs going for touchdowns. Defensively, he had three interceptions and defended 17 passes. He returned one intercep tion for a score. Lloyd said he had three or four schools on his short list, but made his decision after his ofcial visit to Meth odist. He liked the phi losophy of Monarchs coach C.J. Goss and the campus. It was an easy de cision after seeing the school, Lloyd said. I could see myself go ing there for four years. I was comfortable the whole time I was there and then when I talk ed to (Goss), everything seemed to t what I wanted in a college. Lloyd took time during his signing cer emony to thank his teammates and his family for his success. His parents, Leroy and Vernetta, sat beside him as he signed his Nation al Letter of Intent. My parents kept me level-headed through the entire process, Lloyd said. And my teammates, especially quarterbacks David (El liott) and Byron (Maso line) made the differ ence for me. I dont think Im signing today without the support of my teammates. Lloyd also credited the atmosphere at First Academy of Leesburg for his success. A trans fer from Leesburg High School prior to his se nior year, Lloyd said First Academys stiffer academic requirements and the unique athletic demands at the school made him a better per son and player. LEESBURG Lloyd becomes FALs first football signee BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Trevor Lloyd, a football player at First Academy, signs with Methodist University at the First Academy library in Leesburg. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Lake Minneola boys basketball coach Fred die Cole is conducting two youth basketball camps in May for play ers looking to improve their fundamentals and ability to perform in game situations. The two-day camps are Friday and Saturday and May 23-24 at the Lake Minneola High School gymnasium for boys and girls between the ages of 5 and 17. Cost of the camps is $50. The rst day for both camps will run from 5 to 8 p.m. and the second day, which is a Satuday, will begin at 9 a.m. and end at noon. Cole is the only boys basketball coach in Lake Minneolas histo ry. He led the Hawks to a 28-4 record in 201314 and the Florida High School Athletic Asso ciation Class 6A state championship game. After playing colle giately at Bethune-Cook man University in Day tona Beach, Cole played professionally over seas before becoming a high-school coach. Lake Minneola is 60-22 during Coles three sea sons at the helm. Many of the teaching tools Cole said he plans to use in the camps were learned during his college and profession al careers. Registration forms for the camp are avail able on request. Email coal are colef@lake.k12. .us to obtain a regis tration form or for any questions. Cole said spots in both camps are lling fast. Ive had 15 peo ple sign up the rst day I put out a signup sheet, Cole said. I planned to stop at 50, but I will gauge any ad ditional interest in the camp if we get to 50 registrations. Lake Minneola hoops coach plans camps MINNEOLA SEE BARAJAS | B3

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B2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 30, 2014 SORRENTO BAIT & TACKLE | SORRENTO Some specks are still spawn ing in the canals in Lake Carlton and Lake Beauclaire among the cat tails, brush and fallen trees where eel grass and lily pads flour ish. Specks are being caught in ap proximately 10 feet of water in the Apopka-Beauclaire canal and out from Deer Island. They are being caught on Rons Zip jigs and small ice jigs fished around 5 to 6 feet covering a lot of water. On Lake Carlton, drift the jig tipped min now across the lake. Post spawn bass are biting early in the morn ing in the mouths of residential canals on noisy top water baits like Rat-L-Traps. Lots of hybrid bass are biting at the mouth of the Wekiva River and around the feed er creeks early in the morning on Rat-L-Traps and shiners. A mixed bag of fish are being caught in Lake Monroe fishing the channel and deep water. Stop in and get the latest daily report. SOUTHERN TACKLEWORKS | TAVARES Largemouth bass are being caught on soft plastic baits such as June bug or June bug blue trick worms and watermelon red and June bug red swimming worms. Shell cracker are being caught on grass shrimp and yellow tailed worms. Some crappie are still be ing caught on chartreuse or pink jig heads tipped with minnows. San dys next regular bass tournament will be an open tournament held May 17 this tournament will usher in a new season. For information, call the shop at 352-742-0036. PINE ISLAND CAMP | FRUITLAND PARK Shellcracker are being caught on worms. Catfish are biting on shrimp. Pine Island has a full sup ply of live baits including grass shrimp as well as a variety of ar tificial baits. RV sites, camp sites boats and slips are available for rental. Check out the restaurant before going out or coming off the lake. PALM GARDENS | TAVARES A few stripers are being caught on saltwater shrimp and lures with silver spoons. A few specks are still being picked up on minnows. The shell cracker action has slowed with the passage of the most re cent cold front. Palm Gardens has pontoon boats available to rent. NELSONS FISH CAMP | WEIRSD ALE Shellcracker activity has been strong. Shell cracker are biting on grass shrimp. Bass action has been very good. They are biting on spin ner baits and soft plastic worms. Bluegill and speck have been bit ing on grass shrimp and worms. BL ACK BASS RESORT AND FISH CAMP | LEESBURG Action has been a little slow er with the passage of the last cold front. A few fish are being caught from the dock. In addition to ca noes and rowboats Black Bass now rents kayaks. Minnows, red worms and night crawlers sales contin ue to be strong, suggesting specks, bream and catfish are biting. Want to try something new, try fishing from a kayak. LAKES REPORT a weekly update from CHERYL STALEY-ARCHER rfntnn bnn nn b nn nn tnn ttn rf nnn bntn tntt b n n nnntn rf f rf f bf rftnn bnt t b tnn n n

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Wednesday, April 30, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B3 CLERMONT BLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSAMILYELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time! IRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONTL Many Other Activities each week Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.org LIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLCHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm SOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary); 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.org ST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am (Rite I) 10:00 am (Rite II) 5:00 pm (Praise & Worship) Sunday School Youth Group Nursery Adult Bible Study Womens Bible Study Mens Prayer Breakfast WOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH GODINCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALE ERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for Children Groveland IRSTBAPTISTCHURCH GROVELAND Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pm MT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! MINNEOLA CONGREGATIONSMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club NEWLPRESBYTERIANCHURCH18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am TLIVINGGOD Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce Rowland MONTVERDE WOODLANDSLUTHERAN15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 am OAKLAND PRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforSouth Lake South LakeGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOMErfn tbt352-394-7121806 W. Minneola Ave.,Clermont,FL Cremation ChoicesDirect Cremation$675Plus Container Ron Becker,Director352-394-8228921 S.US Hwy 27,Minneola,FL 260 pounds. At 238 pounds, An thony Yurich of South Sumter nished 10th with 600 pounds 310 pounds in the bench press and 290 pounds in the clean-and-jerk. A pair of local lifters competed in the Heavy weight classication, with Montel Presley n ishing ninth with 665 pounds with Mount Do ras Richard Marinacci nishing 11th with 650 pounds. Presley reached his to tal weight with a bench press of 380 pounds and a clean-and-jerk of 285 pounds. Marinacci had 395 pounds in the bench press and 255 in the clean-and-jerk. BARAJAS FROM PAGE B1 FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Iron Jungle Weightlifting continues to move along. Lake Countys only weight lifting club competed recent ly at the Florida Youth Trials, a tune-up meet at Port Orange Spruce Creek High School and Iron Jungle Weighlifting had two more lifters earn spots in USA Weightliftings Youth Na tional Championship in June. I only had four lifters com pete, so half of our competi tors qualied for nationals, said Iron Jungle Weightlifting coach Josh Boyer. That gives us four team members who have qualied (for nationals). We have a tough six-week prep period coming up, and our success at Youth Nationals will be a direct correlation to the approach to our training. We are past the level of being con tent with qualifying and now it is time to bring home medals each time we attend a national championship. I have condence that we will have our best training days over this next monthand-a-half. Alexis Smith and Carlos Mo lano had solid performances at Port Orange Spruce Creek to join teammates Morgan Rhone and Brett Ollila at na tionals. Smith competed at 75 kilograms (about 165 pounds) and Molano lifted at 69 kilo grams (about 152 pounds). Smith entered the competi tion needing 97 kilograms (213 pounds) to qualify for nationals and Boyer said she turned up at the meet ready to succeed. She hit personal records of 41 kilograms (90 pounds) in the Snatch and another personal record weight of 56 kilograms (123 pounds) in the Clean-andJerk for a total of 97 kilograms, a third personal mark. Smith hit on four of her six total lifts and qualied for na tionals with her second at tempt in the Clean-and-Jerk. Her performance earned Iron Jungle its only medal of the competition. I couldnt be more proud of Alexis because she has come so far in reaching this point, Boyer said. Alexis hurt her wrist during the high-school season and has battled the mental block many athletes go through on their road to re covery. I shared with her that I dont ask of my student-ath letes to do anything I have done myself. In college, I broke my femur in a football game. I explained that I to her that I completely understand the physical and mental chal lenges she was going through. Being able to relate to her sit uation, I think, helped her in overcoming the mental obsta cle of being healed. LEESBURG Iron Jungle has 2 more qualifiers for nationals

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B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 30, 2014 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 7 25 34 47 67 13 18 31 59 74 9 21FREE SPACE53 72 2 16 42 48 63 5 29 39 52 68ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N I B O G BINGO B I N G O SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Lee Alexander WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! B 5 I 29 G 52 O 68 N 39

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Ann Dupee REMEMBER WHEN A weekly column that reprints some of the more interesting news stories that have appeared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press. C1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 30, 2014 www.southlakepress.com C OMMUNITY Proudly serving CLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWS STAFF WRITER ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 E-MAIL .... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com FROM THE FILES | 27 YEARS AGO 1987 Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press Congratulations to John Claypool, son of Shirley Claypool, re cently selected as the Good Citizen of his Class of 1987 at Grove land High School. Clermont High School now has a golf team, the rst in many years since the Modica boys and Jackie Gaines were bringing home so many honors. Brian Roddy and Carol Ploszaj are the coaches. The home course is Green Val ley Country Club. Rod dy is employed full-time in golf course mainte nance on the Magnolia Course at Walt Disney World and is the teach ing pro at Green Valley. Miss Polszaj teaches at Clermont Junior High School. The Clermont team has two seniors, Mickey Olivenbaum and Lance Walsworth; ve juniors, Bradley Beerlohm, Matt Jones, Danny Lindsey, Craig Stephens and Gary Surin; four sophomores, Jake Doty, Eric Eyerly, Tim Misuraca and Terry McCarthy; and two ninth graders, T.J. Garrett and Scott Severinhaus. A special mention to Carolyn Mathieson, a 10th grader, who is the only girl right now. The coaches hope more girls will join this prom ising and ourishing new program at CHS. CLERMONT HIGH SCHOOL PROM Saturday night, the Junior-Senior Class Prom of Clermont High School was held at the Orange Lake Coun try Clubs clubhouse on U.S. Highway 192. Following the prom, Ron and Donna Clarke and two of their chil dren, Raechel and Ron nie, members of the ju nior class, were hosts to a breakfast. Assist ing the hosts were Wer ner and Marty Hein rich, John and Joanne Hughes, Jim and Bren da Mayer and Wan da Cox. Attending were Principal David Cogg shall and his wife, Car ol; Assistant Princi pal Bill Sullivan and his wife, Rosa, and t eacher Gary Kinninger. LOCAL 100-YEAR-OLD RECOGNIZED NBC weatherman Willard Scott often rec ognizes people cele brating their longev ity of life. Clermonts Paul Halstead, who just turned 101, received a nice letter from Scott, adding his own good wishes to those of many who recognized this very special milestone. During the Clermont Centennial in 1984, Scott showed the Cen tennial T-shirt on the networks Today Show and told all about the celebration. FOOD PRICES Food prices at Winn-Dixie: Heinz Ketchup, 32-ounce bottle, 79 cents; HOMETOWN: Hometown is going to be a bit hard. I consider myself a New York baby and a Jer sey girl with an extended stay in the Poconos. I have lived in a few states and moved here from the Pocono Mountains in Pennsylva nia, where I resided for 20 years before coming to Florida. OCCUPATION: Ordained minis ter, reiki master/teacher, medium, intuitive and angel guidance read ings, spiritual counseling FAMILY: My youngest daugh ter, Marisa, lives here with me and is a freshman in high school. My oldest daughter, Megan, lives in the Poconos and is working to ward her teaching certicate. 1) If you had to summarize your philosophy of life in one sen tence, what would it be? I have two that I live by. One: I am neither dened nor limited by labels, and two: Ask, believe, receive. 2) Name a person or incident youve come across recently thats touched you in some way. Why did this person or incident impress you so much? The sweetest thing happened about a month or two ago. My daughter loves Chinese food and roughly twice a month I take her to a local restaurant. We walked in and the young lady that worked there came ying out around the corner and said, Oh my! Its YOU! I had no idea what was go ing on. She gave me a BIG hug and said, Today is my last day here and I was hoping to see you because you are one of my most favorite customers. Well, I gotta tell you, that simple act of joy and appreciation is one I will carry for ever in my heart. 3) How does what you do contrib ute to the welfare of the area? Everybody, at one time or another, Meet Your NEIGHBOR ERIN KOCZUR SEE NEIGHBOR | C4 SEE HISTORY | C3 CASEY BROOKE LAWSON / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com C lermont will hold its rst dragon boat festi val Saturday on Lake Minneola. All proceeds from the event, hosted by New Be ginnings, will benet the New Beginnings organiza tion that serves homeless families, individuals and children and other chari ties in the area. New Beginnings founder Steve Smith said the event is expected to draw thou sands of visitors to Wa terfront Park to watch as more than 25 teams race across the lake in teams made up of locals, city of cials, police and re de partment personnel, plus regional teams visiting from throughout Florida. We are so excited about this event because not only will it help us raise mon ey so that we can continue to help homeless families and children but because we think this is going to be a great event for the city of Clermont, Smith said. In fact, Clermonts City Manager Darren Gray, the events honorary chair man, will be at the event to present the days awards and trophies. The city will host a team, and our police de partment was so excited about the event, they are elding a second team. I think it will quickly be come an annual tradition, Gray said. Dragon boat races have been growing in popu larity all over the world. I think as word gets out and people see what a beauti ful park and waterfront we have and how many other activities, restaurants and shops we have, the crowds will grow. The weekend event, pro duced by High Five Dragon Boat, LLC, starts Friday at 5 p.m. with dinner and en tertainment at the Water front Pavilion. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for children. The races start at 9 a.m., Saturday. The event will also fea ture food vendors, a health fair and kids zone, with bounce houses and face painting. The races will pit local and regional teams against each other in a series of heats. Novice teams get in struction led by Lee Cerovac from The Villages, Team USA Senior Rowing Team Coach and all of the necessary equipment to race. Spectators are encour aged to come to Waterfont Park with their lawn chairs and blankets. For information, go to SouthLakeCountyDragon Boat.com. Clermont to host dragon boat races DAVE HYATT / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP The Clermont Dragon Boat Festival will start at 9 a.m. on Saturday.

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C2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 30, 2014 Second graders Kaelyn Neuhauser and Catherine Decker, along with other second graders from Pine Ridge Elementary in Clermont recently created crafts using reusable materials and sold the items to raise money at the schools annual Bear Olympics held on April 5, to benet a fellow Lake County second grader who was recently in a serious accident. The students with the help of other Pine Ridge Elementary families were able to raise $175 for the cause. SUBMITTED PHOTO ON WHEELSBY ELIZABETH C. GORSKI / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZNo. 0420RELEASE DATE: 4/27/2014 ACROSS1 Healing cover 5 Instants 9 Ancient symbols of royalty 13 Checks 18 ___ and Louis, 1956 jazz album 19 The Sun, The Moon or The Star 21 Best-selling novelist whom Time called Bard of the Litigious Age 23 Attribute of Elks or Lions Club members 25 Recital piece for a wind player 26 Toast words after Heres 27 Relative of turquoise 29 Proceeds 30 Within earshot 32 Anthem preposition 33 Mobile home seeker? 34 1966 Wilson Pickett R&B hit 40 Abbr. on sale garment tags 41 Short open jackets 42 Commandment word 43 Pipe valves 49 Ive got half ___ to 50 s political inits. 51 Year, to Casals 52 Greeting that includes a Spanish greeting in reverse? 53 Andean tuber 54 Opera based on a play by Pierre Beaumarchais, with The 58 Complete shutout? 61 Post letters 62 Hammer 63 Stockholm-bound carrier 65 Yale Bowl fan 66 Roisterous 68 Bond yield: Abbr. 69 These, to Thierry 70 Ruler known as Big Daddy 72 TVs Cousin ___ 73 Urban renewal target 76 Qualcomm Stadium athlete 79 Pariss ___ du Carrousel 81 Writer Chekhov 82 Pet Shop Boys, e.g. 83 Stella D___ (cookie brand) 84 Jermaine of the N.B.A. 86 Theyre steeped in strainers 89 Mrs. abroad 90 Vocabulary 92 Reversal, of sorts 93 Walkers strip 95 Govt. promissory notes 99 Former Chevrolet division 100 Suffix with narc101 Dirty rats 102 Like equinoxes 105 Fine hosiery material 110 Visa alternative 112 The African Queen novelist 114 Makeup removal item 115 Classic theater name 116 Stain 117 Designer Anne 118 Leonard ___ a.k.a. Roy Rogers 119 Covenant keepers 120 All alternative DOWN1 Breakaway group 2 Renault model with a mythological name3 Woodys Annie Hall role 4 Joanie Loves Chachi co-star 5 ___ 500, annual race in Ridgeway, Va. 6 Wildlife IDs 7 Ones who are the talk of the town? 8 Baking ___ 9 Actress Judd 10 Use elbow grease on 11 Opening for a dermatologist 12 Common newsstand locale: Abbr. 13 Seat at the counter 14 Ready to be played, say 15 De-file? 16 ___ Trend 17 Graceful trumpeter20 ___ Aviv 22 John Irving character 24 QE2s operator 28 Leave in a hurry 31 Music producer Brian 33 ___-Magnon man 34 New corp. hire, often 35 Man, in Milano 36 Cuts, as a cake 37 Coffee-break time, perhaps 38 Shakespeares Titus ___ 39 Financial writer Marshall 40 What business is ___ yours? 43 Bird whose feathers were once prized by milliners 44 Neil of Fox News 45 Ken of Brothers & Sisters 46 Quaker production47 One of the Kardashians 48 Composer Camille Saint-___ 50 The U.N.s ___ Hammarskjld 51 Pounds sounds 54 Give rise to 55 You Must Love Me musical 56 Nosy one 57 Millennia on end 59 Candy-heart message 60 Thats ___! (Not true!) 63 Rug fiber 64 Herseys Italian town 67 Roman emperor 71 Flaps 74 Naval petty officer: Abbr. 75 Amazing debunker 77 Anita of jazz 78 La Dolce Vita setting 80 Sluggers practice area 84 Futurist 85 ESPN broadcaster Bob 87 Certain Sooner 88 Some M.I.T. grads: Abbr. 89 Are you putting ___? 90 Slick hairstyle 91 Fancy tie 93 English church official 94 Kick-around shoe 95 Chaim ___, 1971 Best Actor nominee 96 City that sounds like a humdinger? 97 Query from Judas 98 Life Saver flavor 99 Like bachelorette parties, typically 101 Product of Yale 102 Jezebels idol 103 Many a PX patron 104 Prime letters? 106 Amazon fig. 107 D-Day invasion town 108 Former C.I.A. chief Panetta 109 Artists alias with an accent 111 The Price Is Right broadcaster 113 I.C.U. pros 1234 5678 91011121314151617 18 19 2021 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3031 32 33 34353637 3839 40 41 42 43 4445464748 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 5657 585960 61 62 6364 65 6667 68 69 70 71 72 7374 75 76 77 78 7980 81 82 83 84 85 86 8788 89 9091 92 93 94 95969798 99 100 101 102 103104 105106107108109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Solution on page D4. Staff Report The 13th annual Free Com ic Book Day returns on Saturday with more than 2,000 comic shops in over 60 countries participating, including locally owned Heroes Landing in Clermont. Heroes Landing, 12348 Roper Blvd., will be open from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. and will be hosting Batman Eternal writer Tim Seeley. Free Comic Book Day is the worlds largest annual comic book event, with more than 4.5 million comics available to be given away free to those who visit a participat ing retailer, Marco Davanxo of the Comics Professional Retail Orga nization said in a press release. More than 50 special Free Comic Book Day editions are being pub lished, featuring a wide variety of entertainment for all ages and au diences, from kids comics to con tent that is on the leading edge of pop culture, he said. More than one million people visited partic ipating comic shops last year and that number is expected to grow as it has every year since the rst Free Comic Book Day in May 2002. The event was founded by Com ics Professional Retail Organiza tion board member and comic book retailer Joe Field as a way to introduce new readers to comics, while calling back former readers and thanking current fans. Free Comic Book Day calls at tention to a very rich and diverse entertainment medium, Field said. If you want to know where Hollywood gets its best ideas, then your local comic shop is the place to be. This years list of free comics include: Guardians of the Gal axy, Archie, Hello Kitty, Sponge bob Squarepants, Transformers vs. GI Joe, Sonic the Hedgehog and the Smurfs. A complete list can be found at www.freecomicbookday. com/comics. Free Comic Book Day also calls attention to the creativity, strength and community importance of lo cally owned comic book stores. For information about Free Comic Book Day, go to www. freecomicbookday. Local store to mark Free Comic Book Day Saturday CLERMONT Staff Report The Ian Tilmann Founda tion and the Lake County Tourism Council are spon soring The 2014 Clermont Challenge 5K / 10K / Slalom Races on May 3 at Lake Lou isa State Park in Clermont. The day of racing features morning 5K and 10K long board distance races sanc tioned by the International Distance Skating Associa tion (IDSA), according to a press release. The after noon fan will watch a Dual Head-to-Head Hybrid Sla lom Race, hosted by worldclass pro Keith Hollien, and sanctioned by the Interna tional Slalom Skateboard ing Association (ISSA). The longboard races are a Pro/Am event and will draw longboard skat ers from the entire east coast, the release stated. Pro/Am skaters and doz ens of sponsored skaters will compete for a piece of the $1,000 cash and skate product prizes. The event has industry support from skateboard ing companies including Sector 9, FreeRide Skate, Bustin, Landyatchz, Klever, Inspiration, Honey, S-ONE, Bern Unlimited, Triple 8, Loaded, J Bords, Gravi ty, RAD, Arbor, Inspiration Longboards and many oth ers, the release stated. The state park gates open at 8 a.m., the IDSA distance races start at 10 a.m. and the ISSA slalom races start at 1:30 pm. Advance on line registra tion is recommended as this event is expected to sell out. On-site sign-in starts at 8:30 a.m. located at the Lake Louisa State Park Ca noe parking area. The Ian Tilmann Foun dations mission is the pre vention of brain injury re sulting from skateboarding. The foundation accom plishes its mission by giving free helmets to skaters who promise to wear it when skateboarding. Since Janu ary 2006, The Ian Tilmann Foundation has distribut ed over 4,500 free helmets throughout the nation. The foundation active ly promotes helmet use in hopes that others wont suffer such a senseless and preventable tragedy as struck our family when Ian Tilmann died from trau matic brain injury in 2005 from a skateboarding fall, said Marcy Tilmann, the foundations director. Skaters heading to Clermont for challenge SUBMITTED PHOTO Clermont Toastmasters honored, from left, Gordie Allen (Best Speaker), Frank Hernandez (Most Improved), Marjorie Benjamin (Best Evaluator), Monty Ray Davidson (Toastmasters Area 72 Governor and Best Table Topics) and Dr. Thomas Spencer (Club President) at the March 24 meeting. Clermont Toastmasters meets every Monday at 6:30 p.m. at the SDA Church, 100 Minnehaha Ave., in Clermont. For information, call 352-234-6495. CLERMONT TOASTMASTERS HONORS MEMBERS AT MEETING PINE RIDGE ELEMENTARY STUDENTS USE RECYCLABLES FOR CRAFTS FOR A CAUSE SUBMITTED PHOTO Members of the South Lake County Historical Society gathered in the Train Depot for a potluck thank you lunch on March 31. Special recognition was given to those present who have gone above and beyond in their service to the society and the village. THANK YOU LUNCH

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Wednesday, April 30, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C3 HYBRID SPECIMEN PALMSAdd curb appeal and value to your home!Our trees are grown from seed and agriculturally inspectedWe provide digging, transport and transportationWe carry Exotic Hybrid PalmsQuality, Care, and Maintenance reflected in our 50+ Yearsof Horticultural Experience!Types of trees we offer: Phoenix Reclinata, Phoenix Sylvester, Phoenix Canary, Phoenix Date, Bismark European Fan, Chinese Fan Palm, and many more!FAMILY OWNED & OPERATEDFREE CONSULTATION!WE COME TO YOU UPON REQUESTSmaller palms available in pots321-388-7587Contact Jim and Jim SPRING SPECIAL ON LARGE LIGUSTRUM TREES Superbrand milk, gal lon size $1.99; Maxwell House Coffee, 1-pound bag, $2.18; Dixie Crys tal Sugar, 5-pound bag, 99 cents. Food prices at Pub lix: Heinz Ketchup, 43-ounce bottle, 69 cents; Dole Pineapple Juice, 46-ounce can, 69 cents; Inglenook Wine, 3-liter bottle, $7.19; Ice berg Lettuce, 49 cents; Dairy Fresh Yogurt, 3, 8-ounce cups, 89 cents; Breyers Ice Cream, half-gallon, $2.89; one dozen large eggs, 9 cents; white potatoes, 10-pound bag, 99 cents and Golden Bananas, per pound, 23 cents. HISTORY FROM PAGE C1 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com Audiences who re member the mayhem from the 1965 movie Boeing Boeing star ring Jerry Lewis and Tony Curtis are in for more laughs as Bay Street Players bring the comedy to the stage. The farce runs through May 11 at the historic State Theatre, 109 North Bay St., Eustis. It is just absolute fun. Its a fun comedy that has a nice naughty to it, said Jim Meadows, producer and co-direc tor with Brendon Rog ers, who believes the atergoers are going to love the shows physi cal comedy. We expect to have people laugh ing throughout the eve ning. Set in the 1960s, the play features American architect/bachelor Ber nard (Rick Paulin) liv ing in Paris as he juggles schedules and his life around three ances, all young ight atten dants, who are unaware of each other. The wom en regard Bernards at as their home during their Paris layovers. He balances them all out by having one in the air, one at the airport ready to take off, and the third one is at his apartment, Meadows said, noting the apart ment has seven doors, so you have people running in and out all the time. Gloria (Bre Lewis), Gabriella (Lauren Mor gan) and Gretchen (Kami Spaulding) star as the three ight atten dants, and Bernards socalled perfect life gets rather bumpy when his friend Robert (Paul Cas taneda) comes to stay and a new and speedier Boeing jet throws off his careful planning. The mayhem comes to a cli max during a sched uling mishap when all three ight attendants end up in Paris and at Bernards apartment at the same time. What are Bernard and Robert going to do? The way that I like to describe it is that youve got three beau tiful, intelligent females who are all ight stew ardesses with two idi ot guys, Meadows said. The only thing that has changed from the 1960s and now is that we call them ight attendants instead stewardesses the guys in the 1960s are idiots and they are still idiots. They try to keep control of things, but the guys nd out that they have no control. And because of the lack of control, Mead ows said the physical comedy in Boeing Boe ing is at its best. Bernard and his best friend visiting from Wis consin are going cra zy trying to balance it all out, the producer said, and theres also the long-suffering house keeper Berthe (Liz Cur tis) who is caught in the middle of it all. Rob ert is forgetting which lies to tell to whom, and even with the help of Bernards housekeeper, catastrophe looms. Boeing Boeing was initially penned by French playwright Marc Camoletti and translat ed by Beverly Cross and Francis E vans before it was Americanized for the 1965 movie with Jer ry Lewis and Tony Cur tis. Deliciously, deliri ously innocent is how The New York Times has described the farce, which recently enjoyed hit revivals in London and New York. It was also bestowed a Tony Award for best revival. The local production features set design by Scott Fattizzi and Tom Mangieri, lighting de sign by Jon Whitely and costumes by Sara Gray. It has been real ly, really exciting for me to work with Bren don Rogers and co-di rect this production, said Meadows, who also noted it has been just as much fun working with the cast and crew. Tickets for Boe ing Boeing are $18 for Wednesday and Thurs day shows and $21 for Friday, Saturday and Sunday performances. Students with ID are ad mitted for $11. Matinee shows are at 2 p.m. and evening performances are set for 8 p.m. Ti ckets may be reserved by call ing 352-357-7777. EUSTIS Boeing Boeing is filled with physical comedy PHOTO COURTESY OF BAY STREET PLAYERS Boeing Boeing cast members Lauren Morgan, Rick Paulin, Kami Spaulding, Liz Curtis, Paul Castaneda and Brew Lewis act out three separate scenes. Call the South Lake Press to get your ad in! 394-2183

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C4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 30, 2014 HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. needs help sorting out a life issue. Any one of the ser vices I offer professionally as well as using these skills for friends and family, helps someone. Helping someone problem solve, gain perspec tive or in the use of Rei ki attain physical relief, has a ripple effect. That per son is now empowered and living a more authentic and productive life, which ripples out and is a positive effect for others. I also volunteer my services to the communi ty through my work with Cler mont Paranormal. 4) Name one of your great est accomplishments so far. I am currently working on my Bachelors degree in Metaphysical Science, something Ive been work ing on for a while. This will be a major goal when ac complished. I am also in talks with Blogtalk Radio to host my own weekly show. However, and though this may sound corny or even cli ch, the thing I consider my greatest accomplishment is being a mother. I absolute ly love being a mom. Nur turing, guiding, supporting and making lifelong memo ries with my daughters, as well as the many adopt ed kids I have the pleasure of loving. Being a mother uses everything youve got. It also propels you to keep growing and learning. It is seriously the most reward ing part of my life. 5) Whats something youve always wanted to do but ha vent yet? Ive always wanted to open a wholeness center that is equipped for everyone, in cluding those with hear ing or sight disabilities. As someone who wears hear ing aids, I know the frus tration of wanting to learn about, explore and get cer tied in the various topics within the holistic, meta physical and spiritual elds. I have yet to come across any avenue for someone with hearing or sight disabil ities. I really desire to ad dress this and offer a solu tion. 6) What advice would you give to people who want to help out in the community? First off, realize that ev ery one can help someone. Open a door, carry a pack age or mow a lawn for a neighbor. Look people in the eye and say hello. Wish the cashier a happy day. Youd be amazed at how much this simple act of kind ness matters. If you have 30 free minutes in a week, volunteer somewhere that calls to you (animal shel ter, church, nursing home, li brary, hospital, a school). If you want to do something nancially and nd your bud get thin, make a change jar. When you ll it up, donate it (those pennies and nickels add up). If you are house bound, call people and ask how they are doing. There are an endless amount of ways to make life brighter. NEIGHBOR FROM PAGE C1 Staff Report The Orange Blossom Cannonball will begin serving Mount Dora again after a ve-year absence. Tavares, Eustis & Gulf Railroad ofcials have announced that service between Tavares and Mount Dora is sched uled to begin May 3, ac cording to a press re lease from the railroad. The last tourist train to serve the city halted operations on Dec. 31, 2009. The train returning to Mount Dora will have a tremendous impact, Mount Dora Mayor Cathy Hoechst said in an email. Were look ing forward to welcom ing even more visitors to our town now that the train is back. Were all very excited. The initial schedule calls for three roundtrips between Tavares and Mount Dora. De partures from Mount Dora will be at 11 a.m., 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. De partures from Tavares will be noon, 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. The railroad will maintain depot facili ties in both cities. The Mount Dora depot will be at 150 West Third Ave. The gift shop/tick et agency is housed in a 1935 former Seaboard Air Line American Flyer passenger coach. The Tavares depot is in a new facility in Woo ton Park. Tuesday through Fri day trains will be pulled by a 1941 GE center cab diesel locomotive. Saturday and Sunday trains will be pulled by a 1907 2-6-0 wood-burn ing steam locomotive. All trains will feature vintage coaches with snack service on board. Several companies have tried to serve Mount Dora with tour ist trains in recent years. The Mount Dora and Lake Eustis Railroad took over operation of the former Orlando and Mount Dora Railway about 15 years ago, leas ing about seven miles of track from Florida Cen tral Railroad. Then, in 2005, In land Lakes Railway, lat er known as Florida Rail Adventures, had a tourist train operating between the towns of Mount Dora, Tavares, Eustis, Lake Jem and Orlando. That ended in 2009. Since then, some 6,000 railroad ties have been replaced, new crossings installed and ballast added to bring the railroad track up to federal standards. The Tavares, Eustis & Gulf Railroad began op erating between Tava res and Lake Jem in Oc tober 2011. Since then, more than 58,000 guests have ridden the train. Steam train tickets are $35 for adults and $24 for children ages 4-12, while diesel train tickets are $25 for adults and $16 for children those same ages. The companys steam locomotive #2 and its vintage cars have been featured in the movies :10 To Yuma, True Grit and Appaloosa. The train was recently used in the feature lm Walt Before Mickey, set to release in June. Reservations can be made at www.orange blossomcannonball. com or by calling 352742-7200, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. MOUNT DORA Orange Blossom Cannonball returns Saturday Tavares, Eustis & Gulf Railroad ofcials announced that service between Tavares and Mount Dora is scheduled to begin Saturday. DAILY COMMERCIAL FILE PHOTO

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Wednesday, April 30, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C5 Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...Enchanted Living Home DecorEnchanted Living Home Decor offers an enchanted world of unique items and furnishings in one shopBy Terri Wells Nestled on Eighth Street in Historic Downtown Clermont, Enchanted Living Home Decor invites visitors in with treasures carefully displayed in every corner. Whether you're looking for a gorgeous antique couch or a much smaller item to help pull your room together, chances are you'll find it here. While owners Anissa Mills and Tony Wallace just opened the shop in February of this year, their passion for antiques goes back much further. Wallace's mother ran an antique business in Saint Augustine, so he learned about it at her knee. Wallace has always been a collector. He's passing the passion on to the next generation, as daughter Ashley works in all aspects of this family-owned business. She does a little of everything, from picking out furniture to running the cash register to helping out at events. "She does it all," Mills declared. The family has been living in Clermont for three years, as the result of "an accident," as Mills described it. Wallace came down for a job, and Mills followed him three months later, but both of them fell in love with the area. "The scenery, the mountains, it's all so different from anywhere else in Florida," Mills reflected. It reminded her of her home state of Ohio. When not hunting out antique treasures for his customers, Wallace can be found fishing out on the lake or indulging his enthusiasm for motorcycles. He's also an enthusiastic and experienced chef, citing Jamaican cuisine as a favorite a passion he learned from his father, who is Jamaican. Asked about her favorite aspect of the business, Mills pointed to the people. She loves talking with them and learning their stories. The business attracts a diversity of customers, from residents who have lived here for years to visitors from out of the country. Wallace's favorite aspect of the business is finding and buying unusual items for those customers. In the future, Wallace and Mills hope to grow their business. "We've outgrown our space," Mills admitted. The couple hopes to open a second store in the future. Enchanted Living Home Decor is located at 639 Eighth Street in Historic Downtown Clermont. You can call the store at 352-243-8888, check out their Facebook page at www.facebook.com/pages/Enchanted-Living-HomeDecor/260209717442997, or visit their website at www.enchantedlivinghomedecor.com/default.html. rfnrtb Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! rffntCall today b fnfffr mprehensim i$59ions$99excludes w i sdo m teeth (thi rd m ola rs)new pa t ients only one time visit offer p anoramic xray required D0330 out of pocket expenseExpires: May 31, 2014 m 352-394-3071 *P anoramic x-ray and/or CT scan of the ja ws necessary for d ia gnos is and trea tment planning. It is our office policy tha t the pa tient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service. examina tion or trea tment which is performed as a result of a nd within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free discounted-offer or reduced-free service, ex ami na tion or trea tment MIn. Free ADA code D0210, D0150 m3 No More Dentures! 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com Leesburg may have earned bragging rights and set a Guinness Book of World Records for ty ing 2,545 black ban danas together to cre ate thelongest chain of bandanas on Sunday, the last day of Bikefest. The 2014 Leesburg Bikefest bandanas in the chain were metic ulously videotaped, documented, photo graphed, counted and measured in the citys attempt to beat the pre vious record of 2,450 bandanas set in 2011 by the Hiratsuka Com ing of Age Day Ceremo ny Committee in Japan. I think that were go ing to break the record. It looks like to me that we are going to achieve that goal. Hopefully, nobody broke it some where else over the weekend, said Joe Shipes, executive vice president of the Lees burg Partnership. The crowd gathered around Towne Square cheered when it was an nounced at 12:10 p.m. that the 2,451st ban dana the one to beat Japan had been val idated. By 12:23 p.m., the last bandana in the chain, No. 2,545, was of cially marked and held up for photographers and videographers to record. This is real fun, abso lutely. Its all for a good cause and it has been a great event for the city, and Im excited to be part of it, said Lees burg City Manager Al Minner, who served as an ofcial witness and certier along with Dai ly Commercial Publish er Steve Skaggs. Brandt Booth and Pete Jaequese from Booth, Ern, Straughan and Hiott (BESH) of Ta vares were the ofcial surveyors document ing and measuring the chain of bandanas. Event ofcials said it may take several weeks before Leesburg learns if it has earned the world record; docu ments to have to be sent to England to be con sidered for a Guinness record. Rachel ORyan, mar keting coordinator for Bikefest, said proceeds from the sale of ban danas used in the at tempt will benet Folds of Honor Foundation, which supports spous es, children and depen dents of soldiers who have been killed or dis abled. The public can help by continuing to buy bandanas, she said, noting the 2014 Lees burg Bikefest bandan as will be available throughout the week at leesburgbikefest.com. I am extremely excit ed with the support that we have gotten from all of the people who have attended here, ORyan said of Bikefest. A lot of motorcycle riders have a military connection, whether they are mil itary or their family is military. They support our troops and Folds of Honor has been an awesome organization to work with They are doing what they can to support the spouses and children of our fall en and injured heroes. ORyan said all of the bandanas that were strung together for the longest chain of ban danas world record at tempt will be untied and each bandana will be sent to a U.S. mili tary member serving overseas. The troops are go ing to get a little present from Leesburg, ORy an said, noting the ban danas will be sent as part of the care pack ages prepared by mem bers of Operation Shoe box in The Villages. Leesburg Bikefest concluded Sunday af ternoon with a perfor mance by recording art ist Uncle Kracker. This has been a good weekend, said Lees burg Partnership board member Steve Knowles. People have really en joyed the good weath er, and the bands have been really good and I think everybody has had a fun time. He noted a special highlight of Bikefest was the camaraderie. There has been a lot of community involve ment a lot of people out here working hard to help out and that makes a go od team, Knowles said. Leesburgs Bikefest may have set new world record THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Lynn Gerig, right, helps count the chain of bandanas along with Linda Henderson, center, on Sunday.

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C6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 30, 2014 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com Joshua Jungferman, the operating partner and gener al manager of Mount Doras Pisces Rising, prefers small er farms over big, industrial ized farms. What seems more natural to me is a working farm. You know, where you can talk to the farmer, Jungferman said. As a restaurant, it would be nice to be able to meet the farmer and maybe talk to him before hes seeding his next crop and let him know what youre looking at, what you want to do. Jungferman said his restau rant is in the process of ex ploring its options to buy more of its ingredients local ly, like it did in January when it began buying microgreens from ARC Greenhouses in Mount Dora. Pisces Rising, however, is just one of approximate ly 15 area restaurants that buys from ARC Greenhous es, according to manager Ra chel Vanlandingham. Those restaurants also include Cask & Larder and The Ravenous Pig in Winter Park, and Dally in the Alley in DeLand. ARC Greenhouses is the company and the brand is Mr. McGre gors Greens. Vanlandingham said it is nice to be able to see where ingredients come from. Just like in Dally in the Al ley in DeLand, they have a huge blackboard in there and it shows all of their local sup pliers, Vanlandingham said. Just to go in there and see, you know, oh, hey, these to matoes are coming from soand-sos farm, and hey, these microgreens are coming from Mr. McGregors over in Mount Dora. She added chefs can tour the farms facilities and are able to talk to her about growing ingredients smaller or larger for their dishes, or suggest something that they might want grown. They can specify to me, as the grower and the supplier, exactly what theyre looking for, Vanlandingham said. The local restaurant pur chases are mixed with dis tributor purchases, Vanland ingham said, and the farm is located at 3050 Britt Rd. in Mount Dora. The farm ex panded to Mount Dora from its other location in New Jer sey, according to the compa nys website. Vanlandingham advised restaurants looking to par ticipate in the farm-to-table movement not to be afraid to reach out to local farms to see if they sell to the public or restaurants and to establish those relationships. There should be more restaurants that are seeking to do farm to table, because its becoming a trend that everybody wants to know where their food is coming from, Vanlandingham said. She said Pisces Rising pur chases micro rainbow mix and micro wasabi from the farm. Meanwhile, Jungferman said Pisces Rising is exploring its options to source more lo cally, which includes looking for small-scale, local distrib utors, and they are currently talking with the company Lo cal Roots. Local Roots web site states that it only sourc es food from Florida farms of the highest standards. He said it is the restaurants responsibility to push clien tele to locally sourced food. People look to us to know the right wine to pair with something. They look to us to know which spirits to mix together for a cocktail. They look to us for our recipes. So, I think thats an important platform we should use it fully to really explore the benets of local local and small, as opposed to the big, industrialized farms, Jung ferman said. Jungferman said buying lo cally has long been import ant to him and the chef, but they now are able to pursue s ourcing locally as Jungfer man became an operating partner of the restaurant in January. It is a nancial undertak ing. Usually, the food is a lit tle costlier and then youre also spending time, Jung ferman said. And its a new er concept. He said while the restau rant is transitioning to using more local products, it has always sourced most of its seafood locally. A study, titled Local Food Systems in Florida: Consum er Characteristics and Eco nomic Impacts, by Alan W. Hodges and Thomas J. Ste vens of the University of Floridas Food and Resource Economics Department, es timated the total value of all food purchased annually through local market chan nels in 2011-2012 in Florida at $8.314 billion. Of that, the study states, $6.079 billion was through grocery stores; $1.813 bil lion through farmers mar kets, u-pick operations and roadside stands; $320 mil lion came through restau rants and food service; $91.2 million came through special arrangements with produc ers and $11.4 million through Community Supported Agri culture organizations. The study claimed an aver age of $1,114 spent annually per household on local food purchases. The study values vegeta bles as the largest local food category at $1.699 billion. Fruits were valued at $1.574 billion; sh at $686 million; beef at $641 million; poultry at $569 million; beverages at $541 million; prepared foods, jams or jellies at $530 million; dairy at $489 million; honey at $439 million; pork, lamb and other meats at $393 mil lion; eggs at $372 million and nuts at $315 million. Local food purchases in 2011-2012 in Florida were es timated by the study to lead to an economic impact of 183,625 fulland part-time jobs. The research was based on a mail survey in the sum mer of 2012 to 7,500 house holds and had 1,599 usable responses, according to the study. The study also notes that there was no standard ac cepted geographic denition of local foods among sur vey respondents. Some of the denitions included in the survey results were with in Florida, in the respon dents county or specic city, the Southeast or within a 100mile radius from the respon dents home. I think its consumer de mand, said Danielle Tread well, an associate professor of horticultural sciences at the University of Florida, of restau rants buying locally. I think ultimately consumers pretty much drive demand and there has been a lot of education, a lot of media attention and a lot of word of mouth. Citing the USDA Census of Agriculture, Treadwell said there are 44,519 farms in Florida, with 93 percent be ing small farms. She added numerous re ports and data show most small farms sell direct to con sumer, which includes sell ing to a restaurant. To me, its a no-brain er. I really would encourage restaurateurs to work with their local farmers and ranch ers, Treadwell said. Food, we know, is a lot more nutri tious when its consumed as quickly after harvest as pos sible. Purchasing things from other states that require days, if not weeks, to arrive, just ar ent going to taste as good. Place your ad here and reach the Local Market!VERY AFFORDABLE!Call today 352-394-2183 FOOD PURCHASES Total value of all food pur chased annually through lo cal market channels in 20112012 in Florida: $8.314 billion Through grocery stores: $6.079 billion Through farmers markets, roadside stands and u-pick farms: $1.813 billion Through restaurants: $320 million Through special arrange ments with producers: $91.2 million Through community-sup ported agriculture organiza tions: $11.4 million Source: Local Food Systems in Florida: Consumer Characteristics and Economic Impacts by Alan W. Hodges and Thomas J. Stevens of the Food and Resource Econom ics Department at the University of Florida. PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Pisces Rising general manager Joshua Jungferman, right, and chef Alexander Gandia, left, pose for a photo at Pisces Rising with all locally sourced or small batch food and liquors in Mount Dora. Workers space out basil plants at ARC Greenhouses in Mount Dora. The company participates in both the Jersey Fresh and Fresh From Florida programs. Mount Dora restaurant, farm doing business locally

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Wednesday, April 30, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D1 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance r t t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital

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D4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 30, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 2 X 4 Black 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr S C A B S E C S A S P S S T E M S E L L A T A R O T S C O T T T U R O W C I V I C P R I D E H O R N S O N A T A T O Y O U T E A L B L U E G O E S O N N E A R O E R C A L D E R M U S T A N G S A L L Y I R R B O L E R O S N O T S T O P C O C K S A M I N D D D E A N O A L O H A O C A B A R B E R O F S E V I L L E E M B A R G O V F W P O U N D O N S A S E L I N O I S Y I N T C E S I D I A M I N I T T E Y E S O R E S A N D I E G O C H A R G E R A R C A N T O N D U O O R O O N E A L L O O S E T E A S M M E W O R D A G E U E Y B E E T L E B A I L E Y T B I L L S G E O O T I C L O U S E S B I A N N U A L L I S L E O P T I M A C A R D C S F O R E S T E R C O T T O N B A L L O D E O N B L O T K L E I N S L Y E A R K S N O N E Crossword puzzle is on page C2. Thank you for reading the local paper!



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SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | C1SPORTS: Trevor Lloyd becomes FALs rst football signee WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWST AND INSIDE CLASSIFIED D1 CROSSWORDS C2 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN C1 SPORTS B1 VOICES A4WORD ON THE STREE T A2SOUTH LAKE PRESSV OLUME 99, NO. 18 5 SECTIOn N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reservedwww. southlakepress.com PRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comThe Lake County Sheriffs Ofce made its rst ar rest two weeks ago for hu man trafcking. Members of the countys Human Trafck ing Task Force s aid it illustrates the organization is trying to address the issue before it be comes a major problem. We want to make sure it does not become a problem in this county, said Capt. Todd English, co-chair of the task force. It is very important to prepare, be aware and trained on how to handle it. The recent undercover oper ation resulted in the rescue of a 14-year-old victim of human trafcking and the arrests of 44 alleged prostitutes, pimps and johns. The suspect, Gregory Lionel Foster, 28, is accused of abducting the 14-year-old from a gas station on April 9 and try ing to force her to have sex with a man for money at an Orlando home and raping her himself before taking her to the motel where he thought another customer awaited, according to an arrest afdavit. The task force is investigating an estimated 10 possible human trafcking cases in the county, representing a relatively low number in comparison to larger cities such as Orlando. But, English said the presence of I-4 to the east and I-75 to the west increases the potential for human trafcking. The truck stop in Wildwood could also be a catalyst for trafcking. Based on my training experience, all truck stops should not be ignored as a potential location where drugs are bought and sold as well as women, he said. Currently, the task force receives no federal funding and two detectives in the homicide and special victims unit are investigating human trafcking cases as part of the task force. English said he hopes to apply for federal funding. It comes with building your task force and the infrastructure of your task force that federal grants require, he said. At this point we take this task force on essentially as an added job responsibility. Human trafcking is considered a form of modern day slav ery by experts. Victims of human trafcking are subjected to force, fraud or coercion for the purpose of sexual exploitation or forced labor, according to the Florida state statute 787.06 on human trafcking.TAVARESCops brace for human trafficking BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Detective Danny Morales poses for a photo at his desk at the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce in Tavares on April 22. STORY HIGHLIGHTS %  enThere are 27 million people enslaved worldwide. %  enFlorida ranks third in the nation for trafcking activity. %  enLake has 10 cases under investigation and has seen 10 other potential victims in the last three years.Sources: Lake County Human Trafcking Task Force, National Human Trafcking Resource Center and Haven of Lake and Sumter Counties Inc. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comNearly two years ago, Patrick Borsey, one of the owners of Red Wing Restaurant in Groveland, found himself ap pealing to the commu nity for the safe return of a baby goat stolen from a fenced-in pet ting farm at the eatery at 12500 State Road 33. Soon after that, and just as mysteriously as hed disappeared, Elvis the goat was returned. Over the past two years, hes been joined by other goats, pigs and an imals that Borsey has either rescued, is fos tering or that have been born throughout the months. About a month ago, though, Elvis vanished again, this time with many of his companion animals. I was very upset at rst and thought maybe theyd gotten out somehow, but that wasnt the case, Borsey said. They were just gone. Some of the little kids are really upset, too, because they like feeding the animals and the goats are a big part of that. Along with Elvis and his father, Donald, Borsey claims someone GROVELANDPopular goat missing again SUBMITTED PHOTO Along with Elvis, seen here, and his father, Donald, someone has stolen 13 fainting goats and two pot-bellied pigs from a petting zoo at the Red Wing Restaurant in Groveland. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMascotte ofcials have been sued twice since March over actions taken against former of cer Sgt. David Grice before, during and after his termination in January. One suit was led by the Flor ida Police Benevolent Association, alleging that Grices Ofcers Bill of Rights was violated as a result of the way the ring process was carried out. Another suit recently led by Eustis Attorney Derek Schroth alleges that city ofcials made false accusations against Grice in retaliation for complaints Grice made about Police Chief Ron aldo Banasco, that he was secretly videotaped without his knowledge, and was harassed, humiliated and mistreated. The suit seeks damages of at least $15,000. I really feel that Sgt. Grices Ofcers Bill of Rights were abused, said Schroth. Schroth said when the city learned of a pending suit by the FPBA on Grices behalf, city of cials claimed he was never red, but records show no pay ment stubs for Grice since January. Ive never seen any thing like this, Schroth said. Documents obtained from the city show that Mas cotte police red Grice in Jan uary for refusing to cooperate with an internal investigation for allegedly harassing a female ofcer. Grice contends he was the tar get of discrimination by Banasco because of complaints he MASCOTTEEx-cop files lawsuit against city BANASCO SEE SUIT | A2SEE MISSING | A2SEE COPS | A2 We are currently using genetic (DNA) testing to diagnose and treat diseases. We are focused on preventing illness before it causes major dysfunction. DNA testing is available for weight loss and performance, cardiac prevention, mental health, and cancer risk. www.marholinmedicalinstitute.com

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 30, 2014 CLERMONT Harpist Victoria Schultz to perform on TuesdayMusic of the Spheres, an afternoon of soothing and beautiful harp music performed by Victoria Schultz will take place from 4 to 6 / p.m., Tuesday as part of the Cooper Memorial Library Concert Series. For information, call Dennis Smolarek at 352-536-2275 or email dsmolarek@lakeline.lib..us.CLERMONT Boy Scout collecting lacrosse equipment for projectBailey Zollweg of Scout Troop 784 of Clermont is in pursuit of his Eagle Scout project which includes collecting new and used lacrosse equipment for kids who couldnt afford the items. A fundraiser car wash event will be held to raise funds and collect items, from noon to 3 p.m., Sunday at Christian Brothers Automotive, 2659 E. State Road 50 in Clermont (across from Target). Items needed are helmets, sticks, cleats, body pads, gloves and accessories, including balls, new mouth guards and equipment sanitizer. For information, email laxeagleproject@gmail.com or call 904-834-1LAX.CLERMONT Congregation Sinai golf tournament registration openRegistration is open for this third annual golf tournament sponsored by Congregation Sinai to be held Saturday at the Legends Country Club in Clermont. The fee for the tournament is $75 and includes breakfast, 18 holes of golf, range balls, lunch, contests, prizes and awards. For information, go to www.congregation-sinai.org, or call Barbara Salsitz at 352-432-6008.CLERMONT Belk seeking charities to sign up for fundraiserBelk can help you raise funds for your favorite nonprot charity, organization, school or church by taking part in the semi-annual Charity Day sale on Saturday. Participating charities raise money by selling tickets for $5 each, which entitles purchasers to attend a private fourhour sale offering discounted prices off rarely discounted brands, plus the attendee will receive $5 off their rst purchase using their charity ticket. The entire $5 from every ticket sold goes to the participating charity. Tickets can be purchased by calling the Clermont Belk store, 270 Citrus tower Blvd., at 352-243-2227, ext. 210.LAKE COUNTY Health department to offer school immunizationsThe Department of Health ofce in Lake County will offer immunizations at local Lake County schools on an ongoing basis for students who will enter the seventh grade during the 2014-15 school year. Immunizations will be given at Eustis Middle School on May 6, East Ridge Middle School in Clermont on May 8, Clermont Middle School on May 15 and Cecil E. Gray Middle School in Groveland on May 20. For information, call 352-771-5500 or go to www.lakechd.com.CLERMONT Puttin Fore Paws Golf Tournament set for SundayHelp homeless animals in the community by participating in the rst annual South Lake Animal Leagues Puttin Fore Paws Golf Tournament Sunday at Kings Ridge Golf Course in Clermont. Check-in and breakfast begin at 7:30 / a.m. followed by an 8:30 / a.m. shotgun start. Prizes will be given for closest-to-the-pin and longest drive. The event will also feature an auction, rafes and 50/50. Lunch will be served following the tournament. For information, go to www.slal.org/ puttinforepaws or email puttinforepaws@slal.org. Area Briefs What south Lake residents are saying about ...HEALTH CARE FINESIndividuals without health care coverage are subject to nes collected by the IRS. What do you think should be done with the collected funds?The thing is, if theyre going to ne, and collect it with your tax return, the people who really cant afford it probably wont have a tax return. How do you match it up with them? JOY ENGLISH CLERMONT I guess it will just end up as part of the countrys GDP. But if they want to create a fund, they could pump it back into the health system. ZOE WEATHERBY TAMPA It should be used to pro vide low cost drugs to peo ple who cant afford them. THERESA BOHLER EUSTIS I think in a perfect world, the money would be used to go back in the health care system to provide plans for people who need them. KATHY MATHIS CLERMONT Word on theStreet Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 made against the chief, including the alleged bug ging of police cars. On Friday, Schroth said that one thing that stands out in his mind is a copy of a video he obtained from a camera Banasco was wearing when he red the ofcer. They made him take his badge off, take his gun out and they made him get into the back of a police car to be transport ed back to the police department from city hall to get his car, Schroth said, adding that the tape shows Banasco speaking unprofessionally even af ter Grice gets into his car and drives off. It was obvious that an attempt was being made to humiliate Grice in an unprecedented manner, Schroth said. In addition, Schroth said that when Grice was red in January he was not red in accordance with the Ofcers Bill of Rights. Grice would have been entitled to a judi cial hearing and certain protection represen tation by the FPBA and a review of all allegations against him until he could be proven guilty of an of fense. In the suit, Schroth seeks to be reinstated to the same position he held prior to being red in January. He also wants his benets and seniority rights restored, his wages, benets and other losses paid back, and an injunction to prevent the city from further retaliating against Grice. He further seeks damages and court and attorney costs he in curred. Banasco could not be reached for comment and no comment could be obtained from the city because its ofces were closed as of Thursday around 5 / p.m. SUIT FROM PAGE A1 has stolen 13 of his 14 fainting goats and two pot-bellied pigs. Unlike the rst incident, Borsey called law enforcement to report the theft and is offering a $500 re ward for information leading to the safe return of his animals. Lake County Sher iffs Ofce spokesman Lt. John Herrell conrmed that Deputy Sheriff Brett Rutzebeck is on the case and actively investigating leads as they come in. I just want them (ani mals) back, Borsey said. I have taken them on and they are like family. Every single one of them. Some have been born on the farm. Im just hoping none of them had made it to anyones dinner ta bles. Since ling the theft re port, one of the two missing pigs has been returned, found through a Facebook posting of someone kissing a pig that looked much like Borseys. Borsey said a friend noticed the posting and showed it to him. Imme diately, Borsey recognized the little fellow and called Rutzebeck, who followed up and got the pig back. No arrest has yet been made however, pending further investigation, Herrell said. Were working the case and theyve (Red Wing) also got their own investigation going through so cial media, Herrell said, adding that he encour ages anyone who knows anything to call the department so the animals can be returned. I am just asking that whoever knows something just come forward and step up because I want my animals back, Borsey said. Anyone with information about the missing animals can call the LCSO at 352-343-2101 or Central Florida Crimeline at 1-800-4236-TIPS, where one may be eligible for a reward for information leading to a felony arrest. Borsey has posted pic tures of his missing an imals on Facebook on the Red Wing Restaurant page. MISSING FROM PAGE A1 Ab out 27 million people are enslaved worldwide, according to the National Human Trafcking Resource Center. In 2011, the resource center r anked Florida third in the nation in the number of calls received by the centers human trafcking hotline. Representatives from the Department of Children and Families and Lake County Shared Ser vices Network in 2012 approached Sheriff Gary Borders about starting the task force. Lake County is a wonderful example of getting ahead of the curve, being smart and getting prepared, said Kimberly Grabert, statewide human trafcking prevention director for the Florida Department of Children and Families and the task forces chairwoman. We are building a continuum of care. We are working closely with leaders, providers and therapists across the state. Grabert said many of the victims of human trafcking ar e desperate to be part of something and to be loved. As a result, they are often drawn into sexual or labor exploitation when they meet a pimp who tells the victim she is wonder ful, beautiful and they will provide the clothing and food for them, said LCSO Detective Daniel Morales, an investigator for the task force. The juvenile or adult then goes back with that trafcker and soon after ward becomes hooked on drugs, Morales said. Then, the trafcker will tell the victim they must repay them for providing food and clothing through prostitution, he added. What we know about this population is there is a high rate of them being exposed to violence in their household, Grabert said. They are seeking relationships with people they are lacking in their personal lives. It lls the void for the child and we have to ll that void: sometimes it is their ther apist or child protective investigator. Statewide, Grabert said she is seeing quite a bit of gang activity in which victims are sold by siblings. The hardest part of many cases is getting victims to comply and keeping them safe, task force ofcials said. When law enforcement recovers them, they disappear, Grabert said. It is a hard population, but they desperately need our help. The biggest challenge, Morales said, is many dont feel they are victims of human trafcking. A lot of people in that lifestyle dont understand the meaning of human trafcking, he said. English said it is much harder to get victims to come forward. They wont cooperate with us in the interview process to give us what law enforcement needs to have probable cause to hold their trafckers, he said. They can be difcult cases as far as to investigate, bring to conclusion and bring to an arrest. Kelly Smallridge, executive director of Haven of Lake and Sumter Counties Inc., a shelter, which provides emergency, longterm shelter and counseling for victims of domestic violence, said about 10 potential victims of human trafcking have come through her shelter in the last three years. All of the victims were from southeast Asia and Russia and did not speak English. Smallridge said she would never forget the 21-year-old girl from Asia who was in the hospital for six weeks after being beaten severely by a trafcker. She nally healed and went back to Thailand, she said. Many trafckers take advantage of the fact that the victims often dont speak English, Smallridge said, threatening many with deportation if they do not do what the trafckers wanted. Morales said he is encouraged that the Florida Legislature has implemented stricter penalties for those charged with human trafcking. It is now a felony, he said. It makes it more difcult to get out of jail. Stiffer laws could be on the horizon. If passed, HB 1019 would prohibit minors from working in an adult theater, remove the statute of limitations for human trafcking violations and increase certain penalties relating to the trafcking of children, among other things. The bond for Foster, who was arrested and charged last week with human trafcking, is $200,000. COPS FROM PAGE A1

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Wednesday, April 30, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3 LINDA CHARLTONSpecial to The Daily CommercialCome on ladies. Hes worth more than a 100 bucks. He put on a bra for you! With those words, auctioneer Laura Mancinelli urged her audience to up the ante for the custom-designed bras (and boxers) up for bid at the Bras for the Cause fundraiser of the Greater Clermont Cancer Foundation Saturday. It was the seventh year the Foundation has held the event, which took place at the Heritage Hills clubhouse in Clermont this year. The new twist was that many of the bras were mod eled by reghters both men and women. As event coordinator Kay Simpson said in her opening remarks, I have learned one thing about reghters. They can run into a burning build ing and rescue people and cats, but they have a hard time wearing a bra. They took a lot of coaxing, but they are here. The rst entry, the Studded bra worn by reght er Robert Siegworth went for $175. Tamara Richardson, as Cruella DeVille, got the bid ding into high gear with an ensemble that fetched $500. Fireghter Dak Rakow didnt hit that mark, but he set the tone for many of the reght ers with his campy approach to the runway, as he tossed stufng from his bra into the audience of about 250 people. Fireghter Eric Strange closed out the show, modeling his black kitty bra and do ing his best to act cat-like. The two high bidders for the kitty bra, with bids of $500 and $525, decided to both pay up, according to Simpson. It was Ann Dupee who, with a $500 bid, got to take the bra home. I will have to see where it ends up, either at the re de partment, or city hall or trav eling around the city, she said. Id like to do something fun with it. Noting that last years event netted close to $25,000, Simp son said she was hoping this one would bring in $30,000. In her opening remarks, Simpson dedicated this years event to longtime Cancer Foundation supporter Kathleen Kelley Brown, whom Simpson described as our Seminole-loving Irish valentine. Brown died of cancer on Wednesday. Unlike many cancer foun dations, the Clermont organization does no research. Instead they give grants to local families who have a hard time dealing with the nancial burden that can come with a diagnosis of cancer. In addition the foundation gives scholarships to high school seniors whose lives have been affected by cancer. In 2013 they gave $76,000 in grants and scholarships, ac cording to Simpson. For more information on the Foundation, go to their website at www.gccf.us.CLERMONTFirefighters model bras, boxers for cancer charity LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Lt. Eric Strange of the Clermont Fire Department displays a black cat bra designed by Sue Joiner and sponsored by Lyns Ice Cream and Sandwich Shoppe. Staff ReportA plucky little dog that survived a bear attack in late March has found a new home. When Deana Osenieks 7-year-old son saw Per cival on the news, he knew that the Treeing Walker coonhound would make the perfect addition to the family, Elisha Pappacoda, a county public informa tion ofcer, said in a press release. Percival was picked up as a stray by Lake County animal control ofcers in the Ocala National Forest. The dog had a grapefruit-size wound on his back. He went to a couple of vets and I think they werent sure exactly what happened to him, but the last vet said bear attack, Pappacoda said. She said denitively it was a bear attack. The Osenieks family from Volusia County in cluding two kids with three dogs in tow visited Per cival at the Lake County Animal Services shelter in Tavares and held their breath that Percival would be theirs, Pappacoda said. I had to tell them if its meant to be, its meant to be, Deana said. The family realized Per cival, or Percy, would make an ideal best friend for the familys dog, Shotgun, a redbone coonhound who got his name after suffer ing two bullet wounds, Pappacoda said. Coinci dentally, Shotgun was a Lake County Animal Ser vices shelter dog before being adopted by the Os enieks last year through a local rescue group.TAVARESDog mauled by bear finds a new home PHOTO COURTESY OF WHITNEY LUCKHART Deana Osenieks and her two sons have adopted Percival, a Treeing Walker coonhound that was mauled by a bear.

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 30, 2014Oppose corporate greedIn the April 6 edition of the Daily Commercial there was a great article by Kevin G. Hall, of the McClatchy Washington Bureau, U.S. companies chipping away at retiree benets. Employees need to get or ganized and unionize against these companies who only show their support through their stockholders and their CEOs large salaries. The poor and middle class Americans need to boycott these companies. And every one in America needs to vote Democrat in upcoming elections for a better Congress who will increase the minimum wage and protect Social Security, allow immigrants who were born here to become U.S. citizens and also keep womens rights intact. LINDA GREEN | LeesburgThe founding fathers would have been pleasedRuss Sloan in his diatribe on Easter Sunday on the welfare system wrote, The Preamble to the Constitution reads, provide for the common defense and promote the general welfare, not vice versa. That is absolutely correct, but he fails to mention the Preamble has no legal standing when we interpret the Constitution. The Founding Fathers in their great wisdom wrote in Article 1 Section 8, Congress shall have the power to, Provide for the common defense and gener al welfare of the United States ... Sloan has a propensity for not telling the whole story, just what ts his ideological beliefs. The founding fathers also added in Article 1 section 8, to make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carry ing into execution the fore going powers ... In essence, they gave the Congress the power to make any law necessary and proper to provide for the general welfare. Sloan also wrote, We have so distorted the intent of our founding fathers that they would be in shock to see what a welfare mentality we have accepted. I do not have the clairvoy ance Russ seems to claim, but most probably would be pleased to see Congress has used the power they gave them to provide for the general welfare. There are some things they probably would be shocked about, like non-property owners, women and blacks voting, that corporations are people, money is speech and a black man is president. MARVIN JACOBSON | ClermontNot the place of the Supreme CourtI am referencing an article on the front page of the Daily Commercial on April 17 by Jim Turner of the News Service of Florida, Amazon to start collecting sales taxes. The article goes on to say if the entity has a presence in the state that a person is ordering from, then they will be charged sales tax. The Supreme Court ruled some years ago that if the business had a presence in a state that a person orders from then a tax can be collected. This is a classic example of the court legislating from the bench. Article 1 section 9-10, states that no tax can be collected from items crossing any state line or from port to port. The proper way to handle it would have been to amend the Constitution but they knew that the amendment would never y. I imagine that political inuence was exercised in this process. I do not pay sales tax on items ordered across state lines. If the shipper hints at charging a tax, I cancel the order. I refuse to be a part of this tax, tax, tax! It is just another way of draining the citi zen of a few more drops of blood in the form of taxes. I would rather do without the product than pay the tax. The state of Florida had to return $700 million to people who were charged a tax for bringing their cars into the state. The person taxed had to make application for it. The state should have been required to purge the archives and see who paid the tax and notify them at their last known address. But then again, they never do the right thing. This ruling by the Supreme Court should have been revisited by a more competent Court than made the ruling. I do remember that one of the judges on the ruling court had a stroke at the time the 5 to 4 decision was made. I have no problem with a 6 to 3, or 7 to 2, but a 5 to 4 is no good. D.J. LYNCH | WildwoodWhen the Florida Legislatures annual ses sion ends next month and campaign ing for state ofces begins, incumbents seeking re-election to state ofces will brag how they have kept taxes low. Their claims will be correct. Florida ranked 47th in total per capita taxation heading into this years session. Whats more, legislators are likely to reduce some revenues this year by, for example, lowering vehicle-registration fees. In this context, Florida TaxWatch, an independent organization that studies state taxation and spending policies, cites these state revenue sources: lottery proceeds, documentary stamps on real estate transactions, a sales tax (6 percent) and taxes on utilities, cellphones, motor fuels, insurance, alcoholic beverages and tobacco. Indeed, Floridas statewide taxes are low compared with those in other states. But, theres more. Floridas place on the bottom rungs of state-level taxation and total revenue are due in part to an extraordinary reliance on local governments not only to provide services, but to generate dollars. Thanks to the folks at TaxWatch, who recently issued their 2014 How Florida Compares report, we know that: %  en The state has the fth-highest percentage (50 percent) of state and local taxes generated by local governments. %  en Florida has the second-highest percentage (55 percent) of state and local revenue generated by local governments. %  en Local revenues include not only property taxes but local-option sales taxes, impact fees, franchise fees for utilities and special assessments. In general, cities, counties and other local entities in Florida are assigned and assume disproportionately greater responsibility for courts, social services, infrastructure, health care for indigent patients and education. Nowhere is the state governments reliance on locals more evident than in public education. The Florida Constitution requires the state to adequately fund high-quality education and also prohibits the state from levying a property tax. Yet, each year, the Legislature requires school boards to levy property taxes at specic rates. Even though local, per capita revenues in Florida rank seventh nationwide and local, per capita taxes rank 22nd, the combined state and local tax burden is below average. Ranked 33rd, Floridas state and local governments collect $5,599 per person in total revenues; the average in the United States is $6,303. In terms of state and local taxes, Florida ranks 37th $3,420 per capita; the national average is $4,287. It would be polite for incumbents in state ofces to thank local governments and their taxpayers for making them look good. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . ........................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTOPINION WHATS YOUR OPINION?The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to: Letters to the Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711By fax to: 352-394-8001EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed.GUEST COLUMNSIf you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OURVIEW SOUTH LAKE PRESSYour community newspaper for more than 100 years.732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 n Fax: 352-394-8001The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Florida 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region.All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. YOUROPINIONSLETTERS TO THE EDITOR The states pass-the-buck LegislatureThe generosity of bikersI have lived in Leesburg for 24 years and I have been a biker for more than 50 years. Having said that, here are the good, bad and the ugly sides of Bikefest. I have gone to every Bikefest since the rst one. I even have the original T-shirt. The good is that the Leesburg Partnership puts on a great rally. The bad is that non-bikers hate it. Now the ugly. The Sound of Money. That was the front-page headline on Easter Sunday in the Daily Commercial. Bikers are the most generous group of people on the earth. They will assemble in masses to donate to charities. So why does the Partnership and every vendor screw them? Basically, Leesburg is a char ity, a depressed community. Hundreds of thousands of bikers come to Leesburg each year and bail them out by pour ing millions into the economy. What do they get for this? Michael Vassell, general m anager of Holiday Inn Express Hotel & Suites in Tavares, says this, A standard room normally goes for $101 to $125, but during Bikefest that goes up to $150 because rates are based on de mand. Dont you really mean greed? I remember when beer cost $2 at Bikefest. It is now $5 to $6, not counting the cost of a commemorative cup. Parking used to be free. Food prices have soared because the vendors have to pay so much for their spaces. The list goes on, and on and on. Leesburg, think about this: The bikers come here to help, and what do they get? What would happen if Bikefest came and no one showed up? Where are your millions then? Get back to reality before you become Daytona. A lot of bikers dont go there any more for the same reasons I mentioned above. Be thankful for the bikers. Dont screw them. THOMAS J. ZAKLUKIEWICZ Leesburg LETTER of the WEEK FILE PHOTO

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Wednesday, April 30, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5 CHAMBERAWARDS& NEWS www.southlakechamber-fl.com Award sponsor Wesley Reed from Ameriprise Financial presented Madison Lynch from South Lake High School the Outstanding Student of the Month award for March 2014. Madison carries a 4.0 GPA in AP & Honors classes, is a member of HOSA and NHS, serves as the Womens Choir President, is the CoCaptain of the Varsity Cheerleading squad, serves as a student aid for Chorus and AVID, and has also received the Leadership Award from the Universal Cheerleading Association. Congratulations to Ms. Lynch, you are a rolemodel to fellow students as well as adults! The Chamber Ambassadors welcomed Insight Credit Union CEO/President George Davis, Branch Manager Steve Hamilton, his staff and many visiting Insight employees to their new location in Clermont (2580 E. Highway 50, NW corner of Hancock Rd. & E. Highway 50 intersection). A catered reception was also served afterwards. See them at www.InsightCreditUnion.com. Chamber Ambassadors welcomed Attorney Karen Rodriguez to her new Law Office located at 1150 Anderson St. Clermont with a ribbon cutting ceremony. Karen is a former prosecutor who deals with criminal law, family law, immigration law, tenancy law, and bankruptcy cases. See her online at www.KarenRodriguezLawFirm.com or call her at 352-404-7881. Chamber Ambassadors recently joined New Beginnings co-founders Linda & Steve Smith, their staff, and many friends to officially Notice the amazing transformation that took place at their Learning & Development Center located at 792 E. Montrose St. in Clermont. Stop by to take a look or see them online at www.newbeginningslake.org. Chamber Ambassadors joined family, friends, and City of Minneola officials in welcoming Heather Monroe to her new store Lighted Memories by Heather located at 200 South US Hwy 27 Suite C in Minneola. Lighted Memories presents a unique alternative to traditional gifts through a selection of decorative lamps which create a lasting and lighted memory to commemorate special occasions. See her beautiful assortment online at www.lightedmemories.com or call her directly at 352-516-6303. The Grand Opening for the first-ever Wawa store in Lake County was celebrated with much fanfare as Chamber Ambassadors, Lake County Dignitaries, the Wawa Management Team, and many excited patrons joined in their ribbon cutting ceremony. The store is located at 1929 S. Highway 27 in Clermont, and offers a large fresh food service selection, including built-to-order hoagies, freshly brewed coffee, hot breakfast sandwiches, specialty beverages, and an assortment of soups, sides and snacks. See www.wawa.com for more information! Chamber Ambassadors welcomed owners Cowboy Jim and Debbie Klingensmith along with their staff to the new location for their mobile trailer at 25029 CR 561 in Astatula (next to the Olive Ingram Community Center). They will be located there every Thursday, Friday, & Saturday from 12PM to 8PM, serving up not only their delicious cookies and desserts, but now also burgers & hotdogs! See them online on Facebook at www.facebook.com/cowboyjimscookies. Friends and Ambassadors were on hand to welcome Mike & Monique Bender from Allstar Cleaning & Enterprises to their new offices located at 720 Almond St. in Clermont. They offer residential & commercial cleaning, new construction cleaning, minor home & business repairs, painting, window washing, and carpet cleaning. Give them a call at 352-708-4200, or online at www.facebook.com/allstareterprisesLLC. Clermont Waterfront Bikes & Boards owners Dawn & Tim Engle officially 'cut the ribbon' while being welcomed to their new location at 15 Second St. in Clermont by the Chamber Ambassadors. They are situated by Clermont Waterfront Park and offer rentals, sales, and service for bicycles, kayaks, & paddleboards as well as other accessories. See them online at www.ClermontWaterfrontBikesandBoards.com or call them at 352-394-0535. The March 2014 Gem of the Hills Award was presented to Aimee Stanley, co-founder of Optima One Realty in Clermont. In addition to running her real estate business, Aimee engages herself in community related non-profit organizations such as the Junior Womans Club, Back to School is COOL Lake County, as well as being involved with the annual Clermont Turkey Trot, Pig on the Pond, and the South Lake Young Professionals. Aimee is pictured receiving the award from Michelle Michnoff from BankFIRST, the Chair of the Community Relations Committee.

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A6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 30, 2014 IN MEMORY DEATH NOTICESSarah Ruth BrannockSarah Ruth Brannock, 81, of Longwood, died Thursday, April 17, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home. Umatilla.Maxine L. CollinsMaxine L. Collins, 75, of Eustis, died Tuesday, April 22, 2014. Hayes Brothers Funeral Home, Eustis.Daniel Hubert DrakeDaniel Hubert Drake, 86, of Leesburg, died Monday, April 21, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares.Maggie M. FoxMaggie M. Fox, 92, of Wildwood, died Wednesday, April 23, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Charles J.A. GunasekaraCharles J.A. Gunasekara, 78, of Leesburg, died Wednesday, April 23, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares.Anne D. HarpAnne D. Harp, 94, of Winter Park, died Sunday, April 20, 2014. Al len J. Harden Funeral Home, Mount Dora.Peter L. HubbellPeter L. Hubbell, 76, of Leesburg, died Wednesday, April 23, 2014. Eastside Funeral Home, LeesburgSammy Lee InmanSammy Lee Inman, 86, of Leesburg, died Friday, April 18, 2014. Eastside Funeral Home, Leesburg.Joseph W. KnightJoseph W. Bub Knight, 69, of Tavares, dies Tuesday, April 22, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares.Lucille MartinLucille Martin, 94, of Oxford, died Thursday, April 24, 2014. Banks/ Page-Theus Funeral Home and Cremation Services, Wildwood.Dorothy F. MaysDorothy F. Mays, 78, of Leesburg, died Wednesday, April 16, 2014. Eastside Funeral Home, Leesburg.Gloria S. OliverGloria S. Oliver, 85, of Tampa, died Saturday, April 5, 2014. Beyers Fu neral Home, UmatillaPaul Ernest PapineauPaul Ernest Papine au, 65, of Leesburg, died on Wednesday, April 23, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Cecelia Skipper PearsonCecelia Skipper Pear son, 82, of Fruitland Park, died Thursday, April 24, 2014. PageTheus Funerals & Cre mations, Leesburg.Troy Cecil RobertsTroy Cecil Roberts, 62, of Eustis, died Friday, April 18, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatil la.Earl Joseph SchirraEarl Joseph Schirra, 84, of Leesburg, died Tuesday, April 22, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Lees burg.Mike Leo SkibaMike Leo Skiba, 93, of Tavares passed away on Friday, April 25, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares, FLWilfred M. Stark Jr.Wilfred M. Stark Jr., 65, of Wildwood, died Friday, April 18, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood, FL. Sandra Fay StieberSandra Fay Stieber, 77, of Bushnell, died Tuesday, April 22, 2014. Purcell Funeral Home, Bushnell.Chad Daniel VanProoyenChad Daniel VanProoyen, 32, of Lees burg, died Sunday, April 20, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares.Norton Kent WingNorton Kent Wing, 82, of Umatilla, died Sunday, April 20, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatilla.Thank you for reading the local newspaper, the Daily Commercial!

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B1SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 30, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTSSPORTS EDITOR . ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE . .............................. 365-8268 FAX . .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL . ......... sports@dailycommercial.comSPORTSandLEISURE FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comDrew Mendoza scored on a bases-loaded walk in the seventh inning on April 24 to give Lake Minneola a 9-8 win in the Class 6A-District 6 title game at Lake Minneola High School. Mendozas run capped a two-run rally in the seventh inning for the Hawks and earned them a home game in Thursdays regional quarter nal round. Aaron Pandorf picked up the win for the Hawks (1511). The third pitcher used by Lake Minneola coach Mike Smith, Pandorf went one hit less inning and struck out two on eight pitches. Ryan Halstead, the third pitcher used by Leesburg, was tagged with the loss. Halstead allowed two hits and two runs one earned in one inning of work. He walked two and struck out two. Even though the Yellow Jackets lost April 24, they will play in the regional quarter nals. However, Leesburg (1017) will be forced to play on the road. Their opponents were not known at press time, al though both games will played at 7 / p.m. Thursday. In the bottom of the sev enth inning, Kevin Lora reached on catchers inter ference and Mendoza laced a single through the left side of the ineld. Jon Hoskinson then doubled down the right eld line, scoring Cameron Recny, who was running for Lora. Brett Coffel was walked in tentionally to bring up Tuck er Rayburn, who was 2-for-3 in the game. After falling behind 1-and-2, Rayburn even tually worked Halstead for a bases-loaded walk that plat ed Mendoza with the walkoff win. Lake Minneola had 13 hits off the Yellow Jackets pitch ing triumvirate of Kyle Bra na, Brendin Perkins and Halstead. The Hawks also beneted from six Leesburg errors. Mendoza and Coffel paced Lake Minneola with three hits. Rayburn and Brandon Hartley had two hits apiece. Rayburn had three RBIs, while Coffel and H artley had two apiece. Mendoza and Hoskinson scored two runs each. Hoskinson started for Lake Minneola and went 4 1/3 in nings, allowing seven hits and seven runs, although only four were earned. Michael Tow and Pandorf combined to pitch 4 2/3 innings of hitless relief. Brana and Jaden Langley had two hits for Leesburg. Tucker Smith had three RBIs and Luis Montalvo had two RBIs. Brian Hepburn and Langley scored two runs apiece.MINNEOLAHawks outlast Yellow Jackets in Class 6A-6 title game FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comTavares High School is home to a state champion. Jose Barajas lifted a combined weight of 635 pounds on April 25 to win at 169 pounds in the Florida High School Athletic Association Class 1A Boys Weight lifting Finals at the Kissimmee Civic Center. According to Tavares weightlifting coach Chris Gauntlett, Barajas is the second Bulldog to win a state weightlifting title. Barajas outlifted his closest competitor, Althas Tristan Grifn, by 30 pounds. Barajas had 340 pounds in the bench press and 295 pounds in the cleanand-jerk. Grifn lifted 330 pounds in the bench press and 275 pounds in the clean-and-jerk. Barajas was the only local lift er to win a state title. At 119 pounds, South Sumters Valentino Avant nished seventh with 370 pounds 200 pounds in the bench press and 170 pounds in the clean-andjerk. Avants teammate, Alan Macias, also earned spot in the nals at 119 pounds, but did not record a weight. Eustis Corey Davis nished fourth at 139 pounds and Uma tillas Brett Bush was fth. Bushs teammate, Chris McEntire, was ninth. Davis lifted 480 pounds 220 pounds in the bench press and 260 pounds in the cleanand-jerk to nish 10 pounds ahead of Bush, who had 265 pounds in the bench press and 205 pounds in the clean-andjerk. McEntire had a nal total of 435 pounds 225 pounds in the bench press and 210 pounds in the clean-and-jerk. McEntire was tied with two others in total weight, but was awarded ninth place because he weighed less than the two lifters with whom he nished in a tie. At 199 pounds, South Sumters Joey Mohler nished eighth with 605 pounds 310 pounds in the bench press and 290 pounds in the clean-and-jerk. South Sumters Caleb Simmons was seventh at 219 pounds following a bench press of 355 pounds and a clean-and-jerk of TAVARESBarajas wins state title PHOTO COURTESY OF CHRIS GAUNTLETT Tavares High School weightlifter Jose Barajas, right, poses with Tavares coach Chris Gauntlett on April 25 after winning the 169-pound classication at the FHSAA Boys Weightlifting Finals in Kissimmee. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comTrevor Lloyd is typical of many students at First Academy of Lees burg. Hes respectful, par ticularly towards adults, always looking others in the eyes when speaking to them and is quick to offer a greeting and a rm handshake. One thing, however, sets Lloyd apart from all other students who have attended the small Leesburg private school he is the rst stu dent-athlete in school history to sign a Na tional Letter of Intent to play football at the next level. Lloyd inked a deal on April 22 to attend Meth odist University, a pri vate school in Fayette ville, N.C., where he is expected to be a receiv er for the Division III institution. He hopes to help the Monarchs im prove on their 8-2 over all record in 2013, which included 6-1 mark in USA South Athletic Conference. This is a great feeling for me, Lloyd said after a signing ceremony in the library at First Acad emy of Leesburg. Lloyd, like many play ers at First Academy of Leesburg, played mul tiple positions for the Eagles. On offense, he was primarily a receiver, while on the other side of the ball, he was a de fensive back and a linebacker. He played an inte gral role in leading First Academy to the Sunshine State Athletic Conference championship in 2013. Lloyd av eraged 21.5 yards per catch, with three of his 13 grabs going for touchdowns. Defensively, he had three interceptions and defended 17 passes. He returned one interception for a score. Lloyd said he had three or four schools on his short list, but made his decision after his ofcial visit to Meth odist. He liked the phi losophy of Monarchs coach C.J. Goss and the campus. It was an easy de cision after seeing the school, Lloyd said. I could see myself go ing there for four years. I was comfortable the whole time I was there and then when I talk ed to (Goss), everything seemed to t what I wanted in a college. Lloyd took time during his signing cer emony to thank his teammates and his family for his success. His parents, Leroy and Vernetta, sat beside him as he signed his National Letter of Intent. My parents kept me level-headed through the entire process, Lloyd said. And my teammates, especially quarterbacks David (El liott) and Byron (Masoline) made the differ ence for me. I dont think Im signing today without the support of my teammates. Lloyd also credited the atmosphere at First Academy of Leesburg for his success. A trans fer from Leesburg High School prior to his senior year, Lloyd said First Academys stiffer academic requirements and the unique athletic demands at the school made him a better per son and player.LEESBURGLloyd becomes FALs first football signee BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Trevor Lloyd, a football player at First Academy, signs with Methodist University at the First Academy library in Leesburg. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comLake Minneola boys basketball coach Freddie Cole is conducting two youth basketball camps in May for play ers looking to improve their fundamentals and ability to perform in game situations. The two-day camps are Friday and Saturday and May 23-24 at the Lake Minneola High School gymnasium for boys and girls between the ages of 5 and 17. Cost of the camps is $50. The rst day for both camps will run from 5 to 8 / p .m. and the second day, which is a Satuday, will begin at 9 / a.m. and end at noon. Cole is the only boys basketball coach in Lake Minneolas history. He led the Hawks to a 28-4 record in 201314 and the Florida High School Athletic Asso ciation Class 6A state championship game. After playing colle giately at Bethune-Cookman University in Day tona Beach, Cole played professionally over seas before becoming a high-school coach. Lake Minneola is 60-22 during Coles three sea sons at the helm. Many of the teaching tools Cole said he plans to use in the camps were learned during his college and profession al careers. Registration forms for the camp are available on request. Email coal are colef@lake.k12. .us to obtain a regis tration form or for any questions. Cole said spots in both camps are lling fast. Ive had 15 peo ple sign up the rst day I put out a signup sheet, Cole said. I planned to stop at 50, but I will gauge any ad ditional interest in the camp if we get to 50 registrations.Lake Minneola hoops coach plans campsMINNEOLASEE BARAJAS | B3

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B2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 30, 2014 %  en SORRENTO BAIT & TACKLE | SORRENTOSome specks are still spawning in the canals in Lake Carlton and Lake Beauclaire among the cat tails, brush and fallen trees where eel grass and lily pads flour ish. Specks are being caught in ap proximately 10 feet of water in the Apopka-Beauclaire canal and out from Deer Island. They are being caught on Rons Zip jigs and small ice jigs fished around 5 to 6 feet covering a lot of water. On Lake Carlton, drift the jig tipped minnow across the lake. Post spawn bass are biting early in the morning in the mouths of residential canals on noisy top water baits like Rat-L-Traps. Lots of hybrid bass are biting at the mouth of the Wekiva River and around the feeder creeks early in the morning on Rat-L-Traps and shiners. A mixed bag of fish are being caught in Lake Monroe fishing the channel and deep water. Stop in and get the latest daily report. %  en SOUTHERN TACKLEWORKS | TAVARESLargemouth bass are being caught on soft plastic baits such as June bug or June bug blue trick worms and watermelon red and June bug red swimming worms. Shell cracker are being caught on grass shrimp and yellow tailed worms. Some crappie are still being caught on chartreuse or pink jig heads tipped with minnows. Sandys next regular bass tournament will be an open tournament held May 17 this tournament will usher in a new season. For information, call the shop at 352-742-0036. %  en PINE ISLAND CAMP | FRUITLAND PARKShellcracker are being caught on worms. Catfish are biting on shrimp. Pine Island has a full sup ply of live baits including grass shrimp as well as a variety of ar tificial baits. RV sites, camp sites boats and slips are available for rental. Check out the restaurant before going out or coming off the lake. %  en PALM GARDENS | TAVARESA few stripers are being caught on saltwater shrimp and lures with silver spoons. A few specks are still being picked up on minnows. The shell cracker action has slowed with the passage of the most recent cold front. Palm Gardens has pontoon boats available to rent. %  en NELSONS FISH CAMP | WEIRSD ALEShellcracker activity has been strong. Shell cracker are biting on grass shrimp. Bass action has been very good. They are biting on spinner baits and soft plastic worms. Bluegill and speck have been biting on grass shrimp and worms. %  en BLACK BASS RESORT AND FISH CAMP | LEESBURGAction has been a little slower with the passage of the last cold front. A few fish are being caught from the dock. In addition to canoes and rowboats Black Bass now rents kayaks. Minnows, red worms and night crawlers sales contin ue to be strong, suggesting specks, bream and catfish are biting. Want to try something new, try fishing from a kayak. LAKES REPORT a weekly update fromCHERYL STALEY-ARCHER rfntnn bnn nn bnn nn tnn ttn rfnnn bntn tntt b n n nnntn rffrff bf rftnn bnt t b tnn n n

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Wednesday, April 30, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B3 CLERMONT BLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSAMILYELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time! IRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONTL Many Other Activities each week Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.org LIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLCHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm SOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary); 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.org ST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am (Rite I) 10:00 am (Rite II) 5:00 pm (Praise & Worship) Sunday School Youth Group Nursery Adult Bible Study Womens Bible Study Mens Prayer Breakfast WOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH GODINCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALE ERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for Children Groveland IRSTBAPTISTCHURCH GROVELAND Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pm MT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! MINNEOLA CONGREGATIONSMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club NEWLPRESBYTERIANCHURCH18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am TLIVINGGOD Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce Rowland MONTVERDE WOODLANDSLUTHERAN15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 am OAKLAND PRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforSouth Lake South LakeGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOMErfn tbt352-394-7121806 W. Minneola Ave.,Clermont,FL Cremation ChoicesDirect Cremation$675Plus Container Ron Becker,Director352-394-8228921 S.US Hwy 27,Minneola,FL 260 pounds. At 238 pounds, Anthony Yurich of South Sumter nished 10th with 600 pounds 310 pounds in the bench press and 290 pounds in the clean-and-jerk. A pair of local lifters competed in the Heavy weight classication, with Montel Presley n ishing ninth with 665 pounds with Mount Doras Richard Marinacci nishing 11th with 650 pounds. Presley reached his to tal weight with a bench press of 380 pounds and a clean-and-jerk of 285 pounds. Marinacci had 395 pounds in the bench press and 255 in the clean-and-jerk. BARAJAS FROM PAGE B1 FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comIron Jungle Weightlifting continues to move along. Lake Countys only weight lifting club competed recent ly at the Florida Youth Trials, a tune-up meet at Port Orange Spruce Creek High School and Iron Jungle Weighlifting had two more lifters earn spots in USA Weightliftings Youth National Championship in June. I only had four lifters com pete, so half of our competi tors qualied for nationals, said Iron Jungle Weightlifting coach Josh Boyer. That gives us four team members who have qualied (for nationals). We have a tough six-week prep period coming up, and our success at Youth Nationals will be a direct correlation to the approach to our training. We are past the level of being con tent with qualifying and now it is time to bring home medals each time we attend a national championship. I have condence that we will have our best training days over this next monthand-a-half. Alexis Smith and Carlos Mo lano had solid performances at Port Orange Spruce Creek to join teammates Morgan Rhone and Brett Ollila at na tionals. Smith competed at 75 kilograms (about 165 pounds) and Molano lifted at 69 kilo grams (about 152 pounds). Smith entered the competition needing 97 kilograms (213 pounds) to qualify for nationals and Boyer said she turned up at the meet ready to succeed. She hit personal records of 41 kilograms (90 pounds) in the Snatch and another personal record weight of 56 kilograms (123 pounds) in the Clean-andJerk for a total of 97 kilograms, a third personal mark. Smith hit on four of her six total lifts and qualied for na tionals with her second at tempt in the Clean-and-Jerk. Her performance earned Iron Jungle its only medal of the competition. I couldnt be more proud of Alexis because she has come so far in reaching this point, Boyer said. Alexis hurt her wrist during the high-school season and has battled the mental block many athletes go through on their road to re covery. I shared with her that I dont ask of my student-ath letes to do anything I have done myself. In college, I broke my femur in a football game. I explained that I to her that I completely understand the physical and mental chal lenges she was going through. Being able to relate to her situation, I think, helped her in overcoming the mental obsta cle of being healed.LEESBURGIron Jungle has 2 more qualifiers for nationals

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B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 30, 2014 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 725344767 1318315974 921FREE SPACE5372 216424863 529395268ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N IB O G BINGO B I N G O SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Lee Alexander WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! B 5 I 29 G 52 O 68 N 39

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Ann DupeeREMEMBER WHENA weekly column that reprints some of the more interesting news stories that have appeared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press.C1SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 30, 2014 www.southlakepress.comCOMMUNITYProudly servingCLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWSSTAFF WRITER . ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE . .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 E-MAIL . .... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com FROM THE FILES | 27 YEARS AGO 1987Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press Congratulations to John Claypool, son of Shirley Claypool, recently selected as the Good Citizen of his Class of 1987 at Groveland High School. Clermont High School now has a golf team, the rst in many years since the Modica boys and Jackie Gaines were bringing home so many honors. Brian Roddy and Carol Ploszaj are the coaches. The home course is Green Valley Country Club. Roddy is employed full-time in golf course maintenance on the Magnolia Course at Walt Disney World and is the teaching pro at Green Valley. Miss Polszaj teaches at Clermont Junior High School. The Clermont team has two seniors, Mickey Olivenbaum and Lance Walsworth; ve juniors, Bradley Beerlohm, Matt Jones, Danny Lindsey, Craig Stephens and Gary Surin; four sophomores, Jake Doty, Eric Eyerly, Tim Misuraca and Terry McCarthy; and two ninth graders, T.J. Garrett and Scott Severinhaus. A special mention to Carolyn Mathieson, a 10th grader, who is the only girl right now. The coaches hope more girls will join this promising and ourishing new program at CHS.CLERMONT HIGH SCHOOL PROMSaturday night, the Junior-Senior Class Prom of Clermont High School was held at the Orange Lake Country Clubs clubhouse on U.S. Highway 192. Following the prom, Ron and Donna Clarke and two of their children, Raechel and Ronnie, members of the junior class, were hosts to a breakfast. Assisting the hosts were Wer ner and Marty Heinrich, John and Joanne Hughes, Jim and Brenda Mayer and Wanda Cox. Attending were Principal David Coggshall and his wife, Car ol; Assistant Principal Bill Sullivan and his wife, Rosa, and teacher Gary Kinninger.LOCAL 100-YEAR-OLD RECOGNIZEDNBC weatherman Willard Scott often recognizes people celebrating their longevity of life. Clermonts Paul Halstead, who just turned 101, received a nice letter from Scott, adding his own good wishes to those of many who recognized this very special milestone. During the Clermont Centennial in 1984, Scott showed the Centennial T-shirt on the networks Today Show and told all about the celebration.FOOD PRICESFood prices at Winn-Dixie: Heinz Ketchup, 32-ounce bottle, 79 cents; %  en HOMETOWN: Hometown is going to be a bit hard. I consider myself a New York baby and a Jersey girl with an extended stay in the Poconos. I have lived in a few states and moved here from the Pocono Mountains in Pennsylvania, where I resided for 20 years before coming to Florida. %  en OCCUPATION: Ordained minister, reiki master/teacher, medium, intuitive and angel guidance readings, spiritual counseling %  en FAMILY: My youngest daughter, Marisa, lives here with me and is a freshman in high school. My oldest daughter, Megan, lives in the Poconos and is working toward her teaching certicate. 1) If you had to summarize your philosophy of life in one sentence, what would it be? I have two that I live by. One: I am neither dened nor limited by labels, and two: Ask, believe, receive. 2) Name a person or incident youve come across recently thats touched you in some way. Why did this person or incident impress you so much? The sweetest thing happened about a month or two ago. My daughter loves Chinese food and roughly twice a month I take her to a local restaurant. We walked in and the young lady that worked there came ying out around the corner and said, Oh my! Its YOU! I had no idea what was going on. She gave me a BIG hug and said, Today is my last day here and I was hoping to see you because you are one of my most favorite customers. Well, I gotta tell you, that simple act of joy and appreciation is one I will carry for ever in my heart. 3) How does what you do contribute to the welfare of the area? Everybody, at one time or another, Meet YourNEIGHBORERIN KOCZURSEE NEIGHBOR | C4SEE HISTORY | C3 CASEY BROOKE LAWSON / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comClermont will hold its rst dragon boat festi val Saturday on Lake Minneola. All proceeds from the event, hosted by New Beginnings, will benet the New Beginnings organization that serves homeless families, individuals and children and other charities in the area. New Beginnings founder Steve Smith said the event is expected to draw thousands of visitors to Waterfront Park to watch as more than 25 teams race across the lake in teams made up of locals, city ofcials, police and re department personnel, plus regional teams visiting from throughout Florida. We are so excited about this event because not only will it help us raise money so that we can continue to help homeless families and children but because we think this is going to be a great event for the city of Clermont, Smith said. In fact, Clermonts City Manager Darren Gray, the events honorary chair man, will be at the event to present the days awards and trophies. The city will host a team, and our police department was so excited about the event, they are elding a second team. I think it will quickly become an annual tradition, Gray said. Dragon boat races have been growing in popularity all over the world. I think as word gets out and people see what a beautiful park and waterfront we have and how many other activities, restaurants and shops we have, the crowds will grow. The weekend event, produced by High Five Dragon Boat, LLC, starts Friday at 5 / p.m. with dinner and en tertainment at the Water front Pavilion. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for children. The races start at 9 / a.m., Saturday. The event will also feature food vendors, a health fair and kids zone, with bounce houses and face painting. The races will pit local and regional teams against each other in a series of heats. Novice teams get instruction led by Lee Cerovac from The Villages, Team USA Senior Rowing Team Coach and all of the necessary equipment to race. Spectators are encour aged to come to Waterfont Park with their lawn chairs and blankets. For information, go to SouthLakeCountyDragonBoat.com.Clermont to host dragon boat races DAVE HYATT / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP The Clermont Dragon Boat Festival will start at 9 a.m. on Saturday.

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C2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 30, 2014Second graders Kaelyn Neuhauser and Catherine Decker, along with other second graders from Pine Ridge Elementary in Clermont recently created crafts using reusable materials and sold the items to raise money at the schools annual Bear Olympics held on April 5, to benet a fellow Lake County second grader who was recently in a serious accident. The students with the help of other Pine Ridge Elementary families were able to raise $175 for the cause.SUBMITTED PHOTO ON WHEELSBY ELIZABETH C. GORSKI / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZNo. 0420RELEASE DATE: 4/27/2014 ACROSS1 Healing cover 5 Instants 9 Ancient symbols of royalty 13 Checks 18 ___ and Louis, 1956 jazz album 19 The Sun, The Moon or The Star 21 Best-selling novelist whom Time called Bard of the Litigious Age 23 Attribute of Elks or Lions Club members 25 Recital piece for a wind player 26 Toast words after Heres 27 Relative of turquoise 29 Proceeds 30 Within earshot 32 Anthem preposition 33 Mobile home seeker? 34 1966 Wilson Pickett R&B hit 40 Abbr. on sale garment tags 41 Short open jackets 42 Commandment word 43 Pipe valves 49 Ive got half ___ to 50 s political inits. 51 Year, to Casals 52 Greeting that includes a Spanish greeting in reverse? 53 Andean tuber 54 Opera based on a play by Pierre Beaumarchais, with The 58 Complete shutout? 61 Post letters 62 Hammer 63 Stockholm-bound carrier 65 Yale Bowl fan 66 Roisterous 68 Bond yield: Abbr. 69 These, to Thierry 70 Ruler known as Big Daddy 72 TVs Cousin ___ 73 Urban renewal target 76 Qualcomm Stadium athlete 79 Pariss ___ du Carrousel 81 Writer Chekhov 82 Pet Shop Boys, e.g. 83 Stella D___ (cookie brand) 84 Jermaine of the N.B.A. 86 Theyre steeped in strainers 89 Mrs. abroad 90 Vocabulary 92 Reversal, of sorts 93 Walkers strip 95 Govt. promissory notes 99 Former Chevrolet division 100 Suffix with narc101 Dirty rats 102 Like equinoxes 105 Fine hosiery material 110 Visa alternative 112 The African Queen novelist 114 Makeup removal item 115 Classic theater name 116 Stain 117 Designer Anne 118 Leonard ___ a.k.a. Roy Rogers 119 Covenant keepers 120 All alternative DOWN1 Breakaway group 2 Renault model with a mythological name3 Woodys Annie Hall role 4 Joanie Loves Chachi co-star 5 ___ 500, annual race in Ridgeway, Va. 6 Wildlife IDs 7 Ones who are the talk of the town? 8 Baking ___ 9 Actress Judd 10 Use elbow grease on 11 Opening for a dermatologist 12 Common newsstand locale: Abbr. 13 Seat at the counter 14 Ready to be played, say 15 De-file? 16 ___ Trend 17 Graceful trumpeter20 ___ Aviv 22 John Irving character 24 QE2s operator 28 Leave in a hurry 31 Music producer Brian 33 ___-Magnon man 34 New corp. hire, often 35 Man, in Milano 36 Cuts, as a cake 37 Coffee-break time, perhaps 38 Shakespeares Titus ___ 39 Financial writer Marshall 40 What business is ___ yours? 43 Bird whose feathers were once prized by milliners 44 Neil of Fox News 45 Ken of Brothers & Sisters 46 Quaker production47 One of the Kardashians 48 Composer Camille Saint-___ 50 The U.N.s ___ Hammarskjld 51 Pounds sounds 54 Give rise to 55 You Must Love Me musical 56 Nosy one 57 Millennia on end 59 Candy-heart message 60 Thats ___! (Not true!) 63 Rug fiber 64 Herseys Italian town 67 Roman emperor 71 Flaps 74 Naval petty officer: Abbr. 75 Amazing debunker 77 Anita of jazz 78 La Dolce Vita setting 80 Sluggers practice area 84 Futurist 85 ESPN broadcaster Bob 87 Certain Sooner 88 Some M.I.T. grads: Abbr. 89 Are you putting ___? 90 Slick hairstyle 91 Fancy tie 93 English church official 94 Kick-around shoe 95 Chaim ___, 1971 Best Actor nominee 96 City that sounds like a humdinger? 97 Query from Judas 98 Life Saver flavor 99 Like bachelorette parties, typically 101 Product of Yale 102 Jezebels idol 103 Many a PX patron 104 Prime letters? 106 Amazon fig. 107 D-Day invasion town 108 Former C.I.A. chief Panetta 109 Artists alias with an accent 111 The Price Is Right broadcaster 113 I.C.U. pros 1234 5678 91011121314151617 18 19 2021 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3031 32 33 34353637 3839 40 41 42 43 4445464748 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 5657 585960 61 62 6364 65 6667 68 69 70 71 72 7374 75 76 77 78 7980 81 82 83 84 85 86 8788 89 9091 92 93 94 95969798 99 100 101 102 103104 105106107108109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Solution on page D4. Staff ReportThe 13th annual Free Com ic Book Day returns on Saturday with more than 2,000 comic shops in over 60 countries participating, including locally owned Heroes Landing in Clermont. Heroes Landing, 12348 Roper Blvd., will be open from 9 / a.m. to 7 / p.m. and will be hosting Batman Eternal writer Tim Seeley. Free Comic Book Day is the worlds largest annual comic book event, with more than 4.5 million comics available to be given away free to those who visit a participat ing retailer, Marco Davanxo of the Comics Professional Retail Orga nization said in a press release. More than 50 special Free Comic Book Day editions are being pub lished, featuring a wide variety of entertainment for all ages and audiences, from kids comics to con tent that is on the leading edge of pop culture, he said. More than one million people visited partic ipating comic shops last year and that number is expected to grow as it has every year since the rst Free Comic Book Day in May 2002. The event was founded by Comics Professional Retail Organization board member and comic book retailer Joe Field as a way to introduce new readers to comics, while calling back former readers and thanking current fans. Free Comic Book Day calls at tention to a very rich and diverse entertainment medium, Field said. If you want to know where Hollywood gets its best ideas, then your local comic shop is the place to be. This years list of free comics include: Guardians of the Gal axy, Archie, Hello Kitty, Sponge bob Squarepants, Transformers vs. GI Joe, Sonic the Hedgehog and the Smurfs. A complete list can be found at www.freecomicbookday. com/comics. Free Comic Book Day also calls attention to the creativity, strength and community importance of lo cally owned comic book stores. For information about Free Comic Book Day, go to www. freecomicbookday.Local store to mark Free Comic Book Day SaturdayCLERMONT Staff ReportThe Ian Tilmann Founda tion and the Lake County Tourism Council are spon soring The 2014 Clermont Challenge 5K / 10K / Slalom Races on May 3 at Lake Lou isa State Park in Clermont. The day of racing features morning 5K and 10K long board distance races sanctioned by the International Distance Skating Associa tion (IDSA), according to a press release. The after noon fan will watch a Dual Head-to-Head Hybrid Slalom Race, hosted by worldclass pro Keith Hollien, and sanctioned by the Interna tional Slalom Skateboarding Association (ISSA). The longboard races are a Pro/Am event and will draw longboard skat ers from the entire east coast, the release stated. Pro/Am skaters and dozens of sponsored skaters will compete for a piece of the $1,000 cash and skate product prizes. The event has industry support from skateboarding companies including Sector 9, FreeRide Skate, Bustin, Landyatchz, Klever, Inspiration, Honey, S-ONE, Bern Unlimited, Triple 8, Loaded, J Bords, Gravi ty, RAD, Arbor, Inspiration Longboards and many oth ers, the release stated. The state park gates open at 8 / a.m., the IDSA distance races start at 10 / a.m. and the ISSA slalom races start at 1:30 pm. Advance on line registration is recommended as this event is expected to sell out. On-site sign-in starts at 8:30 / a.m. located at the Lake Louisa State Park Ca noe parking area. The Ian Tilmann Foun dations mission is the pre vention of brain injury re sulting from skateboarding. The foundation accomplishes its mission by giving free helmets to skaters who promise to wear it when skateboarding. Since January 2006, The Ian Tilmann Foundation has distributed over 4,500 free helmets throughout the nation. The foundation actively promotes helmet use in hopes that others wont suffer such a senseless and preventable tragedy as struck our family when Ian Tilmann died from trau matic brain injury in 2005 from a skateboarding fall, said Marcy Tilmann, the foundations director.Skaters heading to Clermont for challenge SUBMITTED PHOTO Clermont Toastmasters honored, from left, Gordie Allen (Best Speaker), Frank Hernandez (Most Improved), Marjorie Benjamin (Best Evaluator), Monty Ray Davidson (Toastmasters Area 72 Governor and Best Table Topics) and Dr. Thomas Spencer (Club President) at the March 24 meeting. Clermont Toastmasters meets every Monday at 6:30 / p.m. at the SDA Church, 100 Minnehaha Ave., in Clermont. For information, call 352-234-6495.CLERMONT TOASTMASTERS HONORS MEMBERS AT MEETING PINE RIDGE ELEMENTARY STUDENTS USE RECYCLABLES FOR CRAFTS FOR A CAUSE SUBMITTED PHOTO Members of the South Lake County Historical Society gathered in the Train Depot for a potluck thank you lunch on March 31. Special recognition was given to those present who have gone above and beyond in their service to the society and the village.THANK YOU LUNCH

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Wednesday, April 30, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C3 HYBRID SPECIMEN PALMSAdd curb appeal and value to your home!Our trees are grown from seed and agriculturally inspectedWe provide digging, transport and transportationWe carry Exotic Hybrid PalmsQuality, Care, and Maintenance reflected in our 50+ Yearsof Horticultural Experience!Types of trees we offer: Phoenix Reclinata, Phoenix Sylvester, Phoenix Canary, Phoenix Date, Bismark European Fan, Chinese Fan Palm, and many more!FAMILY OWNED & OPERATEDFREE CONSULTATION!WE COME TO YOU UPON REQUESTSmaller palms available in pots321-388-7587Contact Jim and Jim SPRING SPECIAL ON LARGE LIGUSTRUM TREES Superbrand milk, gallon size $1.99; Maxwell House Coffee, 1-pound bag, $2.18; Dixie Crystal Sugar, 5-pound bag, 99 cents. Food prices at Publix: Heinz Ketchup, 43-ounce bottle, 69 cents; Dole Pineapple Juice, 46-ounce can, 69 cents; Inglenook Wine, 3-liter bottle, $7.19; Iceberg Lettuce, 49 cents; Dairy Fresh Yogurt, 3, 8-ounce cups, 89 cents; Breyers Ice Cream, half-gallon, $2.89; one dozen large eggs, 9 cents; white potatoes, 10-pound bag, 99 cents and Golden Bananas, per pound, 23 cents. HISTORY FROM PAGE C1 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comAudiences who remember the mayhem from the 1965 movie Boeing Boeing star ring Jerry Lewis and Tony Curtis are in for more laughs as Bay Street Players bring the comedy to the stage. The farce runs through May 11 at the historic State Theatre, 109 North Bay St., Eustis. It is just absolute fun. Its a fun comedy that has a nice naughty to it, said Jim Meadows, producer and co-director with Brendon Rogers, who believes theatergoers are going to love the shows physi cal comedy. We expect to have people laughing throughout the evening. Set in the 1960s, the play features American architect/bachelor Ber nard (Rick Paulin) living in Paris as he juggles schedules and his life around three ances, all young ight attendants, who are unaware of each other. The wom en regard Bernards at as their home during their Paris layovers. He balances them all out by having one in the air, one at the airport ready to take off, and the third one is at his apartment, Meadows said, noting the apart ment has seven doors, so you have people running in and out all the time. Gloria (Bre Lewis), Gabriella (Lauren Mor gan) and Gretchen (Kami Spaulding) star as the three ight atten dants, and Bernards socalled perfect life gets rather bumpy when his friend Robert (Paul Cas taneda) comes to stay and a new and speedier Boeing jet throws off his careful planning. The mayhem comes to a cli max during a sched uling mishap when all three ight attendants end up in Paris and at Bernards apartment at the same time. What are Bernard and Robert going to do? The way that I like to describe it is that youve got three beau tiful, intelligent females who are all ight stew ardesses with two idiot guys, Meadows said. The only thing that has changed from the 1960s and now is that we call them ight attendants instead stewardesses the guys in the 1960s are idiots and they are still idiots. They try to keep control of things, but the guys nd out that they have no control. And because of the lack of control, Meadows said the physical comedy in Boeing Boe ing is at its best. Bernard and his best friend visiting from Wisconsin are going cra zy trying to balance it all out, the producer said, and theres also the long-suffering housekeeper Berthe (Liz Cur tis) who is caught in the middle of it all. Robert is forgetting which lies to tell to whom, and even with the help of Bernards housekeeper, catastrophe looms. Boeing Boeing was initially penned by French playwright Marc Camoletti and translat ed by Beverly Cross and Francis E vans before it was Americanized for the 1965 movie with Jer ry Lewis and Tony Cur tis. Deliciously, deliriously innocent is how The New York Times has described the farce, which recently enjoyed hit revivals in London and New York. It was also bestowed a Tony Award for best revival. The local production features set design by Scott Fattizzi and Tom Mangieri, lighting design by Jon Whitely and costumes by Sara Gray. It has been real ly, really exciting for me to work with Bren don Rogers and co-di rect this production, said Meadows, who also noted it has been just as much fun working with the cast and crew. Tickets for Boeing Boeing are $18 for Wednesday and Thursday shows and $21 for Friday, Saturday and Sunday performances. Students with ID are ad mitted for $11. Matinee shows are at 2 / p .m. and evening performances are set for 8 / p .m. Ti ckets may be reserved by call ing 352-357-7777.EUSTISBoeing Boeing is filled with physical comedy PHOTO COURTESY OF BAY STREET PLAYERS Boeing Boeing cast members Lauren Morgan, Rick Paulin, Kami Spaulding, Liz Curtis, Paul Castaneda and Brew Lewis act out three separate scenes. Call the South Lake Press to get your ad in! 394-2183

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C4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 30, 2014 HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. needs help sorting out a life issue. Any one of the services I offer professionally as well as using these skills for friends and family, helps someone. Helping someone problem solve, gain perspective or in the use of Reiki attain physical relief, has a ripple effect. That person is now empowered and living a more authentic and productive life, which ripples out and is a positive effect for others. I also volunteer my services to the community through my work with Clermont Paranormal. 4) Name one of your greatest accomplishments so far. I am currently working on my Bachelors degree in Metaphysical Science, something Ive been working on for a while. This will be a major goal when accomplished. I am also in talks with Blogtalk Radio to host my own weekly show. However, and though this may sound corny or even clich, the thing I consider my greatest accomplishment is being a mother. I absolutely love being a mom. Nurturing, guiding, supporting and making lifelong memories with my daughters, as well as the many adopted kids I have the pleasure of loving. Being a mother uses everything youve got. It also propels you to keep growing and learning. It is seriously the most rewarding part of my life. 5) Whats something youve always wanted to do but havent yet? Ive always wanted to open a wholeness center that is equipped for everyone, including those with hearing or sight disabilities. As someone who wears hearing aids, I know the frustration of wanting to learn about, explore and get certied in the various topics within the holistic, metaphysical and spiritual elds. I have yet to come across any avenue for someone with hearing or sight disabilities. I really desire to address this and offer a solution. 6) What advice would you give to people who want to help out in the community? First off, realize that every one can help someone. Open a door, carry a package or mow a lawn for a neighbor. Look people in the eye and say hello. Wish the cashier a happy day. Youd be amazed at how much this simple act of kindness matters. If you have 30 free minutes in a week, volunteer somewhere that calls to you (animal shelter, church, nursing home, library, hospital, a school). If you want to do something nancially and nd your budget thin, make a change jar. When you ll it up, donate it (those pennies and nickels add up). If you are housebound, call people and ask how they are doing. There are an endless amount of ways to make life brighter. NEIGHBORFROM PAGE C1 Staff ReportThe Orange Blossom Cannonball will begin serving Mount Dora again after a ve-year absence. Tavares, Eustis & Gulf Railroad ofcials have announced that service between Tavares and Mount Dora is sched uled to begin May 3, ac cording to a press release from the railroad. The last tourist train to serve the city halted operations on Dec. 31, 2009. The train returning to Mount Dora will have a tremendous impact, Mount Dora Mayor Cathy Hoechst said in an email. Were looking forward to welcoming even more visitors to our town now that the train is back. Were all very excited. The initial schedule calls for three roundtrips between Tavares and Mount Dora. De partures from Mount Dora will be at 11 / a.m., 1 / p.m. and 3 / p .m. De partures from Tavares will be noon, 2 / p .m. and 3 / p.m. The railroad will maintain depot facilities in both cities. The Mount Dora depot will be at 150 West Third Ave. The gift shop/tick et agency is housed in a 1935 former Seaboard Air Line American Flyer passenger coach. The Tavares depot is in a new facility in Wooton Park. Tuesday through Fri day trains will be pulled by a 1941 GE center cab diesel locomotive. Saturday and Sunday trains will be pulled by a 1907 2-6-0 wood-burning steam locomotive. All trains will feature vintage coaches with snack service on board. Several companies have tried to serve Mount Dora with tour ist trains in recent years. The Mount Dora and Lake Eustis Railroad took over operation of the former Orlando and Mount Dora Railway about 15 years ago, leas ing about seven miles of track from Florida Central Railroad. Then, in 2005, Inland Lakes Railway, later known as Florida Rail Adventures, had a tourist train operating between the towns of Mount Dora, Tavares, Eustis, Lake Jem and Orlando. That ended in 2009. Since then, some 6,000 railroad ties have been replaced, new crossings installed and ballast added to bring the railroad track up to federal standards. The Tavares, Eustis & Gulf Railroad began op erating between Tavares and Lake Jem in Oc tober 2011. Since then, more than 58,000 guests have ridden the train. Steam train tickets are $35 for adults and $24 for children ages 4-12, while diesel train tickets are $25 for adults and $16 for children those same ages. The companys steam locomotive #2 and its vintage cars have been featured in the movies :10 To Yuma, True Grit and Appaloosa. The train was recently used in the feature lm Walt Before Mickey, set to release in June. Reservations can be made at www.orange blossomcannonball. com or by calling 352742-7200, 10 / a.m. to 5 / p.m. Tuesday through Sunday.MOUNT DORAOrange Blossom Cannonball returns Saturday Tavares, Eustis & Gulf Railroad ofcials announced that service between Tavares and Mount Dora is scheduled to begin Saturday.DAILY COMMERCIAL FILE PHOTO

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Wednesday, April 30, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C5 Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...Enchanted Living Home DecorEnchanted Living Home Decor offers an enchanted world of unique items and furnishings in one shopBy Terri Wells Nestled on Eighth Street in Historic Downtown Clermont, Enchanted Living Home Decor invites visitors in with treasures carefully displayed in every corner. Whether you're looking for a gorgeous antique couch or a much smaller item to help pull your room together, chances are you'll find it here. While owners Anissa Mills and Tony Wallace just opened the shop in February of this year, their passion for antiques goes back much further. Wallace's mother ran an antique business in Saint Augustine, so he learned about it at her knee. Wallace has always been a collector. He's passing the passion on to the next generation, as daughter Ashley works in all aspects of this family-owned business. She does a little of everything, from picking out furniture to running the cash register to helping out at events. "She does it all," Mills declared. The family has been living in Clermont for three years, as the result of "an accident," as Mills described it. Wallace came down for a job, and Mills followed him three months later, but both of them fell in love with the area. "The scenery, the mountains, it's all so different from anywhere else in Florida," Mills reflected. It reminded her of her home state of Ohio. When not hunting out antique treasures for his customers, Wallace can be found fishing out on the lake or indulging his enthusiasm for motorcycles. He's also an enthusiastic and experienced chef, citing Jamaican cuisine as a favorite a passion he learned from his father, who is Jamaican. Asked about her favorite aspect of the business, Mills pointed to the people. She loves talking with them and learning their stories. The business attracts a diversity of customers, from residents who have lived here for years to visitors from out of the country. Wallace's favorite aspect of the business is finding and buying unusual items for those customers. In the future, Wallace and Mills hope to grow their business. "We've outgrown our space," Mills admitted. The couple hopes to open a second store in the future. Enchanted Living Home Decor is located at 639 Eighth Street in Historic Downtown Clermont. You can call the store at 352-243-8888, check out their Facebook page at www.facebook.com/pages/Enchanted-Living-HomeDecor/260209717442997, or visit their website at www.enchantedlivinghomedecor.com/default.html. rfnrtb Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! rffntCall today b fnfffr mprehensim i$59ions$99excludes w isdo m teeth (thi rd m ola rs)new pa tients only one time visit offer p anoramic xray required D0330 out of pocket expenseExpires: May 31, 2014 m 352-394-3071 *P anoramic x-ray and/or CT scan of the ja ws necessary for d ia gnos is and trea tment planning. It is our office policy tha t the pa tient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service. examina tion or trea tment which is performed as a result of a nd within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free discounted-offer or reduced-free service, ex ami na tion or trea tment MIn. Free ADA code D0210, D0150 m3 No More Dentures! 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comLeesburg may have earned bragging rights and set a Guinness Book of World Records for ty ing 2,545 black bandanas together to cre ate thelongest chain of bandanas on Sunday, the last day of Bikefest. The 2014 Leesburg Bikefest bandanas in the chain were meticulously videotaped, documented, photographed, counted and measured in the citys attempt to beat the previous record of 2,450 bandanas set in 2011 by the Hiratsuka Com ing of Age Day Ceremony Committee in Japan. I think that were going to break the record. It looks like to me that we are going to achieve that goal. Hopefully, nobody broke it somewhere else over the weekend, said Joe Shipes, executive vice president of the Leesburg Partnership. The crowd gathered around Towne Square cheered when it was an nounced at 12:10 / p .m. that the 2,451st ban dana the one to beat Japan had been val idated. By 12:23 / p .m., the last bandana in the chain, No. 2,545, was of cially marked and held up for photographers and videographers to record. This is real fun, abso lutely. Its all for a good cause and it has been a great event for the city, and Im excited to be part of it, said Leesburg City Manager Al Minner, who served as an ofcial witness and certier along with Daily Commercial Publisher Steve Skaggs. Brandt Booth and Pete Jaequese from Booth, Ern, Straughan and Hiott (BESH) of Tavares were the ofcial surveyors documenting and measuring the chain of bandanas. Event ofcials said it may take several weeks before Leesburg learns if it has earned the world record; docu ments to have to be sent to England to be considered for a Guinness record. Rachel ORyan, mar keting coordinator for Bikefest, said proceeds from the sale of ban danas used in the at tempt will benet Folds of Honor Foundation, which supports spouses, children and depen dents of soldiers who have been killed or dis abled. The public can help by continuing to buy bandanas, she said, noting the 2014 Lees burg Bikefest bandanas will be available throughout the week at leesburgbikefest.com. I am extremely excited with the support that we have gotten from all of the people who have attended here, ORyan said of Bikefest. A lot of motorcycle riders have a military connection, whether they are military or their family is military. They support our troops and Folds of Honor has been an awesome organization to work with They are doing what they can to support the spouses and children of our fallen and injured heroes. ORyan said all of the bandanas that were strung together for the longest chain of ban danas world record at tempt will be untied and each bandana will be sent to a U.S. mili tary member serving overseas. The troops are go ing to get a little present from Leesburg, ORy an said, noting the ban danas will be sent as part of the care pack ages prepared by members of Operation Shoebox in The Villages. Leesburg Bikefest concluded Sunday af ternoon with a perfor mance by recording artist Uncle Kracker. This has been a good weekend, said Leesburg Partnership board member Steve Knowles. People have really enjoyed the good weather, and the bands have been really good and I think everybody has had a fun time. He noted a special highlight of Bikefest was the camaraderie. There has been a lot of community involvement a lot of people out here working hard to help out and that makes a good team, Knowles said.Leesburgs Bikefest may have set new world record THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Lynn Gerig, right, helps count the chain of bandanas along with Linda Henderson, center, on Sunday.

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C6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 30, 2014 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comJoshua Jungferman, the operating partner and gener al manager of Mount Doras Pisces Rising, prefers smaller farms over big, industrialized farms. What seems more natural to me is a working farm. You know, where you can talk to the farmer, Jungferman said. As a restaurant, it would be nice to be able to meet the farmer and maybe talk to him before hes seeding his next crop and let him know what youre looking at, what you want to do. Jungferman said his restau rant is in the process of ex ploring its options to buy more of its ingredients local ly, like it did in January when it began buying microgreens from ARC Greenhouses in Mount Dora. Pisces Rising, however, is just one of approximately 15 area restaurants that buys from ARC Greenhouses, according to manager Ra chel Vanlandingham. Those restaurants also include Cask & Larder and The Ravenous Pig in Winter Park, and Dally in the Alley in DeLand. ARC Greenhouses is the company and the brand is Mr. McGregors Greens. Vanlandingham said it is nice to be able to see where ingredients come from. Just like in Dally in the Alley in DeLand, they have a huge blackboard in there and it shows all of their local sup pliers, Vanlandingham said. Just to go in there and see, you know, oh, hey, these to matoes are coming from soand-sos farm, and hey, these microgreens are coming from Mr. McGregors over in Mount Dora. She added chefs can tour the farms facilities and are able to talk to her about growing ingredients smaller or larger for their dishes, or suggest something that they might want grown. They can specify to me, as the grower and the supplier, exactly what theyre looking for, Vanlandingham said. The local restaurant pur chases are mixed with dis tributor purchases, Vanlandingham said, and the farm is located at 3050 Britt Rd. in Mount Dora. The farm ex panded to Mount Dora from its other location in New Jer sey, according to the companys website. Vanlandingham advised restaurants looking to par ticipate in the farm-to-table movement not to be afraid to reach out to local farms to see if they sell to the public or restaurants and to establish those relationships. There should be more restaurants that are seeking to do farm to table, because its becoming a trend that everybody wants to know where their food is coming from, Vanlandingham said. She said Pisces Rising pur chases micro rainbow mix and micro wasabi from the farm. Meanwhile, Jungferman said Pisces Rising is exploring its options to source more lo cally, which includes looking for small-scale, local distrib utors, and they are currently talking with the company Local Roots. Local Roots web site states that it only sourc es food from Florida farms of the highest standards. He said it is the restaurants responsibility to push clientele to locally sourced food. People look to us to know the right wine to pair with something. They look to us to know which spirits to mix together for a cocktail. They look to us for our recipes. So, I think thats an important platform we should use it fully to really explore the benets of local local and small, as opposed to the big, industrialized farms, Jung ferman said. Jungferman said buying lo cally has long been important to him and the chef, but they now are able to pursue s ourcing locally as Jungfer man became an operating partner of the restaurant in January. It is a nancial undertak ing. Usually, the food is a lit tle costlier and then youre also spending time, Jung ferman said. And its a new er concept. He said while the restau rant is transitioning to using more local products, it has always sourced most of its seafood locally. A study, titled Local Food Systems in Florida: Consum er Characteristics and Eco nomic Impacts, by Alan W. Hodges and Thomas J. Stevens of the University of Floridas Food and Resource Economics Department, estimated the total value of all food purchased annually through local market channels in 2011-2012 in Florida at $8.314 billion. Of that, the study states, $6.079 billion was through grocery stores; $1.813 billion through farmers mar kets, u-pick operations and roadside stands; $320 mil lion came through restaurants and food service; $91.2 million came through special arrangements with produc ers and $11.4 million through Community Supported Agriculture organizations. The study claimed an aver age of $1,114 spent annually per household on local food purchases. The study values vegetables as the largest local food category at $1.699 billion. Fruits were valued at $1.574 billion; sh at $686 million; beef at $641 million; poultry at $569 million; beverages at $541 million; prepared foods, jams or jellies at $530 million; dairy at $489 million; honey at $439 million; pork, lamb and other meats at $393 million; eggs at $372 million and nuts at $315 million. Local food purchases in 2011-2012 in Florida were es timated by the study to lead to an economic impact of 183,625 fulland part-time jobs. The research was based on a mail survey in the sum mer of 2012 to 7,500 house holds and had 1,599 usable responses, according to the study. The study also notes that there was no standard ac cepted geographic denition of local foods among sur vey respondents. Some of the denitions included in the survey results were within Florida, in the respon dents county or specic city, the Southeast or within a 100mile radius from the respon dents home. I think its consumer demand, said Danielle Tread well, an associate professor of horticultural sciences at the University of Florida, of restau rants buying locally. I think ultimately consumers pretty much drive demand and there has been a lot of education, a lot of media attention and a lot of word of mouth. Citing the USDA Census of Agriculture, Treadwell said there are 44,519 farms in Florida, with 93 percent being small farms. She added numerous reports and data show most small farms sell direct to con sumer, which includes selling to a restaurant. To me, its a no-brain er. I really would encourage restaurateurs to work with their local farmers and ranch ers, Treadwell said. Food, we know, is a lot more nutri tious when its consumed as quickly after harvest as pos sible. Purchasing things from other states that require days, if not weeks, to arrive, just ar ent going to taste as good. Place your ad here and reach the Local Market!VERY AFFORDABLE!Call today 352-394-2183 FOOD PURCHASESTotal value of all food purchased annually through local market channels in 20112012 in Florida: $8.314 billion %  enThrough grocery stores: $6.079 billion %  enThrough farmers markets, roadside stands and u-pick farms: $1.813 billion %  enThrough restaurants: $320 million %  enThrough special arrangements with producers: $91.2 million %  enThrough community-supported agriculture organizations: $11.4 millionSource: Local Food Systems in Florida: Consumer Characteristics and Economic Impacts by Alan W. Hodges and Thomas J. Stevens of the Food and Resource Economics Department at the University of Florida. PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Pisces Rising general manager Joshua Jungferman, right, and chef Alexander Gandia, left, pose for a photo at Pisces Rising with all locally sourced or small batch food and liquors in Mount Dora. Workers space out basil plants at ARC Greenhouses in Mount Dora. The company participates in both the Jersey Fresh and Fresh From Florida programs.Mount Dora restaurant, farm doing business locally

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Wednesday, April 30, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D1 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance rt t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital

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D2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 30, 2014

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Wednesday, April 30, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D3 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 6 X 6.625 Black Veterinarian Services Window Services To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact the Classified Department at (352) 314-3278. Window Services

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D4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 30, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 2 X 4 Black 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr SCABSECSASPSSTEMS ELLATAROTSCOTTTUROW CIVICPRIDEHORNSONATA TOYOUTEALBLUEGOESON NEAROERCALDER MUSTANGSALLYIRR BOLEROSNOTSTOPCOCKS AMINDDDEANOALOHA OCABARBEROFSEVILLE EMBARGOVFWPOUNDON SASELINOISYINTCES IDIAMINITTEYESORE SANDIEGOCHARGERARC ANTONDUOOROONEAL LOOSETEASMMEWORDAGE UEYBEETLEBAILEY TBILLSGEOOTIC LOUSESBIANNUALLISLE OPTIMACARDCSFORESTER COTTONBALLODEONBLOT KLEINSLYEARKSNONE Crossword puzzle is on page C2. Thank you for reading the local paper!