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THERESA CAMPBELL and AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writersnews@dailycommercial.comWhen 100,000 bik ers and visi tors descend on downtown Leesburg this week for the 18th annual Bikefest, it will be big and colorful and loud. In other words, it wont be everyones ideal weekend along what is usually a quiet stretch of Main Street known more for its quaint brick crosswalks, soft background music and tortoise speed limit than for the thunder of Harleys. Indeed, some of downtown Leesburgs mer chants will close shop and leave town for the event. But for merchants who are intrepid enough to stay open and creative enough to nd a product niche that appeals to this non-traditional clientele, Bikefest is a chance to stuff their cash registers in a way that few other events can. Bikefest organizers and local economic de velopment experts estimate the impact of the three-day event at roughly $100 million, a number they derive by multiplying the projected attendance by the per capita spending by out-oftowners and applying a complex multiplier that assumes every dollar spent radiates throughout the community. Lake County Economic Development Director Robert Chandler IV offered the example of a biker spending money at a restaurant. The direct benet to the restaurant multiplies as the owners pay their suppliers and employ ees, who in turn spend their extra income in the community. So, every time it gets re-spent, thats called the ripple effect, or the multiplier, however you want to say it. And then what happens is, you get a little leakage each time, which is why it doesnt keep going on for innity, Chandler said. A survey of 378 visitors for the 2012 Bikefest conducted by TouchPoll of South Florida revealed that the average total expenditure per visitor was $987.17. According to the sur vey, 30 percent of outof-town guests spent an average of $330.67 on local lodging. The average spent on SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | C1SPORTS: FSUs Aurora Davis becoming Queen of Sand WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWST AND INSIDE CLASSIFIED D1 CROSSWORDS C2 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN C1 SPORTS B1 VOICES A4WORD ON THE STREE T A2SOUTH LAKE PRESSV OLUME 99, NO. 17 5 SECTIOn N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reservedwww. southlakepress.com PRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Chip Simpson, a 58-year-old salesman at Gator Harley-Davidson in Leesburg rearranges motorcycles on the showroom oor in preparation for Bikefest on Friday. John Malik Jr., owner of Gator Harley, said he expects to sell about 60 motorcycles over the Bikefest weekend. THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Joyce Huey of Two Old Hags shows the special red wine Sweet Ride that was ordered with the Bikefest crowd in mind. MONEY ROLLING INLake County ofcials estimate the total economic impact of Bikefest at roughly $100 million based on data gathered from the 2012 Bikefest TouchPoll of South Florida survey. Among the ndings of the survey: $987.17 Average expenditure per visitor$173Average spent on food and drinks$140Average spent on gifts and merchandise43%Merchants who close during Bikefest21%Merchants reporting no negative impact14%Merchants reporting a negative impactSound of moneyFor merchants, the roar of motorcycles means profitLEESBURG ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMore than 100 people turned out last week to ght the development of a 1,196-acre sand mine outside Clermont. Organizers said the meetings intent was to kick off the formation of what theyve dubbed The South Lake Citizens Coalition, a group of locals they hope will band together to represent common views when it comes to causes that could impact residents and their com munities. In this case, organizers are asking citizens to stand up publicly against the sand mine. According to Cler mont City Councilman Ray Goodgame, if Cemex is granted a zon ing change for the sand and gravel operation, it could doom the 16,000acre Wellness Way Sector Plan, an area where county ofcials envi sion companies with high-paying jobs in the medical eld. If we let a sand mine come in and destroy the sector plan, wed be ashamed of ourselves, Goodgame said during the meeting. The Clermont City Council and City Man ager Darren Gray, a former Lake County CLERMONTLocals fight proposed sand mine at meeting LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comMinimum scores of 50 on report cards and indi vidual school assignments appear to be ending in Lake County. School Board members agreed to those changes when they tentatively approved modications to the Student Progression Plan last week. Final approval of the plan comes back before the board at a public hearing tentatively set for May 12. A recent report shared with School Board mem bers found the majority of county schools do not give students scores of less than 50 on report cards, which are sent home after each nine-week grading period.School Board will abolish lenient grading systemTAVARESSEE BIKEFEST | A2SEE GRADES | A5SEE CEMEX | A5

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 23, 2014transportation, including gas, rental cars and parking was $214.31 per visitor. There was an average of $173 per visitor spent on food and drinks, an average of $129 per visitor spent on entertainment, and an average of $140 per visitor spent on gifts and merchandise. Michael Vassell, the general manager of Holiday Inn Express Hotel & Suites in Tavares, said the 73-room hotel is booked for the event, and it bookings for next years event generally start in ear nest right after the cur rent years Bikefest concludes. He said it is the biggest booking event for the year. A standard room nor mally goes for $101 to a $125, but during Bikefest that goes up to $150 because rates are based on demand. John Malik Jr., who owns Gator Harley-Davidson, said it is the biggest weekend of the year for the dealership. He estimated the event brings in more than a couple hundred thousand dollars just in merchandise, and he expects to sell 60 motorcycles four times more than normal. The dealership will be so busy, he said, that he hired an extra ve employees to work the weekend and is borrowing four from Daytonas Har ley-Davidson. Rhonda Jones, a manager at Ramshackle Caf in Leesburg, said the restaurant gets a boost in business and it increases every year. Like Gator Harley, Jones will add staff on each shift to accommodate the rush. Its absolutely good for business, said Joyce Huey of Two Old Hags Wine Shop, who sells beer and wine during the event. I love Bikefest and we have never had any issues or any problems with any our bikers, ever. Huey expects to take in $10,000 in beer and wine sales, and she said a special bottle of red wine Sweet Ride is a big hit with the Bikefest crowd. The wine was produced by Lakeridge Winery in Clermont. I have a lot of repeats who come back every year, Huey said, noting many of her customers love being able to savor their drinks in the outdoor seating area of her shop. But some merchants have to do more than add staff and inventory to take advantage of the money walking down the street. They have to reinvent themselves temporarily by adding products and services they normally wouldnt carry. Linda Felton of Lindas Soap Box is making beer soap to appeal to the Bikefest crowd. Kar en Egert of Karens Canine Kitchen has sewn biker doggy apparel, while Cheryl Bloom of Blooms Baking House and Restaurant is creating easy desserts for bikers to carry. Its good for business, and I just want to make a little money, said Felton, who is making up to 100 bars of beer soap, which was a big hit last year. I found out that beer itself, because of the hop, has extra antioxidants, so its actually very good for your skin. Moneca Mo Monroe, owner of My Secret Closet, a consignment boutique, plans to feature racks of biker apparel along with pewter sculptures of bikers. Our consignors are bringing in Bike Week stuff, and we have lots of leather, these cool purple Harley Davidson boots, and were going to be rafing a Harley Davidson Barbie doll. Monroe hopes to bring in $1,000 or more each day during Bikefest. Other merchants see Bikefest as more than a boon; it is a lifeline that carries them through the slow summer months. For most of the mer chants, Bikefest carries them through the summer, said Don Folker, owner of Cupcake Time Caf. If I had beer to sell, I would quadruple the business, without a doubt. Yet not everyone sees dollar signs in Bikefest. According to the TouchPoll survey of local mer chants, 43 percent close during the event. Kim Sovercool, owner Michaels Couture Hair Salon, closes her shop because her regular clients have no place to park. We could stay open and do walk-ins, but we just havent yet. We just go on vacation, she said. God Caf owner Gary Hagen and his wife, Victoria, go on vacation and celebrate their wedding anniversary. We take a break during Bikefest and it helps us recharge for the rest of the year, Hagen said. We come back all rested and everyone else is all tired. Huey, of Two Old Hags, believes all the merchants benet, whether they are opened or not. They all benet in the big picture, and thats my opinion, she said. There is that trickle-down effect. Yes, Im going to make money, and Michaels Hair Salon might not be open, but I go to Michaels to get my hair done, so thats the way that I look it, and its going to benet when I go to Palm Plaza and go to Popeyes or to Publix. Its not just downtown that benets. CLERMONT Bras for the Cause and Boxers Too is SaturdayReal men do wear bras when they are reghters supporting the Greater Clermont Cancer Foundations 7th annual Bras for the Cause and Boxers Too on Saturday at Heritage Hills in Clermont. Igniting Hope is the theme for the event this year and it will be an evening of fun and food. Doors open at 6 / p.m., with the show at 7 / p.m. Tickets are $30 in advance or $35 at the door. To design a bra for this event or be a sponsor call Kay Simpson at 352-435-3202. The Greater Clermont Cancer foundation receives funds raised from this event for the community. Go to www.brasforthecauseandboxerstoo.com for details.CLERMONT East Ridge High to present The Last 5 YearsThis musical about New Yorkers who fall in and out of love over the course of ve years will be performed by the East Ridge High theater department at 7 / p.m., Thursday through Saturday. Tickets are $8 and doors will open at 6:30 / p.m. at the Barn, 13322 Excalibur Road in Clermont. Seating is limited to 60 people per performance and reservations are encouraged. To reserve tickets, email Vince Santo at santov@lake.k12..us.GROVELAND Arbor Day tree planting event is set for FridayCelebrate Arbor Day by planting a scrub oak from 8:30 to 10:30 / a.m. on Friday at Lake Thomas Cove Park, 3020 Thomas Cove Dr., in Groveland. For information, call 352-253-4950, email parksandtrails@lakecounty. gov or go to www.lakecounty.gov.CLERMONT Congregation Sinai golf tournament registration openRegistration is open for this third annual golf tournament, sponsored by Congregation Sinai, to be held on May 3 at the Legends Country Club in Clermont. The fee for the tournament is $75 and includes breakfast, 18 holes of golf, range balls, lunch, contests, prizes and awards. For information, go to www.congregation-sinai.org, or call Barbara Salsitz at 352-432-6008.MINNEOLA Guys and Dolls set to begin ThursdayThe Tony award-winning musical Guys and Dolls is the perfect musical comedy for all ages and will be performed on Thursday through Saturday at Lake Minneola High School, 101 N. Hancock Road, in Minneola. Doors will open at 6:30 / p.m. for a 7 / p.m. curtain. Tickets for the musical are $7 for seniors and students with an ID, $10 for adults and $15 for preferred seating. To make reservations or for infor mation, call Kaitlin Baxter at 352-3949600, ext. 5168, or email BaxterK@ lake.k12..us.LAKE COUNTY Health department to offer school immunizationsThe Department of Health ofce in Lake County will offer immunizations at local Lake County schools on an ongoing basis for students who will enter the seventh grade during the 2014-15 school year. Immunizations will be given at Carver Middle School in Leesburg on April 29, Eustis Middle School on May 6, East Ridge Middle School in Clermont on May 8, Clermont Middle School on May 15 and Cecil E. Gray Middle School in Groveland on May 20. For information, call the Department of Health in Lake County at 352-771-5500 or go to www.lakechd.com. Area Briefs What south Lake residents are saying about ...CHICKENSDo you feel local governments should allow chickens in residential areas.Yes, for personal use only, with a special permit and a limit of six. I have no problem with people growing their own eggs, and chicken poop is good fertilizer for your garden. BONNIE RAY CLERMONT Absolutely yes, with minimal guidelines. Six is plenty to provide the family, and most owners are logical, conscientious caretakers of their ocks. Probably in most neighborhoods, no roosters. CHUCK ARNONE CLERMONT I think that would be ne with the proper reg ulations. If its done, it should be done proper ly, in a sanitary manner. It shouldnt be any differ ent than someone having a pot bellied pig as a pet. BILL OLSEN TAVARES It depends chickens or roosters, because roosters are annoying. Theres smell and ies. They can have that stuff in the country, but not the city. BILLY REED MASCOTTE Word on theStreet Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Harley-Davidson motorcycles sit on the showroom oor at Gator Harley-Davidson in Leesburg. BIKEFEST FROM PAGE A1

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Wednesday, April 23, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comAll roads in Leesburg are resurfaced every 17 years. But if a new proposed local option gas tax distribution formula is approved, those roads will be resurfaced just once every 28 years. Lake County Commissioners renewed the rst 2 cents of the 6 cent local gas tax option, which goes to the main tenance of roads, in January. In 2015 and 2016, commissioners will vote whether to approve the remaining 4 cents in two-cent increments each year. Currently, the $8 million is split between the county and the cities, with the county re ceiving 66 percent and the cities receiving 34 percent collectively. The change involves how the cities would divvy up their share. Currently, the cities di vide 75 percent of the money based on transportation ex penditures and the remain ing 25 percent on population. That formula has been in place since 1984. The new distribution for mula would award half the funding to cities based on population and half based on the miles of roads they main tain. The cities of Leesburg, Eu stis, Mount Dora, Umatilla and Tavares would lose money under the new formula, while nine cities would get additional money. Clermont would receive the largest allocation at $539,309. The cities representing a majority population of the incorporated area must approve the formula, which will then be sent to the Lake County Commission for nal approval on May 20. At a recent board meeting, commissioners voted 4-1, with Commissioner Leslie Campione dissenting, to go forward with the new formu la. Some cities slated to get less money expect minimal impacts while others could see dips in the number of roads resurfaced over the long term, city ofcials said. However, it is not yet clear which roads will be put off for maintenance as many cit ies are still working through budgets and others are eval uating roads to determine which ones are in most need of maintenance. Our current allocation will be reduced by roughly 40 percent, said D.C. Maudlin, Leesburg Public Works director. Maudlin said the city would receive an estimated $357,140 a year, compared to $607,993. With a 40 percent reduc tion in our budget, we wont be able to get as much done. Maudlin said the city is as sessing all of its roads and prioritizing the ones in worst shape. We wont be able to do as many roads next year, he said. But this does not mean the roads left untreated would noticeably deteriorate immediately, Maudlin said. It is a much more longterm impact, he said. The overall condition of the road drops gradually over time. We will still hit the worst roads each year, but there will be fewer of the worst roads done each year. Maudlin said the new dis tribution formula will allow the city to resurface approx imately one less mile of road per year. Overall, the city re surfaces a little less than ve miles of roads a year. City employees jobs will not be affected by the reduc tion. The major resurfacing road work is done by con tractors, he said. Leesburg City Manager Al Minner said the city was preparing for the change in the formula but does not know what road projects will be cut until the road assessment is completed. When the municipalities met, we agreed we did not have enough votes to pull off what would have been a fair solution, he said. We dont think the formula takes into account age and existing in frastructure of the city. The city of Eustis faces a similar predicament. Diane Kramer, Eustis city manager, said the city has been using reserves to balance the budget and had to raise taxes in 2013 to make up for lost revenue. It has a major impact on our city, she said of the $278,000 reduction in revenue. That is the money we have used to re surface our roads. The cities that are losing the money are all of our older cities, with the older roads that really need the money for maintenance purposes. We cant lose $250,000300,000 and not have it im pact the city, she added. You either have to nd rev enues to replace it or reduce your services. The city of Mount Dora faces a reduction of about $100,000 for its road mainte nance needs. Mount Dora City Manager Michael Quinn said the city has been one step ahead in addressing its road needs. We have done a good job on maintaining our roads in the last few years and being able to prioritize and get the needy ones done rst, he said. The roads that suffer the most are the ones that are not the worst but in the mid dle zone.Cities struggle to divvy up road money equitably BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Workers construct a bike path on Tremain Street in Mount Dora, on April 16. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comJason and Teresa Ash are part of Lake Countys Special Olympics team. Jason runs track and eld while wife Te resa plays bocce ball. Both love competing, but what makes it worthwhile for Jason is the support and camaraderie between fellow athletes, coaches and sponsors. I like doing differ ent things to give back to Special Olympics because they give back to me, Jason said during Mondays Law Enforcement Torch Run, one of the largest national grass roots fundraisers each year for the orga nization. Those who support the athletes and organization feel the same way. In fact, Lake Countys Assistant State At torney, James Argen to, said hearing from the athletes Monday morning in Clermont gave him the inspiration to complete the two-mile trek. Argento said he was touched by the way all of the participating law enforcement agencies from throughout the county and state came together for the cause. It really is all about these children, he said. This year, Lake Coun tys leg of the torch run involved nearly 200 participants, including law enforcement personnel and ofcials from all over the coun ty, volunteers belong ing to programs associated with various departments, and Special Olympics athletes, coaches, friends and family members. Clermont Police Department, led by Chief Charles Broadway, sponsored the morn ings event, including lunch and music after ward. This is something we look forward to every year, Broadway said. For 30 years, the Spe cial Olympics Flame of Hope has traversed Florida before it is car ried by law enforce ment ofcers to the opening ceremony of Floridas annual State Summer Games, which this year will be held at the ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex in Lake Buena Vista on May 16. Special Olympics CEO Sherry Wheelock said the whole idea behind the run or any other fundrais er for the organization is to showcase the athletes abilities and raise awareness for the or ganization and the opportunities it provides them. Special Olympics CLERMONTTorch of hope passes through city BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Jonathan Rummel, center, with the Lake County Correctional Institution, carries the torch during the Law Enforcement Torch Run for the Special Olympics Florida in Clermont on Monday.SEE TORCH | A6 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comA plucky little dog that reportedly survived a bear attack in late March is currently up for adoption, according to Lake County Public Information Ofcer Elisha Pappacoda. He went to a cou ple of vets and I think they werent sure ex actly what happened to him, but the last vet said bear attack. She said denitively it was a bear Dog mauled by bear is recovering, needs a home PHOTO COURTESY OF THE LAKE COUNTY ANIMAL SHELTER Percival was mauled by a bear but is recovering through the Lake County Animal Shelter.SEE DOG | A6

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 23, 2014BikeFest, which rumbles into downtown Leesburg Friday for three days, isnt everyones cup of tea, and thats understandable. When you pour an estimated 100,000 people into an area that usually accommodates hundreds, then throw in the roar of thousands of motorcycles and add large quantities of alcohol, there is little question that it will change the tone and complexion of this quaint little town for a few days. Indeed, 43 percent of merchants will close for the weekend, according to an independent survey commissioned last year by the events hosts, the Leesburg Partnership. Others complain that they wont get a piece of the action and wonder why the city of Leesburg supports an event that doesnt benet a wider array of businesses. Still others bemoan the antics of a handful of festival guests But heres the truth about BikeFest: Its one of Lake Countys signature events, one that draws not only massive numbers of people, but huge quantities of dollars and valuable exposure. How lucrative is BikeFest? As Daily Commercial staff writers Theresa Campbell and Austin Fuller report on page A1 today, the event has an estimated $100 million impact on the local economy, based on attendance and spending estimates compiled by economic development experts. Lets take a closer look. The average BikeFest visitor spends almost $1,000, including $330 on lodging, $214 on transportation, $173 on food and drinks, $129 on entertainment and $140 on gifts and merchandise. Thats to say nothing of the visitors from across the map who fall in love with the area and decide to move here. That sort of impact probably cant be quantied. BikeFest is just a good time. There will be an abundance of food and fantastic music, as well as a number of unique forms of motorcyclethemed entertainment. And when the bikers and other visitors roll out of town, Main Street will regain its quiet charm and serenity, but with its coffers a little fuller. So to those who would complain about BikeFest, we preach patience. The noise, the mild antics and the crowds are but momentary distractions. The electricity this event generates, along with the dollars and entertainment and the good exposure, are excellent for the community as a whole. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . ........................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTOPINION WHATS YOUR OPINION?The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Letters to the Editor 732 W. Montrose St. Clermont, FL 34711By fax to: 352-394-8001EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed.GUEST COLUMNSIf you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@daily commercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OURVIEW SOUTH LAKE PRESSYour community newspaper for more than 100 years.732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Florida 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region.All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Almost that time of the year: Bring on BikeFestVote no on legalizing potDo we really want to make the use of that dangerous weed legal for any reason? Will its use bring back the lives of those lost on our highways by impaired drivers? Will it releave the pain and anguish of those who have lost loved family members because of its use? Those who are behind the drive to put it on the ballot claim that it relieves pain. But why not use one of the pain medications that are already legally available? We already have too many impaired drivers on our roads from alcohol, legal and illegal pain killers, old age, and just plain bad drivers. To add marijuana to the mix would compound the mayhem we already have. When we take a serious look at this question, it is rather obvious why it will be on the ballot. Lawyers are behind it because they know that making it legal will put more ambulances on the road for them to chase. Say no to the ambulance chasers when you vote this year. JAMES S. FRANKLIN Fruitland Park LETTER of the WEEK YOURVOICESLETTERS TO THE EDITORDont subsidize insurance companiesSince 2003, the U.S. government paid billions of dollars in subsidies to private insur ers who participate in Medicare Advantage. A portion of the subsidies have been paid by Medicare beneciaries themselves, whether they were in a Medicare Advantage plan or not. How unfair and unnecessary since private insurers have routinely claimed they can provide better care for less cost. At least Obamacare began to correct this wasteful practice by gradually reducing the subsidies, which forces these high-prot insurers to compete with traditional Medicare on a level play ing eld. But the private insurers and their big lobby threatens to raise rates or drop coverage to scare seniors into pressuring Congress not to cut the subsidies. Its time for Congress and the president to stop caving in to the demands of big insurance companies and do the right thing end the insurance industry subsidies. NANCY HURLBERT | LEESBURGThank you for the coverageAs a former 35-year resident of Boston, Mass. who moved to Florida a year ago, I was so pleased to see the great cover age that the Daily Commercial gave to the Boston Marathon bombing event, with the story, Solemn tributes mark the anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombing in the April 16 edition. I was living in Boston when the bombings occurred and experienced the deafening silence at the nish line as runners made their way to victory, only to discover the sadness that awaited them. It was a day I will never forget. There was no cheering or celebrating going on. Instead, people walked around the city like zombies trying in vain to gure out why such a dreadful thing had happened during one of Bostons traditional events. Although I have settled quite nicely in Florida,my heart still remains very much a part of Boston and it is articles like the one in the Daily Commercial that make me proud of a city that is now known as Boston Strong. Thanks to the newspaper for acknowledging this tragic anniversary event in such a positive way. MATTI KNIVA SPENCER | LeesburgHonor our veteransIn response to a letter by Carole Burke of The Villages about a recent letter I wrote, Not so friendly to outsiders, from March 16, she missed the whole point of the letter. The entire point of my letter was and is to honor all veterans. The Eisenhower Center is supposed to be a place for all veter ans organizations to be able to conduct their meetings VFW, American Legion, DAV, VVA, AMVETS, Korean War Veterans, Jewish War Veterans, Catholic War Veterans and others. These and other groups are chartered by the U.S. Congress and are organized to aid their fellow comrades, families and community. These associations do not recognize the geographic addresses of their members. Not so in The Villages. The latest information I have learned is that for the sum of $37 per room per hour, The Villages management will allow the veterans to meet there. It is also of interest for all to know that the uniforms worn by the mannequins were donated by their owners. Photos, art work and other memorabilia are also donated. Its really almost a museum with the artifacts donated by veterans. DAVID HODGKINS | Lady LakeThe paper must get it rightThe people of the greater Leesburg area deserve a lot more from our local newspaper. Your editorial regarding the use of Venetian Gardens and its future shows how little you know or really pay attention to what you write. Venetian Gardens is not located on Lake Grifn. It is located on Lake Harris! At the bottom of your column you explain that your editorial is a consensus opinion of the editorial board, which is comprised of the upper echelon of your newspapers local management. Do none of you know where Venetian Gardens is located? It is about a 5-minute walk from your ofce! Maybe Im wrong but I thought a local newspapers job is to accurately and with no bias cover the things that are going on within a community. Leesburg is going to undergo signicant changes in the next few years with the economy coming back and the growth of The Villages just to our western border. It would be nice to see a little more effort given to asking the tough questions of our community leaders about what they see as our vision for the future. Couldnt you nd it in your budget to hire one person back from the people you let go when you consolidated your printing operation back as a proofreader? If you are going to be relevant and have your opinion count for something get your facts right. MARK CRAWFORD | Fruitland Park HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO

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Wednesday, April 23, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 Modications to the plan require teach ers to record the actual grade earned by the student on individual assignments. Teachers also have the discretion to give an Incom plete during the rst and third nine-week grading period, giving students the opportunity to earn their grade later. Another change species encouraging schools to establish grading criteria that will permit students with failing grades to successfully participate in grade recovery in future grading periods, which could mean anything from making up tests or extra credit, according to school board ofcials. School Board mem ber Bill Mathias ap plauded the changes. I feel very strongly that in the real world you get what you earn, he said. We were setting a bad precedent by this minimum grade. School Board mem ber Rosanne Brande burg said the incom plete gives students the opportunity to change the grade into one that is earned. I think the change (in the plan) is good, she said. I think students should receive the grade they earn. Stuart Klatte, president of the Lake Coun ty Education Association, applauded the districts tentative changes to the plan. It is a good step to provide real world experiences within the structure of the school, he said. Keith Hyndshaw, 2014 Lake County Schools Teacher of the Year nalist, was asked his opinion on the issue as a guest of the board. The history and psy chology teacher said he was never in favor of giving a minimum score of 50, and spoke favorably of the in complete as a way to help students in exten uating circumstances. That is how colleges and universities operate, he said, refer ring to the incomplete. I do like the exibility for the teacher to have that. The goal of education is for the kids to learn the skills and content. Superintendent Susan Moxley agreed. If the student is coming to the table and wanting to do better, we want to give the student the opportuni ty to do that, she said. GRADES FROM PAGE A1 manager, oppose the sand mine project. The meeting at the Cler mont Community Center was chaired by Jack Martin, a former past president of the Kings Ridge Homeowners As sociation, where resi dents expressed concerns about trafc, noise and dust from the sand mine. Residents believe as many as 300 trucks a day will haul sand and gravel from the mine to the many road-building projects Cemex is involved with in Central Florida. The company recently asked Hernando County ofcials for permission to expand Cemexs 730acre mining operation near Brooksville to keep up with demand for their material. Martin said residents are not opposed to Ce mex as a company. Wellness Way received its name from the desire to attract health, tness, biomedical research and related industries to the area, capitalizing on the existing triath lon and health/tness industries in South Lake. County ofcials and key stakeholders in the area envision the area to be a ma jor employment center for Central Florida, anchored by compact urban-growth centers, and surrounded by rolling hills and lakes. W ellness Way covers a huge tract east of U.S. Highway 27 along the Orange County bor der, running from south from State Road 50 to U.S. Highway 192. It has been called the largest tract of undeveloped land left in Lake County. Besides, trafc, noise and dust, sand-mine opponents have concerns about the project deterring other busi nesses from relocating to the area, and harming the environment and water table. CEMEXs application says the mine will be situated on aban doned agricultural land and that excava tion only would occur on 623 acres of the site. Mining over 30 years will take place in phases of 100 acres or less and all mined ar eas will be reclaimed, the application states. Sara Engdahl, direc tor of communications for Cemex, previously said the mine would have no effect on water and would aid in economic development, bringing in at least $4.7 million a year. County commissioners will address the sand mine at 1:30 / p m. on May 20 at the old courthouse building in Tavares. CEMEX FROM PAGE A1 IN MEMORY DEATH NOTICESDolores Ann BednarczykDolores Ann Bed narczyk, 78, of Eustis, died Friday, April 11, 2014. Hamlin & Hilbish Funeral Directors. Eus tis.Roy BeltonRoy Belton, 77, of Leesburg, died Friday, April 11, 2014. PageTheus Funerals & Cre mations.Patricia Ann BoggsPatricia Ann Boggs, 59, of Mount Dora, died Saturday, March 12, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatilla.Evelyn Elmira DickinsonEvelyn Elmira Dickinson, 88, of Leesburg, died Thursday, April 17, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares.James H. HardemanJames H. Hardeman, 93, of The Villages, died Thursday, April 17, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Crfemations, Wildwood.Linda Kristeff HermanLinda Kristeff Her man, 54, of Umatillia, died Friday, April 11, 2014. Page-Theus Fu nerals & Cremations, Leesburg.Edward Warren HunterEdward Warren Hunter 61, of Paisley, died Saturday, April 12, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatilla.Irene W. KreftIrene W. Kreft, 76, of Leesburg, died Satur day, April 12.Dennis C. KrugerDennis C. Lefty Kruger, 67, of Tavares, died Monday, April 14, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares.Kent A. LinesKent A. Lines, 73, of Leesburg, died Thursday, April 17, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations. Leesburg.Eleanor M. McMahonEleanor M. McMa hon, 83, of St. Peters burg, died Wednesday, April 16, 2014. PageTheus Funerals & Cre mations, Leesburg.Lucille L. ParrLucille L. Parr, 86, of Leesburg, died Sunday, April 13, 2014. Banks/ Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Steve Alfred RoshySteve Alfred Roshy, 88, of Tavares, died Sat urday, April 12, 2014. Cremation Choices, Minneola.Linda Lee RountreeLinda Lee Rountree, 74, of Ferndale, died Friday, April 11, 2014. Hamlin-Hilbish Funer al Directors.Gregory William SankovicGregory William Sankovic, 63, of Eustis died Monday. April 14, 2014. Hamlin & Hilbish Funeral Directors, Eustis.Joseph Neil SmithJoseph Neil Smith, 81, of Leesburg, died Friday, April 11, 2014. Hamlin-Hilbish Funer al Directors. STEVE FUSSELLSpecial to the Daily CommercialLake-Sumter State College is looking for an experienced food service manager who wants to become a business-owning en trepreneur. Verdia and Larry Jackson, who own VIP Foods and have operated Lakers Cove Caf in the Stu dent Center on the colleges Leesburg campus for the past 11 years, are retiring at the end of this month. Bill Ponko, assistant director of the Purchasing Department at LSSC, said the Jacksons will be hard to replace. The Lakers Cove Caf serves up comfort foods such as pancakes, biscuits and gravy, hamburgers and grilled chicken from 8:30 / a.m. to 3:30 / p .m. Monday through Thursday. The Jacksons have been driving from Ocala four days a week to run the cafe, which occasion ally hires student help. Verdia Jackson said she is looking forward to retirement but shell miss the students and faculty. Many of them have become our friends and we look forward to seeing them every day, she said. But Larry Jackson said he is more than ready for retirement. Im going to sit on the front porch and, when I get tired of that, Im going to sit on the back porch, he said. The college is ready to offer a sweetheart deal if Ponko can nd the right operator: free rent, free electric, free water and free use of all the caf equipment for a reliable vendor who can serve up reasonably-priced breakfasts, lunches and snacks to students, faculty and staff. Lakers Cove, which has indoor seating for about 30 people and outdoor seating for at least 30 more, can be a money-maker, Ponko said. He just posted a classied advertisement asking candidates to send rsums to his ofce. Qual ied candidates will be asked to come for interviews and facility tours, he said. The college will pick its ven dor based on food service experi ence, qualications (such as Flor ida Food Service and Manager certicates), a management plan and fresh ideas to make the caf more appealing to its on-campus customers, Ponko said.LEESBURGLSSC seeks new caf operator SASHEIKA TOMLINSON / SUBMITTED PHOTO Larry and Verdia Jackson, left, serves a student at the Lakers Cove Caf at Lake Sumter State College. They are retiring and the school is looking for a new caf operator. LIVI STANFORD| Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comThe Lake County Wa ter Authority Board has funded $400,000 in stormwater grants to the cities of Clermont and Umatilla, as well as the Lake County Public Works Department, to help reduce pollutants in lakes. The annual grants are designed to assist local municipalities seeking to remove total phos phorus and other pol lutants such as grease, pesticides, heavy metals or animal waste from stormwater runoff, according to a press release from the LCWA. LCWA ofcials said runoff comes from var ious sources, includ ing parks, streets, backyards and lakes, and is causing the largest source of lake water quality problems. These projects can directly impact the lakes and aquifer by reducing pollutants, and making the lakes healthier for those of us who live and recreate on these water bodies, said Ron Hart, LCWA Water Resource program manager. The city of Clermont has been designat ed $100,000 to make improvements to the 12th Street and Lakeshore Drive area to treat stormwater runoff before it drains into Lake Minnehaha. Based on some of our recent studies, we have identied this location as one of the places where stormwater was untreat ed, said Darren Gray, Clermont city manager. This grant will enable us to improve and main tain the pristine quality of Lake Minnehaha and our chain of lakes. The city of Umatil la has also been desig nated $100,000 for Lake Yale stormwater reuse and Lake County Pub lic Works has been given $200,000 for Wolf Branch sink drainage improvements. Each year the stormwater projects remove 1,219 pounds of total phosphorus, the press release states. Since the stormwater grant was awarded 18 years ago, 8,916 pounds of phosphates have been removed.TAVARES$400K in stormwater grants awarded

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A6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 23, 2014 has touched the lives of thousands of athletes from all over the world by giving them a ven ue in which to compete and the tools necessary to help them succeed. For the rst time ever, Lake County this year will have three athletes who will represent Special Olympics at the Nation al Games in New Jersey in June. The whole idea behind the torch is that it represents the ame of hope, the future of the community and what our ath letes can accomplish, Whee lock said. On Monday, she said every one came together beautifully, a sentiment seconded by Lt. Jonathon Rummel, a part of the Lake County Correctional Institutions Rapid Response Team, who for the rst time this year, partici pated in Lake Countys run. For the past four years in a row and before moving to Flor ida a few months ago, Rummel ran in the event in Santa Rosa, Calif., but never before has the experience hit home quite like it did Monday, he said. Ive done this elsewhere but, besides the route being much hillier here, we never had the actual kids, the athletes who participate in Special Olym pics, be a part of it by running with us or standing along the route cheering us on, Rummel said. It makes the experience much more meaningful because it gives you more of a vi sual and a sense of what youre doing it for, instead of just running. Its nice to hear from the athletes and just their Thank yous bring it all home. More than $3 million has been raised by the law enforcement torch run this year, in ad dition to other monies theyll receive from other sponsors in cluding Publix and Procter & Gamble, a Special Olympics ofcial said Monday. TORCH FROM PAGE A3 attack, Pappacoda said. She said a wound on the back of the dogs neck was originally larger than a grapefruit, but it has since healed to about the size of a lemon. The dog was picked up as a stray by Lake County animal control ofcers in the Ocala National Forest. He is currently being taken care of by Whitney Luck hart, a volunteer with Lake County Animal Services, Pappacoda said earlier in a press release. In addition to the enor mous crater in his back, he had hemorrhaging behind his eye, Luckhart said. He was hosting thousands of ticks but always maintained a pleasant demeanor. He has a very cheerful person ality and loves attention. Animal services cleaned the wound and when Luck hart took him home she gave him medication, Pap pacoda said. The dog, a Treeing Walk er Coonhound named Per cival, is less than 2 years old and will be less than 60 pounds fully grown, the re lease stated. Pappacoda said Percival, or Percy, is xed and ready to be adopted immediate ly. Shelter ofcials said he is up to date with shots, good with kids, dogs and cats. The adoption fee is $50. If interested, call 352-3439688. DOG FROM PAGE A3 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillardives@dailycommercial.comA three-day undercover operation in Lake County last week ended with the arrests of 44 alleged prosti tutes, pimps and johns. They all came to an undis closed motel, some carrying condoms, alcohol, guns and drugs, hoping to help feed sexual wants that includ ed a man offering $1,000 for a three-hour mnage trois and another willing to spend $60 to satisfy his foot fetish, detectives said. But they also said they no ticed something different about one prostitute. She was young and didnt seem famil iar with the business lingo, including john, or one who solicits sex for money. Something was wrong, Det. Jonathan Chavis said during a press conference Tuesday to announce the operation. Detectives soon learned the girl was 14 years old and allegedly was being forced to have sex with a man at the motel for $270. They said it is just one of almost a dozen human trafcking cases they are investigating in Lake County. The suspect, Gregory Lionel Foster, 28, is accused of abducting her from a gas sta tion on April 9 and trying to force her to have sex for mon ey with a man at an Orlando home and raping her him self, before taking her to the motel where he thought an other customer awaited, ac cording to an arrest afdavit. After talking with the girl, detectives were able to re unite her with her mother. Foster, of Orlando, was charged with kidnapping, human trafcking and pos session of marijuana. He re mained in the Lake County jail late Tuesday in lieu of $231,000 bail. Sheriff Gary Borders called the operation a success. We were able to get a 14-year-old girl and reunite her with her mother, and put a guy in jail who had kidnapped her, Borders said. According to detectives and an arrest afdavit, the 14-year-old girl met Foster at a neighborhood gas station. She knew him as , a man from the neighbor hood and a friend of her adult sister. Detectives said Foster helped lure her by buying her drinks and snacks at the gas station, with a promise to give her a ride home. They never made it. Chavis said Foster took her to a home and tried to make her have sex for mon ey with another man which sent her running out of the house screaming. But unfamiliar with the area, she stayed with Foster. The af davit adds the 260-pound Foster then forced her to have sex with him at a motel and, despite her crying, still refused to take her home. Chavis said the girl thought she was stuck with him. This is real, this is real, he kept telling her, accord ing to the afdavit. Then Foster was lured to the Clermont motel himself by an online advertisement for someone looking for a prostitute. Lt. John Herrell, sheriffs spokesman, said more and more prostitutes are stay ing off the streets and us ing online services so de tectives have started going online themselves to catch suspects. Chavis said Oper ation Hollerback was done completely online, mostly through websites like Craig slist and Backpage. They set up dates and prices with customers with undercover ofcials posing as prostitutes; and sex with prostitutes with ofcials posing as customers. With the help of Cler mont and Eustis police, vid eos released of some of the encounters show men tak ing off their shirts for sex only for deputies to come in instead and arrest them. Were keeping up with technology, Herrell said. Those arrested includ ed 20 women and 24 men, which included two customers who were nurses. Most of the bails were for about $500.TAVARES44 caught in prostitution stingDetectives soon learned the girl was 14 years old and allegedly was being forced to have sex with a man at the motel for $270. They said it is just one of almost a dozen human trafficking cases they are investigating in Lake County.

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10% OFFAll options with this couponrffnntb B1SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 23, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTSSPORTS EDITOR . ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE . .............................. 365-8268 FAX . .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL . ......... sports@dailycommercial.comSPORTSandLEISURE FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comAurora Davis is listed at 5-foot9 on the Florida State University website, but she is a giant in the world of collegiate sand volley ball. The former South Lake High School multi-sport standout teamed up with Jace Pardon this season and the duo has bolted to a 30-1 record and led FSU to a No. 4 ranking with the nation al championship tournament about two weeks away. Davis and Pardon left no doubt they are focused on the sports big prize with a domi nant performance last week end at the Fiesta on Siesta Key event. The pair won four matches without dropping a game to win their second straight pairs tournament title. In the title match, Davis and Pardon knocked off the Univer sity of North Floridas Dagnija Medina and Kim Hildreth 21-15 and 21-14. Jace and Aurora were super impressive, FSU coach Dana lee Corso said after the Siesta Key tournament. They made me believe they have the ability to win a national champion ship. If they can play like they did today, the sky is the limit. Davis and Pardon set the stage for a breakout year when the Seminoles traveled to Long Beach, Calif., early in the sea son to square off against Long Beach State, the defending na tional champion. As the Semi noles top team, Davis and Par don were slotted for a Court 1 match against the 49ers. Against Delainey Aigner-Swe sey and Bojana Todorovic, Davis and Pardon sent a message to the sand volleyball nation with 21-17 and 21-13 wins to lead the Seminoles to a 3-2 team victory the rst time FSU had ever beaten Long Beach State in dual play. Any time you beat the de fending national champions its a huge win, Corso said following the match. Jace and Auro ra were fantastic on Court 1 as they have been all year. The Seminoles top team has been so dominant this season that it has been forced to a third Florida States Aurora Davis becoming Queen of Sand DAVID N. JESTER / USA VOLLEYBALLAurora Davis, a former South Lake High School standout, makes a play on a ball during the Fiesta on Siesta sand volleyball tournament in Siesta Key. Davis is a senior at Florida State University.Jace and Aurora were super impressive. They made me believe they have the ability to win a national championship. If they can play like they did (against North Florida in the title match at Fiesta on Siesta Key), the sky is the limit.FSU coach Danalee Corso FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comJeremy Hoornstra is known to many people in Lake County as a re ghter and emergency medical technician for the Leesburg Fire Department. Others recognize him as a world record pow erlifter twice decorated. Hoornstra established his second world mark on Saturday at the American Powerlifting Association Raw Nationals in Defuniak Springs. Despite weighing only 246 pounds, Hoornstra competed in the 275-pound catego ry and bench pressed 672.4 pounds, eras ing the previous record of 669 pounds, set in Leesburg firefighter sets new record for powerlifting PHOTO COURTESY OF JEREMY HOORNSTRA Leesburg reghter/paramedic and professional powerlifter Jeremy Hoornstra competes in the bench press. Hoornstra recently set a world record by bench pressing 672.4 pounds. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comMontverde Academy added the latest jewel to its growing sports complex on Thursday when the school held an opening ceremo ny and ribbon cutting for its new aquatic center. School Headmaster Dr. Kasey Kesselring spoke at the ceremony, which was attended by former Headmaster Walter L. Stephens, members of the schools Board of Trustees and ofcials from the South Lake Chamber of Commerce. The facility, located on the east side of The Nest, the Montverde Academy Center for Sportsmanship and Wellness, is 84 feet long and 62 feet wide. It is 6 feet deep at each end and 4 feet deep in the middle. Kesselring indicated the facility will be used as a training facility for Montverde Academy Boys and Girls swim teams. As part of the ceremo ny, members of the schools swim teams swam a lap in the pool. In the past several years, Montverde Academy has upgraded its sports complex with a new foot ball-soccer-track facility, as well as new baseball and softball elds. The Nest, home to Montverde Academys two-time national champion ship boys basketball team, opened in 2012. In his speech, Kesselring praised the efforts of everyone involved in the construction of the pool, in cluding Brad Long, the schools business manager, for his budget ary help and dedication in making the project a reality.Montverde Academy opens latest sports facility BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL The Montverde swimming team dives into the new pool during the grand opening of the Montverde Academy Aquatic Complex in Montverde on April 17.SEE AURORA | B2SEE POWER | B2

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B2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 23, 2014OutdoorsFishing352-365-8268 sports@dailycommercial.com www.dailycommercial.com %  %  SOUTHERN TACKLEWORKS | TAVARESShellcracker and bluegill are preparing to spawn and are biting on yellow tail worms. They are biting on night crawlers and red worms too, but prefer the yellow tailed worms over other worms. Bass are biting on all moving baits such as crank baits. The Wednesday night open bass tournament have resumed with the time change. For anyone interested, they start at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday. Sandys bass tour nament, open to all, is held on the third Saturday monthly, with square bills, swimming worms and soft plastic baits. Sandys next regular bass tournament will be an open tournament on May 17. This tour nament will usher in a new season. For information, call the shop at 352-742-0036. %  %  PINE ISLAND CAMP | FRUITLAND PARKShell cracker have been hitting hard the last two or three weeks on grass shrimp. Many are catching limits in Haynes Creek, along the Wall and around Bird Island. Predominantly males are being caught. Bream shing has been excellent, the best it has been in four years. Bass are being caught consistently. Speck action has slowed. %  %  PALM GARDENS | TAVARESS hellcracker and bluegill are biti ng on grass shrimp, minnows and worms in the pads. Largemouth bass are biting along the shoreline, in the pads and grass on articial baits and shiners. %  %  NELSONS FISH CAMP | WEIRSD ALEBass action has been strong. They are biting on spinner baits and soft plastic worms. Shell cracker are biting on grass shrimp. Bluegill and speck activity has been negligible. %  %  BLACK BASS RESORT-FISH CAMP Some small bream are being caught from the dock. More activity is being seen in Haynes Creek and Lake Eustis on Black Bass minnows. %  %  SORRENTO BAIT AND TACKLESchooling-sized bass are being caught in the local lakes. Some late bedding activity is still being seen in the spring-fed lakes due to the cooler water temperature. These sh are biting on shiners, Gambler Big EZ baits, Devil Force baits and swim baits. Fish are biting in Bear Pond, on Highway 46, shiners and plastic worms shed slowly. Several recent guide trips have produced 18 to 20 bass caught and re leased. The bass were caught on shiners, drop shots and June bug worms on a light line. A few scattered crappie are biting in the Saint Johns River, Lake Beauclaire, Lake Dora and the ApopkaBeauclaire Canal. Bluegill and sunsh are beginning to bite on red worms. Big catsh are being caught on night crawlers. Stop in and get the latest daily report. LAKES REPORT a weekly update fromCHERYL STALEY-ARCHER rf ntbb nrntf tbb b rf fff rb ntfbbb nrnt tbf ffbf rbf rffrff f rff ntfb nrntfb tff fbb fb rfbf game in only two matches this season. And on both occasions, Davis and Pardon walked away with the win. I have such an awesome partner and friend, Davis said of Pardon. Davis has been an integral part of the sports growth at the college level. She was part of the rst season of collegiate sand vol leyball in 2012, after transferring to FSU as a sophomore. Prior to that, Davis played indoor volley ball at State College of Florida in Saraso ta, where she was earned All-America hon ors, but followed her heart by transferring to FSU. My favorite has always been beach, Da vis said. As a sophomore, in 2012, Davis recorded a 50-7-1 record and reached the quarternals of the National Championships with playing partner Brittany Tiegs. She didnt start the season as a member of the Seminoles No. 1 team, but became a dominant player after being paired with Tiegs, sporting a 22-2-1 re cord and winning three tournament titles af terward. Davis was named to the sports rst All-America team in 2012. In her junior season, Davis had a 22-9 re cord and reached the seminals at nationals. Davis recently earned All-America honors for the second time and likely will be recog nized as one of the top college players in the history of the sport. Davis will get the chance to put a bow on her career at the American Volleyball Coach es Association Sand Volleyball National Championships May 2-4 in Gulf Shores, Ala. As Corso and Davis teammates have learned over the past three seasons, it would not be surprising if Davis left Gulf Shores with a share of the national championship in a sport many consider to be a tall persons game. (Davis and Pardon) arent the tallest team in the nation, but they make up for that by being complete players, Corso said. Their defense is incredibly good. They both dig so well. They make great choices on the court. They have so many different tools ball control, serving and setting. They can do it all and they are so much fun to coach. AURORA FROM PAGE B1 2011 by Russias Vladimir Krastsov. He then attempted to bench press 701 pounds, but was unsuccessful. According to pub lished reports, Hoornstra is the lightest man in history to bench press at least 672 pounds. Im not done, Hoorn stra said. The heaviest bench press ever is 724 pounds and Im work ing for that one. I want to have the heaviest lift ever. In the gym, Hoorns tra has lifted over 700 pounds, including a 715-pound bench press. Hoornstra set his rst world record in 2012 when he pressed 661 pounds in the 242-pound classication a mark that still stands. He sur passed a record set by Mike MacDonald that had stood for more than 30 years. For Hoornstra, powerlifting has been some thing that has interested him for most of life. A third generation reght er in Leesburg, he be gan lifting as a youngster when he would accompa ny his father to work. Hoornstra continued to work with weights during his time in high school and while he attended Florida State Universi ty. He competes as a pro fessional, which he says, helps to pay the bills. The solitude of the sport is what attracted Hoornstra and has maintained his interest over the years. He likes how it helps him stay in shape for his job, which can be physically demanding. Hoornstra also likes that he and he alone is responsible for his success in the sport. You have no one else to blame, Hoornstra said. Its all up to you and how hard you train. Besides, it helps to keep me in shape, which real ly helps at work with all the heavy gear and tools we have to carry and use. At work, if they need something thats heavy carried around, they usually look to me to move it. And his accomplish ments are making fans out of longtime enthusiasts of the sport. Jeremy Hoornstra in my eyes the best bencher ever born, wrote Chris Pappillion on Hoornstras Facebook page. If Hoornstra has his wish, Pappillion and other followers of powerlifting will have many more years to follow his bench-pressing feats. Even though he feels the all-time record of 724 pounds is only three or four months away, Hoornstra stressed he has no plans to walk away from the barbell. Im only 33 years old, Hoornstra said. Power lifters dont reach their prime until they reach their early to mid 40s, so I have a long way to go. If I dont get hurt, I plan to lift for a very long time. I want to set a record that will never be broken. POWER FROM PAGE B1 Staff ReportMichael Hennessey surren dered a single run over seven innings of work on Monday to help Lake-Sumter State College eke out a 2-1 victory over visiting Daytona State College. Hennessey, who improved his record to 4-2 with the win, limited DSC to just ve hits and fanned ve without allowing a walk. Steve McClellan came on in the eighth to pick up his rst save. But Daytona State College freshman pitcher Phoenix Sanders (4-5) was almost as effective as his mound opponent. Sanders allowed a pair of runs over eight in nings and held the Lakehawks to just ve hits. The visitors took the early lead, scoring their only run of the game in the third inning when Ezequiel Sanchez doubled to deep right-center eld. Catcher Kyle Cunningham reached on a elders choice with Sanchez remain ing at second. Luke Johnston then singled through the hole at sec ond but Cunningham was held to third on the throw. Freshman third-baseman Austin Marrs then beat out an ineld hit to enable Sanchez to cross the plate. The Lakehawks evened the score in the fourth when LSSCs leading hitter, Dakota Higdon, singled up the middle and raced to third when Tanner Elsbernd laced a double down the left-eld line, putting runners on second and third with no outs. Third-sack er Jack Curtis then scored Higdon with a sacrice y to deep center eld. But Sanders bore down and managed to escape with no fur ther damage. LSSC scored what turned out to be the winning run in the bottom of the fth inning on a single hit combined with a defensive lapse. Catcher Chris Blanton led off with a single to shallow center, but was cut down at second by Sanders when Tanner Longs at tempted sacrice went awry. But the Daytona hurler gave the base back on a wild throw, allowing Long to reach third on the play. Taylor Saris followed with a sacrice y to center, scoring Long with the nal run of the game.Michael Hennessey shines in Lake-Sumter States 2-1 win over Daytona State College

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Wednesday, April 23, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B3 HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. Staff ReportEustis High School unpacked their big bats on April 14 to post an 8-3 come-from-behind victo ry over East Ridge. Sam Gatch was the starter for the Panthers, tossing the rst four innings and registering a 2-for3 performance at the plate. Jack Kirkpatrick also collected a pair of hits and drove in three runs along the way. Kyle Wiseman nished with a pair of hits in three plate appearances and was responsible for starting the third-inning, game-tying rally that put Eustis back in the ballgame. In the fourth inning, Wiseman led off with a two-out double and scored on a Wesley Mounden base hit. Billy Ornes took the loss on the mound for East Ridge. Eustis went ahead for good with a three-run rally in the fth inning that put the game out of reach.Eustis unpacks big bats to outslug East Ridge BRETT LEBLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL East Ridge senior Carter Varga slides in safely to second base as Eustis senior Jeremy Migliori tries to tag him out during the East Ridge-Eustis game on April in Eustis. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comLake Minneola boys basketball coach Freddie Cole is conducting two youth basketball camps in May for play ers looking to improve their fundamentals and ability to perform in game situations. The two-day camps are May 2-3 and May 23-24 at the Lake Minneola High School gymnasium for boys and girls between the ages of 5 and 17. The cost of the camps is $50. The rst day for both camps will run from 5 to 8 / p .m. and the second day will begin at 9 / a.m. and end at noon. Cole is the only boys basketball coach in Lake Minneolas his tory. He led the Hawks to a 28-4 record in 2013-14 and the Flor ida High School Ath letic Association Class 6A state championship game. After play ing collegiately at Bethune-Cookman University in Dayto na Beach, Cole played professionally over seas before becoming a high school coach. Lake Minneola is 6022 during Coles three seasons at the helm. Many of the teach ing tools Cole said he plans to use in the camps were learned during his college and professional careers. Registration forms for the camp are avail able on request. Email colef@lake.k12..us to obtain a registration form or for information.LMHS basketball coach plans camps FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comKoral Smith had three RBIs and pitched a complete game for the Bulldogs in a 5-0 win on Tuesday in the Class 5A-District 13 tour nament at Eustis. Tavares will face Eustis at 7 p.m. Thursday for the district title. By nishing no worse than sec ond, both teams advance to next weeks regional tournament. Brielle Dougherty and Savan nah Money also contributed for Tavares (11-13). Tavares softball tops Umatilla in tourney Tavares High School senior Savannah Money (4) takes a swing during Tuesdays Class 5A-District 13 tournament game against Umatilla at Eustis High School.BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL

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B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 23, 2014 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 725344767 1318315974 921FREE SPACE5372 216424863 529395268ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N IB O G BINGO B I N G O SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Amy Pike WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! B 9 I 21 G 53 O 72 FREE

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Ann DupeeREMEMBER WHENA weekly column that reprints some of the more interesting news stories that have appeared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press.C1SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 23, 2014 www.southlakepress.comCOMMUNITYProudly servingCLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWSSTAFF WRITER . ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE . .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 EMAIL..... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com FROM THE FILES | 25 YEARS AGO 1989Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press 16 CJHS STUDENTS WIN ODYSSEY OF THE MINDSixteen Clermont Junior High School students, forming three separate teams, participated in the Odyssey of the Mind regional competition in Tampa and distinguished themselves by bringing home honors. The Do More With Less team, consisting of Ben Boney, Chad Morrison, Mercer Simmons, Adam Swanson, Kevin Swanson and John Wichers, won the award for Exceptional Creativity. To solve their competition problem, they built a balsa wood structure, but found upon checking in that their tower specications were incomplete and their structure was disqualied. To the complete amazement of the judges, the team requested and was given permission to build a new structure before their scheduled performance time, which they did. The Fabulous Fables team of Kelli Angel, Kellie Burd, Maureen Campbell, Meladie Gey and Jenny James created a coordinated fable to illustrate the sayings, Good things come in small packages and Beauty is only skin deep. The challenge of the Ye Gods team of Chuck Arendt, Jennifer Bort, Jennifer Cobia, James Hunnicutt and Tracy White was to explain a mythological character and produce a commercial advertising product that incor porated a mythological character. Both these teams will compete at the state level April 15. Mascotte Elementary School third grader Marty Brasher of Mrs. Sanders class was pictured holding his model of a modern-day robot that he built with the help of his father, Randy Brasher. The model, weighing about 10 pounds, was entered in the Lake County Fair.MAYOR POOL COMPLIMENTS COOPER MEMORIAL LIBRARYClermont Mayor Bob Pool complimented Cooper Memorial Library for its recent 75th year celebration. He added the average library in the state offers two books per capita. The Clermont library has four books per per son, which speaks highly of our library. The Spring Book Sale of the Friends of the Library is over. Cashiers were Lois Gwin, Dotty Wiebush, Sonna Lou Vitter, Miriam Johnson, May Nielson, Helen Trolle and Ted Stern. The sales and hauling crew of Les Sanner, Joe Wiebush, Steve Nielson, Helen and George Zielbauer, Bernice and Paul Terry, Toni Moody, Olga Granger, Carmen ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comWhen Wawa person nel and ofcials began last Thursday morn ing to prepare for the stores grand opening, they noticed a line about 30 people deep waiting for the doors to open, Area Manager Charlene Mar ko-Heim said. She said they treated the waiting guests to bakery samples, breakfast samples and drinks, but since the line continued to grow, Marko-Heim said she went ahead and opened at 7:30 / a.m., a half hour earlier than scheduled. We are thrilled by the great welcome to the community weve gotten by everybody, Marko-Heim said. By the start of the stores grand opening festivities at 10 / a.m., the parking lot was overowing with visitors. Ofcials, fresh off a company-wide celebration of Wawas 50th anniversary, even brought along two dancing, high-ving Wally mascots. A few customers were so happy, they brought old Wawa memorabilia, wore their Wawa shirts and told Wawa stories to anyone whod listen. Terry Stitt had a yellow Wawa coffee mug shes had since the early 1980s when she lived in Philadelphia. According to Mar ko-Heim, Stitts mug is the rst ever put out by Wawa, available in the late s through the s. The rst thing Stitt did was ll her mug with Wawa coffee, something she has hoped to do for years. Oh man, there aint nothing like it, Stitt said about the coffee, the same reply she gave when asked about the Wawa pretzels and hoagies. Clermonts Steve Kaczmarski, CLERMONTResidents go gaga over Wawa PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Lettuce ies at a hoagie-building contest between police ofcers and reghters during grand opening festivities for a new Wawa convenience store in Clermont on Thursday. BELOW: Lt. Erik Strange of the Clermont Fire Department spices up his hoagie. BOTTOM: Summer Phillips gets down with the Wawa Wallys. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comThough the mean ing of Easter is known by most in the Christian community, the significance of the days pre ceding it referred to as Passover in the Jew ish faith may be less known. Congregation Sinai in Minneola host ed a Taste of Passover Seder luncheon to give a little insight into the season and to break de nominational barriers within the community, starting with an explanation of what it sig nies the exodus of the Jewish people from Egypt. Passover is a sto ry that has a sad be ginning and a happy ending, said Marlene Kostan, president of the congregations Sister hood ladies group. The Seder is a time to reect on those less fortunate than ourselves, as well as the good fortune we now enjoy. In that spirit, let no stranger be alone on Seder night and in vite anyone who wishes to participate. The Sisterhood welcomed womens groups from other congrega tions around south Lake County recently for the event, which included a short Seder service and luncheon. Easter Sunday falls on the seventh night of Passover, which lasts eight days. Ritual Chairman Kar en Miller said the Seder marks the rst and second night of Passover, MINNEOLAFaiths come together for Passover ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Sharon Kowalski, left, and Evelyn Rose, both from First United Methodist Church of Clermonts Womens Group, attended Congregation Sinais fourth annual Taste of Passover Seder service.Passover is a story that has a sad beginning and a happy ending. The Seder is a time to reflect on those less fortunate than ourselves, as well as the good fortune we now enjoy.Marlene Kostan Sisterhood ladies group presidentSEE PASSOVER | C2SEE WAWA | C5SEE HISTORY | C2

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C2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 23, 2014 ITS TAXINGBY DAN SCHOENHOLZ / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZNo. 0413RELEASE DATE: 4/20/2014 ACROSS1 Crazy places5 Supply (with)8 Yogi in the New Jersey Hall of Fame13 Give up on18 Neutral zone, say20 Genevas ___ des Nations21 Its organized in a family22 Fragile decoration23 Elevated24 Hangovers at home?25 Agreement for an amount to be taken from ones salary?28 Samoan capital31 Glow32 Soil33 What C.P.A.s wish for their clients?39 Reactor43 For44 We shun it ___ it comes: Dickinson45 Guest book, e.g.46 Purim villain47 First name of the first female Supreme Court justice49 C.P.A.s advice for lowering future-year liabilities?55 Serious overcharging57 Place in trust58 Tony-winning Robert Morse role59 Fast62 European wheels?64 Alley ___65 Match66 Ample, informally67 Chart used to calculate a married couples taxes?70 ___ Reader71 Have a series of sudden inspirations?72 General mailing address?: Abbr.73 Night hunter74 Let loose75 What pop-ups do76 Websites of interest?79 First name among Mouseketeers81 I.R.S. update?84 Soccer team88 Three-time s World Series champs89 Alpine stream90 Milk91 Halves of zygotes92 G.P.S. component: Abbr.93 Last-minute way to reduce tax for a desperate filer?100 Deadline time appropriate to this puzzle102 Sad to say 103 Choice word?104 C.P.A.s masterstroke?112 Vive ___!113 South American land114 Troublemakers118 Triatomic oxygen molecule119 Strengthen120 Certain fundraiser121 Ebbed122 Certain tracks123 Foxy124 Wail DOWN1 When repeated, one of the Gabors2 Galley sight3 Time and again4 Modern two-wheeler5 How now! ___?: Hamlet6 Alter, as a form7 Digital olio8 Tour group?9 K-1210 Parade spoiler11 Sailor, sometimes12 Waste place13 Perfume14 Where to land for the night15 Break apart16 ___, brother!17 Nudnik19 Aladdin prince20 Like some opposites26 Suffix with deposit27 Choice words28 Hypes (up)29 Chute opener?30 Hip to34 Judean ruler35 19-Down, e.g.36 Wing37 Gift for many a PBS donor38 Lousy reviews40 Ape41 Division head?42 Double-checked, e.g.46 Conform (to)48 Go with the flow49 Breed of hunting dog50 Like some traditions51 ___ disease52 Transition area from deciduous to evergreen, e.g.53 ___ Plaza (hotel chain)54 El ___ (cheap cigar, slangily)56 Do me one favor 59 Important parts of Thanksgiving and Easter60 There is no greater evil than ___: Antigone61 They might be pulled63 Airport on a bay, for short65 Food processor setting67 Classic perfume68 Algerian port69 Call up74 Army base near Petersburg, Va.76 S.A.S.E. recipients77 1980s Chrysler offering78 Retrieve and throw back, in baseball practice80 Syndicated radio host John82 What to never do, according to the title of a 2005 best seller83 Exist85 Raise ones hand, say86 Tied up87 ___ a one90 Co. with the longtime stock symbol X93 Verdis ___ tu94 Alternatives to Mustangs95 Pacific current event?96 2008 Olympic tennis gold medalist97 Actor Gulager of old TV98 Settings for Skyfall and Casino Royale99 Laxness101 Engaged in, as a trade104 Sudden misfortune105 Shah ___ Pahlavi106 Wood alternative107 Where Davy Crockett was born: Abbr.108 Last little bit109 Memorable times110 In a bad way111 Bravo!115 Cry of discovery116 Partner of again117 ___ Digital Short 1234 567 891011121314151617 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 282930 31 32 33 3435 363738 39404142 43 44 45 46 47 48 495051 525354 55 56 57 58 596061 62 63 64 65 66 67 6869 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 777879 80 81 82 83 84 858687 88 89 90 91 92 939495 969798 99 100101 102 103 104105106 107108109 110111 112 113 114 115116117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Solution on D4 adding that the luncheon makes it even more spe cial because the sister hood gets to share tradi tions with others. We want to share our traditions with oth ers, Miller said. I know our Bible is the basis for some other Bibles, and it means a lot for some people to see what it talks about in certain parts, actually played out before them. Many rituals were shared through the ser vice, starting with the re moval of Chametz (any leavened food), the lighting of a Sabbath candle, an opening prayer and the explanation of the Seder plate that sat in the center of each table next to a pitcher of wine and the matzah. The Seder plate in cluded a roasted lamb or chicken bone, which signies Gods mighty arm that convinced the Egyptians to free the Jewish slaves. Also on the plate were matzah, maror and chazeret, (bitter herbs), char oset, (a mixture of grat ed apples, nuts and cin namon mixed with red wine), a hard beitzah, (a hard boiled egg), karpas (a vegetable), salt water and wine all signify ing the transition from the Jewish people being slaves to the time they were freed. Various readings tell ing the story of Passover were heard, along with rituals attendees par ticipated in that were meant to illustrate var ious parts of it. Guests included members of the Womans Guild of Blessed Sacrament Church, a Catholic church in Clermont, and womens groups from First Unit ed Methodist Church in Clermont, Zion Luther an Church of Clermont and South Lake Presby terian of Clermont. Sylvia Barto, who belongs to South Lake Presbyterian, said the Seder was meaningful. We need to learn the culture, she said. After all, its out faith also, and Jesus was Jewish. We read about all of this in the Bible, so its nice to see how its presented. During the week after Palm Sunday before Easter, Jesus was travel ing to Jerusalem to par ticipate in a Passover Seder and in Christian ity, that developed into the last supper. PASSOVER FROM PAGE C1 Metts and Frank Trolle also worked diligently.NEWS OF NOTEZip codes are changing July 1. A small decrease in monthly electric bills takes effect April 1 for Florida Power customers. Cost of 1,000 kilo watt-hours for residential customers will decrease 18 cents, from $66.77 to $66.59. Groveland resident Betty Sewell recently re turned from a fun-lled cruise to Nassau, Baha mas, and two days at Walt Disney World as one of 400 Avon sales represen tatives nationwide that qualied for the prize in a four-week sales competition last summer. Employees of Walt Disney World Company are getting a sneak preview of the new Disney/MGM Studio this month, while cast and crew make nal adjustments for the new parks opening May 1.KIWANIS, LIONS NEWSSouth Lake Kiwanis President Jeff Ladd was pictured presenting a $1,000 check to Clermont High School Principal David Coggshall to use in the schools popular grade incentive program, Catch the Wave, now in its second year. Clermont Minneola Li ons Club celebrated the 40th anniversary of its March 29, 1979 charter ing at a dinner at the Flor ida Citrus Tower. President Joe Janusiak welcomed 61 Lions and guests; Lion Nor val Brown gave the invocation. District Gover nor Lion Ed Payton gave out Monarch Awards: Ray Cochran, 40 years; Nor val Brown and Claude Teachout, 25 years; John Boyd and Leif Zetter lund, 20 years and Lavern Molye, 15 years. As Lion Richard Harris read each charter members name, Lion Jay Vander Meer lit a candle.HONOR ROLL AND ALL AMERICANReceiving all A grades for the third marking pe riod at Clermont High School were: ninth grade, Frances Hovis, Christi na Lindgren, Sara Robarge and Leigh Ann Tucker; 10th grade; Wen dy Brooks, Carly Meeker, Dee Dee Miller and Chris tie Surin; 11th grade, Bryn Tyner and 12th grade, Christopher Franklin, Brandon Huber, Shane Masters, Matthew Mc Lean, Alice Seewer, Su san Smith and Brian Wil liams. Mary Jones received the surprise package of her life in the mail. Western Kentucky Special Teams Coach Drake shipped her a shiny, colorful plaque with the prole of her son Cedric on it with the inscription reading Cedric Jones All American. The award came after Cedric had completed a four-year stint as a wide receiver and punt returner for the Western Ken tucky team at Bowling Green. HISTORY FROM PAGE C1 SUBMITTED PHOTO The Indoor Percussion Ensemble and the Minneola High School Color Guard pose after winning the Florida Federation of Color Guard Circuit (FFCC) State Championship. The Indoor Percussion Ensemble performed in the 2A Class Competition and received the State Championship Gold Medal Title, with each student receiving a special gold medal at the awards ceremony. The group was also recognized for its advanced level of performance in its class. The Lake Minneola High School Color Guard also performed in the 2A Class Competition and received fth place, a new high rating for the team. Their performance was titled Stay Gold.LAKE MINNEOLA HIGH DRUM LINE WINS STATE CHAMPIONSHIP COMMUNITY CALENDAR TODAYMINNEOLA BOOK DAY AT THE MINNEOLA SCHOOLHOUSE LIBRARY: Aided by the Friends of the Library volunteers, for this celebration of reading by giving books away to chosen groups. This year we are ex -panding to three loca -tions. Call the library at 352-432-3921 for de -tails. THURSDAYSOUTH LAKE RIVER-WIND NATIVE AMERICAN FLUTE CIRCLE: From 6 to 8:30 p.m., Cler -mont Historic Village, 490 West Ave., in Cler -mont. Call Pam Dickey at 352-989-6326 for information. SPRING BOWS: At 6 p.m., Marion Baysinger Memorial County Li -brary, 756 W. Broad St., Groveland. To partici-pate in making spring accessories, register at the library or by calling 352-429-5840.SOUTH LAKE 912 PROJECT HOSTS KAREN SCHOEN: Speaker at 7 p.m., at the Clermont Community Center in downtown Clermont. Schoen will dene ex -actly what Agenda 21 is, how it could end up generally affecting many landowners and how it could have a lo cal impact on our area. FRIDAYSPRING FLING: From 4 to 7 p.m., at Windermere Union Church, United Church of Christ, 10710 Park Ridge-Gotha Rd., in Windermere. Silent auction, games, bounce house, slides, cake walk, obstacle course and pony rides. Food trucks, including Kona Ice, a taco truck and Smokin Hot Dogs will be on site for food purchases. For information, call 407-909-0464 or email at wucpreschool@gmail.com. SUNDAYLOW COST PET VACCI -NATION CLINIC: From noon to 4 p.m., Irish Trails and Pet Supply, 102 S. U.S. Highway 27 in Clermont. MONDAYKINGS RIDGE MENS GOLF ASSOCIATION HOSTS 9TH ANNUAL CHARITY GOLF TOURNA-MENT: Registration at 7:30 a.m., shotgun start at 8:30 a.m., 1950 Kings Ridge Blvd., Clermont. SEE EVENTS | C5

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Wednesday, April 23, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C3 Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) HYBRID SPECIMEN PALMSAdd curb appeal and value to your home!Our trees are grown from seed and agriculturally inspectedWe provide digging, transport and transportationWe carry Exotic Hybrid PalmsQuality, Care, and Maintenance reflected in our 50+ Yearsof Horticultural Experience!Types of trees we offer: Phoenix Reclinata, Phoenix Sylvester, Phoenix Canary, Phoenix Date, Bismark European Fan, Chinese Fan Palm, and many more!FAMILY OWNED & OPERATEDFREE CONSULTATION!WE COME TO YOU UPON REQUESTSmaller palms available in pots321-388-7587Contact Jim and Jim SPRING SPECIAL ON LARGE LIGUSTRUM TREES Place your ad here and reach the Local Market!VERY AFFORDABLE!Call today 352-394-2183 SUBMITTED PHOTODema Neilson, program chair; Joy Dickinson, of the Orlando Sentinel, and Marilyn Paone, president of Sandspurs Circle pose at a recent meeting where Dickinson, was the guest speaker, giving an informative talk about the history of the Gardens of Orlando and the city of Orlando in the late 1800s. Call Marilyn Paone at 352-394-2390 for information about the group. THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comGallery director Mike Senger delighted in ar ranging Spring Abstracts, a new, colorful ne art exhibit by art ist Christopher Volpe at the Bowersock Gallery in Mount Dora. I put on a different set of music and just got lost in it, Senger said of hanging a total of 20 pieces of the New Hampshire artists works in the show. His work is wonderful; I think that people are really going to love the colors, the vi brancy of them. It makes one think spring and summer. All year long you could look at his paintings and feel the warmth. The show opened last weekend and runs through May 6. People are really loving how he is taking the oral and turning the abstract on it; the colors are very Florida, Senger said of the artist, who si multaneously controls composition and works with drips, scribbles and accidents in his pieces. The best way to de scribe Chriss work is moving, curator Steve Bowersock said in a press release, while noting the artist is showcasing two collections of his works. Viewing either series is like getting lost in a dream, Bowersock said. One captures the excitement of a garden, its delicate air and brilliant hues. Likewise the dark night and often rain-drenched land scapes of the second series are reminiscent of the changing weather of early spring, impart a distinct atmosphere, raw and haunting. Volpe is known for his tonal works and more impressionist style. Over the past few years he has focused more on abstraction. The experience of owers or an amazing garden is a big experi ence its a lot of emotion and excitement of the senses. I wanted to paint that feeling, the artist said in a press re lease. But, I didnt just want to try to express a eeting ecstatic experience. Theres a cer tain amount of gravitas to some of the garden work because whenever you go deeply into the vibrancy of life you also have to come up against the other half of nature, which is death. Bowersock said Volpes works feature vibrant shocks of color of spring in full bloom, yet it is abstract enough for the mind to sketch. The gallery is located at 137 East Fourth Ave., Mount Dora, and can be reached at 352-729-2415.MOUNT DORASpring Abstracts burst into bloom at Bowersock COURTESY OF BOWERSTOCK GALLERY Home of the hummingbird is the title of this abstract painting by artist Christopher Volpe. The painting is on display through May 6 at Bowersock Gallery in Mount Dora.SANDSPURS HAS SPECIAL GUEST SUBMITTED PHOTO Pictured is assistant principal Tricia Murphy, with students, Grady Prinzel, Sarah Read, Ivo Popaduik and Ashley Hutter, the Random Acts of Kindness winners at Lost Lake Elementary School in Clermont for students in grades 1-5. Students are chosen each month who demonstrate spontaneous kindness toward other children and adults. The Masons of Kings Ridge sponsor the incentive program. Winning students are recognized on the morning news and receive a RAK T-shirt and dog tag.RANDOM ACTS OF KINDNESS WINNERS AT LOST LAKE CLERMONT Stewart new member of American Angus AssociationBreanna Stewart of Clermont is a new junior member of the American Angus Association, reports Bryce Schumann, CEO of the national orga nization with headquarters in Saint Joseph, Mo. Junior members of the Association are eligible to register cattle in the American Angus Associ ation, participate in programs conducted by the National Junior Angus Association and take part in Association-sponsored shows and other na tional and regional events. The American Angus Association is the largest beef breed association in the world, with over 24,000 active adult and junior members.

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C4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 23, 2014 Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...Enchanted Living Home DecorEnchanted Living Home Decor offers an enchanted world of unique items and furnishings in one shopBy Terri Wells Nestled on Eighth Street in Historic Downtown Clermont, Enchanted Living Home Decor invites visitors in with treasures carefully displayed in every corner. Whether you're looking for a gorgeous antique couch or a much smaller item to help pull your room together, chances are you'll find it here. While owners Anissa Mills and Tony Wallace just opened the shop in February of this year, their passion for antiques goes back much further. Wallace's mother ran an antique business in Saint Augustine, so he learned about it at her knee. Wallace has always been a collector. He's passing the passion on to the next generation, as daughter Ashley works in all aspects of this family-owned business. She does a little of everything, from picking out furniture to running the cash register to helping out at events. "She does it all," Mills declared. The family has been living in Clermont for three years, as the result of "an accident," as Mills described it. Wallace came down for a job, and Mills followed him three months later, but both of them fell in love with the area. "The scenery, the mountains, it's all so different from anywhere else in Florida," Mills reflected. It reminded her of her home state of Ohio. When not hunting out antique treasures for his customers, Wallace can be found fishing out on the lake or indulging his enthusiasm for motorcycles. He's also an enthusiastic and experienced chef, citing Jamaican cuisine as a favorite a passion he learned from his father, who is Jamaican. Asked about her favorite aspect of the business, Mills pointed to the people. She loves talking with them and learning their stories. The business attracts a diversity of customers, from residents who have lived here for years to visitors from out of the country. Wallace's favorite aspect of the business is finding and buying unusual items for those customers. In the future, Wallace and Mills hope to grow their business. "We've outgrown our space," Mills admitted. The couple hopes to open a second store in the future. Enchanted Living Home Decor is located at 639 Eighth Street in Historic Downtown Clermont. You can call the store at 352-243-8888, check out their Facebook page at www.facebook.com/pages/Enchanted-Living-HomeDecor/260209717442997, or visit their website at www.enchantedlivinghomedecor.com/default.html. rfnrtb Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! rffntCall today b fnfffr mprehensim i$59ions$99excludes w isdo m teeth (thi rd m ola rs)new pa tients only one time visit offer p anoramic xray required D0330 out of pocket expenseExpires: May 31, 2014 m 352-394-3071 *P anoramic x-ray and/or CT scan of the ja ws necessary for d ia gnos is and trea tment planning. It is our office policy tha t the pa tient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service. examina tion or trea tment which is performed as a result of a nd within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free discounted-offer or reduced-free service, ex ami na tion or trea tment MIn. Free ADA code D0210, D0150 m3 No More Dentures! AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comThe owners of Mammas Pizzeria in Leesburg are planning to open a new restaurant called Mammas Pizza Express at the former Sbar ro location inside the Lake Square Mall. John Voss, who co-owns the restaurants with his wife Tammy, said he hopes to open the store Thursday. While their current eatery, at 27405 U.S. Highway 27, is a full-Italian restaurant, Mam mas Pizza Express will serve pizza, some pastas and items like strombolis, subs and sal ads, Voss said. Mammas Pizza Express will have ve to six fulland part-time employees, he said, adding they have hired three of the former Sbarro employees to work at either his Leesburg location or the mall store. Voss said they were look ing to be on that side of town when he heard about Sbar ro closing and the new mall ownership. Sandi Moore, the executive director of the Leesburg Area Chamber of Commerce, said the mall needs to have a pizzeria. Its kind of a staple for a food court, she said. Lake Square Mall General Manager Jennifer Glidewell agreed that the mall needs to have a pizza place in its food court. The Sbarro at the Lake Square Mall was one of 155 under-performing Sbarro stores the company is closing nationally, the Daily Commercial previously reported. Weve had a lot of requests since they left for another pizza store, Glidewell said. The mall also announced last week that it had nal ized negotiations with Cuba Pichys Cuisine, Dunkin Donuts and Boba Galaxy Smoothies. The smoothie store will be near the BooksA-Million, Glidewell said. Smoothies are becoming a big thing, and so weve had several requests for that also and we dont have anything of that nature down in that area of the mall. So, I think that will be a wonderful addi tion, Glidewell said. The Daily Commercial pre viously reported that Cuba Pichys Cuisine will be a ne dining Cuban restaurant in the space that once housed Garelds restaurant and the Dunkin Donuts will be in an outparcel location that previously housed KFC.LEESBURGAnother pizza restaurant to replace Sbarro in mall SUBMITTED PHOTO Rotarians from left to right, Bill Weckerly, Anna Rose Pauley and Sam Worrel of the Rotary Club of South Lake County stand with student members of the Rotary-sponsored Interact Club of Minneola, which recently spent a Saturday morning cleaning the roadway along Hartwood-Marsh Road in Clermont, from the intersection of U.S. Highway 27 to the Elementary Charter School. The Rotary Club cleans this section of the roadway once every other month as a service to the community. For information about the club, call Roger Pierce 352-394-3849.ROTARY CLUB AND STUDENTS CLEAN ROADWAY SUBMITTED PHOTO The monthly Principals Breakfast for students in grades 3-5, goes to one child that has made signicant improvement in the area of conduct, grades and/or citizenship. Student winners are then rewarded with breakfast served by administrators. Pictured are Jacob Pallas, Elly Hime, Angela Chavez, Karina Lopez, Jamir Carnegie, Santiago Solis, Ana Moncaleano, Evan Gilbert, Isaiah Hinson, Madison Pearson, Kennedy Feagan, Kristina Vela, Andres Hernandez-Munoz, Bryleigh Fincham, Zachary Graham, Cody Riggins, David Penney, Lucas Gaynes, Ali Maqsood, India Suraton, Guilianna Castellanno, Jakob Foley, Najla Hack, Micah Sims, Angela Moncaeleano, Wyatt Watson, Michael Vazquez, Marcella Giglio, Jerrell Jackson, George Pisare, Oriana Rivera-Vargas, Amy Nandan, Austin Wheeler, Emily Gacek, Jacob Brown, Madisyn Burcheld, MarKese Kelly, Sanjay Chotoosingh, Kenrick Bradford, Trent Laverghetta, Jodie Lin, Michael Hughes, Nathan Valada, Vincent Flori and Principal Rhonda Hunt and Assistant Principal Chad Frazier.PRINCIPALS BREAKFAST AT LOST LAKE ELEMENTARY IN CLERMONT

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Wednesday, April 23, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C5 CLERMONT BLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSAMILYELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time! IRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONTL Many Other Activities each week Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.org LIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLCHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm SOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary); 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.org ST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am (Rite I) 10:00 am (Rite II) 5:00 pm (Praise & Worship) Sunday School Youth Group Nursery Adult Bible Study Womens Bible Study Mens Prayer Breakfast WOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH GODINCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALE ERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for Children Groveland IRSTBAPTISTCHURCH GROVELAND Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pm MT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! MINNEOLA CONGREGATIONSMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club NEWLPRESBYTERIANCHURCH18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am TLIVINGGOD Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce Rowland MONTVERDE WOODLANDSLUTHERAN15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 am OAKLAND PRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforSouth Lake South LakeGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOMErfn tbt352-394-7121806 W. Minneola Ave.,Clermont,FL Cremation ChoicesDirect Cremation$675Plus Container Ron Becker,Director352-394-8228921 S.US Hwy 27,Minneola,FL originally from Ocean City in south New Jer sey, said he has frequented the Wawas that have opened in Orlando, but is glad to have one close by, as he and his wife are big fans of everything Wawa. Kaczmarski brought a Wawa mug from the 1990s. South Lake Chambers Membership Director Ray Villegas, who was also among those from the Philly area so eagerly awaiting Wawas arrival, said the companys newest location in Clermont will save him some gas and miles on his car. I drive to the Wawa near the airport (in Or lando) about once every week or two, grab about 6-8 of their soft pretzels, put them in individual Ziploc bags when I get home and freeze them so that I can eat one when I want one, he said. Now, I wont have to drive as far. WAWA FROM PAGE C1 Benefits Mike Conley Hospice House and Cornerstone Hospice. For information or to register, call 352-243-2714. OPERA AT THE LIBRARY: At 1:45 p.m., Opera@theLibrary will pres -ent Giuseppe Verdis Rigoletto at the Cooper Memorial Library, 2525 Oakley Seaver Dr., in Clermont. Call Dennis Smolarek at 352-536-2275. TUESDAYLAKE MINNEOLA HIGH TO HOST ATH -LETIC PHYSICAL NIGHT: From 5 to 7 p.m., for all current and incoming athletes, in the schools health lab (rooms 273-275). Cost is $10 and only cash is accepted. The physi -cals will be performed by Dr. Da -vid Brcka and the staff of the Sports Medicine Institute. Call Melissa Neu at 352-394-9600, ext. 5259 or email neum@lake.k12..us. APRIL 30TEEN SPRING BOW CLASS: At 4:40 p.m., Marion Baysinger Memorial County Library, 756 W. Broad St., Groveland. Call the library at 352429-5840. MAY 3CLERMONT GARDEN CLUBS GAR -DEN WALK: Gardens in the Hills, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Clermont. The cost is $10. Guests will tour the gardens of four homes as well as the Community Garden at South Lake Hospital. Tour begins at the garden club, 849 West Ave. There will also be a Kids Korner, rafe and a plant sale. Go to www.clermont gardenclub.com for details.To place an item on the calendar, send an email to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. EVENTSFROM PAGE C2 SUBMITTED PHOTO Left to right, Montverde Academy Headmaster, Dr. Kasey Kesselring; Julia Buddendorff and Wesley Reed of American Financial. Buddendorff was recognized as the South Lake Chamber February Student of the Month at the chamber breakfast meeting at First United Methodist Church Clermont. Felecia Williams, director of college counseling; Emily Long, director of school and community service programming, Headmaster Kesselring and his wife, Maureen Kesselring, director of learning support services, attended. BUDDENDORFF IS STUDENT OF THE MONTH

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C6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 23, 2014 A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Handyman Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. Irrigation Services 5% Off Any Svc. under $1,000 $150 Off Any Svc. $2,000 or more $75 Off Any Svc. $1,000 or moreLawn Maintenance, Hardscape, Patios, Retaining Walls, Maint., SoddingLeesburg 536-3708 Landscaping Services Lawn Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Painting Services Pressure Cleaning Shower Doors Service Veterinarian Services Enclosure Screening Fencing Services Window Services Handyman Services Marine Services Cleaning Services Affordable Home Repair, LLC rffnn tbb nn352-551-6073 Electrical Services Free Est.Lic. & Ins. rfn ftb Concrete Services Roofing Services Tree Service Home Improvement Plumbing Services rfntbb b tnfnrb rfffnn ntbtrrr nbt Land Clearing Services Lawn Services BrocksLAWN SERVICE352-242-7864Mowing Trimming Mulching

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Wednesday, April 23, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D1 Classified IndexLegal Notices....................0001 Notices............................1000 At Your Service................9000 Employment....................2000 Pets/Animals....................6865 Merchandise....................6000 Real Estate/For RENT......3000 Real Estate/For SALE........4000 Recreation........................7000 Transportation..................8000 Cancellations for ads running Wednesday must be made by 4pm Monday.ADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since The Daily Commercial will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error call the classified department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error.TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde

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D2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 23, 2014 Untitled art#: order#: 6 X 5.25 Black 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance rt t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital Call the South Lake Press to get your ad in! 394-2183

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D4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 23, 2014 Untitled art#: order#: 5 X 11.325 Black Untitled art#: order#: 2 X 4.125 Black 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr ZOOSARMBERRASCRAP SAFEAREAPALAISCRIME ARTGLASSONHIGHEAVES WITHHOLDINGCONSENT APIAAURAEARTH MANYHAPPYRETURNSPILE PROERELOGHAMAN SANDRAROLLTHECREDITS ROBBERYESCROWTRU RAPIDEDAMSOOPPAIR ENUFTABLEFORTWOUTNE PANTAPOORIONFREED ARCEBANKSANNETTE SCHEDULECHANGEELEVEN THEASAARUSEOVA SYSTEMERGENCYSHELTER APRILALASEENY BRILLIANTDEDUCTION LEROITIERRAHELLIONS OZONEANNEALTELETHON WANEDSONGSSLYYOWL Solution to puzzle on C2



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THERESA CAMPBELL and AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writers news@dailycommercial.com W hen 100,000 bik ers and visi tors descend on downtown Leesburg this week for the 18th annual Bikefest, it will be big and colorful and loud. In other words, it wont be everyones ideal weekend along what is usually a qui et stretch of Main Street known more for its quaint brick cross walks, soft background music and tortoise speed limit than for the thunder of Harleys. In deed, some of down town Leesburgs mer chants will close shop and leave town for the event. But for merchants who are intrepid enough to stay open and creative enough to nd a product niche that appeals to this non-traditional cli entele, Bikefest is a chance to stuff their cash registers in a way that few other events can. Bikefest organizers and local economic de velopment experts es timate the impact of the three-day event at roughly $100 mil lion, a number they derive by multiplying the projected atten dance by the per capi ta spending by out-oftowners and applying a complex multipli er that assumes every dollar spent radiates throughout the com munity. Lake County Eco nomic Development Director Robert Chan dler IV offered the example of a biker spending money at a restaurant. The direct benet to the restau rant multiplies as the owners pay their sup pliers and employ ees, who in turn spend their extra income in the community. So, every time it gets re-spent, thats called the ripple effect, or the multiplier, however you want to say it. And then what happens is, you get a little leak age each time, which is why it doesnt keep going on for innity, Chandler said. A survey of 378 visi tors for the 2012 Bike fest conducted by TouchPoll of South Florida revealed that the average total ex penditure per visitor was $987.17. According to the sur vey, 30 percent of outof-town guests spent an average of $330.67 on local lodging. The average spent on SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | C1 SPORTS: FSUs Aurora Davis becoming Queen of Sand WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWSTAND INSIDE CLASSIFIED D1 CROSSWORDS C2 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN C1 SPORTS B1 VOICES A4 WORD ON THE STREE T A2 SO UTH LAKE PRE SS V OLUME 99, NO. 17 5 SECTIO N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reserved www. southlakepress.com PRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Chip Simpson, a 58-year-old salesman at Gator Harley-Davidson in Leesburg rearranges motorcycles on the showroom oor in preparation for Bikefest on Friday. John Malik Jr., owner of Gator Harley, said he expects to sell about 60 motorcycles over the Bikefest weekend. THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Joyce Huey of Two Old Hags shows the special red wine Sweet Ride that was ordered with the Bikefest crowd in mind. MONEY ROLLING IN Lake County ofcials estimate the total economic impact of Bikefest at roughly $100 million based on data gathered from the 2012 Bikefest TouchPoll of South Florida survey. Among the ndings of the survey: $987.17 Average expenditure per visitor $173 Average spent on food and drinks $140 Average spent on gifts and merchandise 43% Merchants who close during Bikefest 21% Merchants reporting no negative impact 14% Merchants reporting a negative impact Sound of money For merchants, the roar of motorcycles means profit LEESBURG ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com More than 100 people turned out last week to ght the development of a 1,196-acre sand mine outside Clermont. Organizers said the meetings intent was to kick off the formation of what theyve dubbed The South Lake Citi zens Coalition, a group of locals they hope will band together to rep resent common views when it comes to causes that could impact res idents and their com munities. In this case, organizers are ask ing citizens to stand up publicly against the sand mine. According to Cler mont City Councilman Ray Goodgame, if Ce mex is granted a zon ing change for the sand and gravel operation, it could doom the 16,000acre Wellness Way Sec tor Plan, an area where county ofcials envi sion companies with high-paying jobs in the medical eld. If we let a sand mine come in and destroy the sector plan, wed be ashamed of ourselves, Goodgame said during the meeting. The Clermont City Council and City Man ager Darren Gray, a former Lake County CLERMONT Locals fight proposed sand mine at meeting LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com Minimum scores of 50 on report cards and indi vidual school assignments appear to be ending in Lake County. School Board members agreed to those changes when they tentatively approved modications to the Student Progression Plan last week. Final ap proval of the plan comes back before the board at a public hearing tentatively set for May 12. A recent report shared with School Board mem bers found the majority of county schools do not give students scores of less than 50 on report cards, which are sent home after each nine-week grading period. School Board will abolish lenient grading system TAVARES SEE BIKEFEST | A2 SEE GRADES | A5 SEE CEMEX | A5

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 23, 2014 transportation, including gas, rental cars and park ing was $214.31 per visi tor. There was an average of $173 per visitor spent on food and drinks, an average of $129 per vis itor spent on entertain ment, and an average of $140 per visitor spent on gifts and merchandise. Michael Vassell, the general manager of Hol iday Inn Express Hotel & Suites in Tavares, said the 73-room hotel is booked for the event, and it book ings for next years event generally start in ear nest right after the cur rent years Bikefest con cludes. He said it is the biggest booking event for the year. A standard room nor mally goes for $101 to a $125, but during Bikefest that goes up to $150 be cause rates are based on demand. John Malik Jr., who owns Gator Harley-Da vidson, said it is the big gest weekend of the year for the dealership. He es timated the event brings in more than a couple hundred thousand dol lars just in merchandise, and he expects to sell 60 motorcycles four times more than normal. The dealership will be so busy, he said, that he hired an extra ve em ployees to work the week end and is borrowing four from Daytonas Har ley-Davidson. Rhonda Jones, a man ager at Ramshackle Caf in Leesburg, said the restaurant gets a boost in business and it increas es every year. Like Ga tor Harley, Jones will add staff on each shift to ac commodate the rush. Its absolutely good for business, said Joyce Huey of Two Old Hags Wine Shop, who sells beer and wine during the event. I love Bikefest and we have never had any issues or any problems with any our bikers, ever. Huey expects to take in $10,000 in beer and wine sales, and she said a spe cial bottle of red wine Sweet Ride is a big hit with the Bikefest crowd. The wine was produced by Lakeridge Winery in Clermont. I have a lot of repeats who come back every year, Huey said, noting many of her customers love being able to savor their drinks in the out door seating area of her shop. But some merchants have to do more than add staff and inventory to take advantage of the money walking down the street. They have to rein vent themselves tempo rarily by adding products and services they normal ly wouldnt carry. Linda Felton of Lin das Soap Box is making beer soap to appeal to the Bikefest crowd. Kar en Egert of Karens Ca nine Kitchen has sewn biker doggy apparel, while Cheryl Bloom of Blooms Baking House and Restaurant is creat ing easy desserts for bik ers to carry. Its good for business, and I just want to make a little money, said Felton, who is making up to 100 bars of beer soap, which was a big hit last year. I found out that beer it self, because of the hop, has extra antioxidants, so its actually very good for your skin. Moneca Mo Monroe, owner of My Secret Clos et, a consignment bou tique, plans to feature racks of biker apparel along with pewter sculp tures of bikers. Our consignors are bringing in Bike Week stuff, and we have lots of leather, these cool purple Harley Davidson boots, and were going to be raf ing a Harley Davidson Barbie doll. Monroe hopes to bring in $1,000 or more each day during Bikefest. Other merchants see Bikefest as more than a boon; it is a lifeline that carries them through the slow summer months. For most of the mer chants, Bikefest carries them through the sum mer, said Don Folker, owner of Cupcake Time Caf. If I had beer to sell, I would quadruple the business, without a doubt. Yet not everyone sees dollar signs in Bikefest. According to the Touch Poll survey of local mer chants, 43 percent close during the event. Kim Sovercool, own er Michaels Couture Hair Salon, closes her shop be cause her regular clients have no place to park. We could stay open and do walk-ins, but we just havent yet. We just go on vacation, she said. God Caf owner Gary Hagen and his wife, Vic toria, go on vacation and celebrate their wedding anniversary. We take a break during Bikefest and it helps us recharge for the rest of the year, Hagen said. We come back all rest ed and everyone else is all tired. Huey, of Two Old Hags, believes all the merchants benet, whether they are opened or not. They all benet in the big picture, and thats my opinion, she said. There is that trickle-down ef fect. Yes, Im going to make money, and Mi chaels Hair Salon might not be open, but I go to Michaels to get my hair done, so thats the way that I look it, and its go ing to benet when I go to Palm Plaza and go to Popeyes or to Publix. Its not just downtown that benets. CLERMONT Bras for the Cause and Boxers Too is Saturday Real men do wear bras when they are reghters supporting the Greater Clermont Cancer Foundations 7th annual Bras for the Cause and Boxers Too on Saturday at Heritage Hills in Clermont. Igniting Hope is the theme for the event this year and it will be an evening of fun and food. Doors open at 6 p.m., with the show at 7 p.m. Tickets are $30 in advance or $35 at the door. To design a bra for this event or be a sponsor call Kay Simpson at 352-435-3202. The Greater Clermont Cancer foun dation receives funds raised from this event for the community. Go to www.brasforthecauseandbox erstoo.com for details. CLERMONT East Ridge High to present The Last 5 Years This musical about New Yorkers who fall in and out of love over the course of ve years will be performed by the East Ridge High theater de partment at 7 p.m., Thursday through Saturday. Tickets are $8 and doors will open at 6:30 p.m. at the Barn, 13322 Excalibur Road in Clermont. Seating is limited to 60 people per performance and reservations are encouraged. To reserve tickets, email Vince Santo at santov@lake.k12..us. GROVELAND Arbor Day tree planting event is set for Friday Celebrate Arbor Day by planting a scrub oak from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. on Friday at Lake Thomas Cove Park, 3020 Thomas Cove Dr., in Groveland. For information, call 352-253-4950, email parksandtrails@lakecounty. gov or go to www.lakecounty.gov. CLERMONT Congregation Sinai golf tournament registration open Registration is open for this third annual golf tournament, sponsored by Congregation Sinai, to be held on May 3 at the Legends Country Club in Clermont. The fee for the tournament is $75 and includes breakfast, 18 holes of golf, range balls, lunch, contests, priz es and awards. For information, go to www.con gregation-sinai.org, or call Barbara Salsitz at 352-432-6008. MINNEOLA Guys and Dolls set to begin Thursday The Tony award-winning musical Guys and Dolls is the perfect mu sical comedy for all ages and will be performed on Thursday through Saturday at Lake Minneola High School, 101 N. Hancock Road, in Minneola. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m. for a 7 p.m. curtain. Tickets for the musical are $7 for seniors and students with an ID, $10 for adults and $15 for pre ferred seating. To make reservations or for infor mation, call Kaitlin Baxter at 352-3949600, ext. 5168, or email BaxterK@ lake.k12..us. LAKE COUNTY Health department to offer school immunizations The Department of Health ofce in Lake County will offer immuniza tions at local Lake County schools on an ongoing basis for students who will enter the seventh grade during the 2014-15 school year. Immunizations will be given at Carver Middle School in Leesburg on April 29, Eustis Middle School on May 6, East Ridge Middle School in Clermont on May 8, Clermont Middle School on May 15 and Cecil E. Gray Middle School in Groveland on May 20. For information, call the Department of Health in Lake County at 352-771-5500 or go to www.lake chd.com. Area Briefs What south Lake residents are saying about ... CHICKENS Do you feel local governments should allow chickens in residential areas. Yes, for personal use only, with a special permit and a limit of six. I have no problem with people growing their own eggs, and chicken poop is good fertilizer for your garden. BONNIE RAY CLERMONT Absolutely yes, with minimal guidelines. Six is plenty to provide the family, and most owners are logical, conscientious caretakers of their ocks. Probably in most neigh borhoods, no roosters. CHUCK ARNONE CLERMONT I think that would be ne with the proper reg ulations. If its done, it should be done proper ly, in a sanitary manner. It shouldnt be any differ ent than someone having a pot bellied pig as a pet. BILL OLSEN TAVARES It depends chickens or roosters, because roost ers are annoying. Theres smell and ies. They can have that stuff in the country, but not the city. BILLY REED MASCOTTE Word on the Street Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Harley-Davidson motorcycles sit on the showroom oor at Gator Harley-Davidson in Leesburg. BIKEFEST FROM PAGE A1

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Wednesday, April 23, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com All roads in Leesburg are resurfaced every 17 years. But if a new proposed local option gas tax distribution formula is approved, those roads will be resurfaced just once every 28 years. Lake County Commission ers renewed the rst 2 cents of the 6 cent local gas tax op tion, which goes to the main tenance of roads, in January. In 2015 and 2016, com missioners will vote whether to approve the remaining 4 cents in two-cent increments each year. Currently, the $8 million is split between the county and the cities, with the county re ceiving 66 percent and the cities receiving 34 percent collectively. The change involves how the cities would divvy up their share. Currently, the cities di vide 75 percent of the money based on transportation ex penditures and the remain ing 25 percent on popula tion. That formula has been in place since 1984. The new distribution for mula would award half the funding to cities based on population and half based on the miles of roads they main tain. The cities of Leesburg, Eu stis, Mount Dora, Umatilla and Tavares would lose mon ey under the new formula, while nine cities would get additional money. Clermont would receive the largest al location at $539,309. The cities representing a majority population of the incorporated area must ap prove the formula, which will then be sent to the Lake County Commission for nal approval on May 20. At a recent board meeting, commissioners voted 4-1, with Commissioner Leslie Campione dissenting, to go forward with the new formu la. Some cities slated to get less money expect minimal impacts while others could see dips in the number of roads resurfaced over the long term, city ofcials said. However, it is not yet clear which roads will be put off for maintenance as many cit ies are still working through budgets and others are eval uating roads to determine which ones are in most need of maintenance. Our current allocation will be reduced by roughly 40 percent, said D.C. Maudlin, Leesburg Public Works di rector. Maudlin said the city would receive an estimated $357,140 a year, compared to $607,993. With a 40 percent reduc tion in our budget, we wont be able to get as much done. Maudlin said the city is as sessing all of its roads and prioritizing the ones in worst shape. We wont be able to do as many roads next year, he said. But this does not mean the roads left untreated would noticeably deteriorate im mediately, Maudlin said. It is a much more longterm impact, he said. The overall condition of the road drops gradually over time. We will still hit the worst roads each year, but there will be fewer of the worst roads done each year. Maudlin said the new dis tribution formula will allow the city to resurface approx imately one less mile of road per year. Overall, the city re surfaces a little less than ve miles of roads a year. City employees jobs will not be affected by the reduc tion. The major resurfacing road work is done by con tractors, he said. Leesburg City Manager Al Minner said the city was pre paring for the change in the formula but does not know what road projects will be cut until the road assessment is completed. When the municipalities met, we agreed we did not have enough votes to pull off what would have been a fair solution, he said. We dont think the formula takes into account age and existing in frastructure of the city. The city of Eustis faces a similar predicament. Diane Kramer, Eustis city manager, said the city has been using reserves to bal ance the budget and had to raise taxes in 2013 to make up for lost revenue. It has a major impact on our city, she said of the $278,000 reduction in revenue. That is the money we have used to re surface our roads. The cities that are losing the money are all of our older cities, with the older roads that really need the money for maintenance purposes. We cant lose $250,000300,000 and not have it im pact the city, she added. You either have to nd rev enues to replace it or reduce your services. The city of Mount Dora faces a reduction of about $100,000 for its road mainte nance needs. Mount Dora City Manager Michael Quinn said the city has been one step ahead in addressing its road needs. We have done a good job on maintaining our roads in the last few years and being able to prioritize and get the needy ones done rst, he said. The roads that suffer the most are the ones that are not the worst but in the mid dle zone. Cities struggle to divvy up road money equitably BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Workers construct a bike path on Tremain Street in Mount Dora, on April 16. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Jason and Teresa Ash are part of Lake Coun tys Special Olympics team. Jason runs track and eld while wife Te resa plays bocce ball. Both love compet ing, but what makes it worthwhile for Jason is the support a nd cama raderie between fellow athletes, coaches and sponsors. I like doing differ ent things to give back to Special Olympics be cause they give back to me, Jason said during Mondays Law Enforce ment Torch Run, one of the largest national grass roots fundraisers each year for the orga nization. Those who support the athletes and orga nization feel the same way. In fact, Lake Coun tys Assistant State At torney, James Argen to, said hearing from the athletes Monday morning in Clermont gave him the inspira tion to complete the two-mile trek. Argento said he was touched by the way all of the participating law enforcement agencies from throughout the county and state came together for the cause. It really is all about these children, he said. This year, Lake Coun tys leg of the torch run involved nearly 200 participants, includ ing law enforcement personnel and ofcials from all over the coun ty, volunteers belong ing to programs as sociated with various departments, and Spe cial Olympics athletes, coaches, friends and family members. Clermont Police De partment, led by Chief Charles Broadway, sponsored the morn ings event, including lunch and music after ward. This is something we look forward to ev ery year, Broadway said. For 30 years, the Spe cial Olympics Flame of Hope has traversed Florida before it is car ried by law enforce ment ofcers to the opening ceremony of Floridas annual State Summer Games, which this year will be held at the ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex in Lake Buena Vista on May 16. Special Olympics CEO Sherry Whee lock said the whole idea behind the run or any other fundrais er for the organization is to showcase the ath letes abilities and raise awareness for the or ganization and the op portunities it provides them. Special Olympics CLERMONT Torch of hope passes through city BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Jonathan Rummel, center, with the Lake County Correctional Institution, carries the torch during the Law Enforcement Torch Run for the Special Olympics Florida in Clermont on Monday. SEE TORCH | A6 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com A plucky little dog that reportedly survived a bear attack in late March is currently up for adoption, according to Lake County Public Information Ofcer Eli sha Pappacoda. He went to a cou ple of vets and I think they werent sure ex actly what happened to him, but the last vet said bear attack. She said denitively it was a bear Dog mauled by bear is recovering, needs a home PHOTO COURTESY OF THE LAKE COUNTY ANIMAL SHELTER Percival was mauled by a bear but is recovering through the Lake County Animal Shelter. SEE DOG | A6

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 23, 2014 B ikeFest, which rumbles into downtown Leesburg Friday for three days, isnt everyones cup of tea, and thats understandable. When you pour an estimated 100,000 people into an area that usually accommodates hundreds, then throw in the roar of thousands of motorcycles and add large quantities of alcohol, there is little question that it will change the tone and complexion of this quaint little town for a few days. Indeed, 43 percent of merchants will close for the weekend, according to an independent survey commissioned last year by the events hosts, the Leesburg Partnership. Others complain that they wont get a piece of the action and wonder why the city of Leesburg supports an event that doesnt benet a wider array of businesses. Still others bemoan the antics of a handful of festival guests But heres the truth about BikeFest: Its one of Lake Countys signature events, one that draws not only massive numbers of people, but huge quantities of dollars and valuable exposure. How lucrative is BikeFest? As Daily Commercial staff writers Theresa Campbell and Austin Fuller report on page A1 today, the event has an estimated $100 million impact on the local economy, based on attendance and spending estimates compiled by economic development experts. Lets take a closer look. The average BikeFest visitor spends almost $1,000, including $330 on lodging, $214 on transportation, $173 on food and drinks, $129 on entertainment and $140 on gifts and merchandise. Thats to say nothing of the visitors from across the map who fall in love with the area and decide to move here. That sort of impact probably cant be quantied. BikeFest is just a good time. There will be an abundance of food and fantastic music, as well as a number of unique forms of motorcyclethemed entertainment. And when the bikers and other visitors roll out of town, Main Street will regain its quiet charm and serenity, but with its coffers a little fuller. So to those who would complain about BikeFest, we preach patience. The noise, the mild antics and the crowds are but momentary distractions. The electricity this event generates, along with the dollars and entertainment and the good exposure, are excellent for the community as a whole. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD ........................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST O PINION WHATS YOUR OPINION? The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Letters to the Editor 732 W. Montrose St. Clermont, FL 34711 By fax to: 352-394-8001 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. GUEST COLUMNS If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@daily commercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OUR VIEW S OUTH LAKE PRESS Your community newspaper for more than 100 years. 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001 The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Florida 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region. All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Almost that time of the year: Bring on BikeFest Vote no on legalizing pot Do we re ally want to make the use of that dangerous weed legal for any reason? Will its use bring back the lives of those lost on our high ways by impaired drivers? Will it releave the pain and anguish of those who have lost loved family members because of its use? Those who are behind the drive to put it on the ballot claim that it relieves pain. But why not use one of the pain medications that are already legally available? We already have too many impaired driv ers on our roads from alco hol, legal and illegal pain kill ers, old age, and just plain bad drivers. To add marijuana to the mix would compound the mayhem we already have. When we take a serious look at this question, it is rather obvious why it will be on the ballot. Lawyers are behind it be cause they know that making it legal will put more ambulances on the road for them to chase. Say no to the ambulance chas ers when you vote this year. JAMES S. FRANKLIN Fruitland Park LETTER of the WEEK YOUR VOICES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Dont subsidize insurance companies Since 2003, the U.S. govern ment paid billions of dollars in subsidies to private insur ers who participate in Medicare Advantage. A portion of the subsidies have been paid by Medicare beneciaries themselves, whether they were in a Medicare Advantage plan or not. How unfair and unnecessary since private insurers have rou tinely claimed they can provide better care for less cost. At least Obamacare began to correct this wasteful practice by grad ually reducing the subsidies, which forces these high-prot insurers to compete with tradi tional Medicare on a level play ing eld. But the private insurers and their big lobby threatens to raise rates or drop coverage to scare seniors into pressuring Congress not to cut the subsidies. Its time for Congress and the president to stop caving in to the demands of big insurance companies and do the right thing end the insurance in dustry subsidies. NANCY HURLBERT | LEESBURG Thank you for the coverage As a former 35-year resident of Boston, Mass. who moved to Florida a year ago, I was so pleased to see the great cover age that the Daily Commercial gave to the Boston Marathon bombing event, with the story, Solemn tributes mark the anni versary of the Boston Marathon bombing in the April 16 edition. I was living in Boston when the bombings occurred and ex perienced the deafening si lence at the nish line as run ners made their way to victory, only to discover the sadness that awaited them. It was a day I will never forget. There was no cheering or cele brating going on. Instead, peo ple walked around the city like zombies trying in vain to gure out why such a dreadful thing had happened during one of Bostons traditional events. Although I have settled quite nicely in Florida,my heart still remains very much a part of Boston and it is articles like the one in the Daily Commercial that make me proud of a city that is now known as Boston Strong. Thanks to the newspaper for acknowledging this tragic anni versary event in such a positive way. MATTI KNIVA SPENCER | Leesburg Honor our veterans In response to a letter by Carole Burke of The Villages about a recent letter I wrote, Not so friendly to outsiders, from March 16, she missed the whole point of the letter. The entire point of my letter was and is to honor all veterans. The Eisenhower Center is sup posed to be a place for all veter ans organizations to be able to conduct their meetings VFW, American Legion, DAV, VVA, AMVETS, Korean War Veterans, Jewish War Veterans, Catholic War Veterans and others. These and other groups are chartered by the U.S. Congress and are organized to aid their fellow comrades, families and community. These associations do not recognize the geographic addresses of their members. Not so in The Villages. The latest information I have learned is that for the sum of $37 per room per hour, The Villages management will allow the veterans to meet there. It is also of interest for all to know that the uniforms worn by the mannequins were donat ed by their owners. Photos, art work and other memorabilia are also donated. Its really almost a museum with the artifacts do nated by veterans. DAVID HODGKINS | Lady Lake The paper must get it right The people of the great er Leesburg area deserve a lot more from our local newspaper. Your editorial regarding the use of Venetian Gardens and its fu ture shows how little you know or really pay attention to what you write. Venetian Gardens is not located on Lake Grifn. It is located on Lake Harris! At the bottom of your column you explain that your editori al is a consensus opinion of the editorial board, which is com prised of the upper echelon of your newspapers local man agement. Do none of you know where Venetian Gardens is lo cated? It is about a 5-minute walk from your ofce! Maybe Im wrong but I thought a local newspapers job is to accurate ly and with no bias cover the things that are going on within a community. Leesburg is going to undergo signicant changes in the next few years with the economy coming back and the growth of The Villages just to our western border. It would be nice to see a little more effort given to asking the tough questions of our com munity leaders about what they see as our vision for the future. Couldnt you nd it in your bud get to hire one person back from the people you let go when you consolidated your printing op eration back as a proofreader? If you are going to be relevant and have your opinion count for something get your facts right. MARK CRAWFORD | Fruitland Park HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO

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Wednesday, April 23, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 Modications to the plan require teach ers to record the actu al grade earned by the student on individual assignments. Teachers also have the discre tion to give an Incom plete during the rst and third nine-week grading period, giving students the opportu nity to earn their grade later. Another change species encouraging schools to establish grading criteria that will permit students with failing grades to successfully partici pate in grade recov ery in future grading periods, which could mean anything from making up tests or ex tra credit, according to school board ofcials. School Board mem ber Bill Mathias ap plauded the changes. I feel very strongly that in the real world you get what you earn, he said. We were set ting a bad precedent by this minimum grade. School Board mem ber Rosanne Brande burg said the incom plete gives students the opportunity to change the grade into one that is earned. I think the change (in the plan) is good, she said. I think stu dents should receive the grade they earn. Stuart Klatte, presi dent of the Lake Coun ty Education Asso ciation, applauded the districts tentative changes to the plan. It is a good step to provide real world experiences with in the structure of the school, he said. Keith Hyndshaw, 2014 Lake County Schools Teacher of the Year nalist, was asked his opinion on the is sue as a guest of the board. The history and psy chology teacher said he was never in favor of giving a minimum score of 50, and spoke favorably of the in complete as a way to help students in exten uating circumstances. That is how colleges and universities op erate, he said, refer ring to the incomplete. I do like the exibility for the teacher to have that. The goal of edu cation is for the kids to learn the skills and content. Superintendent Su san Moxley agreed. If the student is coming to the table and wanting to do bet ter, we want to give the student the opportuni ty to do that, she said. GRADES FROM PAGE A1 manager, oppose the sand mine project. The meeting at the Cler mont Community Cen ter was chaired by Jack Martin, a former past president of the Kings Ridge Homeowners As sociation, where resi dents expressed con cerns about trafc, noise and dust from the sand mine. Residents believe as many as 300 trucks a day will haul sand and gravel from the mine to the many road-build ing projects Cemex is involved with in Cen tral Florida. The com pany recently asked Hernando County of cials for permission to expand Cemexs 730acre mining operation near Brooksville to keep up with demand for their material. Martin said residents are not opposed to Ce mex as a company. Wellness Way re ceived its name from the desire to attract health, tness, bio medical research and related industries to the area, capitalizing on the existing triath lon and health/tness industries in South Lake. County ofcials and key stakeholders in the area envision the area to be a ma jor employment cen ter for Central Florida, anchored by compact urban-growth centers, and surrounded by rolling hills and lakes. W ellness Way cov ers a huge tract east of U.S. Highway 27 along the Orange County bor der, running from south from State Road 50 to U.S. Highway 192. It has been called the largest tract of undeveloped land left in Lake County. Besides, trafc, noise and dust, sand-mine opponents have con cerns about the project deterring other busi nesses from relocating to the area, and harm ing the environment and water table. CEMEXs applica tion says the mine will be situated on aban doned agricultural land and that excava tion only would occur on 623 acres of the site. Mining over 30 years will take place in phases of 100 acres or less and all mined ar eas will be reclaimed, the application states. Sara Engdahl, direc tor of communications for Cemex, previous ly said the mine would have no effect on water and would aid in eco nomic development, bringing in at least $4.7 million a year. County commission ers will address the sand mine at 1:30 p. m. on May 20 at the old courthouse building in Tavares. CEMEX FROM PAGE A1 IN MEMORY DEATH NOTICES Dolores Ann Bednarczyk Dolores Ann Bed narczyk, 78, of Eustis, died Friday, April 11, 2014. Hamlin & Hilbish Funeral Directors. Eus tis. Roy Belton Roy Belton, 77, of Leesburg, died Friday, April 11, 2014. PageTheus Funerals & Cre mations. Patricia Ann Boggs Patricia Ann Boggs, 59, of Mount Dora, died Saturday, March 12, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatilla. Evelyn Elmira Dickinson Evelyn Elmira Dick inson, 88, of Leesburg, died Thursday, April 17, 2014. Steverson, Ham lin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tava res. James H. Hardeman James H. Hardeman, 93, of The Villages, died Thursday, April 17, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Crfemations, Wildwood. Linda Kristeff Herman Linda Kristeff Her man, 54, of Umatillia, died Friday, April 11, 2014. Page-Theus Fu nerals & Cremations, Leesburg. Edward Warren Hunter Edward Warren Hunt er 61, of Paisley, died Saturday, April 12, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatilla. Irene W. Kreft Irene W. Kreft, 76, of Leesburg, died Satur day, April 12. Dennis C. Kruger Dennis C. Lefty Kru ger, 67, of Tavares, died Monday, April 14, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares. Kent A. Lines Kent A. Lines, 73, of Leesburg, died Thurs day, April 17, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations. Leesburg. Eleanor M. McMahon Eleanor M. McMa hon, 83, of St. Peters burg, died Wednesday, April 16, 2014. PageTheus Funerals & Cre mations, Leesburg. Lucille L. Parr Lucille L. Parr, 86, of Leesburg, died Sunday, April 13, 2014. Banks/ Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wild wood. Steve Alfred Roshy Steve Alfred Roshy, 88, of Tavares, died Sat urday, April 12, 2014. Cremation Choices, Minneola. Linda Lee Rountree Linda Lee Rountree, 74, of Ferndale, died Friday, April 11, 2014. Hamlin-Hilbish Funer al Directors. Gregory William Sankovic Gregory William San kovic, 63, of Eustis died Monday. April 14, 2014. Hamlin & Hilbish Fu neral Directors, Eustis. Joseph Neil Smith Joseph Neil Smith, 81, of Leesburg, died Friday, April 11, 2014. Hamlin-Hilbish Funer al Directors. STEVE FUSSELL Special to the Daily Commercial Lake-Sumter State College is looking for an experienced food service manager who wants to become a business-owning en trepreneur. Verdia and Larry Jackson, who own VIP Foods and have operat ed Lakers Cove Caf in the Stu dent Center on the colleges Leesburg campus for the past 11 years, are retiring at the end of this month. Bill Ponko, assistant director of the Purchasing Department at LSSC, said the Jacksons will be hard to replace. The Lakers Cove Caf serves up comfort foods such as pan cakes, biscuits and gravy, ham burgers and grilled chicken from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday. The Jacksons have been driv ing from Ocala four days a week to run the cafe, which occasion ally hires student help. Verdia Jackson said she is look ing forward to retirement but shell miss the students and faculty. Many of them have become our friends and we look forward to seeing them every day, she said. But Larry Jackson said he is more than ready for retirement. Im going to sit on the front porch and, when I get tired of that, Im going to sit on the back porch, he said. The college is ready to offer a sweetheart deal if Ponko can nd the right operator: free rent, free electric, free water and free use of all the caf equipment for a reliable vendor who can serve up reasonably-priced breakfasts, lunches and snacks to students, faculty and staff. Lakers Cove, which has indoor seating for about 30 people and outdoor seating for at least 30 more, can be a money-maker, Ponko said. He just posted a classied ad vertisement asking candidates to send rsums to his ofce. Qual ied candidates will be asked to come for interviews and facility tours, he said. The college will pick its ven dor based on food service experi ence, qualications (such as Flor ida Food Service and Manager certicates), a management plan and fresh ideas to make the caf more appealing to its on-campus customers, Ponko said. LEESBURG LSSC seeks new caf operator SASHEIKA TOMLINSON / SUBMITTED PHOTO Larry and Verdia Jackson, left, serves a student at the Lakers Cove Caf at Lake Sumter State College. They are retiring and the school is looking for a new caf operator. LIVI STANFORD| Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com The Lake County Wa ter Authority Board has funded $400,000 in stormwater grants to the cities of Clermont and Umatilla, as well as the Lake County Public Works Department, to help reduce pollutants in lakes. The annual grants are designed to assist local municipalities seeking to remove total phos phorus and other pol lutants such as grease, pesticides, heavy met als or animal waste from stormwater runoff, ac cording to a press re lease from the LCWA. LCWA ofcials said runoff comes from var ious sources, includ ing parks, streets, back yards and lakes, and is causing the largest source of lake water quality problems. These projects can directly impact the lakes and aquifer by reducing pollutants, and making the lakes healthier for those of us who live and recreate on these water bodies, said Ron Hart, LCWA Water Resource program manager. The city of Clermont has been designat ed $100,000 to make improvements to the 12th Street and Lake shore Drive area to treat stormwater runoff be fore it drains into Lake Minnehaha. Based on some of our recent studies, we have identied this location as one of the places where stormwater was untreat ed, said Darren Gray, Clermont city manager. This grant will enable us to improve and main tain the pristine quality of Lake Minnehaha and our chain of lakes. The city of Umatil la has also been desig nated $100,000 for Lake Yale stormwater reuse and Lake County Pub lic Works has been giv en $200,000 for Wolf Branch sink drainage improvements. Each year the storm water projects remove 1,219 pounds of total phosphorus, the press release states. Since the stormwater grant was awarded 18 years ago, 8,916 pounds of phosphates have been removed. TAVARES $400K in stormwater grants awarded

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A6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 23, 2014 has touched the lives of thou sand s of athletes from all over the world by giving them a ven ue in which to compete and the tools necessary to help them succeed. For the rst time ever, Lake County this year will have three athletes who will represent Special Olympics at the Nation al Games in New Jersey in June. The whole idea behind the torch is that it represents the ame of hope, the future of the community and what our ath letes can accomplish, Whee lock said. On Monday, she said every one came together beautifully, a sentiment seconded by Lt. Jona thon Rummel, a part of the Lake County Correctional Institutions Rapid Response Team, who for the rst time this year, partici pated in Lake Countys run. For the past four years in a row and before moving to Flor ida a few months ago, Rummel ran in the event in Santa Rosa, Calif., but never before has the experience hit home quite like it did Monday, he said. Ive done this elsewhere but, besides the route being much hillier here, we never had the actual kids, the athletes who participate in Special Olym pics, be a part of it by running with us or standing along the route cheering us on, Rummel said. It makes the experience much more meaningful be cause it gives you more of a vi sual and a sense of what youre doing it for, instead of just run ning. Its nice to hear from the athletes and just their Thank yous bring it all home. More than $3 million has been raised by the law enforce ment torch run this year, in ad dition to other monies theyll receive from other sponsors in cluding Publix and Procter & Gamble, a Special Olympics of cial said Monday. TORCH FROM PAGE A3 attack, Pappacoda said. She said a wound on the back of the dogs neck was originally larger than a grapefruit, but it has since healed to about the size of a lemon. The dog was picked up as a stray by Lake County ani mal control ofcers in the Ocala National Forest. He is currently being tak en care of by Whitney Luck hart, a volunteer with Lake County Animal Services, Pappacoda said earlier in a press release. In addition to the enor mous crater in his back, he had hemorrhaging behind his eye, Luckhart said. He was hosting thousands of ticks but always maintained a pleasant demeanor. He has a very cheerful person ality and loves attention. Animal services cleaned the wound and when Luck hart took him home she gave him medication, Pap pacoda said. The dog, a Treeing Walk er Coonhound named Per cival, is less than 2 years old and will be less than 60 pounds fully grown, the re lease stated. Pappacoda said Percival, or Percy, is xed and ready to be adopted immediate ly. Shelter ofcials said he is up to date with shots, good with kids, dogs and cats. The adoption fee is $50. If interested, call 352-3439688. DOG FROM PAGE A3 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millardives@dailycommercial.com A three-day undercov er operation in Lake Coun ty last week ended with the arrests of 44 alleged prosti tutes, pimps and johns. They all came to an undis closed motel, some carrying condoms, alcohol, guns and drugs, hoping to help feed sexual wants that includ ed a man offering $1,000 for a three-hour mnage trois and another willing to spend $60 to satisfy his foot fetish, detectives said. But they also said they no ticed something different about one prostitute. She was young and didnt seem famil iar with the business lingo, including john, or one who solicits sex for money. Something was wrong, Det. Jonathan Chavis said during a press conference Tuesday to announce the operation. Detectives soon learned the girl was 14 years old and allegedly was being forced to have sex with a man at the motel for $270. They said it is just one of almost a dozen human trafcking cases they are investigating in Lake County. The suspect, Gregory Lio nel Foster, 28, is accused of abducting her from a gas sta tion on April 9 and trying to force her to have sex for mon ey with a man at an Orlando home and raping her him self, before taking her to the motel where he thought an other customer awaited, ac cording to an arrest afdavit. After talking with the girl, detectives were able to re unite her with her mother. Foster, of Orlando, was charged with kidnapping, human trafcking and pos session of marijuana. He re mained in the Lake Coun ty jail late Tuesday in lieu of $231,000 bail. Sheriff Gary Borders called the operation a success. We were able to get a 14-year-old girl and reunite her with her mother, and put a guy in jail who had kid napped her, Borders said. According to detectives and an arrest afdavit, the 14-year-old girl met Foster at a neighborhood gas sta tion. She knew him as , a man from the neighbor hood and a friend of her adult sister. Detectives said Foster helped lure her by buying her drinks and snacks at the gas station, with a promise to give her a ride home. They never made it. Chavis said Foster took her to a home and tried to make her have sex for mon ey with another man which sent her running out of the house screaming. But unfamiliar with the area, she stayed with Foster. The af davit adds the 260-pound Foster then forced her to have sex with him at a motel and, despite her crying, still refused to take her home. Chavis said the girl thought she was stuck with him. This is real, this is real, he kept telling her, accord ing to the afdavit. Then Foster was lured to the Clermont motel himself by an online advertisement for someone looking for a prostitute. Lt. John Herrell, sheriffs spokesman, said more and more prostitutes are stay ing off the streets and us ing online services so de tectives have started going online themselves to catch suspects. Chavis said Oper ation Hollerback was done completely online, mostly through websites like Craig slist and Backpage. They set up dates and prices with customers with undercover ofcials posing as prostitutes; and sex with prostitutes with ofcials posing as customers. With the help of Cler mont and Eustis police, vid eos released of some of the encounters show men tak ing off their shirts for sex only for deputies to come in instead and arrest them. Were keeping up with technology, Herrell said. Those arrested includ ed 20 women and 24 men, which included two cus tomers who were nurses. Most of the bails were for about $500. TAVARES 44 caught in prostitution sting Detectives soon learned the girl was 14 years old and allegedly was being forced to have sex with a man at the motel for $270. They said it is just one of almost a dozen human trafficking cases they are investigating in Lake County.

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10% OFFAll options with this couponrffnntb B1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 23, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTS SPORTS EDITOR ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE .............................. 365-8268 FAX .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL ......... sports@dailycommercial.com S PORTS and LEISURE FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Aurora Davis is listed at 5-foot9 on the Florida State University website, but she is a giant in the world of collegiate sand volley ball. The former South Lake High School multi-sport standout teamed up with Jace Pardon this season and the duo has bolted to a 30-1 record and led FSU to a No. 4 ranking with the nation al championship tournament about two weeks away. Davis and Pardon left no doubt they are focused on the sports big prize with a domi nant performance last week end at the Fiesta on Siesta Key event. The pair won four match es without dropping a game to win their second straight pairs tournament title. In the title match, Davis and Pardon knocked off the Univer sity of North Floridas Dagnija Medina and Kim Hildreth 21-15 and 21-14. Jace and Aurora were super impressive, FSU coach Dana lee Corso said after the Siesta Key tournament. They made me believe they have the abili ty to win a national champion ship. If they can play like they did today, the sky is the limit. Davis and Pardon set the stage for a breakout year when the Seminoles traveled to Long Beach, Calif., early in the sea son to square off against Long Beach State, the defending na tional champion. As the Semi noles top team, Davis and Par don were slotted for a Court 1 match against the 49ers. Against Delainey Aigner-Swe sey and Bojana Todorovic, Davis and Pardon sent a message to the sand volleyball nation with 21-17 and 21-13 wins to lead the Seminoles to a 3-2 team victo ry the rst time FSU had ever beaten Long Beach State in dual play. Any time you beat the de fending national champions its a huge win, Corso said follow ing the match. Jace and Auro ra were fantastic on Court 1 as they have been all year. The Seminoles top team has been so dominant this season that it has been forced to a third Florida States Aurora Davis becoming Queen of Sand DAVID N. JESTER / USA VOLLEYBALL Aurora Davis, a former South Lake High School standout, makes a play on a ball during the Fiesta on Siesta sand volleyball tournament in Siesta Key. Davis is a senior at Florida State University. Jace and Aurora were super impressive. They made me believe they have the ability to win a national championship. If they can play like they did (against North Florida in the title match at Fiesta on Siesta Key), the sky is the limit. FSU coach Danalee Corso FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Jeremy Hoornstra is known to many people in Lake County as a re ghter and emergency medical technician for the Leesburg Fire De partment. Others recognize him as a world record pow erlifter twice deco rated. Hoornstra established his second world mark on Saturday at the American Powerlift ing Association Raw Nationals in Defuniak Springs. Despite weigh ing only 246 pounds, Hoornstra competed in the 275-pound catego ry and bench pressed 672.4 pounds, eras ing the previous record of 669 pounds, set in Leesburg firefighter sets new record for powerlifting PHOTO COURTESY OF JEREMY HOORNSTRA Leesburg reghter/paramedic and professional powerlifter Jeremy Hoornstra competes in the bench press. Hoornstra recently set a world record by bench pressing 672.4 pounds. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Montverde Academy added the latest jewel to its growing sports complex on Thursday when the school held an opening ceremo ny and ribbon cutting for its new aquatic center. School Headmaster Dr. Kasey Kesselring spoke at the ceremo ny, which was attended by former Headmaster Walter L. Stephens, members of the schools Board of Trustees and ofcials from the South Lake Chamber of Commerce. The facility, located on the east side of The Nest, the Montverde Academy Center for Sportsmanship and Wellness, is 84 feet long and 62 feet wide. It is 6 feet deep at each end and 4 feet deep in the middle. Kesselring indicated the facility will be used as a training facility for Montverde Academy Boys and Girls swim teams. As part of the ceremo ny, members of the schools swim teams swam a lap in the pool. In the past several years, Mont verde Academy has upgraded its sports complex with a new foot ball-soccer-track facility, as well as new baseball and softball elds. The Nest, home to Montverde Acade mys two-time national champion ship boys basketball team, opened in 2012. In his speech, Kesselring praised the efforts of everyone involved in the construction of the pool, in cluding Brad Long, the schools business manager, for his budget ary help and dedication in making the project a reality. Montverde Academy opens latest sports facility BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL The Montverde swimming team dives into the new pool during the grand opening of the Montverde Academy Aquatic Complex in Montverde on April 17. SEE AURORA | B2 SEE POWER | B2

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B2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 23, 2014 Outdoors Fishing 352-365-8268 sports@dailycommercial.com www.dailycommercial.com SOUTHERN TACKLEWORKS | TAVARES Shellcracker and bluegill are pre pa ring to spawn and are biting on yellow tail worms. They are biting on night crawlers and red worms too, but prefer the yellow tailed worms over other worms. Bass are biting on all moving baits such as crank baits. The Wednesday night open bass tournament have re sumed with the time change. For anyone interested, they start at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday. Sandys bass tour name nt, open to all, is held on the third Saturday monthly, with square bills, swimming worms and soft plastic baits. Sandys next regular bass tournament will be an open tournament on May 17. This tour nament will usher in a new season. For information, call the shop at 352-742-0036. PINE ISLAND CAMP | FRUITLAND PARK Shell cracker have been hitting hard the last two or three weeks on grass shrimp. Many are catching limits in Haynes Creek, along the Wall and around Bird Island. Pre dominantly males are being caught. Bream shing has been e xcellent, the best it has been in four years. Bass are being caught consistently. Speck action has slowed. PALM GARDENS | TAVARES S hellcracker and bluegill are bit i ng on grass shrimp, minnows and worms in the pads. Largemouth bass are biting along the shoreline, in the pads and grass on articial baits and shiners. NELSONS FISH CAMP | WEIRSD ALE Bass action has been strong. They are biting on spinner baits and soft plastic worms. Shell cracker are bit ing on grass shrimp. Bluegill and speck activity has been negligible. BLACK BASS RESORT-FISH CAMP Some small bream are being caught from the dock. More activi ty is being seen in Haynes Creek and Lake Eustis on Black Bass minnows. SORRENTO BAIT AND TACKLE Schooling-sized bass are being caught in the local lakes. Some late bedding activity is still being seen in the spring-fed lakes due to the cooler water temperature. These sh are bit ing on shiners, Gambler Big EZ baits, Devil Force baits and swim baits. Fish are biting in Bear Pond, on Highway 46, shiners and plastic worms shed slowly. Several recent guide trips have produced 18 to 20 bass caught and re leased. The bass were caught on shin ers, drop shots and June bug worms on a light line. A few scattered crap pie are biting in the Saint Johns Riv er, Lake Beauclaire, Lake Dora and the ApopkaBeauclaire Canal. Blue gill and sunsh are beginning to bite on red worms. Big catsh are being caught on night crawlers. Stop in and get the latest daily report. LAKES REPORT a weekly update from CHERYL STALEY-ARCHER rf ntbb nrntf t bb b rf fff r b ntfbbb nrnt t b f ffbf rbf rf f rf f f rff ntfb nrntfb t ff f b b f b rfbf game in only two matches this season. And on both occasions, Davis and Pardon walked away with the win. I have such an awesome partner and friend, Davis said of Pardon. Davis has been an integral part of the sports growth at the college level. She was part of the rst season of collegiate sand vol leyball in 2012, after transferring to FSU as a sophomore. Prior to that, Davis played indoor volley ball at State College of Florida in Saraso ta, where she was earned All-America hon ors, but followed her heart by transferring to FSU. My favorite has always been beach, Da vis said. As a sophomore, in 2012, Davis recorded a 50-7-1 record and reached the quarternals of the National Championships with playing partner Brittany Tiegs. She didnt start the season as a member of the Seminoles No. 1 team, but became a dominant player after being paired with Tiegs, sporting a 22-2-1 re cord and winning three tournament titles af terward. Davis was named to the sports rst All-America team in 2012. In her junior season, Davis had a 22-9 re cord and reached the seminals at nationals. Davis recently earned All-America honors for the second time and likely will be recog nized as one of the top college players in the history of the sport. Davis will get the chance to put a bow on her career at the American Volleyball Coach es Association Sand Volleyball National Championships May 2-4 in Gulf Shores, Ala. As Corso and Davis teammates have learned over the past three seasons, it would not be surprising if Davis left Gulf Shores with a share of the national championship in a sport many consider to be a tall persons game. (Davis and Pardon) arent the tallest team in the nation, but they make up for that by being complete players, Corso said. Their defense is incredibly good. They both dig so well. They make great choices on the court. They have so many different tools ball control, serving and setting. They can do it all and they are so much fun to coach. AURORA FROM PAGE B1 2011 by Russias Vladimir Krastsov. He then attempted to bench press 701 pounds, but was unsuccessful. According to pub lished reports, Hoorns tra is the lightest man in history to bench press at least 672 pounds. Im not done, Hoorn stra said. The heaviest bench press ever is 724 pounds and Im work ing for that one. I want to have the heaviest lift ever. In the gym, Hoorns tra has lifted over 700 pounds, including a 715-pound bench press. Hoornstra set his rst world record in 2012 when he pressed 661 pounds in the 242-pound classication a mark that still stands. He sur passed a record set by Mike MacDonald that had stood for more than 30 years. For Hoornstra, pow erlifting has been some thing that has interest ed him for most of life. A third generation reght er in Leesburg, he be gan lifting as a youngster when he would accompa ny his father to work. Hoornstra continued to work with weights during his time in high school and while he attended Florida State Universi ty. He competes as a pro fessional, which he says, helps to pay the bills. The solitude of the sport is what attracted Hoornstra and has main tained his interest over the years. He likes how it helps him stay in shape for his job, which can be physically demanding. Hoornstra also likes that he and he alone is responsible for his success in the sport. You have no one else to blame, Hoornstra said. Its all up to you and how hard you train. Besides, it helps to keep me in shape, which real ly helps at work with all the heavy gear and tools we have to carry and use. At work, if they need something thats heavy carried around, they usually look to me to move it. And his accomplish ments are making fans out of longtime enthusi asts of the sport. Jeremy Hoornstra in my eyes the best bencher ever born, wrote Chris Pappillion on Hoornstras Facebook page. If Hoornstra has his wish, Pappillion and other followers of pow erlifting will have many more years to follow his bench-pressing feats. Even though he feels the all-time record of 724 pounds is only three or four months away, Hoo rnstra stressed he has no plans to walk away from the barbell. Im only 33 years old, Hoornstra said. Power lifters dont reach their prime until they reach their early to mid 40s, so I have a long way to go. If I dont get hurt, I plan to lift for a very long time. I want to set a record that will never be bro ken. POWER FROM PAGE B1 Staff Report Michael Hennessey surren dered a single run over seven in nings of work on Monday to help Lake-Sumter State College eke out a 2-1 victory over visiting Daytona State College. Hennessey, who improved his record to 4-2 with the win, limit ed DSC to just ve hits and fanned ve without allowing a walk. Steve McClellan came on in the eighth to pick up his rst save. But Daytona State College freshman pitcher Phoenix Sand ers (4-5) was almost as effective as his mound opponent. Sanders al lowed a pair of runs over eight in nings and held the Lakehawks to just ve hits. The visitors took the early lead, scoring their only run of the game in the third inning when Eze quiel Sanchez doubled to deep right-center eld. Catcher Kyle Cunningham reached on a eld ers choice with Sanchez remain ing at second. Luke Johnston then singled through the hole at sec ond but Cunningham was held to third on the throw. Freshman third-baseman Austin Marrs then beat out an ineld hit to enable Sanchez to cross the plate. The Lakehawks evened the score in the fourth when LSSCs leading hitter, Dakota Higdon, singled up the middle and raced to third when Tanner Elsbernd laced a double down the left-eld line, putting runners on second and third with no outs. Third-sack er Jack Curtis then scored Higdon with a sacrice y to deep center eld. But Sanders bore down and managed to escape with no fur ther damage. LSSC scored what turned out to be the winning run in the bottom of the fth inning on a single hit combined with a defensive lapse. Catcher Chris Blanton led off with a single to shallow center, but was cut down at second by Sanders when Tanner Longs at tempted sacrice went awry. But the Daytona hurler gave the base back on a wild throw, allowing Long to reach third on the play. Taylor Saris followed with a sac rice y to center, scoring Long with the nal run of the game. Michael Hennessey shines in Lake-Sumter States 2-1 win over Daytona State College

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Wednesday, April 23, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B3 HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. Staff Report Eustis High School unpacked their big bats on April 14 to post an 8-3 come-from-behind victo ry over East Ridge. Sam Gatch was the starter for the Panthers, tossing the rst four innings and registering a 2-for3 performance at the plate. Jack Kirkpatrick also collected a pair of hits and drove in three runs along the way. Kyle Wiseman nished with a pair of hits in three plate appearances and was responsi ble for starting the third-inning, game-tying rally that put Eustis back in the ballgame. In the fourth inning, Wiseman led off with a two-out double and scored on a Wesley Mound en base hit. Billy Ornes took the loss on the mound for East Ridge. Eustis went ahead for good with a three-run rally in the fth inning that put the game out of reach. Eustis unpacks big bats to outslug East Ridge BRETT LEBLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL East Ridge senior Carter Varga slides in safely to second base as Eustis senior Jeremy Migliori tries to tag him out during the East Ridge-Eustis game on April in Eustis. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Lake Minneola boys basketball coach Fred die Cole is conducting two youth basketball camps in May for play ers looking to improve their fundamentals and ability to perform in game situations. The two-day camps are May 2-3 and May 23-24 at the Lake Minneola High School gymnasium for boys and girls between the ages of 5 and 17. The cost of the camps is $50. The rst day for both camps will run from 5 to 8 p.m. and the second day will be gin at 9 a.m. and end at noon. Cole is the only boys basketball coach in Lake Minneolas his tory. He led the Hawks to a 28-4 record in 2013-14 and the Flor ida High School Ath letic Association Class 6A state championship game. After play ing collegiately at Bethune-Cookman University in Dayto na Beach, Cole played professionally over seas before becoming a high school coach. Lake Minneola is 6022 during Coles three seasons at the helm. Many of the teach ing tools Cole said he plans to use in the camps were learned during his college and professional careers. Registration forms for the camp are avail able on request. Email colef@lake.k12..us to obtain a registration form or for informa tion. LMHS basketball coach plans camps FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Koral Smith had three RBIs and pitched a complete game for the Bulldogs in a 5-0 win on Tuesday in the Class 5A-District 13 tour nament at Eustis. Tavares will face Eustis at 7 p.m. Thursday for the district title. By nishing no worse than sec ond, both teams advance to next weeks regional tournament. Brielle Dougherty and Savan nah Money also contributed for Tavares (11-13). Tavares softball tops Umatilla in tourney Tavares High School senior Savannah Money (4) takes a swing during Tuesdays Class 5A-District 13 tournament game against Umatilla at Eustis High School. BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL

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B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 23, 2014 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 7 25 34 47 67 13 18 31 59 74 9 21FREE SPACE53 72 2 16 42 48 63 5 29 39 52 68ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N I B O G BINGO B I N G O SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Amy Pike WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! B 9 I 21 G 53 O 72 FREE

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Ann Dupee REMEMBER WHEN A weekly column that reprints some of the more interesting news stories that have appeared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press. C1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 23, 2014 www.southlakepress.com C OMMUNITY Proudly serving CLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWS STAFF WRITER ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 EMAIL ..... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com FROM THE FILES | 25 YEARS AGO 1989 Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press 16 CJHS STUDENTS WIN ODYSSEY OF THE MIND Sixteen Clermont Ju nior High School stu dents, forming three separate teams, partic ipated in the Odyssey of the Mind regional competition in Tam pa and distinguished themselves by bringing home honors. The Do More With Less team, consist ing of Ben Boney, Chad Morrison, Mercer Sim mons, Adam Swanson, Kevin Swanson and John Wichers, won the award for Exceptional Creativity. To solve their competition problem, they built a balsa wood structure, but found upon checking in that their tower specica tions were incomplete and their structure was disqualied. To the complete amaze ment of the judges, the team requested and was given permission to build a new struc ture before their sched uled performance time, which they did. The Fabulous Fa bles team of Kelli An gel, Kellie Burd, Mau reen Campbell, Meladie Gey and Jenny James created a coordinat ed fable to illustrate the sayings, Good things come in small packag es and Beauty is only skin deep. The chal lenge of the Ye Gods team of Chuck Arendt, Jennifer Bort, Jennifer Cobia, James Hunnicutt and Tracy White was to explain a mythological character and produce a commercial advertis ing product that incor porated a mythological character. Both these teams will compete at the state level April 15. Mascotte Elementa ry School third grader Marty Brasher of Mrs. Sanders class was pic tured holding his mod el of a modern-day ro bot that he built with the help of his father, Randy Brasher. The model, weighing about 10 pounds, was entered in the Lake County Fair. MAYOR POOL COMPLIMENTS COOPER MEMORIAL LIBRARY Clermont Mayor Bob Pool complimented Cooper Memorial Li brary for its recent 75th year celebration. He added the average li brary in the state offers two books per capita. The Clermont library has four books per per son, which speaks highly of our library. The Spring Book Sale of the Friends of the Li brary is over. Cashiers were Lois Gwin, Dot ty Wiebush, Sonna Lou Vitter, Miriam John son, May Nielson, Hel en Trolle and Ted Stern. The sales and hauling crew of Les Sanner, Joe Wiebush, Steve Niel son, Helen and George Zielbauer, Bernice and Paul Terry, Toni Moody, Olga Granger, Carmen ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com W hen Wawa person nel and ofcials began last Thursday morn ing to prepare for the stores grand opening, they noticed a line about 30 people deep waiting for the doors to open, Area Manager Charlene Mar ko-Heim said. She said they treated the waiting guests to bakery sam ples, breakfast samples and drinks, but since the line con tinued to grow, Marko-Heim said she went ahead and opened at 7:30 a.m., a half hour earlier than scheduled. We are thrilled by the great welcome to the communi ty weve gotten by everybody, Marko-Heim said. By the start of the stores grand opening festivities at 10 a.m., the parking lot was overowing with visitors. Ofcials, fresh off a compa ny-wide celebration of Wawas 50th anniversary, even brought along two dancing, high-ving Wally mascots. A few customers were so hap py, they brought old Wawa memorabilia, wore their Wawa shirts and told Wawa stories to anyone whod listen. Terry Stitt had a yellow Wawa coffee mug shes had since the early 1980s when she lived in Philadelphia. According to Mar ko-Heim, Stitts mug is the rst ever put out by Wawa, available in the late s through the s. The rst thing Stitt did was ll her mug with Wawa coffee, something she has hoped to do for years. Oh man, there aint noth ing like it, Stitt said about the coffee, the same reply she gave when asked about the Wawa pretzels and hoagies. Clermonts Steve Kaczmarski, CLERMONT Residents go gaga over Wawa PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Lettuce ies at a hoagie-building contest between police ofcers and reghters during grand opening festivities for a new Wawa convenience store in Clermont on Thursday. BELOW: Lt. Erik Strange of the Clermont Fire Department spices up his hoagie. BOTTOM: Summer Phillips gets down with the Wawa Wallys. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Though the mean ing of Easter is known by most in the Christian community, the signif icance of the days pre ceding it referred to as Passover in the Jew ish faith may be less known. Congregation Si nai in Minneola host ed a Taste of Passover Seder luncheon to give a little insight into the season and to break de nominational barriers within the communi ty, starting with an ex planation of what it sig nies the exodus of the Jewish people from Egypt. Passover is a sto ry that has a sad be ginning and a happy ending, said Marlene Kostan, president of the congregations Sister hood ladies group. The Seder is a time to reect on those less fortunate than ourselves, as well as the good fortune we now enjoy. In that spirit, let no stranger be alone on Seder night and in vite anyone who wishes to participate. The Sisterhood wel comed womens groups from other congrega tions around south Lake County recently for the event, which included a short Seder service and luncheon. Easter Sunday falls on the seventh night of Passover, which lasts eight days. Ritual Chairman Kar en Miller said the Seder marks the rst and sec ond night of Passover, MINNEOLA Faiths come together for Passover ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Sharon Kowalski, left, and Evelyn Rose, both from First United Methodist Church of Clermonts Womens Group, attended Congregation Sinais fourth annual Taste of Passover Seder service. Passover is a story that has a sad beginning and a happy ending. The Seder is a time to reflect on those less fortunate than ourselves, as well as the good fortune we now enjoy. Marlene Kostan Sisterhood ladies group president SEE PASSOVER | C2 SEE WAWA | C5 SEE HISTORY | C2

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C2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 23, 2014 ITS TAXINGBY DAN SCHOENHOLZ / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZNo. 0413RELEASE DATE: 4/20/2014 ACROSS1 Crazy places5 Supply (with)8 Yogi in the New Jersey Hall of Fame13 Give up on18 Neutral zone, say20 Genevas ___ des Nations21 Its organized in a family22 Fragile decoration23 Elevated24 Hangovers at home?25 Agreement for an amount to be taken from ones salary?28 Samoan capital31 Glow32 Soil33 What C.P.A.s wish for their clients?39 Reactor43 For44 We shun it ___ it comes: Dickinson45 Guest book, e.g.46 Purim villain47 First name of the first female Supreme Court justice49 C.P.A.s advice for lowering future-year liabilities?55 Serious overcharging57 Place in trust58 Tony-winning Robert Morse role59 Fast62 European wheels?64 Alley ___65 Match66 Ample, informally67 Chart used to calculate a married couples taxes?70 ___ Reader71 Have a series of sudden inspirations?72 General mailing address?: Abbr.73 Night hunter74 Let loose75 What pop-ups do76 Websites of interest?79 First name among Mouseketeers81 I.R.S. update?84 Soccer team88 Three-time s World Series champs89 Alpine stream90 Milk91 Halves of zygotes92 G.P.S. component: Abbr.93 Last-minute way to reduce tax for a desperate filer?100 Deadline time appropriate to this puzzle102 Sad to say 103 Choice word?104 C.P.A.s masterstroke?112 Vive ___!113 South American land114 Troublemakers118 Triatomic oxygen molecule119 Strengthen120 Certain fundraiser121 Ebbed122 Certain tracks123 Foxy124 Wail DOWN1 When repeated, one of the Gabors2 Galley sight3 Time and again4 Modern two-wheeler5 How now! ___?: Hamlet6 Alter, as a form7 Digital olio8 Tour group?9 K-1210 Parade spoiler11 Sailor, sometimes12 Waste place13 Perfume14 Where to land for the night15 Break apart16 ___, brother!17 Nudnik19 Aladdin prince20 Like some opposites26 Suffix with deposit27 Choice words28 Hypes (up)29 Chute opener?30 Hip to34 Judean ruler35 19-Down, e.g.36 Wing37 Gift for many a PBS donor38 Lousy reviews40 Ape41 Division head?42 Double-checked, e.g.46 Conform (to)48 Go with the flow49 Breed of hunting dog50 Like some traditions51 ___ disease52 Transition area from deciduous to evergreen, e.g.53 ___ Plaza (hotel chain)54 El ___ (cheap cigar, slangily)56 Do me one favor 59 Important parts of Thanksgiving and Easter60 There is no greater evil than ___: Antigone61 They might be pulled63 Airport on a bay, for short65 Food processor setting67 Classic perfume68 Algerian port69 Call up74 Army base near Petersburg, Va.76 S.A.S.E. recipients77 1980s Chrysler offering78 Retrieve and throw back, in baseball practice80 Syndicated radio host John82 What to never do, according to the title of a 2005 best seller83 Exist85 Raise ones hand, say86 Tied up87 ___ a one90 Co. with the longtime stock symbol X93 Verdis ___ tu94 Alternatives to Mustangs95 Pacific current event?96 2008 Olympic tennis gold medalist97 Actor Gulager of old TV98 Settings for Skyfall and Casino Royale99 Laxness101 Engaged in, as a trade104 Sudden misfortune105 Shah ___ Pahlavi106 Wood alternative107 Where Davy Crockett was born: Abbr.108 Last little bit109 Memorable times110 In a bad way111 Bravo!115 Cry of discovery116 Partner of again117 ___ Digital Short 1234 567 891011121314151617 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 282930 31 32 33 3435 363738 39404142 43 44 45 46 47 48 495051 525354 55 56 57 58 596061 62 63 64 65 66 67 6869 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 777879 80 81 82 83 84 858687 88 89 90 91 92 939495 969798 99 100101 102 103 104105106 107108109 110111 112 113 114 115116117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Solution on D4 adding that the luncheon makes it even more spe cial because the sister hood gets to share tradi tions with others. We want to share our traditions with oth ers, Miller said. I know our Bible is the basis for some other Bibles, and it means a lot for some people to see what it talks about in certain parts, actually played out before them. Many rituals were shared through the ser vice, starting with the re moval of Chametz (any leavened food), the light ing of a Sabbath candle, an opening prayer and the explanation of the Seder plate that sat in the center of each table next to a pitcher of wine and the matzah. The Seder plate in cluded a roasted lamb or chicken bone, which signies Gods mighty arm that convinced the Egyptians to free the Jewish slaves. Also on the plate were matzah, maror and chazeret, (bitter herbs), char oset, (a mixture of grat ed apples, nuts and cin namon mixed with red wine), a hard beitzah, (a hard boiled egg), karpas (a vegetable), salt water and wine all signify ing the transition from the Jewish people being slaves to the time they were freed. Various readings tell ing the story of Passover were heard, along with rituals attendees par ticipated in that were meant to illustrate var ious parts of it. Guests included members of the Wom ans Guild of Blessed Sacrament Church, a Catholic church in Cl ermont, and womens groups from First Unit ed Methodist Church in Clermont, Zion Luther an Church of Clermont and South Lake Presby terian of Clermont. Sylvia Barto, who be longs to South Lake Presbyterian, said the Seder was meaningful. We need to learn the culture, she said. After all, its out faith also, and Jesus was Jewish. We read about all of this in the Bible, so its nice to see how its presented. During the week af ter Palm Sunday before Easter, Jesus was travel ing to Jerusalem to par ticipate in a Passover Seder and in Christian ity, that developed into the last supper. PASSOVER FROM PAGE C1 Metts and Frank Trolle also worked diligently. NEWS OF NOTE Zip codes are changing July 1. A small decrease in monthly electric bills takes effect April 1 for Florida Power custom ers. Cost of 1,000 kilo watt-hours for residential customers will decrease 18 cents, from $66.77 to $66.59. Groveland resident Betty Sewell recently re turned from a fun-lled cruise to Nassau, Baha mas, and two days at Walt Disney World as one of 400 Avon sales represen tatives nationwide that qualied for the prize in a four-week sales competi tion last summer. Employees of Walt Dis ney World Company are getting a sneak preview of the new Disney/MGM Studio this month, while cast and crew make nal adjustments for the new parks opening May 1. KIWANIS, LIONS NEWS South Lake Kiwanis President Jeff Ladd was pictured presenting a $1,000 check to Clermont High School Principal David Coggshall to use in the schools popular grade incentive program, Catch the Wave, now in its second year. Clermont Minneola Li ons Club celebrated the 40th anniversary of its March 29, 1979 charter ing at a dinner at the Flor ida Citrus Tower. President Joe Janu siak welcomed 61 Lions and guests; Lion Nor val Brown gave the invo cation. District Gover nor Lion Ed Payton gave out Monarch Awards: Ray Cochran, 40 years; Nor val Brown and Claude Teachout, 25 years; John Boyd and Leif Zetter lund, 20 years and Lavern Molye, 15 years. As Lion Richard Harris read each charter members name, Lion Jay Vander Meer lit a candle. HONOR ROLL AND ALL AMERICAN Receiving all A grades for the third marking pe riod at Clermont High School were: ninth grade, Frances Hovis, Christi na Lindgren, Sara Ro barge and Leigh Ann Tucker; 10th grade; Wen dy Brooks, Carly Meeker, Dee Dee Miller and Chris tie Surin; 11th grade, Bryn Tyner and 12th grade, Christopher Franklin, Brandon Huber, Shane Masters, Matthew Mc Lean, Alice Seewer, Su san Smith and Brian Wil liams. Mary Jones received the surprise package of her life in the mail. Western Kentucky Special Teams Coach Drake shipped her a shiny, colorful plaque with the prole of her son Cedric on it with the in scription reading Cedric Jones All American. The award came after Cedric had completed a four-year stint as a wide receiver and punt return er for the Western Ken tucky team at Bowling Green. HISTORY FROM PAGE C1 SUBMITTED PHOTO The Indoor Percussion Ensemble and the Minneola High School Color Guard pose after winning the Florida Federation of Color Guard Circuit (FFCC) State Championship. The Indoor Percussion Ensemble performed in the 2A Class Competition and received the State Championship Gold Medal Title, with each student receiving a special gold medal at the awards ceremony. The group was also recognized for its advanced level of performance in its class. The Lake Minneola High School Color Guard also performed in the 2A Class Competition and received fth place, a new high rating for the team. Their performance was titled Stay Gold. LAKE MINNEOLA HIGH DRUM LINE WINS STATE CHAMPIONSHIP COMMUNITY CALENDAR TODAY MINNEOLA BOOK DAY AT THE MINNEOLA SCHOOLHOUSE LIBRARY: Aided by the Friends of the Library volunteers, for this celebration of reading by giving books away to chosen groups. This year we are ex panding to three loca tions. Call the library at 352-432-3921 for de tails. THURSDAY SOUTH LAKE RIVER WIND NATIVE AMERICAN FLUTE CIRCLE: From 6 to 8:30 p.m., Cler mont Historic Village, 490 West Ave., in Cler mont. Call Pam Dickey at 352-989-6326 for in formation. SPRING BOWS: At 6 p.m., Marion Baysinger Memorial County Li brary, 756 W. Broad St., Groveland. To partici pate in making spring accessories, register at the library or by calling 352-429-5840. SOUTH LAKE 912 PROJECT HOSTS KAREN SCHOEN: Speaker at 7 p.m., at the Clermont Community Center in downtown Clermont. Schoen will dene ex actly what Agenda 21 is, how it could end up generally affecting many landowners and how it could have a lo cal impact on our area. FRIDAY SPRING FLING: From 4 to 7 p.m., at Windermere Union Church, United Church of Christ, 10710 Park Ridge-Gotha Rd., in Windermere. Silent auction, games, bounce house, slides, cake walk, obstacle course and pony rides. Food trucks, including Kona Ice, a taco truck and Smokin Hot Dogs will be on site for food purchases. For information, call 407-909-0464 or email at wucpreschool@ gmail.com. SUNDAY LOW COST PET VACCI NATION CLINIC: From noon to 4 p.m., Irish Trails and Pet Supply, 102 S. U.S. Highway 27 in Clermont. MONDAY KINGS RIDGE MENS GOLF ASSOCIATION HOSTS 9TH ANNUAL CHARITY GOLF TOURNA MENT: Registration at 7:30 a.m., shotgun start at 8:30 a.m., 1950 Kings Ridge Blvd., Clermont. SEE EVENTS | C5

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Wednesday, April 23, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C3 Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) HYBRID SPECIMEN PALMSAdd curb appeal and value to your home!Our trees are grown from seed and agriculturally inspectedWe provide digging, transport and transportationWe carry Exotic Hybrid PalmsQuality, Care, and Maintenance reflected in our 50+ Yearsof Horticultural Experience!Types of trees we offer: Phoenix Reclinata, Phoenix Sylvester, Phoenix Canary, Phoenix Date, Bismark European Fan, Chinese Fan Palm, and many more!FAMILY OWNED & OPERATEDFREE CONSULTATION!WE COME TO YOU UPON REQUESTSmaller palms available in pots321-388-7587Contact Jim and Jim SPRING SPECIAL ON LARGE LIGUSTRUM TREES Place your ad here and reach the Local Market!VERY AFFORDABLE!Call today 352-394-2183 SUBMITTED PHOTO Dema Neilson, program chair; Joy Dickinson, of the Orlando Sentinel and Marilyn Paone, president of Sandspurs Circle pose at a recent meeting where Dickinson, was the guest speaker, giving an informative talk about the history of the Gardens of Orlando and the city of Orlando in the late 1800s. Call Marilyn Paone at 352-394-2390 for information about the group. THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com Gallery director Mike Senger delighted in ar ranging Spring Ab stracts, a new, colorful ne art exhibit by art ist Christopher Volpe at the Bowersock Gallery in Mount Dora. I put on a different set of music and just got lost in it, Senger said of hanging a total of 20 pieces of the New Hampshire artists works in the show. His work is wonderful; I think that people are really going to love the colors, the vi brancy of them. It makes one think spring and summer. All year long you could look at his paintings and feel the warmth. The show opened last weekend and runs through May 6. People are really lov ing how he is taking the oral and turning the abstract on it; the colors are very Florida, Senger said of the artist, who si multaneously controls composition and works with drips, scribbles and accidents in his pieces. The best way to de scribe Chriss work is moving, curator Steve Bowersock said in a press release, while not ing the artist is show casing two collections of his works. Viewing either se ries is like getting lost in a dream, Bowersock said. One captures the excitement of a garden, its delicate air and bril liant hues. Likewise the dark night and of ten rain-drenched land scapes of the second se ries are reminiscent of the changing weather of early spring, impart a distinct atmosphere, raw and haunting. Volpe is known for his tonal works and more impressionist style. Over the past few years he has focused more on abstraction. The experience of owers or an amazing garden is a big experi ence its a lot of emo tion and excitement of the senses. I wanted to paint that feeling, the artist said in a press re lease. But, I didnt just want to try to express a eeting ecstatic ex perience. Theres a cer tain amount of gravitas to some of the garden work because whenever you go deeply into the vibrancy of life you also have to come up against the other half of nature, which is death. Bowersock said Volpes works feature vibrant shocks of color of spring in full bloom, yet it is abstract enough for the mind to sketch. The gallery is located at 137 East Fourth Ave., Mount Dora, and can be reached at 352-729-2415. MOUNT DORA Spring Abstracts burst into bloom at Bowersock COURTESY OF BOWERSTOCK GALLERY Home of the hummingbird is the title of this abstract painting by artist Christopher Volpe. The painting is on display through May 6 at Bowersock Gallery in Mount Dora. SANDSPURS HAS SPECIAL GUEST SUBMITTED PHOTO Pictured is assistant principal Tricia Murphy, with students, Grady Prinzel, Sarah Read, Ivo Popaduik and Ashley Hutter, the Random Acts of Kindness winners at Lost Lake Elementary School in Clermont for students in grades 1-5. Students are chosen each month who demonstrate spontaneous kindness toward other children and adults. The Masons of Kings Ridge sponsor the incentive program. Winning students are recognized on the morning news and receive a RAK T-shirt and dog tag. RANDOM ACTS OF KINDNESS WINNERS AT LOST LAKE CLERMONT Stewart new member of American Angus Association Breanna Stewart of Clermont is a new junior member of the American Angus Association, re ports Bryce Schumann, CEO of the national orga nization with headquarters in Saint Joseph, Mo. Junior members of the Association are eligible to register cattle in the American Angus Associ ation, participate in programs conducted by the National Junior Angus Association and take part in Association-sponsored shows and other na tional and regional events. The American Angus Association is the largest beef breed association in the world, with over 24,000 active adult and junior members.

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C4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 23, 2014 Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...Enchanted Living Home DecorEnchanted Living Home Decor offers an enchanted world of unique items and furnishings in one shopBy Terri Wells Nestled on Eighth Street in Historic Downtown Clermont, Enchanted Living Home Decor invites visitors in with treasures carefully displayed in every corner. Whether you're looking for a gorgeous antique couch or a much smaller item to help pull your room together, chances are you'll find it here. While owners Anissa Mills and Tony Wallace just opened the shop in February of this year, their passion for antiques goes back much further. Wallace's mother ran an antique business in Saint Augustine, so he learned about it at her knee. Wallace has always been a collector. He's passing the passion on to the next generation, as daughter Ashley works in all aspects of this family-owned business. She does a little of everything, from picking out furniture to running the cash register to helping out at events. "She does it all," Mills declared. The family has been living in Clermont for three years, as the result of "an accident," as Mills described it. Wallace came down for a job, and Mills followed him three months later, but both of them fell in love with the area. "The scenery, the mountains, it's all so different from anywhere else in Florida," Mills reflected. It reminded her of her home state of Ohio. When not hunting out antique treasures for his customers, Wallace can be found fishing out on the lake or indulging his enthusiasm for motorcycles. He's also an enthusiastic and experienced chef, citing Jamaican cuisine as a favorite a passion he learned from his father, who is Jamaican. Asked about her favorite aspect of the business, Mills pointed to the people. She loves talking with them and learning their stories. The business attracts a diversity of customers, from residents who have lived here for years to visitors from out of the country. Wallace's favorite aspect of the business is finding and buying unusual items for those customers. In the future, Wallace and Mills hope to grow their business. "We've outgrown our space," Mills admitted. The couple hopes to open a second store in the future. Enchanted Living Home Decor is located at 639 Eighth Street in Historic Downtown Clermont. You can call the store at 352-243-8888, check out their Facebook page at www.facebook.com/pages/Enchanted-Living-HomeDecor/260209717442997, or visit their website at www.enchantedlivinghomedecor.com/default.html. rfnrtb Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! rffntCall today b fnfffr mprehensim i$59ions$99excludes w i sdo m teeth (thi rd m ola rs)new pa t ients only one time visit offer p anoramic xray required D0330 out of pocket expenseExpires: May 31, 2014 m 352-394-3071 *P anoramic x-ray and/or CT scan of the ja ws necessary for d ia gnos is and trea tment planning. It is our office policy tha t the pa tient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service. examina tion or trea tment which is performed as a result of a nd within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free discounted-offer or reduced-free service, ex ami na tion or trea tment MIn. Free ADA code D0210, D0150 m3 No More Dentures! AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com The owners of Mammas Pizzeria in Leesburg are plan ning to open a new restau rant called Mammas Pizza Express at the former Sbar ro location inside the Lake Square Mall. John Voss, who co-owns the restaurants with his wife Tammy, said he hopes to open the store Thursday. While their current eatery, at 27405 U.S. Highway 27, is a full-Italian restaurant, Mam mas Pizza Express will serve pizza, some pastas and items like strombolis, subs and sal ads, Voss said. Mammas Pizza Express will have ve to six fulland part-time employees, he said, adding they have hired three of the former Sbarro employees to work at either his Leesburg location or the mall store. Voss said they were look ing to be on that side of town when he heard about Sbar ro closing and the new mall ownership. Sandi Moore, the executive director of the Leesburg Area Chamber of Commerce, said the mall needs to have a piz zeria. Its kind of a staple for a food court, she said. Lake Square Mall General Manager Jennifer Glidewell agreed that the mall needs to have a pizza place in its food court. The Sbarro at the Lake Square Mall was one of 155 under-performing Sbarro stores the company is closing nationally, the Daily Com mercial previously reported. Weve had a lot of requests since they left for another pizza store, Glidewell said. The mall also announced last week that it had nal ized negotiations with Cuba Pichys Cuisine, Dunkin Donuts and Boba Galaxy Smoothies. The smoothie store will be near the BooksA-Million, Glidewell said. Smoothies are becoming a big thing, and so weve had several requests for that also and we dont have anything of that nature down in that area of the mall. So, I think that will be a wonderful addi tion, Glidewell said. The Daily Commercial pre viously reported that Cuba Pichys Cuisine will be a ne dining Cuban restaurant in the space that once housed Garelds restaurant and the Dunkin Donuts will be in an outparcel location that previ ously housed KFC. LEESBURG Another pizza restaurant to replace Sbarro in mall SUBMITTED PHOTO Rotarians from left to right, Bill Weckerly, Anna Rose Pauley and Sam Worrel of the Rotary Club of South Lake County stand with student members of the Rotary-sponsored Interact Club of Minneola, which recently spent a Saturday morning cleaning the roadway along Hartwood-Marsh Road in Clermont, from the intersection of U.S. Highway 27 to the Elementary Charter School. The Rotary Club cleans this section of the roadway once every other month as a service to the community. For information about the club, call Roger Pierce 352-394-3849. ROTARY CLUB AND STUDENTS CLEAN ROADWAY SUBMITTED PHOTO The monthly Principals Breakfast for students in grades 3-5, goes to one child that has made signicant improvement in the area of conduct, grades and/or citizenship. Student winners are then rewarded with breakfast served by administrators. Pictured are Jacob Pallas, Elly Hime, Angela Chavez, Karina Lopez, Jamir Carnegie, Santiago Solis, Ana Moncaleano, Evan Gilbert, Isaiah Hinson, Madison Pearson, Kennedy Feagan, Kristina Vela, Andres Hernandez-Munoz, Bryleigh Fincham, Zachary Graham, Cody Riggins, David Penney, Lucas Gaynes, Ali Maqsood, India Suraton, Guilianna Castellanno, Jakob Foley, Najla Hack, Micah Sims, Angela Moncaeleano, Wyatt Watson, Michael Vazquez, Marcella Giglio, Jerrell Jackson, George Pisare, Oriana Rivera-Vargas, Amy Nandan, Austin Wheeler, Emily Gacek, Jacob Brown, Madisyn Burcheld, MarKese Kelly, Sanjay Chotoosingh, Kenrick Bradford, Trent Laverghetta, Jodie Lin, Michael Hughes, Nathan Valada, Vincent Flori and Principal Rhonda Hunt and Assistant Principal Chad Frazier. PRINCIPALS BREAKFAST AT LOST LAKE ELEMENTARY IN CLERMONT

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Wednesday, April 23, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C5 CLERMONT BLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSAMILYELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time! IRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONTL Many Other Activities each week Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.org LIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLCHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm SOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary); 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.org ST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am (Rite I) 10:00 am (Rite II) 5:00 pm (Praise & Worship) Sunday School Youth Group Nursery Adult Bible Study Womens Bible Study Mens Prayer Breakfast WOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH GODINCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALE ERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for Children Groveland IRSTBAPTISTCHURCH GROVELAND Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pm MT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! MINNEOLA CONGREGATIONSMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club NEWLPRESBYTERIANCHURCH18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am TLIVINGGOD Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce Rowland MONTVERDE WOODLANDSLUTHERAN15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 am OAKLAND PRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforSouth Lake South LakeGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOMErfn tbt352-394-7121806 W. Minneola Ave.,Clermont,FL Cremation ChoicesDirect Cremation$675Plus Container Ron Becker,Director352-394-8228921 S.US Hwy 27,Minneola,FL originally from Ocean City in south New Jer sey, said he has fre quented the Wawas that have opened in Orlando, but is glad to have one close by, as he and his wife are big fans of everything Wawa. Kaczmarski brought a Wawa mug from the 1990s. South Lake Cham bers Membership Di rector Ray Villegas, who was also among those from the Philly area so eagerly awaiting Wawas arrival, said the compa nys newest location in Clermont will save him some gas and miles on his car. I drive to the Wawa near the airport (in Or lando) about once ev ery week or two, grab about 6-8 of their soft pretzels, put them in individual Ziploc bags when I get home and freeze them so that I can eat one when I want one, he said. Now, I wont have to drive as far. WAWA FROM PAGE C1 Benefits Mike Conley Hospice House and Cornerstone Hospice. For information or to register, call 352-243-2714. OPERA AT THE LIBRARY: At 1:45 p.m., Opera@theLibrary will pres ent Giuseppe Verdis Rigoletto at the Cooper Memorial Library, 2525 Oakley Seaver Dr., in Clermont. Call Dennis Smolarek at 352-536-2275. TUESDAY LAKE MINNEOLA HIGH TO HOST ATH LETIC PHYSICAL NIGHT: From 5 to 7 p.m., for all current and incoming athletes, in the schools health lab (rooms 273-275). Cost is $10 and only cash is accepted. The physi cals will be performed by Dr. Da vid Brcka and the staff of the Sports Medicine Institute. Call Melissa Neu at 352-394-9600, ext. 5259 or email neum@lake.k12..us. APRIL 30 TEEN SPRING BOW CLASS: At 4:40 p.m., Marion Baysinger Memorial County Library, 756 W. Broad St., Groveland. Call the library at 352429-5840. MAY 3 CLERMONT GARDEN CLUBS GAR DEN WALK: Gardens in the Hills, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Clermont. The cost is $10. Guests will tour the gardens of four homes as well as the Community Garden at South Lake Hospital. Tour begins at the garden club, 849 West Ave. There will also be a Kids Korner, rafe and a plant sale. Go to www.clermont gardenclub.com for details. To place an item on the calen dar, send an email to pam.fenni more@dailycommercial.com. EVENTS FROM PAGE C2 SUBMITTED PHOTO Left to right, Montverde Academy Headmaster, Dr. Kasey Kesselring; Julia Buddendorff and Wesley Reed of American Financial. Buddendorff was recognized as the South Lake Chamber February Student of the Month at the chamber breakfast meeting at First United Methodist Church Clermont. Felecia Williams, director of college counseling; Emily Long, director of school and community service programming, Headmaster Kesselring and his wife, Maureen Kesselring, director of learning support services, attended. BUDDENDORFF IS STUDENT OF THE MONTH

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C6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 23, 2014 A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Handyman Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. Irrigation Services 5% Off Any Svc. under $1,000 $150 Off Any Svc. $2,000 or more $75 Off Any Svc. $1,000 or moreLawn Maintenance, Hardscape, Patios, Retaining Walls, Maint., SoddingLeesburg 536-3708 Landscaping Services Lawn Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Painting Services Pressure Cleaning Shower Doors Service Veterinarian Services Enclosure Screening Fencing Services Window Services Handyman Services Marine Services Cleaning Services Affordable Home Repair, LLC rffnn tbb nn352-551-6073 Electrical Services Free Est.Lic. & Ins. rfn ftb Concrete Services Roofing Services Tree Service Home Improvement Plumbing Services rfntbb b tnfnrb rfffnn ntbtrrr nbt Land Clearing Services Lawn Services BrocksLAWN SERVICE352-242-7864Mowing Trimming Mulching

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Wednesday, April 23, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D1 Classified IndexLegal Notices....................0001 Notices............................1000 At Your Service................9000 Employment....................2000 Pets/Animals....................6865 Merchandise....................6000 Real Estate/For RENT......3000 Real Estate/For SALE........4000 Recreation........................7000 Transportation..................8000 Cancellations for ads running Wednesday must be made by 4pm Monday.ADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since The Daily Commercial will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error call the classified department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error.TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde

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D2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 23, 2014 Untitled art#: order#: 6 X 5.25 Black 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance r t t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital Call the South Lake Press to get your ad in! 394-2183

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D4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 23, 2014 Untitled art#: order#: 5 X 11.325 Black Untitled art#: order#: 2 X 4.125 Black 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr Z O O S A R M B E R R A S C R A P S A F E A R E A P A L A I S C R I M E A R T G L A S S O N H I G H E A V E S W I T H H O L D I N G C O N S E N T A P I A A U R A E A R T H M A N Y H A P P Y R E T U R N S P I L E P R O E R E L O G H A M A N S A N D R A R O L L T H E C R E D I T S R O B B E R Y E S C R O W T R U R A P I D E D A M S O O P P A I R E N U F T A B L E F O R T W O U T N E P A N T A P O O R I O N F R E E D A R C E B A N K S A N N E T T E S C H E D U L E C H A N G E E L E V E N T H E A S A A R U S E O V A S Y S T E M E R G E N C Y S H E L T E R A P R I L A L A S E E N Y B R I L L I A N T D E D U C T I O N L E R O I T I E R R A H E L L I O N S O Z O N E A N N E A L T E L E T H O N W A N E D S O N G S S L Y Y O W L Solution to puzzle on C2