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LIVI STANFORD| Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com A s he prepares to make a proposal to take over Lake Countys Animal Ser vices, Sheriff Gary Bor ders is looking at how other sheriffs ofces are doing that job. If county commis sioners approve the proposal at a later commission meeting, Lake will become the eighth county in Flor ida where the sheriffs ofce oversees animal services. Brevard County plans to hand over its animal services to the sheriff by Oct. 1, while Bradford, Dixie, Hend ry, Martin, Polk, Put nam and Sarasota counties already have such arrangements in place. Lake County Com missioner Leslie Cam pione discussed the idea at Tuesdays com mission meeting as a way to improve all op erations at the shel ter, including custom er service and animal registration, while ad dressing animal over population, hiring a rescue coordinator, lowering the euthaniza tion rate and increasing the adoption rate. The proposal comes after the head of the Animal Services di vision recently an nounced her resig nation, citing a tight budget and public pressure over the de partments euthaniza tion rate. Cyndi Nason was the second director of An imal Services to resign within the past year. SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | C1 SPORTS: MDB trio invited to football camp WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWSTAND INSIDE CLASSIFIED D1 CROSSWORDS C2 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN C1 SPORTS B1 VOICES A4 WORD ON THE STREE T A2 SO UTH LAKE PRE SS V OLUME 99, NO. 16 5 SECTIO N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reserved www. southlakepress.com PRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID TAVARES PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL A dog waits to be adopted at Lake County Animal Services in Tavares on Wednesday. A worker at Lake County Animal Services rells a waterbowl. Sheriffs offices in Florida taking on animal control duties Going to the dogs MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millardives@dailycommercial.com The Lake County Sher iffs Ofce said they have identied a man seen at an Ocoee Walmart with a woman whose body was found two days lat er in Clermont. The man appeared to be walking with Cheri Amber Houston, 28, at the store at 6:15 p.m. on April 2. Lt. John Herrell, sher iffs spokesman, said detectives received callin tips of the mans iden tity after the media ran pictures of him starting Wednesday. Herrell would not re veal if detectives have located or talked with the man, who has only been labeled as some one detectives want to speak with regarding Houstons disappear ance. Herrell did say the mans vehicle has been positively identi ed and crime scene in vestigators are currently processing it. Houston was found on the morning of April 4 near the intersection of Hancock and Hart wood Marsh roads. A woman walking her dog discovered the body in a wooded area about 300 feet from the inter section. Detectives be lieve the body had been there less than 24 hours and have not said how she died. Houston was a tran sient and over the past 8-10 weeks had moved from Miami to Nash ville, on to North Car olina, and then to the Atlanta area before coming to the Orlan do area, detectives said. They believe Houston, who is from Newnan, Ga., had been in the Ocoee and Winter Gar den areas along the Highway 50 corridor since March 31. Detectives also said they learned he wom an has a history of drug abuse. Anyone with informa tion can call the Lake County Sheriffs Of ce at 352-343-2101, or Central Florida CRIME LINE at 1-800-423TIPS, where callers may remain anonymous. CLERMONT Detectives ID man with woman before body found LAKE COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE This man was seen with Cheri Amber Houston on April 2 at an Ocoee Walmart, two days before her lifeless body was found. LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com Facing tough budget deci sions ahead, several Lake Coun ty commissioners said they are left with two options: raise taxes or cut services. There has not been a tax in crease in the last ve years, county ofcials said. We knew this day was going to come and we have cut and cut and there is nowhere else, County Commissioner Welton Cadwell said. We are in a po sition where we have to pro vide the basic services. We dont want public safety to suffer, so Taxes may be needed to fill budget gaps BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Ambulances await repairs in the garage of Lake Emergency Medical Services in Leesburg on Thursday. SEE SHERIFF | A2 SEE BUDGET | A3

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 16, 2014 Nason and Marjorie Boyd both resigned amid pressure from animal ac tivists who claim the shel ter was putting down too many animals. Before Nason took the position last May, two critical internal audits in April 2013 cited at least 45 areas for improvement at the shelter. Some of the primary recommenda tions involved improved record keeping and better care of animals. Brian Sheahan, direc tor of the Department of Community Safety and Compliance, and Nasons boss, said euthanizations have been reduced and, in the last six months, there has been no euth anizations of adoptable dogs. But the public criticism is only a partial reason for the resignations, county ofcials said, pointing to funding issues that kept the county from hiring a eld supervisor and res cue coordinator to help take the pressure off the director. County commissioners agreed in a meeting on March 11 to delay fund ing those positions until Oct. 1. Campione, who pro posed the position be lled immediately, said she believed some com missioners decided to stop listening altogether about the importance of lling the position. Even so, Campione said with the sheriffs help, the county could overcome problems at the shelter. I dont think he is get ting involved unless he can do a great job with this, she said. Commissioner Sean Parks said while the pro posal needs to be vetted, it is equally important to have spay and neutering programs in place. The sheer number of animals in Animal Ser vices will not go away without comprehensive spay and neutering pro grams, he said. In her proposal, Campi one said there are discus sions about the potential for expanding the coun tys spay and neutering program in partnership with the South Lake Ani mal League. In October 2013, the county implemented a spay and neutering pro gram that gives residents a $50 rebate if they spay or neuter an animal. While in support of the proposal, Commission er Tim Sullivan said he wanted to weigh the costs involved in the turnover before making a nal de cision. If he can meet (our) expectations and stan dards, and do it in a less costly way than it is cost ing us, it makes perfect sense, he said. Last month, the Bre vard County Commission approved a plan to have the sheriff take over its animal services depart ment, which was bogged down with funding issues and high turnover rates in management, ofcials said. Venetta Valdengo, as sistant county manager for Brevard County, said the commission reached its decision because the sheriff could provide bet ter training, improve the centers image and work closely with law enforce ment. There has been a lot of turnover of management here, she said, explain ing that public criticism also was a factor in their resignations. In Bradford County, Sheriffs Ofce ofcials said they have been in charge of animal services for at least nine years. It costs about $104,200 to run the shelter annually. Capt. Carol Starling, who oversees animal con trol for Bradford, said the ofce has two employees, with one general manag er running the shelter. The manager has been in the position for at least seven years, Starling said. Bradford County Ani mal Services is a mem ber of the Florida Animal Control Association. Starling said the ofce has received few com plaints about euthani zations and makes clear to residents the facility is not a humane society. We are part of an ani mal control operation to keep the public safe, she said. We do everything in our power and work diligently with rescue groups to save as many animals as we can. The county does not have a rescue coordina tor position, she said, ex plaining they are a much smaller county in com parison to Lake. Inmates sentenced to the jail in a trustee status play an important role in helping reduce opera tional costs, Starling said. Two are responsible for all the cleaning and feeding of the animals, Starling said, saving the county from having to hire additional help. For the month of Feb ruary, the shelter received 30 animals of which nine were euthanized, repre senting 30 percent of the animal population for the month. In Lake, the annual live release rate for dogs was 77 percent and 31 percent for cats in 2012, accord ing to an internal audit conducted on the depart ment in 2013. In 2013, the live release rate increased 10 percent for dogs and three per cent for cats. Similar to Bradford, Sarasota took over Ani mal Services in 1994, as they viewed the sheriffs ofce as more of an en forcement agency, ac cording to Wendy Rose, public information of cer for the Sarasota Sher iffs Ofce. Rose said the euthani zation rates for adoptable animals are 5 percent. Steve Shank, a mem ber of the Mist Animal Rescue, wrote in an email message, his biggest con cern is the person who is hired to manage the ev eryday operations of the facility. Repeatedly making the wrong selection as to who runs our shel ter will result in no im provement, continued discontentment among the workforce and pub lic, unremitting killing of adoptable pets and a waste of taxpayer mon ey, he wrote. CLERMONT Pre-GED language arts classes to be held at library The Cooper Memorial Library in Clermont is offering free pre-GED class es designed for those who left school before the eighth grade and now want to go back and complete a GED. This program will provide extra help with basic reading and writing skills needed to enter the GED classroom. Classes will run from April 22 to June 19, on Tuesday and Thursday after noons from 1 to 4 p.m. Registration is required. For information or to register for the program, call Barbara Perry at 352-253-6164 or go to the reference desk on the second oor of Cooper Memorial Library. GROVELAND Relay for Life comes to south Lake on April 25 More than 1,000 walkers will walk around the clock on April 25 support ing the battle against cancer when the American Cancer Society Relay for Life of south Lake gets under way at South Lake High School in Groveland at 6 p.m. Call 800-227-2345 or go to RelayForLife.org. CLERMONT Belk seeking charities to sign up for fundraiser Belk can help you raise funds for your favorite nonprot charity, orga nization, school or church by taking part in the semiannual Charity Day sale on May 3. Participating charities raise money by selling tickets for $5 each, which entitles purchasers to attend a pri vate four-hour sale offering discount ed prices off rarely discounted brands, plus the attendee will receive $5 off their rst purchase using their chari ty ticket. The entire $5 from every ticket sold goes to the participating charity. Tickets can be purchased by calling the Clermont Belk Store, 270 Citrus tower Blvd., at 352-243-2227, ext. 210. CLERMONT South Lake Animal League to host Puttin Fore Paws Join us at South Lake Animal Leagues 1st Annual Puttin Fore Paws Golf Tournament from 7:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on May 4 at Kings Ridge Golf Club, 1950 Kings Ridge Blvd., in Clermont. The event will begin at 7:30 a.m. with check-in and breakfast, followed by an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start. For information or to register, go to www.slal.org/puttinforepaws, email puttinforepaws@slal.org or call 407-340-8698. CLERMONT Mandatory Grant Symposium for future funding on April 22 The Community Foundation of South Lake County will be offering a grant symposium at 9 a.m. on April 22 to explain the foundations new direction. Attendance is required for the meeting held at the Community Foundation ofce, 2150 Oakley Seaver Dr., in Clermont, to apply for future funding. To RSVP for the meeting, call 352394-3818 or email Tiffany Gay at tiffa ny@cfslc.org. CLERMONT South Lake Junior Womans Club to award scholarships The South Lake Junior Womans Club will be giving away two $500 scholarships this year. One award ed to a high school student that re sides in south Lake County and will be attending college this fall. Another award will go to a woman 21 years of age or older who would like to contin ue her education. For details on qualications, appli cation and deadline, go to www.slwjc. webs.com. For information, email rhonda_ sljwc2011@yahoo.com, aimeeopti maone@gmail.com or go to facebook. com/sljwc. Area Briefs What south Lake residents are saying about ... POLITICIANS What differences do you see between the Republican and Democratic parties at this time? Theres not a lot of dif ferences between the par ties anymore. Theyre both drifting from one extreme to another. I would sup port either party that is an advocate of smaller gov ernment and less bureau cracy. The parties need to cater to their constituents rather than special inter est groups and lobbyists. CHUCK ARNONE CLERMONT The Democrats spend the money now and the Republicans borrow it I guess they both borrow it. PETE BONASKIEWICH CLERMONT At the present time we have huge gaps between the major parties in per formance, morals, hones ty. God help us with our present president. PEGGY WEATHERBY CLERMONT I guess I see quite a big difference, even now. Gen erally speaking, the Re publicans are still very conservative and very ex pensive. They dont want big government because they dont need it. The lit tle guy who needs it is suf fering and is generally represented by the Demo crats. BOB BOLLET ALTAMONTE SPRINGS Word on the Street Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL A cat waits to be adopted at Lake County Animal Services in Tavares on Wednesday. SHERIFF FROM PAGE A1

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Wednesday, April 16, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3 some tough decisions are going to have to be made. Cadwell said the coun tys past practice of tap ping into reserves to bal ance the budget is not a viable option anymore. The only other way is to create additional rev enues, he said. The countys budget has a $7 million short fall because of declin ing property values and an estimated $3 million increase to the Lake County Sheriffs Of ce budget to replace aging vehicles and for pay raises for deputies whose salaries are fall ing behind other juris dictions, county of cials said. In order to maintain 7 percent in reserves, that shortfall must be met, according to Stephen Koontz, budget director. Koontz said there could be an effect on any of the services the county provides, includ ing parks and libraries, dependent on what the commission decides. In estimating the scal year 2013-14 budget, Koontz said he has already tak en into account a 3 per cent increase in proper ty values. Whats more, Lake Emergency Medical Services is facing cuts to service beginning in October if the organiza tion has to chop an ad ditional $750,000 to bal ance its budget for scal year 2015. Meanwhile, coun ty ofcials said they are struggling to come up with funding to make needed repairs at coun ty buildings and to re place obsolete technol ogy. With 41 percent of the countys buildings more than 20 years old, the HVAC controls sys tem and IT le serv ers must be replaced to avoid system and oper ational failures. There is a backlog of $12.2 million in facili ties needs, while IT is reporting $950,000 for critical updates to le servers, data storage units and telephone systems. Moreover, county of cials are also project ing a $450,000 shortfall in the Parks and Storm water Municipal Ser vice Taxing Unit, which levies taxes to fund im provements. In 2012, commission ers voted against the rollback rate, which would have allowed the county to raise tax es to generate the same amount of revenue as in the previous year. If commissioners had voted for the rollback rate, there could have been more revenues in reserves, one county of cial said. We have kind of cut all around the edg es and it may be time where we are going to have to make the deci sion to probably raise taxes or cut services drastically, Commis sioner Tim Sullivan said. We put off capital improvements. Putting off some of those de cisions has now come back to haunt us. I dont see any huge increases in revenues coming in without raising taxes. But commissioners Jimmy Conner and Sean Parks said it is prema ture to speak about tax increases without know ing exactly what the property values will be. Even so, Conner said if the county is forced to raise property taxes in the name of public safe ty, it would be deemed essential. Jerry Smith, executive director of Lake EMS, said he was informed the ambulances alloca tion, which it receives through the Munici pal Service Taxing Unit, has been reduced by $400,000 for scal year 2014-15 because addi tional funds left over from the Lake-Sumter EMS split have been de pleted. Sumter County dis solved its contract with the organization in 2011. The allocation from the MSTU funds one third of Smiths budget with the ambulance ser vice collecting the re mainder of its revenue from user fees, which have not been increas ing at anticipated levels. Smith has to replace four truck chassis, 16 LifePaks (known as car diac monitors) and 14 stretchers by 2016. The cardiac monitors are $30,000 apiece, and each stretcher is $14,000. To maintain our state of readiness, our current deployment of 19 ambulances and for capital, Lake EMS needs more than a mil lion in additional reve nue, Smith said. One option commis sioners could consider is to raise the MSTU for Lake EMS, Koontz said. If the ambulance or ganization is forced to make cuts, it could re sult in one or two few er ambulances on the road, Smith said. BUDGET FROM PAGE A1

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 16, 2014 Bring back Mutts I see that your comics page has been slightly revamped. The comic strip Mutts has, I gather, been given the axe. I wish to register my regret for that decision. Mutts is a won derful comic strip that not only affords an occasional chuck le, but the strips Zen-like qual ities lend a sense of peace and goodwill to my mornings. Thats pretty amazing functionality for a mere 7 square inches of news print. I understand, of course, that this move is likely a matter of economics. If that is the case, Id like to put in my two cents re garding the worthiness of the strips on your comics page. I wonder why you would choose to drop a comic strip with new, original content, rath er than drop one that is recy cled. As delightful as they were in their day, Peanuts and For Better or Worse have long been in reruns. Given the average age of your readers, I dare say most of us have already read and enjoyed these strips before. Shouldnt we give preference to original, new content on the comics page? For that matter, are you aware that Shoe has been cobbled to gether on a computer from bits and pieces of old strips for more than a decade? Then there are strips like Snuffy Smith, B.C., Hagar, Heathcliff, Dennis the Menace and more which are drawn by lackluster hired hands, their original creators having died years ago. Id prefer to read comic strips drawn by their orig inal creators, those which sink or swim based on their own merits rather than the hazy recollection that the strip used to be funny. So as not to be too negative, let me mention that I applaud the recent addition of Luann. Although at rst this seemed like a strip that wouldnt in terest me, I nd it has quick ly become one of my favor ites. Congratulations on a ne choice. ALLAN HOLTZ | Tavares Poor service from the DMV I thought Lake County had come into the 21st century, the same as the rest of the world did. I just returned from the of ce of the Department of Motor Vehicles in Astatula, and after a 3 1/2 hour wait to renew my drivers license, the receptionist made the excuse that they were so busy because it was spring break and all of those on break were there. But, that was not so. Every age bracket was very well represent ed, from young people with ba bies to senior citizens, and Im a senior citizen. I followed the instructions that came with the paperwork from Tallahassee about mak ing an appointment on the web page about having my eyes test ed, and also called ahead to the phone number listed. I was told all the appointments were taken and to call back, and all of the clerks were busy. Both of their printers were not working and it would take over an hour for the repairman to get there and over two dozen people were given temporary licenses. This is the only Department of Motor Vehicles in this area be cause the powers that be closed a perfectly good ofce on U.S. Highway 27 near State Road 50. Our politicians and the people who work for them have a cus tomer-be-damned attitude. HELEN NEWTON | Clermont Are we entering a new era in world evolution? Who would have thought a former communist country would have a majority of citi zens that believed in and prac ticed pure democracy? Would the politicians in Washington, D.C., have been so anxious to destroy the Soviet Union if they knew that people were not going to set up an oli garchy like we have in America? The rulers in Washington en visioned a small group of rul ers in post-Soviet countries that they could set up sweetheart deals with and together rule the common citizen worldwide surprise, oligarchy. The Crimean people believe in one man, one vote and majori ty rules. This sets a bad example for American politics. What if California citizens vote to join Mexico? Maine and Washington State residents vote to join Canada? Texas cit izens vote to return to a sepa rate country with pure democ racy and Florida citizens vote to join Puerto Rico, a new pure democracy? Are we entering a new era in world evolution? Our national debt is unpayable, ever! Why not leave it behind and start new with a clean slate? Let the rest of the nation join Israel as a new nation called nevermore. Their ag could be white with an out stretched begging hand. VERNON HALL | Umatilla T here is a sayin g that the denition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and ex pecting a different result. Yet that seems to be what the Lake County School Board did last week when it opened the door to considering a controversial student uni form proposal that parents have vehemently opposed and the School Board subsequently rejected several times before. To be clear, the School Board did not actu ally propose or recommend such a change in the districts dress code during its meeting last week. But board members inexplicably opened the door a crack when they recommended that Superintendent Susan Moxley have a commit tee study the idea. But why? There are strong points to be made pro and con. Opponents have argued that enforcing unifor mity sties creativity and individuality, and some have said the burden of having to buy and main tain a separate school wardrobe for their kids is nancially taxing. To be sure, there are some solid arguments to be made in favor of a uniform dress code, and supporters of the idea have made them. They insist that uniforms improve morale and stu dent conduct and can even have a positive in uence on academic achievement. Even the head of the esteemed Montverde Academy weighed in via letter, saying that re quiring school uniforms would initiate posi tive change in the culture of your school com munities in a relatively short time. All that may be true, although Montverde Academy, a small private institution, is not truly analogous to a large public school. Still, the Lake County school system might want to consider whether this is the time to implement such a signicant and controver sial change. The School Board is already mired with signicant budget issues, decaying school buildings, obsolete technology, busing chal lenges and a number of other problems. In fact, the board is waging a tense debate with Lake County government ofcials right now over how much of the local penny sales tax should go toward schools, which they say have a backlog of needs totaling $1 billion or more. It would behoove the School Board to focus its attention on the pressing matters that lay ahead rather than inviting a ght that will sure ly draw signicant time and energy. Put another way, would you worry about painting the kitchen if your house was falling down? Of course you wouldnt. We encourage the School Board to roll up its sleeves and bear down on the challenges ahead xing their budget hole, shoring up tired old school buildings, planning for a projected surge in student enrollment and elevating academic standards district-wide. No, the school uniform debate can wait for another day. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD ........................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST O PINION WHATS YOUR OPINION? The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Letters to the Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711 By fax to: 352-394-8001 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. GUEST COLUMNS If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OUR VIEW S OUTH LAKE PRESS Your community newspaper for more than 100 years. 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001 The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Florida 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region. All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. YOUR OPINIONS LETTERS TO THE EDITOR The government should provide total health care for wounded warriors Has no one questioned why our present governmental re gime does not provide total health care for our wounded amputees/military personnel? Instead, we are bombard ed with TV commercials like those soliciting $19 per month by groups such as Wounded Warriors. The prime benefactors of this charity are entertain ment gures and money-hun gry TV networks, not the sol diers who were put in harms way by the same regime Commander-in-Chief. This regime seems dead set on bankrupting our country by spending borrowed or newly printed money on every dead beat reason, but never for this one legitimate cause our fallen war heroes. Jeff Foxworthy recently pub lished a treatise dening rea sons why our nation was founded by geniuses but is now run by idiots. These are some of his points which show the basis for my previous sentence. 1) Our government believes the best way to eradicate tril lions of dollars in debt is to spend trillions more. 2) Hard work and success are met with higher taxes, regula tions and intrusion, while not working is rewarded with food stamps, WIC checks, Medicaid, subsidized housing and free cell phones. 3) The government plan for getting people back to work is to provide 99 weeks of un employment checks without proof of looking for work. 4) You pay your mortgage faithfully while denying your self the newest big-screen TV, while your neighbor buys iP hones, timeshares, a huge TV and new cars, and the govern ment forgives his mortgage debt when he defaults. 5) You must show your pic ture ID to board a plane, cash a check, buy liquor and rent a video, but not to vote for who runs the country. Our country has masterful ly spent us into $17 trillion in debt while endlessly buying votes with continuously grow ing entitlement programs. If you dont understand the extent of ination and the im pact of printing and borrow ing money from your visits to grocery stores and gas stations, just consider this: In 1964, IBM spent $5 billion on a makeor-break gamble, the intro duction of the rst Solid Logic computer system. Due to ina tion, that $5 billion would be $38 billion today. Do not vote democrat. CLINTON G. FISH | Tavares LETTER of the WEEK School uniform discussion is a distraction

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Wednesday, April 16, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Fresh off a spate of re cent public and televi sion appearances, Chris P. Bacon a Clermont pig born with no hind legs visited Lost Lake Elementary School for the second consecutive year. School Principal Rhonda Hunt puckered up and kissed Chris P.s pink snout in front of the entire student body of almost 1,000 as a way to reward them for the hard work they put into raising money for a school playground re cently. I missed my pig gy boyfriend, she said. I hadnt seen him for a whole year. Chris P. weighed about 5 pounds then; now, he weighs about 73. His owner, Dr. Len Lu cero, said Chris P. loves the attention but gets spooked by too much noise. On Thursday, he got plenty of both, with the children chanting Kiss the pig, kiss the pig, before Hunt nal ly obliged. The kids really love seeing Chris P. Bacon. They remember him visiting, they remember the kiss and at the same time, they get the won derful message he in spires to never give up, Hunt said. Chris P. Bacons stop at Lost Lake comes right after his appearance last week in a PBS docu mentary series Nature in an episode entitled My Bionic Pet. The pigs story is a touching one. A wom an came to the Eastside Veterinary Clinic in Cl ermont, where Lucero used to work, about 15 months ago to inquire about putting down the animal. But one look at the piglet, who weighed less than 1 pound, stirred something in Lu cero. The doctor took the pig to his Summerville home and built a tiny rear-end wheelchair out of KNex blocks, a childrens building toy similar to Legos. A vid eo posted on YouTube showing Chris P. Bacon scooting around in his wheeled contraption went viral, and the pig got national television exposure (the Today show, Anderson Coo per, TMX, Discovery network, etc.), his own Facebook page with 107,174 likes and even worldwide T-shirt sales. 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 DEATH NOTICES Janet M. Barbuto Janet M. Barbuto, 76, of Leesburg, died Sat urday, April 6, 2014. National Cremation Society, Fruitland Park. Ronny Lee Buchanan Ronny Lee Buchan an, 60, of Fruitland Park, died Sunday, April 6, 2014. PageTheus Funerals & Cre mations. Leesburg. Joann Chaput Joann Chaput, 75, of Leesburg, died Sun day, April 6, 2014. PageTheus Funerals & Cre mations, Leesburg. Doris A. Fitzgerald Doris A. Fitzgerald, 92, or Mount Dora, died Wedneday, March 19, 2014. Allen J. Hard en Funeral Home, Mount Dora. Wilbur Robert Gradin Wilbur Robert Gra din, 91, of Eustis, died Monday, April 7, 2014. Hamlin & Hilbish Fu neral Directors. Eustis. Tanya S. Jett Tanya S. Jett, 60, of Sorrento, died Satur day, April 5, 2014. Bey ers Funeral Home, As tor. Nava King Nava Belle King, 96, of Sumterville, died Monday, April 7, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Catherine Lipka Catherine Lipka, 93, of Ocala, died Monday, April 7, 2014. Banks/ Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wild wood. Vera Lea Murphy Vera Lea Murphy, 91, of Eustis, died Mon day, April 7, 2014. Mar vin C. Zanders Funeral Home, Inc. Apopka. Maynard Tarr Maynard Tarr, 70, of Oxford, died Saturday, April 5, 2014. Banks/ Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wild wood. Mayfred Warren Mayfred Warren, 88, of Oxford, died Wednesday, April 9, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Fenerals and Cremations, Wild wood. Sanders E. Wheeler Sanders E. Sam Wheeler, 89 of Tava res, died, Wednesday April 9, 2014. Stever son, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Crema tions, Tavares. Edward Lodge Wilson Edward Lodge Wil son, 66, of Tavares, died Thursday, April 10, 2014. Beyers Funer al Home, Umatilla. IN MEMORY Principal puckers up for Crisp P. Bacon ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Lost Lake Elementary School Principal Rhonda Hunt leans in for her kiss with Internet and television sensation Chris P. Bacon. CLERMONT

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A6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 16, 2014

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10% OFFAll options with this couponrffnntb B1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 16, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTS SPORTS EDITOR ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE .............................. 365-8268 FAX .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL ......... sports@dailycommercial.com S PORTS and LEISURE FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com The Show! Its the ultimate goal for baseball players the Major Leagues. Shane Greene is one of the few who gets to realize that dream. The former East Ridge High School pitch er was recalled by the New York Yankees on April 9 from Scranton-Wilkes Barre, the teams Triple-A afliate. Greene was recalled after the Yankees optioned catch er Austin Romine down to Scranton-Wilkes Barre fol lowing New Yorks 14-5 loss on April 8 to Baltimore at Yankee Stadium. Greene, a right hander, was in the bull pen for the April 9 game, but did not appear in the Orioles 5-4 win. He had not appeared in a game through Saturdays 7-4 win against Boston. Tam pa Bay hosts New York in a four-game series beginning Thursday at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg. A starter in 90 of the 105 games in which he has ap peared in as a professional, Greene said he would be used as a reliever by the Yankees. The rst player from East Ridge to reach the major leagues, Greene was selected in the 15th round by the Yan kees in the 2009 June Am ateur Draft. After graduat ing from East Ridge, Greene went on to play at Dayto na Beach Community College, now known as Daytona State College. Greene said he learned about his pro motion in a phone call from Mark Newman, the Yankees senior vice president of baseball op erations. At the time Newman called, Greene was speaking Former East Ridge pitcher called up by Yankees GREENE SEE GREENE | B2 FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Three football-play ing student-athletes from Mount Dora Bible have been invited to at tend the Football Uni versity Top Gun camp. Mount Dora Bible coach Dennis Cardoso announced Wednesday that juniors John Grant and Chad Simmons re ceived invitations to the camp, as did eighth grader Eric Seidelman. Scheduled for July 17-19 at Jerome High School in Dublin, Ohio, the showcase camp is reserved only for the best of the best to show case their talent on a national stage, accord ing to the camps web site. To be eligible, an athlete must be cho sen from among the top 15 percent of athletes at his regional Football University camp and be specically invited to Top Gun. The top 750 stu dent-athletes from around the world are invited to the camp. Cardoso said the Mount Dora Bible trio earned invitations based on their perfor mance last weekend at the Football Universi ty camp in Kissimmee. Simmons worked out as a linebacker, while Grant performed as a long snapper and Se idelman competed as an offensive lineman. In addition to his invi tation to Top Gun, Sim mons also was named Defensive Most Valu able Player on the rst day in Kissimmee. Cardoso said Top Gun focuses on teach ing technique and skill. Grant, Simmons and Seidelman will partici pate with other athletes in a small-group set ting. Football University was founded as a pre mier educational foot ball camp for an elite class of players who have already demon strated their high-level football ability, serious ness for the game and have chasen football as their primary sport, Cardoso said. Football Univeristy is owned by All American Games, an organization that puts on football camps throughout the country. Camp faculties are made up of more than 100 former colle giate and professional players and coaches. Mount Dora Bible trio invited to camp PHOTO COURTESY OF DENNIS CARDOSO Mount Dora Bible football players Chad Simmons, John Grant and Eric Seidelman stand with Bulldogs coach Dennis Cardoso on April 9 after the three received invitations to the Football University Top Gun camp in Dublin, Ohio. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Iron Jungle Weightlifting con tinues to grow. The Lake County-based team introduced three more lifters to USA Weightlifting competition recently and had each member set personal records at the Orlu sia Open in Orlando. In all, six Iron Jungle weight lifters earned medals at the meet and Brett Ollila hit his qualify ing total for this summers Youth Nationals at Port Orange Spruce Creek High School. It was Ollilas rst meet with Iron Jungle. Iron Jungle Weightlifting has been training hard, said coach Josh Boyer. Our rookies per formed well in their rst meet and it was great to see each one of our lifters hit personal re cords. Were continuing to make progress towards our goal of be ing the best. In addition to Ollila, Tony Huang and Carlos Molano made their debuts for Iron Jun gle in the Orlusia Open. Com peting at 77 kilograms (about 169 pounds), Ollila and Mola no needed at least 308 pounds combined in the Snatch and Clean-and-Jerk to qualify for Youth Nationals. Brett looked very condent and comfortable in his debut meet, Boyer said. He was ac tually our only lifter to go 6-for6 for the day he didnt miss on any of his attempts. Ollila had 66 kilograms (145 pounds) in the Snatch and 84 kilograms (194 pounds) in the Clean-and-Jerk for a combined weight of 150 kilograms (339 pounds), easily surpassing the minimum weight needed to earn a spot in the Youth Nation als. Molano hit 57 kilograms (125 pounds) in the Snatch and 68 kilograms (149 pounds) in the Clean-and-Jerk for a total of 125 kilograms. Even though he came up short of qualifying for Youth Nationals, Boyer is con dent it will happen this month. Carlos was comfortable and condent in his rst compe tition with Iron Jungle, Boyer said. He is a very calm kid and he was cool on the platform. I feel certain that he will qualify later in April for his rst Youth Nationals. The Iron Jungles third rookie, Tony Huang, also stepped up in his rst meet, Boyer said. Lifting at 85 kilograms (187 pounds), Huang hit 66 kilograms (145 pounds) in the Snatch and 88 kilograms (194 pounds) in the Clean-and-Jerk. Tony was very condent in his rst meet, Boyer said. After we sit down and look at the vid eo from his lifts, he will knock out the attempts he missed. I believe Tony has a very high ceiling for this sport. Warren Brown also compet ed, at 77 kilograms, giving Iron Jungle four male lifters in same session for the rst time in club history. For veteran Brown, it was business as usual. He hit on ve of his six attempts, missing only his rst try in the Snatch. Nonetheless, Brown went on to establish a personal record Iron Jungle turns in solid performance at Orlando meet PHOTO COURTESY OF JOSH BOYER Morgan Rhone, a member of Iron Jungle Weightlifting, competes during a recent meet in Orlando. Rhone won top honor in the 53 kilogram weight class. SEE IRON | B2 Iron Jungle Weightlifting has been training hard. Our rookies performed well in their first meet and it was great to see each one of our lifters hit personal records. Were continuing to make progress towards our goal of being the best. Iron Jungle coach Josh Boyer

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B2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 16, 2014 HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. Outdoors Fishing 352-365-8268 sports@dailycommercial.com www.dailycommercial.com SOUTHERN TACKLEWORKS | TAVARES Bass have started biting in the mai n portions of the lake on crank baits such as Rat-L-Traps and soft plastic worms in June bug and green pumpkin. Crappie are biting in the deep parts of the lakes on pink and chartreuse jigs tipped with min nows. Shell cracker are starting to bite on yellow tail worms, grass shrimp and crickets. Dick Fon da and Matt Gee won the Wednes day night tournament with a big bass weighing 6.28 pounds and a total weight of 9-plus pounds. The Wednesday night open bass tour nament has resumed with the time change. For anyone interested, it starts at 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday. Sandys bass tournament, open to all, is held monthly on the third Sat urday at the Buzzard Beach ramp. Sandys next regular bass tourna ment will be an open tournament held Saturday with the weigh in at Buzzard Beach at 2:30 p.m.; any questions about the tournament, call the shop at 352-742-0036. PINE ISLAND CAMP | FRUITLAND PARK Stripers are being caught on Dead River on silver spoons and salt wa ter shrimp. Some specks are still be ing picked up on minnows and jigs. Pine Island has a full supply of live baits including grass shrimp as well as a variety of articial baits. PALM GARDENS | TAVARES Specks are still being caught on mostly minnows and some jigs. They are at the edge of the grass and shorelines, and are back in the deeper water. NELSONS FISH CAMP | WEIRSD ALE Bass action has been hot and heavy even with them having moved o ff the beds. They are biting on grass shrimp and black, blue and silver plastic worms. Shellcracker are starting to move in. A few specks are still being caught. BLACK BASS RESORT-FISH CAMP Guests from Michigan have rented a rowboat all week and are catching bass and crappie. Minnow and worm sales still continue to be strong. SORRENTO BAIT AND TACKLE Specks and bass have moved off the beds and out into other areas of the lakes. Try shing the mouths of res idential canals early in the morning and later in the afternoon with shin ers and crank baits like Rat-L-Traps. Crappie are back in open water and biting on tight lined minnow and jig combinations. A few specks and bass are being caught post-spawn in the Apopka-Beauclaire Canal feeding with minnows and shiners. Lots of hybrid bass are being caught in the St. Johns River. Schooling bass are biting at the mouth of the Wekiva River and around the feeder creeks early in the morning on Rat-L-Traps and shiners. Stop in and get the latest daily report. LAKES REPORT a weekly update from CHERYL STALEY-ARCHER rff ntbff ttbf nb ff f r ntb nr nb f fff rf f rf f f rf ntb nr nb f f f f f f with 75 kilograms (165 pounds) in the Snatch and a 92 kilograms (202 pounds) in the Cleanand-Jerk to nish with a total of 167 kilograms (368 pounds). Browns best lift in the Cleanand-Jerk and his total weight also were per sonal records. The clubs two fe male lifters at the meet Morgan Rhone and Alexis Smith also stepped up for the team. Rhone, competing at 53 kilograms (116 pounds) missed on a personal record in the Snatch, but produced a workman-like ef fort of 34 kilograms (74 pounds) in the disci pline. She hit on a per sonal record 55 kilo grams (121 pounds) in the Clean-and-Jerk to nish with 89 kilograms (196 pounds). We are about a third of the way into our cur rent training progres sion, Boyer said. I feel more condent that Morgan will peak and hit career numbers at Youth Nationals, which is how I have designed the training program were are on now. Alexis Smith has con tinued to show more and more condence in her ability, Boyer said. Smith established a new personal record with 39 kilograms (85 pounds) in the Snatch and 50 ki lograms (110 pounds) in the Clean-and-Jerk to nish with 89 kilograms (196 pounds). Boyer said Smith still is short of qualify ing for Youth Nationals, but she has opportuni ties to hit the mark this month. Alexis still doesnt re alize how strong she is, Boyer said. When she does, watch out. For the meet, Rhone took rst place in the 53 kilogram Youth catego ry and Ollila was second at 77 kilograms. Molano was third at 77 kilograms and Smith took second at 75 kilograms and up. Huang was third in the 85-kilogram Junior category and Brown nished second in the 77-kilogram Juniors. Iron Jungle Weight lifting is the only USA Weightlifting club in Lake County. IRON FROM PAGE B1 with his parents on his phone. He didnt recognize Newmans number, but answered it any way, putting his par ents on hold. When I clicked back over, Greene said, I told (my parents) the news. It was a dream come true for me, but my parents were a lit tle bit more emotional than I was. After being draft ed, Greene spent the next ve seasons pitch ing between the rookie leagues and Double-A. Greene produced his best season in 2013 with Trenton in the Dou ble-A Eastern League, where he had an 8-4 re cord with a 3.18 ERA. He also pitched for the Tampa Yankees in the Single-A Florida State League, and was 4-6 with a 3.60 ERA. Greenes combined record in 2013 of 1210 with a 3.38 ERA was good enough to make him the Yankees Mi nor League Pitcher of the Year. He was named to the Florida State League All-Star team in 2013 and was selected as an Organization AllStar by MinorLeague Baseball.com. Greene said he was surprised to get his call to The Show, even with the accolades he re ceived last season and a solid spring training. I thought it was go ing to happen at some point (this year), Greene said. I didnt re ally think it was going to be this early, though. In ve seasons as a professional, Greene has compiled a 24-41 record with a 4.35 ERA. He has struck out 452 batters in 496 innings. He will wear No. 39 with the Yankees. GREENE FROM PAGE B1 FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Former Leesburg Lightning manager Frank Viola has been released from a New York hospi tal a week after heart surgery. The New York Mets made the announcement last, say ing the 53-year-old former ma jor leaguer would rehab at home before rejoining the organiza tion as a minor league pitching coach. Out of hospital, Viola wrote on Twitter on April 9. Thanks again for everyones prayers and well-wishes. Time to get back in rehab mode. Will be back on the eld in the near future. Viola underwent open-heart surgery on April 3 at New York Presbyterian-Weill Cornell Med ical Center after a heart problem was detected during a spring training exam. According to his son, Frank III, doctors per formed surgery on April 2 and Viola spent two days in the hos pitals intensive care unit after ward, per hospital protocol. After noting he had been dis charged from the hospital, Vio la wrote about the support he re ceived as an inpatient. Cant thank Dr. Leonard Gi rardi and Dr. Lawrence Inra, the Wilpons, Sandy, Ray, Chick, Bri an, Jay and everyone else in the organization (enough) for all theyve done, Viola wrote. Girardi is a professor of car diothoracic surgery at New York Presbyterian-Weill Cornell Med ical Center. Inra is a cardiologist in New York. Fred Wilpon, patriarch of the Wilpon family, is the principal owner of the Mets. During his stay in the hospital, Frank Viola III said he, his moth er, Kathy and sisters, Brittany and Kaley, spent a great deal of time at the hospital during Vio las stay. He said his mother and sisters played big roles in the early days of Violas rehab by get ting him up and walking around this hospital. In three seasons with the Lees burg Lightning, which included the 2008, 2009 and 2010 seasons, Viola led the Florida Collegiate Summer League franchise to two FCSL championship games. The Lightning won the 2009 title un der his leadership, beating the Clermont Mavericks 5-1. After being drafted by the Minnesota Twins in the second round of the 1981 Major League Baseball Draft, Viola made his major league debut in 1982. He pitched for the Twins until 1989, winning the 1987 World Series Most Valuable Player award and the 1988 American League Cy Young Award. In 15 seasons, Viola compiled a 176-150 record with a 3.73 Ex-Lightning skipper discharged from hospital following open-heart surgery SEE VIOLA | B3

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Wednesday, April 16, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B3 CLERMONT BLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSAMILYELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time! IRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONTL Many Other Activities each week Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.org LIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLCHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm SOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary); 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.org ST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am (Rite I) 10:00 am (Rite II) 5:00 pm (Praise & Worship) Sunday School Youth Group Nursery Adult Bible Study Womens Bible Study Mens Prayer Breakfast WOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH GODINCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALE ERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for Children Groveland IRSTBAPTISTCHURCH GROVELAND Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pm MT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! MINNEOLA CONGREGATIONSMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club NEWLPRESBYTERIANCHURCH18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am TLIVINGGOD Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce Rowland MONTVERDE WOODLANDSLUTHERAN15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 am OAKLAND PRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforSouth Lake South LakeGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOMErfn tbt352-394-7121806 W. Minneola Ave.,Clermont,FL Cremation ChoicesDirect Cremation$675Plus Container Ron Becker,Director352-394-8228921 S.US Hwy 27,Minneola,FL ERA. After leaving the Twins in a trade during the 1989 season, Vio la pitched for the Mets, Boston, Cincinnati and Toronto before retiring in 1996. After that, Vio la coached at Orlan do Lake Highland Prep where he won a Florida High School Athletic As sociation state champi onship. His minor league coaching career began in 2011 when the Mets hired him to work with the Brooklyn Cyclones, the teams Single-A short-season franchise. He spent 2012 and 2013 seasons with the Sin gle-A Savannah Sand Gnats in the South At lantic League. In 2013, Viola was named Coach of the Year in the South Atlan tic League. In January, Viola was named pitching coach for the Las Vegas 51s, the Mets Triple-A afl iate in the Pacic Coast League. Ofcials with the Mets have said Vio la will join the 51s once doctors are satised he has completed the re habilitation process. VIOLA FROM PAGE B2 LC HOOPS HONORS REFEREE PHOTO COURTESY OF ALEX LUDICK Miguel Carrion, center, holds Jim Frana Award, presented to one of the top volunteers in Lake County Hoops, a recreational basketball league based in Clermont. The award is named for Jim Frana, a longtime LC Hoops member, who died in 2012. Standing with Carrion are, from left, Alex Ludick, co-founder of the organization and its current director, and Franas son, Trevor. LC Hoops recently celebrated its 20th anniversary. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Lake Minneola boys basketball coach Freddie Cole wanted to cre ate something that would help his teams 2013-14 season live on far past the nal buzzer. After tossing around a variety of ideas, Cole created a T-shirt that would memorialize the Hawks run to the Class 6A state championship game. Now, hes hoping to get the pub lic, particularly Lake Minneola, in terested in buying the shirt before the online store closes after today. Any shirts purchased by then will be printed and shipped directly to cus tomers. The front of the T-shirt is black with Lake Minneola Basketball emblazoned in white, along with an image of a basketball. The back of the shirt is white with -2014, Class 6A, District Champs, 28-4, Re gional Champs, State Runner-up in black lettering, along with the name of each player and coach. The T-shirts come in long and short sleeve and also are available in white, gray and gold. We want to see as many people as possible in our community wearing Hawks basketball shirts, Cole said. The cost of the shirt is $24.99. Add an additional $5 for 3XL and $6 for 4XL. Personalized shirts also can be or dered for $30. To order a Lake Minneola boys basketball commemorative T-shirt, go to www.bsnsports.com and click on the my team shop logo. Then click log in now and use the access code hawks4RH. Lake Minneola looks to keep 2013-14 season memories alive

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B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 16, 2014 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 7 25 34 47 67 13 18 31 59 74 9 21FREE SPACE53 72 2 16 42 48 63 5 29 39 52 68ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N I B O G BINGO B I N G O SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Thi-Anna Hunter WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! O 74 O 72 O 63 O 68 O 67

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Ann Dupee REMEMBER WHEN A weekly column that reprints some of the more interesting news stories that have appeared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press. C1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 16, 2014 www.southlakepress.com C OMMUNITY Proudly serving CLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWS STAFF WRITER ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 EMAIL ..... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com HOMETOWN: Clermont OCCUPATION: Student FAMILY: Parents, John and Di anne Garvis, and brother, Gregory John Garvis What do you enjoy most about south Lake County? The beautiful hills and small-town community of caring people. 1) If you had to summarize your philosophy of life in one sen tence, what would it be? Ephesians 15:10: But by the grace of God I am what I am.... 2) Name a person or incident youve come across recently thats touched you in some way. Why did this person or incident impress you so much? Childrens author/artist Betty Ann Hutchens. She recently was here donating her time and talent to the extreme makeover of Kid dieland Academy. While spending three days with her, my heart was touched by this 79-year-old hid den American treasure who has traveled the world reaching out to those in need. Her books were all written as gifts for poor commu nities and orphanages in places such as Mongolia. I pray that my heart will always use my talents as she does to give back. 3) How does what you do contrib ute to the welfare of the area? As a member of the Garvis family, who are the founders of the Good Neighbor Program, and as corporal in Orlando Devil Dogs, Young Ma rines program, I spend most of my free time giving back by volunteer ing, from handing out over 2,000 blankets to our neighbors in need this past winter and helping with the extreme makeover of Kiddieland FROM THE FILES | 25 YEARS AGO 1989 Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press Meet Your NEIGHBOR SARAH ANNE GARVIS NEW JAIL DESIGN CONTAINS 1,000 BEDS Plans for the new Lake County jail are for a 1,000-bed facility ver sus the 600-bed facili ty planned previously. Each building will have four levels consisting of two pods. Twenty-eight beds are planned for the medical facility, 24 beds for isolation and an area for mini mum-security inmates. Construction will begin in March of 1990 with an expected comple tion date of April 1992. The new justice building has not been designed and no time table is available. The jail and justice building will have underground access. NEWS OF NOTE The 30-acre DeSisto at Howey High School property was sold back to the original owner at the Lake County Court house in Tavares. Mort gage holder, The C.V. Grifn, Sr. Foundation, gave the highest bid at $200,000. Lake County Com missioners unani mously approved hav ing the county attorney draft an ordinance that will require risk warn ing signs be posted throughout the county wherever alcoholic bev erages are sold. Grand Reopening: Contoured Body lo cated in the Clermont Shopping Center, cor ner of State Road 50 and Bloxam Avenue. New Owners: Barbara Lam bert and Sue Cerilli. Clermont Minne ola Lions Club held a special 40th anniver sary celebration din ner at the Citrus Tow er Restaurant March 25. Joe Janusiak is Head Lion. His wife, Frances, is also a Lion and works two days a week at the SL Press. NAMES IN THE NEWS Girl Scout Junior Troop 564 camped at Woodlands Luther an Campground. Even though the weather forecast was wonder ful, it did rain at night. Leaders are Barba ra Watson and Barba ra Northcutt. Scouts are Cara Northcutt, Tiffa ny Beighley, Kelly Gra ham, Kelly Hateld, Ha ley Jones, Erica Walker, Kristin Watson and Melanie Horton. Former Lake Coun ty Sheriff Willis McCall (1945-72) recently com pleted and published his own illustrated au tobiography. The candlelight wed ding of Miss Nan cy Jones to First Lieu tenant David Lee Clutts took place at the First United Method ist Church sanctuary. (Mrs. Clutts is a former mayor of Tavares.) Receiving all A grades at Clermont Elementary School were rst graders Andrea Asmann, Brandy SEE GARVIS | C2 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com T o ge t a sense of how the new owner of Lake Square Mall hopes to breathe new life into the struggling shopping cen ter in Leesburg, it helps to look around the Unit ed States at some of the 13 other malls under the um brella of Kohan Retail In vestment Group. A glance at those Kohan properties reveals an in teresting, somewhat un orthodox strategy that fea tures a mix of traditional anchor stores and retail outlets, but also a heavy dose of entertainment as well as a sprinkling of gov ernment, non-prot and political hubs meant to at tract non-shoppers who might not otherwise ven ture inside. The nearby Crystal Riv er Mall is one such build ing that Kohan has trans formed into a community space that uses events to draw people there. Kohan bought the mall in Crystal River two years ago, according to Millie Bresnahan, the manager at the Crystal River Mall. Citrus County Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Josh Wooten said Ko han bought the mall out of foreclosure. They essentially bought a distressed piece of prop erty, Wooten said. Mike Kohan, head of the company, said he tries to make malls destinations. You got to give them a hope, and you got to give them a reason to come and shop in this mall, and thats what Im trying to do, Kohan said. The Crystal River Mall has a Disabled American Veterans chapter and a putt-putt golf course and also hosts a farmers mar ket, according to Bresnah an and the Kohan Retail In vestment Groups website. Wooten said the Crys tal River Mall under Kohan UNIQUE STORES While its commonplace to see stores like Hallmark, Radio Shack and Foot Locker in malls, which Kohans properties have, the company also has an eclectic group of tenants not usually seen in indoor shopping venues Driving school United States Postal Service branch Dance academy Two churches Red Cross bingo room A virtual school County Republican club head quarters Goodwill ofce A Court Appointed Special Advocates ofce to help local children caught up in the legal system Inside a Kohan mall Lake Square Mall owner uses unorthodox methods to attract patrons The Crystal River Mall has a miniature golf course and other entertainment in what used to be an anchor store in Crystal River. PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL The Crystal River Malls food court is a tented area in the center of the mall in Crystal River. SEE MALL | C2 SEE HISTORY | C2

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C2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 16, 2014 AT TIMESBY PATRICK BERRY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZNo. 0406RELEASE DATE: 4/13/2014 ACROSS1 Improvisational music4 Brick color10 Bibliographical abbr.14 Indigenous people known for their tattoos19 NPR journalist Shapiro20 1986 girls-name song by Boston21 Catch-22 profiteer Minderbinder22 DuPont trademark of 194123 Clumsy pharmacist, at times?26 Easily misled27 String section members28 Dressage rider, at times?30 Smidgen31 Suffix with social34 ___ suit35 Maintain36 Grant for a filmmaker?38 Indonesian tourist haven39 London ___ (British Ferris wheel)40 Reminiscent of41 Tucked away42 Some supplies for Hersheys44 Overzealous sorts47 Old-fashioned barber, at times?49 Missile launched at Goliath51 National Book Mo.53 Circus performer Kelly54 Inexperienced shucker, at times?58 Low pair60 Out of fashion61 Subject of a van Gogh series62 Software users shortcut65 No-limit Texas holdem player, at times?69 People may be down on them70 TWA competitor71 Dual-sport athlete Sanders72 Answers that may anger74 Farmer, at times?78 Unfettered82 Knowledge83 Shall we proceed?84 Sleeping sunbather, at times?87 Buyers final figure90 Spirits in Scandinavia91 New Haven alum92 Breaks down93 Stanford rival, informally95 Job everyone wants96 Sound at a horror film97 Florentine dynasty name100 Cut that out!101 West African vegetable102 Double-handed cooking vessel103 Dieter, at times?106 Fall stopper109 French : merci :: German : ___110 Person getting out of a tub, at times?114 Transpire115 Memo opener116 Detestable117 Something that may be amalgamated118 Manual parts?119 Giants or Titans120 Porcelain purchase, perhaps121 As matters stand DOWN1 Entrance side2 Department3 Current location?4 Brought to tears, possibly5 Times Arrow novelist Martin6 Took off7 Wedded8 Unconventional9 Person moving against traffic?10 Bring on11 Go quietly12 Fully attentive13 Some hand-medowns?14 Snowboard relative15 Polluted Asian lake16 Peridot color17 Vehicle on Mars18 Lifeless24 Goodness me!25 Exudes29 Less humble31 One of four in As I Was Going to St. Ives32 Problematic roomie33 Sal of Rebel Without a Cause36 Lunch spot37 Thing that might decay38 Bearded comic strip bully40 Old cavalrymen42 Illustrations, e.g.43 In need of spicing up, say44 ---. ... .45 News analyst Roberts46 Word on a clapperboard48 Like some measuring units49 Right away50 Its got problems52 Valrys very55 Disburse56 Goes to court?57 Offensive line striker59 Melancholy62 Flood residue63 Ghostly64 The Ipcress File star, 196566 ___ cest moi67 Told stories68 Way too thin73 Not a single thing?75 Blue76 Diminish77 Opposite of smooth79 Take by surprise80 Mud ___ (bottom-dwelling fish)81 Total bore85 Slurpee flavor86 Supermodel Heidi88 Dress in fancy duds89 Long-eared dogs, informally90 Reshape93 Fuerza Democrtica Nicaragense member94 Its played in ballparks96 Viscous substance97 PC platform of old98 Ratify99 The Harlem Shake or the Dougie100 One of the Allman Brothers102 Flick site?104 Expiration notice105 Fundamental part106 Modelists need107 Julio-Claudian dynasty ruler108 Attracted111 Horatian ___112 Hamm of soccer113 Signal that replaced CQD 123 456789 101112131415161718 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31323334 35 3637 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 4546 47 48 4950 5152 53 5455 5657 58 59 60 61 626364 65666768 69 70 71 7273 74 75 7677 78 798081 82 83 848586 878889 90 91 92 9394 95 96 979899 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107108 109 110 111112113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Solution to puzzle on D4 has been very commu nity oriented. They have catered more to mom and pops to ll up some of the spaces and they put in a miniature putt-putt, Wooten said. Bresnahan said the mom and pop stores in the Crystal River Mall are there partly to ll the malls vacancies but also for their communi ty impact. Weve kind of tak en the thinking of, you know, its the Crystal River Mall, but its also a community space. Its a place to gather. Its a place to do things, she said. Rural King has re cently bought an an chor store at the Crystal River Mall, Bresnahan said. Crystal River Mayor Jim Farley agreed that the Crystal River Mall has a hometown feel. Theres malls all over the country and not taking anything away from them, but theyre mostly chain stores and ... I dont think you get the hometown feel that you get in our mall with the mom and pop stores, Farley said. He added the mall has been transforming under Kohan. Several months ago, before we even knew that Rural King was coming in, people were crying the blues to some degree, say ing the mall was dying, and they didnt want to see that happen. And I said publicly that the mall is not dying, that its simply in the pro cess of reinventing it self. I think that was true then and its even more true now, he said. Bresnahan said the Crystal River Mall tries to do one large event each month and to offer entertainment weekly. For right now, its very important. Its whats helping us, you know, sustain. Its keeping people aware that we are in business. You know, just because we lost a Belk or we lost a Sears, were still here, Bresnahan said. Kohan agreed the events are, very, very important because they drive trafc into the mall. You got to give them a reason. You cant just advertise and say, OK, come and shop in Crystal River or come and shop (at the) Lake Square Mall. Youve got to have a reason for them to come in, Ko han said. When they know theres a band thats playing on Sat urday, so they bring the kids, they bring the wife, their fami ly, and everybody, and they (are) just making it a fun day for them selves. Bresnahan believes that Lake Square Mall should adopt some of the strategies em ployed by Crystal River. They should do the farmers market, she said, and that can be done inside, where you can attract people in, out of the sun, and they also shop at the same time. It benets all of your stores. A food truck event also attracted 4,500 people, she said. They all came in the mall and shopped. She added that she tries to involve the malls stores in the events. We just did a prom fashion show, and so our tuxedo-prom shop did all the dresses and tuxedos for that, she said. The Crystal River Mall also has a weekly dance event that draws about 80 participants, she said. Lake Square Mall General Manager Jen nifer Glidewell said the mall will eventually fol low Crystal Rivers lead with regard to events. Wooten believes Ko han has brought value back to the mall. I would certain ly give them props for taking what, as I said, was a distressed as set with major tenants leaving and turning it into something that is of value to the commu nity, Wooten said. Already, new tenants are beginning to ll up vacant space. The mall recently nalized negotiations with Cuba Pichys Cui sine, Dunkin Donuts, Mammas Pizza Ex press, and Boba Gal axy Smoothies. Cuba Pichys Cuisine will be a ne-dining Cuban restaurant in the space that once housed Gar elds restaurant, and the Dunkin Donuts store will be in a space that formerly housed a KFC. Glidewell said the smoothie store will be near the Books-AMillion, and the piz za restaurant will be in the space that formerly housed Sbarro. The gross leas able area at the Lake Square Mall, including out-parcels, is 559,000 square feet, accord ing to Glidewell. Gross leasable space in the mall itself is 520,177 square feet. BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL The outside of Crystal River Mall is shown. KOHAN RETAIL INVESTMENT GROUPS MALLS Tulsa Promenade, Tulsa, Okla (98 stores) Crystal River Mall (40 stores) Southshore mall, Aberdeen, Wash. (27 stores) Warren Mall, Warren, Ohio (13 stores) Mayberry Mall, Mount Airy, N.C. (23 stores) Village Square Mall, Efngham, Ill. (42 stores) Nebraska City Outlet Mall, Nebraska City, Neb. (12 stores) Story City Outlet Mall, Story City, Iowa (21 stores) Graceville Outlet Mall, Graceville (12 stores) Tifn Mall, Tifn, Ohio (32 stores) Rotterdam Square Mall, Albany, N.Y. (90 stores) Northland Mall, Worthington, Minn. Trumball Plaza, Warren, Ohio MALL FROM PAGE C1 Haycock, Jenna Caldwell, Maya Coley, John Costigan, Kathryn Grant, Katie Hays, Chad Mathe son, Amanda Pederson, Emily Per rin, Jade Pillsbury, Amy Reedy, Daniel Revell, Matthew Seymour and Dana Tauten. Clermont High Schools Chris tie Surin turned in a master ful pitching performance with a one-hit shutout over Groveland High at Clermonts West Park. Paul Halstead had a triple cel ebration of his 103rd birthday. South Lake Presbyterian Church members shared a cake, baked by Sue and Pete Joiner. Clermont Kiwanis Club also shared a cake and ice cream with Paul, a club member, at its weekly meeting and the actual day, March 29, was shared with family members. Betty Zelman and Bob Eyerly are Green Valley Country Clubs new Club Champions. For the second time in three months, bad weather demol ished the screened pool enclo sure of Bonnie and Charles Davis on County Road 565B. HISTORY FROM PAGE C1 Academy in Groveland to teaching 10 seminars at local schools on drug demand awareness. 4) Name one of your greatest accomplish ments so far. I have been blessed to have been dual-en rolled in college since the age of 13. I earned my associate degree at the age of 15 and now am in my third semester of my fourth year at Faith Christian University. I will earn my B.A. in Bible and theology before I gradu ate from high school. I am also a corporal recently promoted in a pinning ceremony at the top of the Empire State Building -in the Young Marines program and in March, was se lected as a delegate to the United Nations. 5) Whats something youve always wanted to do but havent yet? I love the ocean and would love to learn to surf. 6) What advice would you give to people who want to help out in the community? My mom always says, if people simply open their eyes a little wider, tune in their ears a lit tle sharper, they will see and hear the needs of those around them. Simply nd a way to reach out helping one person each day. This can be as simple as a smile, note of encour agement, mentoring, clothing and feeding neighbors in need. The opportunities are end less. GARVIS FROM PAGE C1

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Wednesday, April 16, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C3 15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.comOur 2012-2013 VPK readiness rate is a 100!We offer 2-, 3and 4-year old preschool programs, including VPK. 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PHILIPLUTHERANCHURCH1050 Boyd Dr. Mt. Dora, FL(across from Kathys Greenhouse Grill)352-383-5402 Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) Thank you for reading the local newspaper, the South Lake Press ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com An alternative name for what now is being called The Celebration Center in Clermont is still up in the air, but the citys name on the structure might turn out to be decisive. So far, thats the con sensus of many resi dents and city ofcials as they continue de bating the 140 suggest ed names for the former Celebration of Praise church property pur chased by Clermont in December for use as a community center. According to city re cords, 82 of those sug gesting names ex pressed their wish that Clermont be includ ed in the name of the center, 15 wanted to in clude Gem of the Hills or Gem in the name and 15 wanted to keep the word Celebration or Celebrate. City spokesperson Doris Bloodsworth, whose background in cludes marketing, gave city commissioners a few things to think about last week as they decide on the new name. She said a num ber of people wanted to include Summit, Hill or Mountain in the name and that some wanted the building named after a person, either living or dead. Clear is better than clever, she said. Clear is the new sexy because, unless you have Nikes marketing budget, its often better to choose a name that says what you are. The police sta tion will always be the Clermont Police Sta tion. So, with that said, you may want to con sider a name such as The Clermont Cen ter for Culture & Rec reation. If you choose a name that doesnt in clude Clermont, or de nes what the build ing is, just know that it will take more time for the name to catch on, and that opportunities will be lost when peo ple search on Google or other search engines for recreation or Cler mont facilities. Bloodsworth also rec ommended that a name should stand the test of time, noting that South Clermont or sim ilar locater names, such as South Annex, may change if population increases grow to the south. If people feel strongly about the name Gem of the Hills, because it has such long ties to the city, then that could be used when naming something like the facil itys performance hall, Bloodsworth suggested. The three most pop ular names suggest ed were Clermont Civic Center, Clermont Com plex and Celebrate Cl ermont Center, Blood sworth said. Mayor Hall Turville wasnt excited about any of them. He suggested the names City of Cler mont South Annex, or The City of Clermont Multiplex and agreed the word Clermont needs to be included in the name. Keith Mullins said hed like to see the main facility named after its main function The Clermont Arts and Rec reation Center with individual names for each center or inside fa cility. The discussion was tabled until May 13, to go along with the dis cussion of a what fees might be charged for use of the associated recreational facilities, such as the swimming pool and event hall. Recreations Direc tor Dave Teske also pre sented the council with a preliminary fee sched ule overview as suggest ed by city staff based on a determination of what similar centers charge. Membership fees, Teske said, may include $1 per day membership fee for residents. Suggested weekly passes would be $5, monthly would be $15, individual season pass would be $40 and family pass (for as many as ve) on a seasonal basis would be $120 for six months. Tentatively, Teske said the season for the pool would probably be June 7 to Sept 28. The center is sched uled to open on June 7 with an ofcial rib bon-cutting celebration on June 6. CLERMONT Whats in a new name? According to city records, 82 of those suggesting names expressed their wish that Clermont be included in the name of (The Celebration Center), 15 wanted to include Gem of the Hills or Gem in the name and 15 wanted to keep the word Celebration or Celebrate.

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Wednesday, April 16, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C5 Join us for Holy Week at South LakePalm Sunday, April 13th9:00 amContemporary, 11:00 amTraditionalMaundy Thursday, April 17th7:00 pm Communion ServiceEaster Sunday, April 20th9:00 amContemporary, 11:00 amTraditionalSouth Lake Presbyterian Church131 Chestnut Street Clermont, Fl 34711 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com People, like South Lake Chamber of Com merce Membership Di rector Ray Villegas, who have eagerly been an ticipating the arrival of Clermonts own Wawa for months, can breathe easy because on Thurs day, its doors opened. I am looking forward to the hoagies, the soft pretzels, the smoothies and just the great qual ity service that I experi enced there (at Wawa) when I lived in the Phil adelphia area, Villegas said. The store has been teasing us, just sitting there looking like its al most ready to open like that. The time is nally here, he said. The grand opening of the store, located at 1929 S. Highway 27 in Cler mont, included a char itable hoagie-building competition Hoa gies for Heroes be tween members of the Clermont Police and the City of Clermont Fire Department, and free coffee to the public for the rst 10 days the store is open. Jeff Pipes, gener al manager of the Cler mont Wawa store, will lead a team of nearly 60 associates. Wawa store will offer customers numerous Wawa brands, such as Wawa coffee (195 mil lion cups sold annual ly); the Sizzli, Wawas hot breakfast sandwich; Wawas new line of spe cialty beverages (hot, cold, iced and frozen); Wawa Bakery; Wawas built-to-order hoagies (80 million sold annu ally); and Wawas bever age line of dairy prod ucts, juices and teas. The Clermont store is the fourth Wawa to open in 2014. The com pany plans to open 45 new stores. Wawa, Inc., a private ly held company, be gan in 1803 as an iron foundry in New Jer sey. Toward the end of the 19th Century, own er George Wood took an interest in dairy farming and the family began a small processing plant in Wawa, Pa, in 1902. The milk business was a huge success, due to its quality, cleanliness and certied process. As home delivery of milk declined in the early 1960s, Grahame Wood, Georges grand son, opened the rst Wawa Food Market in 1964 as an outlet for dairy products. A chain of more than 635 convenience retail stores (over 365 offering gasoline), Wawa stores are located in Pennsyl vania, New Jersey, Dela ware, Maryland and Vir ginia and as of July of 2012, Central Florida. CLERMONT Wawa to open Thursday MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millardives@dailycommercial.com Thousands showed up to celebrate some of the Souths favor ite foods on Saturday at the annual Planes, Trains & BBQ in Woo ton Park in Tavares. From ribs, pork and brisket to deep-fried bacon and Devils Blood hot sauce, pork lovers had their choice. A big focus of the day were the 28 bar becue vendors who showed up for the Florida B-B-Q Asso ciation-sanctioned event. These includ ed: Ring of Fire, Back yard Brothers, Smoked Butt BBQ and Big Pa pas Country Kitchen. Its all about us ing the right grill, said Charlie Hall, of Smoked Butt, using a Lang grill, heated with wood. For $5 each, more than 200 people wad dled through the line to pick up a tiny cup of barbecue from pans, which didnt identify the cook, then voting for the barbecue they liked the best. It took taster John Lamb about two min utes to get through all the pork samples, but he made it clear none tasted the same. They all have a dis tinct southern avor, he said. There also was plen ty of entertainment, including an air show, seaplane rides, a vin tage car show and live TAVARES Barbecue draws crowds to Wooton Park musical acts. The live air show was comprised of four acts, including perform er Patty Wagstaff, a sixtime member of the U.S. Aerobatic Team and winner of gold, sil ver and bronze med als. She thrilled audi ences with complex daredevil stunts such as eight-point rolls and death-defying rollovers in her Extra-300S plane. Her stunts reached speeds up to 250 mph and heights of about 3,000 feet and left smoke loops and lines in the air that garnered several oohs and aahs from the crowd gathered in the park and on nearby streets. You dont even have to be there to enjoy it, said Thomas Lang, watching the show from nearby Caroline Avenue. In addition to the ae rial exhibitions, the U.S. Special Ops Parachute Team executed preci sion freefall parachute maneuvers. Back this year was a train ride where dozens of residents climbed aboard the Orange Blos som Cannonball and watched a staged rob bery complete with cowboys and bad guys. The live air show was comprised of four acts, including performer Patty Wagstaff, a sixtime member of the U.S. Aerobatic Team and winner of gold, silver and bronze medals. She thrilled audiences with complex daredevil stunts such as eight-point rolls and deathdefying rollovers in her Extra-300S plane.

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C6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 16, 2014 Psychic Services A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services 352-431-9481Residential / Commercial rfnfftbrftb f Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Handyman Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. 5% Off Any Svc. under $1,000 $150 Off Any Svc. $2,000 or more $75 Off Any Svc. $1,000 or moreLawn Maintenance, Hardscape, Patios, Retaining Walls, Maint., SoddingLeesburg 536-3708 Landscaping Services Lawn Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Painting Services Pressure Cleaning Restaurants rr fntbnntnt r Airport Transportation Shower Doors Service Veterinarian Services Enclosure Screening Fencing Services Window Services Handyman Services Marine Services Cleaning Services Affordable Home Repair, LLC rffnn tbb nn352-551-6073 Electrical Services Free Est.Lic. & Ins.ntnt rfn ftb Concrete Services Roofing Services To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact Michelle in the Classified Department at (352) 365-8233 or by email michelle.fuller@dailycommercial.com Tree Service Home Improvement Plumbing Services b b

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Wednesday, April 16, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D1 Classified IndexLegal Notices....................0001 Notices............................1000 At Your Service................9000 Employment....................2000 Pets/Animals....................6865 Merchandise....................6000 Real Estate/For RENT......3000 Real Estate/For SALE........4000 Recreation........................7000 Transportation..................8000 Cancellations for ads running Wednesday must be made by 4pm Monday.ADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since The Daily Commercial will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error call the classified department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error.TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde

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D2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 16, 2014 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance r t t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital

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Wednesday, April 16, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D3 Untitled art#: order#: 6 X 5 Black Call the South Lake Press to get your ad in! 394-2183

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D4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 16, 2014 Untitled art#: order#: 5 X 11.25 Black Untitled art#: order#: 2 X 4 Black 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr J A M M A R O O N E T A L M A O R I A R I A M A N D A M I L O O R L O N M E D I C I N E D R O P P E R N A I V E B A S S E S C O L T R E V O L V E R T A D I S M Z O O T A S S E R T C A R Y B A L I E Y E L I K E A T E A L M O N D S M A N I A C S F O A M R U B B E R S T O N E O C T E M M E T T O Y S T E R C R A C K E R T W O S P A S S E S E I N E M A C R O A L L B E T T E R K N E E S U S A I R D E I O N S A S S C H I C K E N T E N D E R L O O S E D K E N R E A D Y B A C K B U R N E R N E T C O S T A B S O L U T E L I R O T S C A L P L U M G A S P M E D I C I D O N T Y A M W O K S N A C K C O U N T E R G R O U N D D A N K E B A T H R O O M S L I P P E R O C C U R I N R E O D I O U S O R E S T E P S T E A M T E A S E T N O W Solution to puzzle on C2



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LIVI STANFORD| Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comAs he prepares to make a proposal to take over Lake Countys Animal Ser vices, Sheriff Gary Bor ders is looking at how other sheriffs ofces are doing that job. If county commissioners approve the proposal at a later commission meeting, Lake will become the eighth county in Flor ida where the sheriffs ofce oversees animal services. Brevard County plans to hand over its animal services to the sheriff by Oct. 1, while Bradford, Dixie, Hendry, Martin, Polk, Putnam and Sarasota counties already have such arrangements in place. Lake County Commissioner Leslie Campione discussed the idea at Tuesdays commission meeting as a way to improve all operations at the shelter, including customer service and animal registration, while addressing animal over population, hiring a rescue coordinator, lowering the euthanization rate and increasing the adoption rate. The proposal comes after the head of the Animal Services division recently announced her resignation, citing a tight budget and public pressure over the departments euthanization rate. Cyndi Nason was the second director of Animal Services to resign within the past year. SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | C1SPORTS:MDB trio invited to football camp WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWST AND INSIDE CLASSIFIED D1 CROSSWORDS C2 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN C1 SPORTS B1 VOICES A4WORD ON THE STREE T A2SOUTH LAKE PRESSV OLUME 99, NO. 16 5 SECTIOn N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reservedwww. southlakepress.comPRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID TAVARES PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL A dog waits to be adopted at Lake County Animal Services in Tavares on Wednesday. A worker at Lake County Animal Services rells a waterbowl. Sheriffs offices in Florida taking on animal control dutiesGoing to the dogs MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillardives@dailycommercial.comThe Lake County Sher iffs Ofce said they have identied a man seen at an Ocoee Walmart with a woman whose body was found two days lat er in Clermont. The man appeared to be walking with Cheri Amber Houston, 28, at the store at 6:15 / p .m. on April 2. Lt. John Herrell, sher iffs spokesman, said detectives received callin tips of the mans identity after the media ran pictures of him starting Wednesday. Herrell would not re veal if detectives have located or talked with the man, who has only been labeled as some one detectives want to speak with regarding Houstons disappear ance. Herrell did say the mans vehicle has been positively identi ed and crime scene investigators are currently processing it. Houston was found on the morning of April 4 near the intersection of Hancock and Hartwood Marsh roads. A woman walking her dog discovered the body in a wooded area about 300 feet from the inter section. Detectives believe the body had been there less than 24 hours and have not said how she died. Houston was a transient and over the past 8-10 weeks had moved from Miami to Nashville, on to North Car olina, and then to the Atlanta area before coming to the Orlan do area, detectives said. They believe Houston, who is from Newnan, Ga., had been in the Ocoee and Winter Gar den areas along the Highway 50 corridor since March 31. Detectives also said they learned he wom an has a history of drug abuse. Anyone with information can call the Lake County Sheriffs Of ce at 352-343-2101, or Central Florida CRIME LINE at 1-800-423TIPS, where callers may remain anonymous.CLERMONTDetectives ID man with woman before body found LAKE COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE This man was seen with Cheri Amber Houston on April 2 at an Ocoee Walmart, two days before her lifeless body was found. LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comFacing tough budget decisions ahead, several Lake County commissioners said they are left with two options: raise taxes or cut services. There has not been a tax increase in the last ve years, county ofcials said. We knew this day was going to come and we have cut and cut and there is nowhere else, County Commissioner Welton Cadwell said. We are in a position where we have to pro vide the basic services. We dont want public safety to suffer, so Taxes may be needed to fill budget gaps BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Ambulances await repairs in the garage of Lake Emergency Medical Services in Leesburg on Thursday.SEE SHERIFF | A2SEE BUDGET | A3

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 16, 2014Nason and Marjorie Boyd both resigned amid pressure from animal activists who claim the shelter was putting down too many animals. Before Nason took the position last May, two critical internal audits in April 2013 cited at least 45 areas for improvement at the shelter. Some of the primary recommendations involved improved record keeping and better care of animals. Brian Sheahan, director of the Department of Community Safety and Compliance, and Nasons boss, said euthanizations have been reduced and, in the last six months, there has been no euthanizations of adoptable dogs. But the public criticism is only a partial reason for the resignations, county ofcials said, pointing to funding issues that kept the county from hiring a eld supervisor and rescue coordinator to help take the pressure off the director. County commissioners agreed in a meeting on March 11 to delay funding those positions until Oct. 1. Campione, who proposed the position be lled immediately, said she believed some commissioners decided to stop listening altogether about the importance of lling the position. Even so, Campione said with the sheriffs help, the county could overcome problems at the shelter. I dont think he is getting involved unless he can do a great job with this, she said. Commissioner Sean Parks said while the proposal needs to be vetted, it is equally important to have spay and neutering programs in place. The sheer number of animals in Animal Ser vices will not go away without comprehensive spay and neutering programs, he said. In her proposal, Campione said there are discussions about the potential for expanding the countys spay and neutering program in partnership with the South Lake Animal League. In October 2013, the county implemented a spay and neutering program that gives residents a $50 rebate if they spay or neuter an animal. While in support of the proposal, Commissioner Tim Sullivan said he wanted to weigh the costs involved in the turnover before making a nal decision. If he can meet (our) expectations and standards, and do it in a less costly way than it is costing us, it makes perfect sense, he said. Last month, the Brevard County Commission approved a plan to have the sheriff take over its animal services department, which was bogged down with funding issues and high turnover rates in management, ofcials said. Venetta Valdengo, assistant county manager for Brevard County, said the commission reached its decision because the sheriff could provide better training, improve the centers image and work closely with law enforcement. There has been a lot of turnover of management here, she said, explaining that public criticism also was a factor in their resignations. In Bradford County, Sheriffs Ofce ofcials said they have been in charge of animal services for at least nine years. It costs about $104,200 to run the shelter annually. Capt. Carol Starling, who oversees animal con trol for Bradford, said the ofce has two employees, with one general manager running the shelter. The manager has been in the position for at least seven years, Starling said. Bradford County Animal Services is a member of the Florida Animal Control Association. Starling said the ofce has received few complaints about euthanizations and makes clear to residents the facility is not a humane society. We are part of an animal control operation to keep the public safe, she said. We do everything in our power and work diligently with rescue groups to save as many animals as we can. The county does not have a rescue coordinator position, she said, explaining they are a much smaller county in comparison to Lake. Inmates sentenced to the jail in a trustee status play an important role in helping reduce operational costs, Starling said. Two are responsible for all the cleaning and feeding of the animals, Starling said, saving the county from having to hire additional help. For the month of February, the shelter received 30 animals of which nine were euthanized, representing 30 percent of the animal population for the month. In Lake, the annual live release rate for dogs was 77 percent and 31 percent for cats in 2012, according to an internal audit conducted on the department in 2013. In 2013, the live release rate increased 10 percent for dogs and three per cent for cats. Similar to Bradford, Sarasota took over Animal Services in 1994, as they viewed the sheriffs ofce as more of an enforcement agency, according to Wendy Rose, public information ofcer for the Sarasota Sher iffs Ofce. Rose said the euthanization rates for adoptable animals are 5 percent. Steve Shank, a member of the Mist Animal Rescue, wrote in an email message, his biggest concern is the person who is hired to manage the everyday operations of the facility. Repeatedly making the wrong selection as to who runs our shelter will result in no improvement, continued discontentment among the workforce and public, unremitting killing of adoptable pets and a waste of taxpayer money, he wrote. CLERMONT Pre-GED language arts classes to be held at libraryThe Cooper Memorial Library in Clermont is offering free pre-GED classes designed for those who left school before the eighth grade and now want to go back and complete a GED. This program will provide extra help with basic reading and writing skills needed to enter the GED classroom. Classes will run from April 22 to June 19, on Tuesday and Thursday after noons from 1 to 4 / p.m. Registration is required. For information or to register for the program, call Barbara Perry at 352-253-6164 or go to the reference desk on the second oor of Cooper Memorial Library.GROVELAND Relay for Life comes to south Lake on April 25More than 1,000 walkers will walk around the clock on April 25 supporting the battle against cancer when the American Cancer Society Relay for Life of south Lake gets under way at South Lake High School in Groveland at 6 / p .m. Call 800-227-2345 or go to RelayForLife.org.CLERMONT Belk seeking charities to sign up for fundraiserBelk can help you raise funds for your favorite nonprot charity, organization, school or church by taking part in the semiannual Charity Day sale on May 3. Participating charities raise money by selling tickets for $5 each, which entitles purchasers to attend a private four-hour sale offering discounted prices off rarely discounted brands, plus the attendee will receive $5 off their rst purchase using their charity ticket. The entire $5 from every ticket sold goes to the participating charity. Tickets can be purchased by calling the Clermont Belk Store, 270 Citrus tower Blvd., at 352-243-2227, ext. 210.CLERMONT South Lake Animal League to host Puttin Fore PawsJoin us at South Lake Animal Leagues 1st Annual Puttin Fore Paws Golf Tournament from 7:30 / a.m. to 1:30 / p.m. on May 4 at Kings Ridge Golf Club, 1950 Kings Ridge Blvd., in Clermont. The event will begin at 7:30 / a.m. with check-in and breakfast, followed by an 8:30 / a.m. shotgun start. For information or to register, go to www.slal.org/puttinforepaws, email puttinforepaws@slal.org or call 407-340-8698.CLERMONT Mandatory Grant Symposium for future funding on April 22The Community Foundation of South Lake County will be offering a grant symposium at 9 / a.m. on April 22 to explain the foundations new direction. Attendance is required for the meeting held at the Community Foundation ofce, 2150 Oakley Seaver Dr., in Clermont, to apply for future funding. To RSVP for the meeting, call 352394-3818 or email Tiffany Gay at tiffany@cfslc.org.CLERMONT South Lake Junior Womans Club to award scholarshipsThe South Lake Junior Womans Club will be giving away two $500 scholarships this year. One awarded to a high school student that resides in south Lake County and will be attending college this fall. Another award will go to a woman 21 years of age or older who would like to continue her education. For details on qualications, application and deadline, go to www.slwjc. webs.com. For information, email rhonda_ sljwc2011@yahoo.com, aimeeoptimaone@gmail.com or go to facebook. com/sljwc. Area Briefs What south Lake residents are saying about ...POLITICIANSWhat differences do you see between the Republican and Democratic parties at this time?Theres not a lot of dif ferences between the par ties anymore. Theyre both drifting from one extreme to another. I would sup port either party that is an advocate of smaller gov ernment and less bureau cracy. The parties need to cater to their constituents rather than special inter est groups and lobbyists. CHUCK ARNONE CLERMONT The Democrats spend the money now and the Republicans borrow it I guess they both borrow it. PETE BONASKIEWICH CLERMONT At the present time we have huge gaps between the major parties in per formance, morals, honesty. God help us with our present president. PEGGY WEATHERBY CLERMONT I guess I see quite a big difference, even now. Gen erally speaking, the Re publicans are still very conservative and very expensive. They dont want big government because they dont need it. The lit tle guy who needs it is suf fering and is generally represented by the Democrats. BOB BOLLET ALTAMONTE SPRINGS Word on theStreet Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL A cat waits to be adopted at Lake County Animal Services in Tavares on Wednesday. SHERIFF FROM PAGE A1

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Wednesday, April 16, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3 some tough decisions are going to have to be made. Cadwell said the coun tys past practice of tapping into reserves to balance the budget is not a viable option anymore. The only other way is to create additional rev enues, he said. The countys budget has a $7 million short fall because of declin ing property values and an estimated $3 million increase to the Lake County Sheriffs Of ce budget to replace aging vehicles and for pay raises for deputies whose salaries are falling behind other juris dictions, county ofcials said. In order to maintain 7 percent in reserves, that shortfall must be met, according to Stephen Koontz, budget director. Koontz said there could be an effect on any of the services the county provides, including parks and libraries, dependent on what the commission decides. In estimating the scal year 2013-14 budget, Koontz said he has already tak en into account a 3 per cent increase in proper ty values. Whats more, Lake Emergency Medical Services is facing cuts to service beginning in October if the organiza tion has to chop an ad ditional $750,000 to bal ance its budget for scal year 2015. Meanwhile, county ofcials said they are struggling to come up with funding to make needed repairs at coun ty buildings and to re place obsolete technol ogy. With 41 percent of the countys buildings more than 20 years old, the HVAC controls system and IT le servers must be replaced to avoid system and oper ational failures. There is a backlog of $12.2 million in facilities needs, while IT is reporting $950,000 for critical updates to le servers, data storage units and telephone systems. Moreover, county ofcials are also projecting a $450,000 shortfall in the Parks and Storm water Municipal Ser vice Taxing Unit, which levies taxes to fund im provements. In 2012, commission ers voted against the rollback rate, which would have allowed the county to raise tax es to generate the same amount of revenue as in the previous year. If commissioners had voted for the rollback rate, there could have been more revenues in reserves, one county of cial said. We have kind of cut all around the edg es and it may be time where we are going to have to make the deci sion to probably raise taxes or cut services drastically, Commissioner Tim Sullivan said. We put off capital improvements. Putting off some of those de cisions has now come back to haunt us. I dont see any huge increases in revenues coming in without raising taxes. But commissioners Jimmy Conner and Sean Parks said it is premature to speak about tax increases without knowing exactly what the property values will be. Even so, Conner said if the county is forced to raise property taxes in the name of public safe ty, it would be deemed essential. Jerry Smith, executive director of Lake EMS, said he was informed the ambulances allocation, which it receives through the Munici pal Service Taxing Unit, has been reduced by $400,000 for scal year 2014-15 because addi tional funds left over from the Lake-Sumter EMS split have been de pleted. Sumter County dissolved its contract with the organization in 2011. The allocation from the MSTU funds one third of Smiths budget with the ambulance ser vice collecting the remainder of its revenue from user fees, which have not been increasing at anticipated levels. Smith has to replace four truck chassis, 16 LifePaks (known as car diac monitors) and 14 stretchers by 2016. The cardiac monitors are $30,000 apiece, and each stretcher is $14,000. To maintain our state of readiness, our current deployment of 19 ambulances and for capital, Lake EMS needs more than a mil lion in additional revenue, Smith said. One option commis sioners could consider is to raise the MSTU for Lake EMS, Koontz said. If the ambulance or ganization is forced to make cuts, it could result in one or two fewer ambulances on the road, Smith said. BUDGET FROM PAGE A1

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 16, 2014Bring back MuttsI see that your comics page has been slightly revamped. The comic strip Mutts has, I gather, been given the axe. I wish to register my regret for that decision. Mutts is a wonderful comic strip that not only affords an occasional chuckle, but the strips Zen-like qualities lend a sense of peace and goodwill to my mornings. Thats pretty amazing functionality for a mere 7 square inches of news print. I understand, of course, that this move is likely a matter of economics. If that is the case, Id like to put in my two cents regarding the worthiness of the strips on your comics page. I wonder why you would choose to drop a comic strip with new, original content, rather than drop one that is recy cled. As delightful as they were in their day, Peanuts and For Better or Worse have long been in reruns. Given the average age of your readers, I dare say most of us have already read and enjoyed these strips before. Shouldnt we give preference to original, new content on the comics page? For that matter, are you aware that Shoe has been cobbled to gether on a computer from bits and pieces of old strips for more than a decade? Then there are strips like Snuffy Smith, B.C., Hagar, Heathcliff, Dennis the Menace and more which are drawn by lackluster hired hands, their original creators having died years ago. Id prefer to read comic strips drawn by their orig inal creators, those which sink or swim based on their own merits rather than the hazy recollection that the strip used to be funny. So as not to be too negative, let me mention that I applaud the recent addition of Luann. Although at rst this seemed like a strip that wouldnt interest me, I nd it has quickly become one of my favor ites. Congratulations on a ne choice. ALLAN HOLTZ | TavaresPoor service from the DMVI thought Lake County had come into the 21st century, the same as the rest of the world did. I just returned from the ofce of the Department of Motor Vehicles in Astatula, and after a 3 1/2 hour wait to renew my drivers license, the receptionist made the excuse that they were so busy because it was spring break and all of those on break were there. But, that was not so. Every age bracket was very well represented, from young people with babies to senior citizens, and Im a senior citizen. I followed the instructions that came with the paperwork from Tallahassee about making an appointment on the web page about having my eyes tested, and also called ahead to the phone number listed. I was told all the appointments were taken and to call back, and all of the clerks were busy. Both of their printers were not working and it would take over an hour for the repairman to get there and over two dozen people were given temporary licenses. This is the only Department of Motor Vehicles in this area because the powers that be closed a perfectly good ofce on U.S. Highway 27 near State Road 50. Our politicians and the people who work for them have a customer-be-damned attitude. HELEN NEWTON | ClermontAre we entering a new era in world evolution?Who would have thought a former communist country would have a majority of citizens that believed in and practiced pure democracy? Would the politicians in Washington, D.C., have been so anxious to destroy the Soviet Union if they knew that people were not going to set up an oligarchy like we have in America? The rulers in Washington envisioned a small group of rulers in post-Soviet countries that they could set up sweetheart deals with and together rule the common citizen worldwide surprise, oligarchy. The Crimean people believe in one man, one vote and majority rules. This sets a bad example for American politics. What if California citizens vote to join Mexico? Maine and Washington State residents vote to join Canada? Texas citizens vote to return to a separate country with pure democracy and Florida citizens vote to join Puerto Rico, a new pure democracy? Are we entering a new era in world evolution? Our national debt is unpayable, ever! Why not leave it behind and start new with a clean slate? Let the rest of the nation join Israel as a new nation called nevermore. Their ag could be white with an outstretched begging hand. VERNON HALL | UmatillaThere is a saying that the denition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and ex pecting a different result. Yet that seems to be what the Lake County School Board did last week when it opened the door to considering a controversial student uni form proposal that parents have vehemently opposed and the School Board subsequently rejected several times before. To be clear, the School Board did not actually propose or recommend such a change in the districts dress code during its meeting last week. But board members inexplicably opened the door a crack when they recommended that Superintendent Susan Moxley have a committee study the idea. But why? There are strong points to be made pro and con. Opponents have argued that enforcing unifor mity sties creativity and individuality, and some have said the burden of having to buy and maintain a separate school wardrobe for their kids is nancially taxing. To be sure, there are some solid arguments to be made in favor of a uniform dress code, and supporters of the idea have made them. They insist that uniforms improve morale and student conduct and can even have a positive inuence on academic achievement. Even the head of the esteemed Montverde Academy weighed in via letter, saying that requiring school uniforms would initiate positive change in the culture of your school communities in a relatively short time. All that may be true, although Montverde Academy, a small private institution, is not truly analogous to a large public school. Still, the Lake County school system might want to consider whether this is the time to implement such a signicant and controver sial change. The School Board is already mired with signicant budget issues, decaying school buildings, obsolete technology, busing challenges and a number of other problems. In fact, the board is waging a tense debate with Lake County government ofcials right now over how much of the local penny sales tax should go toward schools, which they say have a backlog of needs totaling $1 billion or more. It would behoove the School Board to focus its attention on the pressing matters that lay ahead rather than inviting a ght that will surely draw signicant time and energy. Put another way, would you worry about painting the kitchen if your house was falling down? Of course you wouldnt. We encourage the School Board to roll up its sleeves and bear down on the challenges ahead xing their budget hole, shoring up tired old school buildings, planning for a projected surge in student enrollment and elevating academic standards district-wide. No, the school uniform debate can wait for another day. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . ........................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTOPINION WHATS YOUR OPINION?The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to: Letters to the Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711By fax to: 352-394-8001EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed.GUEST COLUMNSIf you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OURVIEW SOUTH LAKE PRESSYour community newspaper for more than 100 years.732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Florida 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region.All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. YOUROPINIONSLETTERS TO THE EDITOR The government should provide total health care for wounded warriorsHas no one questioned why our present governmental regime does not provide total health care for our wounded amputees/military personnel? Instead, we are bombarded with TV commercials like those soliciting $19 per month by groups such as Wounded Warriors. The prime benefactors of this charity are entertainment gures and money-hungry TV networks, not the soldiers who were put in harms way by the same regime Commander-in-Chief. This regime seems dead set on bankrupting our country by spending borrowed or newly printed money on every deadbeat reason, but never for this one legitimate cause our fallen war heroes. Jeff Foxworthy recently published a treatise dening reasons why our nation was founded by geniuses but is now run by idiots. These are some of his points which show the basis for my previous sentence. 1) Our government believes the best way to eradicate trillions of dollars in debt is to spend trillions more. 2) Hard work and success are met with higher taxes, regulations and intrusion, while not working is rewarded with food stamps, WIC checks, Medicaid, subsidized housing and free cell phones. 3) The government plan for getting people back to work is to provide 99 weeks of unemployment checks without proof of looking for work. 4) You pay your mortgage faithfully while denying your self the newest big-screen TV, while your neighbor buys iP hones, timeshares, a huge TV and new cars, and the government forgives his mortgage debt when he defaults. 5) You must show your picture ID to board a plane, cash a check, buy liquor and rent a video, but not to vote for who runs the country. Our country has masterfully spent us into $17 trillion in debt while endlessly buying votes with continuously growing entitlement programs. If you dont understand the extent of ination and the impact of printing and borrowing money from your visits to grocery stores and gas stations, just consider this: In 1964, IBM spent $5 billion on a makeor-break gamble, the introduction of the rst Solid Logic computer system. Due to ination, that $5 billion would be $38 billion today. Do not vote democrat. CLINTON G. FISH | Tavares LETTER of the WEEKSchool uniform discussion is a distraction

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Wednesday, April 16, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comFresh off a spate of re cent public and television appearances, Chris P. Bacon a Clermont pig born with no hind legs visited Lost Lake Elementary School for the second consecutive year. School Principal Rhonda Hunt puckered up and kissed Chris P.s pink snout in front of the entire student body of almost 1,000 as a way to reward them for the hard work they put into raising money for a school playground recently. I missed my pig gy boyfriend, she said. I hadnt seen him for a whole year. Chris P. weighed about 5 pounds then; now, he weighs about 73. His owner, Dr. Len Lucero, said Chris P. loves the attention but gets spooked by too much noise. On Thursday, he got plenty of both, with the children chanting Kiss the pig, kiss the pig, before Hunt nal ly obliged. The kids really love seeing Chris P. Bacon. They remember him visiting, they remember the kiss and at the same time, they get the wonderful message he in spires to never give up, Hunt said. Chris P. Bacons stop at Lost Lake comes right after his appearance last week in a PBS docu mentary series Nature in an episode entitled My Bionic Pet. The pigs story is a touching one. A woman came to the Eastside Veterinary Clinic in Clermont, where Lucero used to work, about 15 months ago to inquire about putting down the animal. But one look at the piglet, who weighed less than 1 pound, stirred something in Lucero. The doctor took the pig to his Summerville home and built a tiny rear-end wheelchair out of KNex blocks, a childrens building toy similar to Legos. A vid eo posted on YouTube showing Chris P. Bacon scooting around in his wheeled contraption went viral, and the pig got national television exposure (the Today show, Anderson Cooper, TMX, Discovery network, etc.), his own Facebook page with 107,174 likes and even worldwide T-shirt sales. 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 DEATH NOTICESJanet M. BarbutoJanet M. Barbuto, 76, of Leesburg, died Sat urday, April 6, 2014. National Cremation Society, Fruitland Park.Ronny Lee BuchananRonny Lee Buchan an, 60, of Fruitland Park, died Sunday, April 6, 2014. PageTheus Funerals & Cre mations. Leesburg.Joann Chaput Joann Chaput, 75, of Leesburg, died Sun day, April 6, 2014. PageTheus Funerals & Cre mations, Leesburg.Doris A. FitzgeraldDoris A. Fitzgerald, 92, or Mount Dora, died Wedneday, March 19, 2014. Allen J. Hard en Funeral Home, Mount Dora.Wilbur Robert Gradin Wilbur Robert Gradin, 91, of Eustis, died Monday, April 7, 2014. Hamlin & Hilbish Funeral Directors. Eustis.Tanya S. JettTanya S. Jett, 60, of Sorrento, died Satur day, April 5, 2014. Bey ers Funeral Home, As tor.Nava KingNava Belle King, 96, of Sumterville, died Monday, April 7, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Catherine Lipka Catherine Lipka, 93, of Ocala, died Monday, April 7, 2014. Banks/ Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Vera Lea MurphyVera Lea Murphy, 91, of Eustis, died Mon day, April 7, 2014. Mar vin C. Zanders Funeral Home, Inc. Apopka.Maynard TarrMaynard Tarr, 70, of Oxford, died Saturday, April 5, 2014. Banks/ Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Mayfred WarrenMayfred Warren, 88, of Oxford, died Wednesday, April 9, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Fenerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Sanders E. WheelerSanders E. Sam Wheeler, 89 of Tavares, died, Wednesday April 9, 2014. Stever son, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Crema tions, Tavares.Edward Lodge WilsonEdward Lodge Wilson, 66, of Tavares, died Thursday, April 10, 2014. Beyers Funer al Home, Umatilla.IN MEMORY Principal puckers up for Crisp P. Bacon ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Lost Lake Elementary School Principal Rhonda Hunt leans in for her kiss with Internet and television sensation Chris P. Bacon.CLERMONT

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10% OFFAll options with this couponrffnntb B1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 16, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTSSPORTS EDITOR . ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE . .............................. 365-8268 FAX . .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL . ......... sports@dailycommercial.comSPORTSandLEISURE FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comThe Show! Its the ultimate goal for baseball players the Major Leagues. Shane Greene is one of the few who gets to realize that dream. The former East Ridge High School pitch er was recalled by the New York Yankees on April 9 from Scranton-Wilkes Barre, the teams Triple-A afliate. Greene was recalled after the Yankees optioned catch er Austin Romine down to Scranton-Wilkes Barre fol lowing New Yorks 14-5 loss on April 8 to Baltimore at Yankee Stadium. Greene, a right hander, was in the bullpen for the April 9 game, but did not appear in the Orioles 5-4 win. He had not appeared in a game through Saturdays 7-4 win against Boston. Tam pa Bay hosts New York in a four-game series beginning Thursday at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg. A starter in 90 of the 105 games in which he has appeared in as a professional, Greene said he would be used as a reliever by the Yankees. The rst player from East Ridge to reach the major leagues, Greene was selected in the 15th round by the Yankees in the 2009 June Am ateur Draft. After graduating from East Ridge, Greene went on to play at Dayto na Beach Community College, now known as Daytona State College. Greene said he learned about his pro motion in a phone call from Mark Newman, the Yankees senior vice president of baseball operations. At the time Newman called, Greene was speaking Former East Ridge pitcher called up by Yankees GREENE SEE GREENE | B2 FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comThree football-play ing student-athletes from Mount Dora Bible have been invited to attend the Football Uni versity Top Gun camp. Mount Dora Bible coach Dennis Cardoso announced Wednesday that juniors John Grant and Chad Simmons re ceived invitations to the camp, as did eighth grader Eric Seidelman. Scheduled for July 17-19 at Jerome High School in Dublin, Ohio, the showcase camp is reserved only for the best of the best to show case their talent on a national stage, according to the camps website. To be eligible, an athlete must be cho sen from among the top 15 percent of athletes at his regional Football University camp and be specically invited to Top Gun. The top 750 student-athletes from around the world are invited to the camp. Cardoso said the Mount Dora Bible trio earned invitations based on their perfor mance last weekend at the Football University camp in Kissimmee. Simmons worked out as a linebacker, while Grant performed as a long snapper and Se idelman competed as an offensive lineman. In addition to his invitation to Top Gun, Sim mons also was named Defensive Most Valuable Player on the rst day in Kissimmee. Cardoso said Top Gun focuses on teaching technique and skill. Grant, Simmons and Seidelman will participate with other athletes in a small-group set ting. Football University was founded as a pre mier educational foot ball camp for an elite class of players who have already demon strated their high-level football ability, seriousness for the game and have chasen football as their primary sport, Cardoso said. Football Univeristy is owned by All American Games, an organization that puts on football camps throughout the country. Camp faculties are made up of more than 100 former colle giate and professional players and coaches.Mount Dora Bible trio invited to camp PHOTO COURTESY OF DENNIS CARDOSO Mount Dora Bible football players Chad Simmons, John Grant and Eric Seidelman stand with Bulldogs coach Dennis Cardoso on April 9 after the three received invitations to the Football University Top Gun camp in Dublin, Ohio. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comIron Jungle Weightlifting con tinues to grow. The Lake County-based team introduced three more lifters to USA Weightlifting competition recently and had each member set personal records at the Orlusia Open in Orlando. In all, six Iron Jungle weight lifters earned medals at the meet and Brett Ollila hit his qualify ing total for this summers Youth Nationals at Port Orange Spruce Creek High School. It was Ollilas rst meet with Iron Jungle. Iron Jungle Weightlifting has been training hard, said coach Josh Boyer. Our rookies per formed well in their rst meet and it was great to see each one of our lifters hit personal re cords. Were continuing to make progress towards our goal of be ing the best. In addition to Ollila, Tony Huang and Carlos Molano made their debuts for Iron Jungle in the Orlusia Open. Competing at 77 kilograms (about 169 pounds), Ollila and Mola no needed at least 308 pounds combined in the Snatch and Clean-and-Jerk to qualify for Youth Nationals. Brett looked very condent and comfortable in his debut meet, Boyer said. He was actually our only lifter to go 6-for6 for the day he didnt miss on any of his attempts. Ollila had 66 kilograms (145 pounds) in the Snatch and 84 kilograms (194 pounds) in the Clean-and-Jerk for a combined weight of 150 kilograms (339 pounds), easily surpassing the minimum weight needed to earn a spot in the Youth Nationals. Molano hit 57 kilograms (125 pounds) in the Snatch and 68 kilograms (149 pounds) in the Clean-and-Jerk for a total of 125 kilograms. Even though he came up short of qualifying for Youth Nationals, Boyer is condent it will happen this month. Carlos was comfortable and condent in his rst competition with Iron Jungle, Boyer said. He is a very calm kid and he was cool on the platform. I feel certain that he will qualify later in April for his rst Youth Nationals. The Iron Jungles third rookie, Tony Huang, also stepped up in his rst meet, Boyer said. Lifting at 85 kilograms (187 pounds), Huang hit 66 kilograms (145 pounds) in the Snatch and 88 kilograms (194 pounds) in the Clean-and-Jerk. Tony was very condent in his rst meet, Boyer said. After we sit down and look at the vid eo from his lifts, he will knock out the attempts he missed. I believe Tony has a very high ceiling for this sport. Warren Brown also compet ed, at 77 kilograms, giving Iron Jungle four male lifters in same session for the rst time in club history. For veteran Brown, it was business as usual. He hit on ve of his six attempts, missing only his rst try in the Snatch. Nonetheless, Brown went on to establish a personal record Iron Jungle turns in solid performance at Orlando meet PHOTO COURTESY OF JOSH BOYER Morgan Rhone, a member of Iron Jungle Weightlifting, competes during a recent meet in Orlando. Rhone won top honor in the 53 kilogram weight class.SEE IRON | B2Iron Jungle Weightlifting has been training hard. Our rookies performed well in their first meet and it was great to see each one of our lifters hit personal records. Were continuing to make progress towards our goal of being the best.Iron Jungle coach Josh Boyer

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B2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 16, 2014 HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. Outdoors Fishing352-365-8268 sports@dailycommercial.com www.dailycommercial.com %  %  SOUTHERN TACKLEWORKS | TAVARESBass have started biting in the main portions of the lake on crank baits such as Rat-L-Traps and soft plastic worms in June bug and green pumpkin. Crappie are biting in the deep parts of the lakes on pink and chartreuse jigs tipped with minnows. Shell cracker are starting to bite on yellow tail worms, grass shrimp and crickets. Dick Fonda and Matt Gee won the Wednesday night tournament with a big bass weighing 6.28 pounds and a total weight of 9-plus pounds. The Wednesday night open bass tour nament has resumed with the time change. For anyone interested, it starts at 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday. Sandys bass tournament, open to all, is held monthly on the third Saturday at the Buzzard Beach ramp. Sandys next regular bass tournament will be an open tournament held Saturday with the weigh in at Buzzard Beach at 2:30 p.m.; any questions about the tournament, call the shop at 352-742-0036. %  %  PINE ISLAND CAMP | FRUITLAND PARKStripers are being caught on Dead River on silver spoons and salt water shrimp. Some specks are still being picked up on minnows and jigs. Pine Island has a full supply of live baits including grass shrimp as well as a variety of articial baits. %  %  PALM GARDENS | TAVARESSpecks are still being caught on mostly minnows and some jigs. They are at the edge of the grass and shorelines, and are back in the deeper water. %  %  NELSONS FISH CAMP | WEIRSD ALEBass action has been hot and heavy even with them having moved off the beds. They are biting on grass shrimp and black, blue and silver plastic worms. Shellcracker are starting to move in. A few specks are still being caught. %  %  BLACK BASS RESORT-FISH CAMP Guests from Michigan have rented a rowboat all week and are catching bass and crappie. Minnow and worm sales still continue to be strong. %  %  SORRENTO BAIT AND TACKLESpecks and bass have moved off the beds and out into other areas of the lakes. Try shing the mouths of residential canals early in the morning and later in the afternoon with shiners and crank baits like Rat-L-Traps. Crappie are back in open water and biting on tight lined minnow and jig combinations. A few specks and bass are being caught post-spawn in the Apopka-Beauclaire Canal feeding with minnows and shiners. Lots of hybrid bass are being caught in the St. Johns River. Schooling bass are biting at the mouth of the Wekiva River and around the feeder creeks early in the morning on Rat-L-Traps and shiners. Stop in and get the latest daily report. LAKES REPORT a weekly update fromCHERYL STALEY-ARCHER rff ntbff ttbf nb ff f r ntb nr nbf fff rffrff f rf ntb nr nb f ffff f with 75 kilograms (165 pounds) in the Snatch and a 92 kilograms (202 pounds) in the Cleanand-Jerk to nish with a total of 167 kilograms (368 pounds). Browns best lift in the Cleanand-Jerk and his total weight also were per sonal records. The clubs two fe male lifters at the meet Morgan Rhone and Alexis Smith also stepped up for the team. Rhone, competing at 53 kilograms (116 pounds) missed on a personal record in the Snatch, but produced a workman-like effort of 34 kilograms (74 pounds) in the disci pline. She hit on a per sonal record 55 kilo grams (121 pounds) in the Clean-and-Jerk to nish with 89 kilograms (196 pounds). We are about a third of the way into our cur rent training progression, Boyer said. I feel more condent that Morgan will peak and hit career numbers at Youth Nationals, which is how I have designed the training program were are on now. Alexis Smith has con tinued to show more and more condence in her ability, Boyer said. Smith established a new personal record with 39 kilograms (85 pounds) in the Snatch and 50 ki lograms (110 pounds) in the Clean-and-Jerk to nish with 89 kilograms (196 pounds). Boyer said Smith still is short of qualify ing for Youth Nationals, but she has opportuni ties to hit the mark this month. Alexis still doesnt re alize how strong she is, Boyer said. When she does, watch out. For the meet, Rhone took rst place in the 53 kilogram Youth category and Ollila was second at 77 kilograms. Molano was third at 77 kilograms and Smith took second at 75 kilograms and up. Huang was third in the 85-kilogram Junior category and Brown nished second in the 77-kilogram Juniors. Iron Jungle Weight lifting is the only USA Weightlifting club in Lake County. IRON FROM PAGE B1 with his parents on his phone. He didnt recognize Newmans number, but answered it any way, putting his par ents on hold. When I clicked back over, Greene said, I told (my parents) the news. It was a dream come true for me, but my parents were a lit tle bit more emotional than I was. After being draft ed, Greene spent the next ve seasons pitch ing between the rookie leagues and Double-A. Greene produced his best season in 2013 with Trenton in the Double-A Eastern League, where he had an 8-4 record with a 3.18 ERA. He also pitched for the Tampa Yankees in the Single-A Florida State League, and was 4-6 with a 3.60 ERA. Greenes combined record in 2013 of 1210 with a 3.38 ERA was good enough to make him the Yankees Mi nor League Pitcher of the Year. He was named to the Florida State League All-Star team in 2013 and was selected as an Organization AllStar by MinorLeagueBaseball.com. Greene said he was surprised to get his call to The Show, even with the accolades he re ceived last season and a solid spring training. I thought it was go ing to happen at some point (this year), Greene said. I didnt re ally think it was going to be this early, though. In ve seasons as a professional, Greene has compiled a 24-41 record with a 4.35 ERA. He has struck out 452 batters in 496 innings. He will wear No. 39 with the Yankees. GREENE FROM PAGE B1 FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comFormer Leesburg Lightning manager Frank Viola has been released from a New York hospi tal a week after heart surgery. The New York Mets made the announcement last, say ing the 53-year-old former ma jor leaguer would rehab at home before rejoining the organization as a minor league pitching coach. Out of hospital, Viola wrote on Twitter on April 9. Thanks again for everyones prayers and well-wishes. Time to get back in rehab mode. Will be back on the eld in the near future. Viola underwent open-heart surgery on April 3 at New York Presbyterian-Weill Cornell Med ical Center after a heart problem was detected during a spring training exam. According to his son, Frank III, doctors per formed surgery on April 2 and Viola spent two days in the hos pitals intensive care unit after ward, per hospital protocol. After noting he had been dis charged from the hospital, Vio la wrote about the support he re ceived as an inpatient. Cant thank Dr. Leonard Gi rardi and Dr. Lawrence Inra, the Wilpons, Sandy, Ray, Chick, Brian, Jay and everyone else in the organization (enough) for all theyve done, Viola wrote. Girardi is a professor of car diothoracic surgery at New York Presbyterian-Weill Cornell Med ical Center. Inra is a cardiologist in New York. Fred Wilpon, patriarch of the Wilpon family, is the principal owner of the Mets. During his stay in the hospital, Frank Viola III said he, his moth er, Kathy and sisters, Brittany and Kaley, spent a great deal of time at the hospital during Vio las stay. He said his mother and sisters played big roles in the early days of Violas rehab by get ting him up and walking around this hospital. In three seasons with the Lees burg Lightning, which included the 2008, 2009 and 2010 seasons, Viola led the Florida Collegiate Summer League franchise to two FCSL championship games. The Lightning won the 2009 title un der his leadership, beating the Clermont Mavericks 5-1. After being drafted by the Minnesota Twins in the second round of the 1981 Major League Baseball Draft, Viola made his major league debut in 1982. He pitched for the Twins until 1989, winning the 1987 World Series Most Valuable Player award and the 1988 American League Cy Young Award. In 15 seasons, Viola compiled a 176-150 record with a 3.73 Ex-Lightning skipper discharged from hospital following open-heart surgerySEE VIOLA | B3

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Wednesday, April 16, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B3 CLERMONT BLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSAMILYELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time! IRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONTL Many Other Activities each week Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.org LIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLCHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm SOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary); 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.org ST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am (Rite I) 10:00 am (Rite II) 5:00 pm (Praise & Worship) Sunday School Youth Group Nursery Adult Bible Study Womens Bible Study Mens Prayer Breakfast WOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH GODINCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALE ERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for Children Groveland IRSTBAPTISTCHURCH GROVELAND Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pm MT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! MINNEOLA CONGREGATIONSMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club NEWLPRESBYTERIANCHURCH18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am TLIVINGGOD Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce Rowland MONTVERDE WOODLANDSLUTHERAN15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 am OAKLAND PRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforSouth Lake South LakeGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOMErfn tbt352-394-7121806 W. Minneola Ave.,Clermont,FL Cremation ChoicesDirect Cremation$675Plus Container Ron Becker,Director352-394-8228921 S.US Hwy 27,Minneola,FL ERA. After leaving the Twins in a trade during the 1989 season, Viola pitched for the Mets, Boston, Cincinnati and Toronto before retiring in 1996. After that, Viola coached at Orlan do Lake Highland Prep where he won a Florida High School Athletic Association state champi onship. His minor league coaching career began in 2011 when the Mets hired him to work with the Brooklyn Cyclones, the teams Single-A short-season franchise. He spent 2012 and 2013 seasons with the Sin gle-A Savannah Sand Gnats in the South At lantic League. In 2013, Viola was named Coach of the Year in the South Atlan tic League. In January, Viola was named pitching coach for the Las Vegas 51s, the Mets Triple-A afl iate in the Pacic Coast League. Ofcials with the Mets have said Vio la will join the 51s once doctors are satised he has completed the rehabilitation process. VIOLA FROM PAGE B2 LC HOOPS HONORS REFEREE PHOTO COURTESY OF ALEX LUDICKMiguel Carrion, center, holds Jim Frana Award, presented to one of the top volunteers in Lake County Hoops, a recreational basketball league based in Clermont. The award is named for Jim Frana, a longtime LC Hoops member, who died in 2012. Standing with Carrion are, from left, Alex Ludick, co-founder of the organization and its current director, and Franas son, Trevor. LC Hoops recently celebrated its 20th anniversary. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comLake Minneola boys basketball coach Freddie Cole wanted to cre ate something that would help his teams 2013-14 season live on far past the nal buzzer. After tossing around a variety of ideas, Cole created a T-shirt that would memorialize the Hawks run to the Class 6A state championship game. Now, hes hoping to get the public, particularly Lake Minneola, interested in buying the shirt before the online store closes after today. Any shirts purchased by then will be printed and shipped directly to customers. The front of the T-shirt is black with Lake Minneola Basketball emblazoned in white, along with an image of a basketball. The back of the shirt is white with -2014, Class 6A, District Champs, 28-4, Regional Champs, State Runner-up in black lettering, along with the name of each player and coach. The T-shirts come in long and short sleeve and also are available in white, gray and gold. We want to see as many people as possible in our community wearing Hawks basketball shirts, Cole said. The cost of the shirt is $24.99. Add an additional $5 for 3XL and $6 for 4XL. Personalized shirts also can be or dered for $30. To order a Lake Minneola boys basketball commemorative T-shirt, go to www.bsnsports.com and click on the my team shop logo. Then click log in now and use the access code hawks4RH.Lake Minneola looks to keep 2013-14 season memories alive

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B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 16, 2014 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 725344767 1318315974 921FREE SPACE5372 216424863 529395268ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N IB O G BINGO B I N G O SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Thi-Anna Hunter WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! O 74 O 72 O 63 O 68 O 67

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Ann DupeeREMEMBER WHENA weekly column that reprints some of the more interesting news stories that have appeared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press.C1SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 16, 2014 www.southlakepress.comCOMMUNITYProudly servingCLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWSSTAFF WRITER . ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE . .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 EMAIL..... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com %  en HOMETOWN: Clermont %  en OCCUPATION: Student %  en FAMILY: Parents, John and Dianne Garvis, and brother, Gregory John Garvis What do you enjoy most about south Lake County? The beautiful hills and small-town community of caring people. 1) If you had to summarize your philosophy of life in one sentence, what would it be? Ephesians 15:10: But by the grace of God I am what I am.... 2) Name a person or incident youve come across recently thats touched you in some way. Why did this person or incident impress you so much? Childrens author/artist Betty Ann Hutchens. She recently was here donating her time and talent to the extreme makeover of Kiddieland Academy. While spending three days with her, my heart was touched by this 79-year-old hidden American treasure who has traveled the world reaching out to those in need. Her books were all written as gifts for poor communities and orphanages in places such as Mongolia. I pray that my heart will always use my talents as she does to give back. 3) How does what you do contribute to the welfare of the area? As a member of the Garvis family, who are the founders of the Good Neighbor Program, and as corporal in Orlando Devil Dogs, Young Marines program, I spend most of my free time giving back by volunteering, from handing out over 2,000 blankets to our neighbors in need this past winter and helping with the extreme makeover of Kiddieland FROM THE FILES | 25 YEARS AGO 1989Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press Meet YourNEIGHBORSARAH ANNE GARVIS NEW JAIL DESIGN CONTAINS 1,000 BEDSPlans for the new Lake County jail are for a 1,000-bed facility ver sus the 600-bed facility planned previously. Each building will have four levels consisting of two pods. Twenty-eight beds are planned for the medical facility, 24 beds for isolation and an area for minimum-security inmates. Construction will begin in March of 1990 with an expected completion date of April 1992. The new justice building has not been designed and no timetable is available. The jail and justice building will have underground access.NEWS OF NOTEThe 30-acre DeSisto at Howey High School property was sold back to the original owner at the Lake County Courthouse in Tavares. Mortgage holder, The C.V. Grifn, Sr. Foundation, gave the highest bid at $200,000. Lake County Commissioners unanimously approved having the county attorney draft an ordinance that will require risk warning signs be posted throughout the county wherever alcoholic beverages are sold. Grand Reopening: Contoured Body located in the Clermont Shopping Center, cor ner of State Road 50 and Bloxam Avenue. New Owners: Barbara Lambert and Sue Cerilli. Clermont Minneola Lions Club held a special 40th anniver sary celebration dinner at the Citrus Tower Restaurant March 25. Joe Janusiak is Head Lion. His wife, Frances, is also a Lion and works two days a week at the SL Press.NAMES IN THE NEWSGirl Scout Junior Troop 564 camped at Woodlands Luther an Campground. Even though the weather forecast was wonder ful, it did rain at night. Leaders are Barbara Watson and Barbara Northcutt. Scouts are Cara Northcutt, Tiffany Beighley, Kelly Graham, Kelly Hateld, Haley Jones, Erica Walker, Kristin Watson and Melanie Horton. Former Lake County Sheriff Willis McCall (1945-72) recently completed and published his own illustrated autobiography. The candlelight wedding of Miss Nancy Jones to First Lieutenant David Lee Clutts took place at the First United Methodist Church sanctuary. (Mrs. Clutts is a former mayor of Tavares.) Receiving all A grades at Clermont Elementary School were rst graders Andrea Asmann, Brandy SEE GARVIS | C2 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comTo ge t a sense of how the new owner of Lake Square Mall hopes to breathe new life into the struggling shopping cen ter in Leesburg, it helps to look around the Unit ed States at some of the 13 other malls under the um brella of Kohan Retail In vestment Group. A glance at those Kohan properties reveals an interesting, somewhat unorthodox strategy that features a mix of traditional anchor stores and retail outlets, but also a heavy dose of entertainment as well as a sprinkling of government, non-prot and political hubs meant to attract non-shoppers who might not otherwise venture inside. The nearby Crystal River Mall is one such building that Kohan has transformed into a community space that uses events to draw people there. Kohan bought the mall in Crystal River two years ago, according to Millie Bresnahan, the manager at the Crystal River Mall. Citrus County Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Josh Wooten said Kohan bought the mall out of foreclosure. They essentially bought a distressed piece of property, Wooten said. Mike Kohan, head of the company, said he tries to make malls destinations. You got to give them a hope, and you got to give them a reason to come and shop in this mall, and thats what Im trying to do, Kohan said. The Crystal River Mall has a Disabled American Veterans chapter and a putt-putt golf course and also hosts a farmers mar ket, according to Bresnahan and the Kohan Retail Investment Groups website. Wooten said the Crystal River Mall under Kohan UNIQUE STORESWhile its commonplace to see stores like Hallmark, Radio Shack and Foot Locker in malls, which Kohans properties have, the company also has an eclectic group of tenants not usually seen in indoor shopping venues %  enDriving school %  enUnited States Postal Service branch %  enDance academy %  enTwo churches %  enRed Cross bingo room %  enA virtual school %  enCounty Republican club headquarters %  enGoodwill ofce %  enA Court Appointed Special Advocates ofce to help local children caught up in the legal systemInside a Kohan mall Lake Square Mall owner uses unorthodox methods to attract patrons The Crystal River Mall has a miniature golf course and other entertainment in what used to be an anchor store in Crystal River. PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL The Crystal River Malls food court is a tented area in the center of the mall in Crystal River.SEE MALL | C2SEE HISTORY | C2

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C2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 16, 2014 AT TIMESBY PATRICK BERRY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZNo. 0406RELEASE DATE: 4/13/2014 ACROSS1 Improvisational music4 Brick color10 Bibliographical abbr.14 Indigenous people known for their tattoos19 NPR journalist Shapiro20 1986 girls-name song by Boston21 Catch-22 profiteer Minderbinder22 DuPont trademark of 194123 Clumsy pharmacist, at times?26 Easily misled27 String section members28 Dressage rider, at times?30 Smidgen31 Suffix with social34 ___ suit35 Maintain36 Grant for a filmmaker?38 Indonesian tourist haven39 London ___ (British Ferris wheel)40 Reminiscent of41 Tucked away42 Some supplies for Hersheys44 Overzealous sorts47 Old-fashioned barber, at times?49 Missile launched at Goliath51 National Book Mo.53 Circus performer Kelly54 Inexperienced shucker, at times?58 Low pair60 Out of fashion61 Subject of a van Gogh series62 Software users shortcut65 No-limit Texas holdem player, at times?69 People may be down on them70 TWA competitor71 Dual-sport athlete Sanders72 Answers that may anger74 Farmer, at times?78 Unfettered82 Knowledge83 Shall we proceed?84 Sleeping sunbather, at times?87 Buyers final figure90 Spirits in Scandinavia91 New Haven alum92 Breaks down93 Stanford rival, informally95 Job everyone wants96 Sound at a horror film97 Florentine dynasty name100 Cut that out!101 West African vegetable102 Double-handed cooking vessel103 Dieter, at times?106 Fall stopper109 French : merci :: German : ___110 Person getting out of a tub, at times?114 Transpire115 Memo opener116 Detestable117 Something that may be amalgamated118 Manual parts?119 Giants or Titans120 Porcelain purchase, perhaps121 As matters stand DOWN1 Entrance side2 Department3 Current location?4 Brought to tears, possibly5 Times Arrow novelist Martin6 Took off7 Wedded8 Unconventional9 Person moving against traffic?10 Bring on11 Go quietly12 Fully attentive13 Some hand-medowns?14 Snowboard relative15 Polluted Asian lake16 Peridot color17 Vehicle on Mars18 Lifeless24 Goodness me!25 Exudes29 Less humble31 One of four in As I Was Going to St. Ives32 Problematic roomie33 Sal of Rebel Without a Cause36 Lunch spot37 Thing that might decay38 Bearded comic strip bully40 Old cavalrymen42 Illustrations, e.g.43 In need of spicing up, say44 ---. ... .45 News analyst Roberts46 Word on a clapperboard48 Like some measuring units49 Right away50 Its got problems52 Valrys very55 Disburse56 Goes to court?57 Offensive line striker59 Melancholy62 Flood residue63 Ghostly64 The Ipcress File star, 196566 ___ cest moi67 Told stories68 Way too thin73 Not a single thing?75 Blue76 Diminish77 Opposite of smooth79 Take by surprise80 Mud ___ (bottom-dwelling fish)81 Total bore85 Slurpee flavor86 Supermodel Heidi88 Dress in fancy duds89 Long-eared dogs, informally90 Reshape93 Fuerza Democrtica Nicaragense member94 Its played in ballparks96 Viscous substance97 PC platform of old98 Ratify99 The Harlem Shake or the Dougie100 One of the Allman Brothers102 Flick site?104 Expiration notice105 Fundamental part106 Modelists need107 Julio-Claudian dynasty ruler108 Attracted111 Horatian ___112 Hamm of soccer113 Signal that replaced CQD 123 456789 101112131415161718 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31323334 35 3637 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 4546 47 48 4950 5152 53 5455 5657 58 59 60 61 626364 65666768 69 70 71 7273 74 75 7677 78 798081 82 83 848586 878889 90 91 92 9394 95 96 979899 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107108 109 110 111112113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Solution to puzzle on D4 has been very community oriented. They have catered more to mom and pops to ll up some of the spaces and they put in a miniature putt-putt, Wooten said. Bresnahan said the mom and pop stores in the Crystal River Mall are there partly to ll the malls vacancies but also for their community impact. Weve kind of taken the thinking of, you know, its the Crystal River Mall, but its also a community space. Its a place to gather. Its a place to do things, she said. Rural King has recently bought an anchor store at the Crystal River Mall, Bresnahan said. Crystal River Mayor Jim Farley agreed that the Crystal River Mall has a hometown feel. Theres malls all over the country and not taking anything away from them, but theyre mostly chain stores and ... I dont think you get the hometown feel that you get in our mall with the mom and pop stores, Farley said. He added the mall has been transforming under Kohan. Several months ago, before we even knew that Rural King was coming in, people were crying the blues to some degree, say ing the mall was dying, and they didnt want to see that happen. And I said publicly that the mall is not dying, that its simply in the process of reinventing itself. I think that was true then and its even more true now, he said. Bresnahan said the Crystal River Mall tries to do one large event each month and to offer entertainment weekly. For right now, its very important. Its whats helping us, you know, sustain. Its keeping people aware that we are in business. You know, just because we lost a Belk or we lost a Sears, were still here, Bresnahan said. Kohan agreed the events are, very, very important because they drive trafc into the mall. You got to give them a reason. You cant just advertise and say, OK, come and shop in Crystal River or come and shop (at the) Lake Square Mall. Youve got to have a reason for them to come in, Kohan said. When they know theres a band thats playing on Saturday, so they bring the kids, they bring the wife, their family, and everybody, and they (are) just making it a fun day for themselves. Bresnahan believes that Lake Square Mall should adopt some of the strategies employed by Crystal River. They should do the farmers market, she said, and that can be done inside, where you can attract people in, out of the sun, and they also shop at the same time. It benets all of your stores. A food truck event also attracted 4,500 people, she said. They all came in the mall and shopped. She added that she tries to involve the malls stores in the events. We just did a prom fashion show, and so our tuxedo-prom shop did all the dresses and tuxedos for that, she said. The Crystal River Mall also has a weekly dance event that draws about 80 participants, she said. Lake Square Mall General Manager Jennifer Glidewell said the mall will eventually follow Crystal Rivers lead with regard to events. Wooten believes Kohan has brought value back to the mall. I would certainly give them props for taking what, as I said, was a distressed as set with major tenants leaving and turning it into something that is of value to the commu nity, Wooten said. Already, new tenants are beginning to ll up vacant space. The mall recently nalized negotiations with Cuba Pichys Cuisine, Dunkin Donuts, Mammas Pizza Express, and Boba Galaxy Smoothies. Cuba Pichys Cuisine will be a ne-dining Cuban restaurant in the space that once housed Gar elds restaurant, and the Dunkin Donuts store will be in a space that formerly housed a KFC. Glidewell said the smoothie store will be near the Books-AMillion, and the pizza restaurant will be in the space that formerly housed Sbarro. The gross leasable area at the Lake Square Mall, including out-parcels, is 559,000 square feet, according to Glidewell. Gross leasable space in the mall itself is 520,177 square feet. BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL The outside of Crystal River Mall is shown. KOHAN RETAIL INVESTMENT GROUPS MALLS %  enTulsa Promenade, Tulsa, Okla (98 stores) %  enCrystal River Mall (40 stores) %  enSouthshore mall, Aberdeen, Wash. (27 stores) %  enWarren Mall, Warren, Ohio (13 stores) %  enMayberry Mall, Mount Airy, N.C. (23 stores) %  enVillage Square Mall, Efngham, Ill. (42 stores) %  enNebraska City Outlet Mall, Nebraska City, Neb. (12 stores) %  enStory City Outlet Mall, Story City, Iowa (21 stores) %  enGraceville Outlet Mall, Graceville (12 stores) %  enTifn Mall, Tifn, Ohio (32 stores) %  enRotterdam Square Mall, Albany, N.Y. (90 stores) %  enNorthland Mall, Worthington, Minn. %  enTrumball Plaza, Warren, Ohio MALL FROM PAGE C1 Haycock, Jenna Caldwell, Maya Coley, John Costigan, Kathryn Grant, Katie Hays, Chad Matheson, Amanda Pederson, Emily Per rin, Jade Pillsbury, Amy Reedy, Daniel Revell, Matthew Seymour and Dana Tauten. Clermont High Schools Christie Surin turned in a master ful pitching performance with a one-hit shutout over Groveland High at Clermonts West Park. Paul Halstead had a triple celebration of his 103rd birthday. South Lake Presbyterian Church members shared a cake, baked by Sue and Pete Joiner. Clermont Kiwanis Club also shared a cake and ice cream with Paul, a club member, at its weekly meeting and the actual day, March 29, was shared with family members. Betty Zelman and Bob Eyerly are Green Valley Country Clubs new Club Champions. For the second time in three months, bad weather demolished the screened pool enclosure of Bonnie and Charles Davis on County Road 565B. HISTORY FROM PAGE C1 Academy in Groveland to teaching 10 seminars at local schools on drug demand awareness. 4) Name one of your greatest accomplishments so far. I have been blessed to have been dual-enrolled in college since the age of 13. I earned my associate degree at the age of 15 and now am in my third semester of my fourth year at Faith Christian University. I will earn my B.A. in Bible and theology before I graduate from high school. I am also a corporal recently promoted in a pinning ceremony at the top of the Empire State Building -in the Young Marines program and in March, was selected as a delegate to the United Nations. 5) Whats something youve always wanted to do but havent yet? I love the ocean and would love to learn to surf. 6) What advice would you give to people who want to help out in the community? My mom always says, if people simply open their eyes a little wider, tune in their ears a little sharper, they will see and hear the needs of those around them. Simply nd a way to reach out helping one person each day. This can be as simple as a smile, note of encouragement, mentoring, clothing and feeding neighbors in need. The opportunities are endless. GARVISFROM PAGE C1

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Wednesday, April 16, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C3 15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.comOur 2012-2013 VPK readiness rate is a 100!We offer 2-, 3and 4-year old preschool programs, including VPK. 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PHILIPLUTHERANCHURCH1050 Boyd Dr. Mt. Dora, FL(across from Kathys Greenhouse Grill)352-383-5402 Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) Thank you for reading the local newspaper, the South Lake Press! ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comAn alternative name for what now is being called The Celebration Center in Clermont is still up in the air, but the citys name on the structure might turn out to be decisive. So far, thats the con sensus of many residents and city ofcials as they continue de bating the 140 suggested names for the former Celebration of Praise church property pur chased by Clermont in December for use as a community center. According to city re cords, 82 of those suggesting names ex pressed their wish that Clermont be includ ed in the name of the center, 15 wanted to in clude Gem of the Hills or Gem in the name and 15 wanted to keep the word Celebration or Celebrate. City spokesperson Doris Bloodsworth, whose background in cludes marketing, gave city commissioners a few things to think about last week as they decide on the new name. She said a number of people wanted to include Summit, Hill or Mountain in the name and that some wanted the building named after a person, either living or dead. Clear is better than clever, she said. Clear is the new sexy because, unless you have Nikes marketing budget, its often better to choose a name that says what you are. The police station will always be the Clermont Police Sta tion. So, with that said, you may want to con sider a name such as The Clermont Center for Culture & Recreation. If you choose a name that doesnt in clude Clermont, or de nes what the build ing is, just know that it will take more time for the name to catch on, and that opportunities will be lost when peo ple search on Google or other search engines for recreation or Cler mont facilities. Bloodsworth also recommended that a name should stand the test of time, noting that South Clermont or sim ilar locater names, such as South Annex, may change if population increases grow to the south. If people feel strongly about the name Gem of the Hills, because it has such long ties to the city, then that could be used when naming something like the facil itys performance hall, Bloodsworth suggested. The three most pop ular names suggested were Clermont Civic Center, Clermont Complex and Celebrate Clermont Center, Bloodsworth said. Mayor Hall Turville wasnt excited about any of them. He suggested the names City of Cler mont South Annex, or The City of Clermont Multiplex and agreed the word Clermont needs to be included in the name. Keith Mullins said hed like to see the main facility named after its main function The Clermont Arts and Rec reation Center with individual names for each center or inside fa cility. The discussion was tabled until May 13, to go along with the discussion of a what fees might be charged for use of the associated recreational facilities, such as the swimming pool and event hall. Recreations Director Dave Teske also presented the council with a preliminary fee schedule overview as suggest ed by city staff based on a determination of what similar centers charge. Membership fees, Teske said, may include $1 per day membership fee for residents. Suggested weekly passes would be $5, monthly would be $15, individual season pass would be $40 and family pass (for as many as ve) on a seasonal basis would be $120 for six months. Tentatively, Teske said the season for the pool would probably be June 7 to Sept 28. The center is sched uled to open on June 7 with an ofcial ribbon-cutting celebration on June 6.CLERMONTWhats in a new name? According to city records, 82 of those suggesting names expressed their wish that Clermont be included in the name of (The Celebration Center), 15 wanted to include Gem of the Hills or Gem in the name and 15 wanted to keep the word Celebration or Celebrate.

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Wednesday, April 16, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C5 Join us for Holy Week at South LakePalm Sunday, April 13th9:00 amContemporary, 11:00 amTraditionalMaundy Thursday, April 17th7:00 pm Communion ServiceEaster Sunday, April 20th9:00 amContemporary, 11:00 amTraditionalSouth Lake Presbyterian Church131 Chestnut Street Clermont, Fl 34711 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comPeople, like South Lake Chamber of Commerce Membership Di rector Ray Villegas, who have eagerly been an ticipating the arrival of Clermonts own Wawa for months, can breathe easy because on Thursday, its doors opened. I am looking forward to the hoagies, the soft pretzels, the smoothies and just the great qual ity service that I experi enced there (at Wawa) when I lived in the Philadelphia area, Villegas said. The store has been teasing us, just sitting there looking like its almost ready to open like that. The time is nally here, he said. The grand opening of the store, located at 1929 S. Highway 27 in Cler mont, included a char itable hoagie-building competition Hoa gies for Heroes be tween members of the Clermont Police and the City of Clermont Fire Department, and free coffee to the public for the rst 10 days the store is open. Jeff Pipes, gener al manager of the Cler mont Wawa store, will lead a team of nearly 60 associates. Wawa store will offer customers numerous Wawa brands, such as Wawa coffee (195 million cups sold annual ly); the Sizzli, Wawas hot breakfast sandwich; Wawas new line of specialty beverages (hot, cold, iced and frozen); Wawa Bakery; Wawas built-to-order hoagies (80 million sold annu ally); and Wawas bever age line of dairy products, juices and teas. The Clermont store is the fourth Wawa to open in 2014. The com pany plans to open 45 new stores. Wawa, Inc., a privately held company, be gan in 1803 as an iron foundry in New Jer sey. Toward the end of the 19th Century, owner George Wood took an interest in dairy farming and the family began a small processing plant in Wawa, Pa, in 1902. The milk business was a huge success, due to its quality, cleanliness and certied process. As home delivery of milk declined in the early 1960s, Grahame Wood, Georges grandson, opened the rst Wawa Food Market in 1964 as an outlet for dairy products. A chain of more than 635 convenience retail stores (over 365 offering gasoline), Wawa stores are located in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland and Vir ginia and as of July of 2012, Central Florida.CLERMONTWawa to open Thursday MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillardives@dailycommercial.comThousands showed up to celebrate some of the Souths favor ite foods on Saturday at the annual Planes, Trains & BBQ in Woo ton Park in Tavares. From ribs, pork and brisket to deep-fried bacon and Devils Blood hot sauce, pork lovers had their choice. A big focus of the day were the 28 bar becue vendors who showed up for the Florida B-B-Q Association-sanctioned event. These included: Ring of Fire, Back yard Brothers, Smoked Butt BBQ and Big Papas Country Kitchen. Its all about us ing the right grill, said Charlie Hall, of Smoked Butt, using a Lang grill, heated with wood. For $5 each, more than 200 people wad dled through the line to pick up a tiny cup of barbecue from pans, which didnt identify the cook, then voting for the barbecue they liked the best. It took taster John Lamb about two min utes to get through all the pork samples, but he made it clear none tasted the same. They all have a distinct southern avor, he said. There also was plenty of entertainment, including an air show, seaplane rides, a vintage car show and live TAVARESBarbecue draws crowds to Wooton Parkmusical acts. The live air show was comprised of four acts, including performer Patty Wagstaff, a sixtime member of the U.S. Aerobatic Team and winner of gold, silver and bronze medals. She thrilled audi ences with complex daredevil stunts such as eight-point rolls and death-defying rollovers in her Extra-300S plane. Her stunts reached speeds up to 250 mph and heights of about 3,000 feet and left smoke loops and lines in the air that garnered several oohs and aahs from the crowd gathered in the park and on nearby streets. You dont even have to be there to enjoy it, said Thomas Lang, watching the show from nearby Caroline Avenue. In addition to the ae rial exhibitions, the U.S. Special Ops Parachute Team executed preci sion freefall parachute maneuvers. Back this year was a train ride where dozens of residents climbed aboard the Orange Blos som Cannonball and watched a staged rob bery complete with cowboys and bad guys.The live air show was comprised of four acts, including performer Patty Wagstaff, a sixtime member of the U.S. Aerobatic Team and winner of gold, silver and bronze medals. She thrilled audiences with complex daredevil stunts such as eight-point rolls and deathdefying rollovers in her Extra-300S plane.

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C6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 16, 2014 Psychic Services A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services 352-431-9481Residential / Commercial rfnfftbrftb f Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Handyman Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. 5% Off Any Svc. under $1,000 $150 Off Any Svc. $2,000 or more $75 Off Any Svc. $1,000 or moreLawn Maintenance, Hardscape, Patios, Retaining Walls, Maint., SoddingLeesburg 536-3708 Landscaping Services Lawn Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Painting Services Pressure Cleaning Restaurants rr fntbnntnt r Airport Transportation Shower Doors Service Veterinarian Services Enclosure Screening Fencing Services Window Services Handyman Services Marine Services Cleaning Services Affordable Home Repair, LLC rffnn tbb nn352-551-6073 Electrical Services Free Est.Lic. & Ins.ntnt rfn ftb Concrete Services Roofing Services To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact Michelle in the Classified Department at (352) 365-8233 or by email michelle.fuller@dailycommercial.com Tree Service Home Improvement Plumbing Services b b

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Wednesday, April 16, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D1 Classified IndexLegal Notices....................0001 Notices............................1000 At Your Service................9000 Employment....................2000 Pets/Animals....................6865 Merchandise....................6000 Real Estate/For RENT......3000 Real Estate/For SALE........4000 Recreation........................7000 Transportation..................8000 Cancellations for ads running Wednesday must be made by 4pm Monday.ADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since The Daily Commercial will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error call the classified department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error.TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde

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D2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 16, 2014 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance rt t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital

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Wednesday, April 16, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D3 Untitled art#: order#: 6 X 5 Black Call the South Lake Press to get your ad in! 394-2183

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