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SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | C1SPORTS:Montverde wins second straight national title WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWST AND INSIDE CLASSIFIED D1 CROSSWORDS C2 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN C1 SPORTS B1 VOICES A4WORD ON THE STREE T A2SOUTH LAKE PRESSV OLUME 99, NO. 15 5 SECTIOn N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reservedwww. southlakepress.comPRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID Florida is banking on an underground reservoir for its water, but much is unknown about the Lower Floridan Aquifer LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comWater experts caution that south Lake Coun ty has just ve years or so to nd an alternative water suppl y before withdrawals from the aquifer could begin impacting lakes, wetlands and springs. County leaders are look ing for answers deeper under ground in the largely un tapped Lower Floridan Aquifer although they acknowledge that much is not known about that water source and they predict there will be substantial challenges in tapping it and using it. Still, the lower aquifer is seen by m any communities in Florida as the best hope for a cost-eff ective solution to the states approaching water shortage. On the front lines of this effort is the South Lake Regional Water Initiative (SLRWI), a coalition which includes the cities of Clermont, Groveland, Minneola, Mascotte, Montverde, the South Lake Chamber of Commerce and the county. Currently, most of the water consumed by Floridians is drawn from the Upper Flor idan Aquifer, a meandering reservoir that sits just below the surface of the earth. Water experts say the upper aquifer cannot supply a grow ing state, including Central Florida, much longer, so many counties Orange, Marion, Polk and Lake among them are beginning to explore the lower aquifer deeper beneath the ground. One key challenge, however, WHITNEY WILLARD / STAFF GRAPHICS LOWER AQUIFERThe South Lake Water Initiative is considering drilling into the lower aquifer, which is largely untapped because it is expensive to reach but could yield an abundance of fresh water for years to come. SEPARATE AQUIFERTo use the lower aquifer, utilities must show that it is a separate source of water and not connected to the upper aquifer. UPPER AQUIFERAlmost all water wells in Florida draw from the upper aquifer. SALT WATER SINKHOLE SPRING LAKE CONFINING UNIT GROUNDWATER RECHARGE AREA CONFINING UNIT LOWER AQUIFER UPPER AQUIFER CONNECTED AQUIFERIf the lower and upper aquifers are connected, they are considered part of the same water source Hope down below SARAH WHITAKER / SMW GEOSCIENCES INC. DRILLING DOWN ON THE PROBLEM Water experts say Central Florida will need an additional 300 million gallons of water a day by 2035, but the Upper Floridan Aquifer will be able to provide only about 50 million gallons. The Lower Floridan Aquifer is considered the best hope for providing plentiful fresh water far in to the future, but tapping it and purifying it could be expensive, geologists say. The South Lake Regional Water Initiative is hoping the Florida Legislature will help fund a $500,000 study to convince state water regulators that the Lower Aquifer is a viable source of potable water for the region.GOING DEEP PAYING THE PRICE GETTING LOW1 2 3 MISSISSIPPI ALABAMA GEORGIA FLORIDA SOUTH CAROLINA FLORIDA AQUIFER SYSTEM The Floridan Aquifer is the largest aquifer in the Southeastern United States. It runs beneath all of Florida and portions of Alabama, Georgia and South Carolina. More than 90 percent of people in northeast and east-central Florida use groundwater, which comes from an aquifer, as their water supply.SEE WATER | A2 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillardives@dailycommercial.comLake County Sheriffs deputies have identied the body of a 28-year-old woman discovered in a wooded area just outside of Cler mont early Friday. Cheri Amber Houston was from Newnan, Ga., sheriffs spokesman Lt. John Herrell said Saturday afternoon. Detectives believe that Houston had been in the Ocoee and Win ter Garden areas along the Highway 50 corri dor since March 31. Houston was a tran sient and over the past 8-10 weeks had moved from Miami to Nash ville, on to North Caro lina, and then to the Atlanta area before coming to the Orlando area. Detectives have also learned that she has a history of drug abuse. A woman walk ing her dog around 8:45 / a.m. on F riday dis covered the body about 300 feet from the inter section of Hancock and CLERMONTBody found in woods identified HOUSTON ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comAsk Dr. Len Lucero about Chris P. Bacon, the celebrated pig born with the withered hind legs, and youd think he was talking about a child, especially when he says its like a broth er to his own children. We (my family) have always been close to him, Lucero said of the pot-bellied porker, who will appear in a PBS documentary series Nature at 8 / p .m. to night in an episode entitled My Bionic Pet. I was very excited about being contacted for the show and cant wait to see it, Lucero said. If you go to PBS Nature and type in Chris P. Bacon, they have some really good teasers out there. Weve been anticipating this for a while now, and Im anxious to see what ends up on the segment, because the shoot took a long time a whole day actually. For those who dont know Chris P. Bacons story, a lady came to the Eastside Veterinary Clinic in Clermont, where Lucero used to work, about 15 months SUMTERVILLEChris P. Bacon to make appearance on PBSSEE BODY | A5SEE BACON | A5

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 9, 2014 ORANGE COUNTY Clermont man seriously injured in car crashA 45-year-old Clermont man suffered serious injuries early Sunday when his vehicle was hit by a driver who crossed over into his lane along the Western Beltway of the Wekiva Parkway in Orange County. The other driver died, the Florida Highway Patrol reported. The accident occurred just after midnight as Philip Joeckel III of Clermont was driving north in a 2013 KIA sports utility vehicle. The other driver, a 33-year-old Orlando man who has not been identied pending notication of relatives, was driving south in a 2004 Mazda sedan. According to the FHP, the Orlando man lost control of his vehicle, crossed the center median and hit Joeckels vehicle with its left side. Joeckel, a wedding professional, was admitted in serious condition at Orlando Regional Medical Center. The other driver was taken to Health Central Hospital in Ocoee, where he died of his injuries, the FHP reported.CLERMONT Cyclist struck and killed by car on FridayA Clermont bicyclist died Friday after being rear-ended by another Clermont motorist who blamed the crash on the setting sun, according to the Florida Highway Patrol. Larry Brantley, 59, died at Orlando Regional Medical Center. According to a FHP report, Brantley was riding his bike west on the edge of Oil Well Road near Alligator Road, just before 7:30 p.m. Friday. John Nussbaumer, 45, was driving a 2002 Ford F-150 somewhat behind him. Nussbaumer told troopers he didnt see Brantley due to the glare from the setting sun, when he struck the bike. Brantley was thrown off the bike as a result of the collision. The report adds the crash is still under investigation and charges are pending.LAKE PANASOFFKEE Lawyer disbarred over trust violationsThe Florida Supreme Court has disciplined 29 attorneys, including a Lake Panasoffkee lawyer disbarred because of allegations of trust account violations. Randall Norman Thornton, 2031 N. County Road 470, requested a disciplinary revocation that was granted immediately because he is no longer practicing law. The Florida Bar said a disciplinary revocation is the equivalent to disbarment, although Thornton can seek readmission in ve years. However, Thornton, who has been practicing law for more than 35 years with an emphasis on real estate closings and litigation, probate and guardianship, and corporate law, has said he is retiring. No information was available about the complaint made against him regarding the alleged trust account violations. Thornton was admitted to The Florida Bar in 1974, one year after graduating from the University of Floridas Fredric G. Levin College of Law. He had no previous disciplinary actions.CLERMONT Lakeridge Winery to host Blues at the Winery eventLakeridge Winery & Vineyards will showcase popular local blues artists and award-winning Lakeridge wines during Blues at the Winery on Saturday from 10 / a.m. to 5 / p.m. and Sunday from 11 / a.m. to 5 / p.m. A $2 donation will be accepted at the gate to benet the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, and parking is free for all guests. Seating is limited and guests are encouraged to bring lawn chairs or blankets to sit on. Food and beverage vendors will be on site and live music will be featured at the two-day event. There will also be a Lakeridge Winery booth on the grounds where guests can sign up for a chance to win a gift basket valued at $150. For information, go to www.laker idgewinery.com. Area Briefs What South Lake residents are saying about ...BUSINESSConsider the businesses already in south Lake County. What additional businesses would you like to see?Food a Longhorn, a Wafe House. What I would really like to see here in Clermont is a chil drens hospital. I have to take my son all the way to Lake Nona. Id like to see a Greek restaurant. Id like a Victorias Secret. SHERE ORDUNA CLERMONT I would like to see not a chain like a boutique with a handful of each item so everybody wont be buying the same thing. I just dont feel like I want to wear the same thing that everybody can get. JULIE KILEY GROVELAND Music and technology. We dont have an Apple Store. We have a music store, but it doesnt have a lot of variety. But I do feel weve got a lot in the area recently. We denite ly have more than we had before. CIARA HILL CLERMONT We have a community theater, we have a mu sic store, we have a dance store, we have a cupcake shop, we have a cute little deli downtown. Honestly Im not sure what else we could want, except I think we should have more rec reation centers for our youth. LAVONTE ROGERS CLERMONT Word on theStreet Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 is determining whether the two aquifers are truly separated by a conning layer of earth and are not simply part of the same aquifer system. Scott Laidlaw, the bureau chief of Water Use Planning and Regulation for the St. Johns River Water Management District, said data about the lower aquifer is limited. If the nature of the connement between the two units (the upper and lower aquifers) is leaky, drawing water from the lower Floridan may have the same impact to the minimum ows and lev els bodies as pulling water from the Upper Flori dan, he said. The two units are hy drologically connected. The nature of that connectivity varies across the region. Indeed, in Georgia, municipalities have been withdrawing from the lower Floridan since 1998, having little impact on the upper Floridan, experts said. The geology of this aquifer system is different in Georgia, said James Reichard, professor of geology at Georgia Southern University. We have more conning layers that sep arate the upper and lower Floridan. But because the low er aquifer is largely un tapped, much about it remains a mystery to sci entists and geologists. We dont know what the local geology looks like in the lower Flori dan and whether you can withdraw a reasonable quantity of water, said Alan Oyler, the technical consultant for the SLRWI, who previously worked for the city of Orlando for 28 years in the waste wa ter department imple menting reclaimed water systems. Finding that out is not cheap. Oyler said there are ar eas can be pulled from that will have a smaller ef fect than other areas. Any withdrawal from the lower aquifer is bound to have some effect on the upper, he said. The question is how much. Even so, the SJRWMD has approved permits,, such as one to Niagara Bottling Co., to more than double the amount of water it draws from the Flor idan Aquifer using the lower aquifer. Niagara contends that withdrawing water from the lower aquifer will have less impact on lake levels. In some places in Flori da, the conning unit (between the two aquifers) is less than 50 feet thick and composed of permeable limestone and dolomite, whereas Niagara con tends the area its looking at has a conning unit of clay up to 75 feet thick. A permit condition also was included in the agree ment that allows the per mit to be revoked or the withdrawal reduced if aquifer tests demonstrate that using water from the lower aquifer does not provide the benet antici pated, according to Water Management ofcials. Lake County Commissioner Sean Parks said before the lower aquifer is utilized as a water source, the best modeling and scientic data will have to demonstrate it has no effect on the Upper Floridan. I do believe any per mits issued for the Lower Floridan should be issued on a short-term basis, he said, so if it is determined it has an impact on the upper aquifer, the permit can be revoked. But studying the aquifers to assure there is sep aration between the up per and lower will be expensive. Working in conjunction with the Central Florida Water Initiative, the SLRWI must come up with $300,000 to fund a study that will convince the Wa ter Management District that using the lower aqui fer is a viable option. The Florida Senate has recommended full funding for the study, while the House of Representatives must still approve the funding. Even so, all parties, with the exception of the Lake County Commission, have agreed to share in the cost of the study. The County Commission is expected to vote for approval at an upcoming meeting. And even if studies prove the aquifers are separated, the costs of drilling deeper and purifying the water that comes from the lower aquifer will affect water users. Oyler said water rates across Central Florida will undoubtedly rise. Parks said nding an alternative water source whether it is tapping the lower aquifer or something else can be just one part of a larger solution to the approaching water shortage. He also advocates conservation, water reuse, and captur ing storm water for use by consumers.LEADING THE CHARGEPolk County, Lakes neighbor to the south, is already seeking a permit to withdraw 30 million gallons a day from the lower aquifer. We have already done tests that will demonstrat ed no impact to the upper aquifer or surcial, said Gary Fries, Polks utilities director. The whole project is expected to cost $320 million because a ma jor pipeline must be in stalled, Fries said. Fries believes that the lower Floridan is the most cost-effective option for Polk County, even though they will have to treat the water because the quality is poor. It will probably impact our water rates by 15 per cent, he said. The further south you go in Florida, the poor er the quality of water, Oyler explained. He said there are eight wells in the south Lake region cur rently withdrawing wa ter needs from the lower aquifer. The water quality test ed in Minneola, Clermont and Groveland lower aquifer wells is excellent, but as you reach the Four Corners area, the quality gets worse, he said. That is a challenge to treat, he said. Drilling in the lower aquifer is like potluck, Oyler said, explaining that one area could pro duce good water quality and another area 15 miles away could have poorer quality. While Oyler said the Lower Floridan is a viable option, the question is whether it will meet all of south Lakes needs. That is why it cannot be the only solution to solving the problem, he noted. If you look at the gen eral use pattern of water, 50 percent of potable wa ter is used for irrigation, he said. If we can stop large-scale irrigation, we dont have a water problem right now. While some areas are connected to reclaimed water, with many cities in the south region, including Groveland, expanding its reclaimed water networks, conservation is also key, Oyler said. Groveland Mayor Tim Loucks said in the next few months the Eagle Ridge Reclaimed Distri bution System would be online, reducing ground water for irrigation by 400,000 gallons a day. Regardless, people should cut back on their use of water, said. We are not in Costa Rica, Oyler said. You cant grow a jungle. WATER FROM PAGE A1

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Wednesday, April 9, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3 Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) DEATH NOTICESMuriel E. CaccamiseMuriel E. Caccamise, 84, of Lady Lake, died Thursday, April 3, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Eleanor ChatmanEleanor Chatman Neg, died, Wedneday, March 26, 2014. Eastside Funeral Home, Leesburg, FLMyra D. EdwardsMyra D. Edwards, 79, of Leesburg, died Tues day, April 1, 2014. Bey ers Funeral Home and Crematory, LeesburgNaomi L. ErbeNaomi L. Erbe, 88 of Avon Park, died Satur day, March 29, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Catherine HardieCatherine Hardie, 96, of Astor, died Friday, April 4, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Astor.Robert G. KeimRobert G. Keim, 77, of the Villages, died Sunday, March 30, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Sarah McDanielSarah McDaniel, 85, of Umatilla, died Friday March 28, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatil laPearl C. MeurerPearl C. Meurer, 85, of Mt. Dora, died Monday, March 31, 2014. All Faiths Cremation SocietyJack OdellJack Odell, 88, of Oxford, died Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Donald Edward RaberDonald Edward Raber, 93, of Leesburg, died Monday, March 31, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Leesburg.John Patrick WalshJohn Patrick Walsh, 89, of Mount Dora died Thursday, April 3, 2014. Allen J. Harden Funeral Home, Mount Dora.Mary M. WardMary M. Ward, 50, of Clermont, died Wednesday, April 2, 2014. Mar vin C. Zanders Funeral Home, Inc.IN MEMORY

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 9, 2014The news l ast week that Lake County of cials may build a massive volleyball com plex on the waterfront in Tavares should sting any resident of Leesburg who cares about the citys growth and prosperity. The complex could become one of the largest sites for beach volleyball tournaments in the Southeast if county commissioners approve the plan on April 8. The 20-court complex would be built in partnership with USA Volleyball, and it could draw thousands of spectators a year while infusing the local economy with hundreds of thousands of dollars. Sadly for Leesburg, this opportunity was theirs for the taking, but the city fumbled the negotiations last year to site the complex at Venetian Gardens on Lake Harris, so the plans supporters took their proposal down the road. Ironically, this all comes at a time when Leesburg ofcials are preparing a master plan for the future of Venetian Gardens, a sprawling 110-acre complex on the shore of Lake Harris that features rec reational facilities and outstanding walking paths. They are asking residents to chime in their ideas in a series of meetings over the coming weeks. Many longtime Leesburg residents fondly recall a time when Venetian Gardens was a vibrant recreation destination and long for a return to those days. They envision boats offshore, parks teeming with picnickers and weekend warriors playing basketball, football and Frisbee. And yet it hasnt happened. Some blame past and present city commission ers for caving in to the wishes of residents in up scale Palmora Park who want Venetian Gardens adjacent to their community to remain low-key and placid. There could be something to that criticism. Many ideas have been oated to the City Commission in recent years, and none have taken root. And while many wish for Venetian Gardens to be a lively destination that draws people to the area, some of the commissions decisions seem designed to have the opposite effect, like the creation of a no-wake zone in the boat basin that has been blamed for driving away recreational boaters. Leesburg really cannot afford to become comfortable and complacent. This is a city being challenged by The Villages for the consumer and entertainment dollars of its residents. It must do what it can to draw visitors, and Venetian Gardens certain has the kind of star power to do that, if only city leaders would allow it. Perhaps there is momentum toward that. Mayor John Christian said the commission will take a thoughtful, deliberate look at Venetian Gardens with an eye toward energizing the area while also protecting the quality of life of those in Palmora Park. Lets hope so. Venetian Gardens is a valuable community asset that should not be permitted to languish. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . ........................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTOPINION WHATS YOUR OPINION?The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to: Letters to the Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711By fax to: 352-394-8001EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed.GUEST COLUMNSIf you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OURVIEW SOUTH LAKE PRESSYour community newspaper for more than 100 years.732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Florida 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region.All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Harvest the potential from the gardensOur silly water policiesWhat is going on with our water supply? If the Florida Senate is allocating $300,000 for a study to nd an alternate water supply for south Lake County and the St. Johns Water Management District and is permitting the Niagara bottler to increase the water amounts to be removed for their prot, does this sound strange to any one else? Taxpayers are spending $300,000 to nd an alternative source for the south Lake water supply while Niagara makes a prot from our very water. Whatever entity that has some say with this decision-making should step up and check into what is going on here. Who is it and why arent they concerned? The taxpayers of Lake County deserve to know, and now, before it is to late. SARA HALE | TavaresSquandering our tax dollarsI cant help wonder why U.S. taxpayers are paying possibly $2 million dollars for Michelle Obama to y herself and her whole entourage over to China to discuss education in China. Also, the president just spent another $1 million or more to y to Orlando to discuss the economy. Im sure there must be a couple of million good reasons to squander tax dollars. I just happened to think, maybe Michelle is in China to get another loan to squander. Oh well, spend. The decit in America is still the fault of George Bush. DUANE HATCH | LeesburgHalf a decade of deceptionIt appears to me that William Campbell in a recent letter, Support the president, from March 16, lives in a different country than I do. After ve years of listening to lies, it seems that he hasnt been listening to the president or watching many of the things he has done. First, how about the president saying that the troops in the military should pay for their own treatment? This shows how far he is from knowing anything about the military. Campbell must not have read any of the Voices letters in the Daily Commercial that tell it like it is, with the Democrats in the Senate that hate the military, and Barbara Boxers comment that a general should address her as Senator rather than maam, which is a respectable term that we learned to call ladies. Even for generals. I am also a veteran of World War II and a prisoner of war. I joined the Ohio Air National Guard in 1974 as a caretaker of the 166th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, and was called to active duty for the Korean War, 1952-1953. I stayed in the Air Force and served in the Strategic Air Command and was also squadron commander of the 351st Strategic Missile Transportation Squadron. I was sent from Germany to Vietnam in 1968, serving a year there, not four months like John Kerry. So, if you need to tell me more about this illegal alien in the White House, have at it. PAUL S. PHILLIPS | LeesburgLet the superintendent pay for the mistakeDuring my 30 years as a public school teacher, I cannot remember having a superintendent that did not visit my classroom, ask about my program, class size and supplies needed for a successful program. If Dr. Susan Moxley were this kind of a superintendent, reporting wrong numbers for class sizes could not have happened. Therefore, I suggest the $20,000 cost for the review requested by Dr. Moxley be paid by her. REV. NORMAN L. CONAWAY | EustisParents must be their childrens best teachersI frequently see and hear about this or that the school system should be doing or teaching. As an adult and a survivor of a local school system (Volusia County), I have to say enough. When the schools are required to teach that bullying and drugs are bad, someone has seriously misplaced their priorities. Once upon a time and not that long ago, parents accepted the responsibility that their child or children were educated. Parents taught kids what was right and what was wrong. Parents made sure kids did their homework. Parents communicated with their kids schools and teachers. When you make the decision to bring a child into this world, you make a lifetime commitment. In very large letters is the word responsibility. You are responsible for this child until he or she reaches adulthood. You can and should accept help from family, friends, neighbors and yes even the school system. You should not, however, expect them to do your job. The school system is here to offer opportunities for your child to learn. Your child is with their teachers a few hours a day for approximately nine months out of the year. This same child is with you a whole lot more than that. So who do you think is going to have a greater inuence on what your child learns? That was a rhetorical question. The next time you see where the local school system ranks, ask yourself, What could I do? Its time that we as parents step up and do what needs to be done. Take responsibility. STEVE JENNELL | Sorrento LETTER of the WEEKIf you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veterans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to www.lakeveterans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANS YOURVOICESLETTERS TO THE EDITORHALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO

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Wednesday, April 9, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 Join us for Holy Week at South LakePalm Sunday, April 13th9:00 amContemporary, 11:00 amTraditionalMaundy Thursday, April 17th7:00 pm Communion ServiceEaster Sunday, April 20th9:00 amContemporary, 11:00 amTraditionalSouth Lake Presbyterian Church131 Chestnut Street Clermont, Fl 34711 Hartwood Marsh roads. The 5-foot, 2-inch strawberry blonde was found wearing denim Capri pants and a blue shirt. Detectives believe the body had been there fewer than 24 hours. The sheriffs ofce has not indicated there were any signs of foul play, but nevertheless are calling the death suspicious. According to ar rest logs published by the Times-Herald in Newnan, the Coweta County Sheriffs Ofce had booked Houston into its jail previously on charges of terror ist threats, loitering or prowling, disorderly conduct and felony vio lation of probation. Herrell said detectives have gone door-to-door in the area to in an effort to determine if any one saw or heard any thing suspicious during the approximate time of death. Anyone with information can call the Lake County Sheriffs Of ce at 352-343-2101; or Central Florida CRIME LINE at 1-800-423TIPS, where callers may remain anonymous. BODY FROM PAGE A1 THANKS FOR READING THE SOUTH LAKE PRESSago to inquire about putting down the animal. But one look at the piglet, who weighed less than 1 pound, stirred something in Lucero. I told her if she surrendered (the pig) to me, I would try to give it the best life possible, Lu cero said. The doctor took the pig to his Summerville home and built a tiny rear-end wheelchair out of KNex blocks, a childrens build ing toy similar to Legos. A video posted on YouTube showing Chris P. Bacon scooting around in his wheeled contraption went viral, and the pig got national television exposure (the Today show, Anderson Cooper, TMX, Discovery network, etc.), his own Facebook page with 107,174 likes and even world wide T-shirt sales. Hes healthy and happy and thats all you can ask for, Luce ro said. I guess I did my job. Be yond that, he inspires me, and as I keep seeing over and over again, he inspires many others as well. Once called a cute little pig, Chris P. Bacon is not that lit tle anymore, having added 72 pounds to his frame since Luce ro rst got him. The PBS episode is about an imals given a second chance at life through human intervention and prosthetics, or in Chris P. Ba cons case, the mobile device Lucero built for him. A lot of people probably dont realize what goes into a 15to 20-minute segment, Lucero said of the TV shoot at his home. I know I didnt. It was take af ter take after take, and Im pretty sure Chris did better than I did. These days, Chris P. Bacon re mains a busy pig, making appear ances at schools and hospitals. I hope and really think Chris is inspiring a lot of people but, if nothing else, every person who meets him ends up with a huge smile on their face. Last weekend, Lucero and Chris P. Bacon made an appear ance at the MDA Muscle Walk in Orlando and, last month, partic ipated in the Boating and Beach Bash for people with disabilities in Boca Raton. Lucero has written a childrens book about acceptance, the rst of a three-part series featuring Chris P. Bacon, himself and his family. The doctor also hopes to drum up interest in a movie deal about the pig on wheels. BACON FROM PAGE A1 PHOTO COURTESY OF DR. LEN LUCERO Chris P. Bacon will appear in a PBS documentary series called Nature at 8 / p.m. on Wednesday in an episode entitled My Bionic Pet. LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comLake Emergency Medical Services is facing cuts to ser vice beginning in October, if the organization has to chop an additional $750,000 from its budget for scal year 2015. If I have to cut three quarters of a million dollars because of revenue projections, I have no other place to relate it to but to service, said Jerry Smith, ex ecutive director of Lake EMS. We have already cut into the bone. Any deeper cuts will re sult in an amputation. This budget year, Lake EMS had close to a $1 million shortfall in its budget, result ing in Smith paring expenses to avoid cutting service. Smith did not ll six positions and was forced to elim inate the deputy chief of op erations position. He also has put off purchasing two am bulances and IT equipment. A reduction in call volume and transport volume has resulted in a $425,000 loss in anticipated revenue. Now, Smith said he was informed the ambulances al location, which it receives through the Municipal Ser vice Taxing Unit, has been re duced by $400,000 for scal year 2014-15. One third of that funds the EMS budget, he said, ex plaining the ambulance ser vice collects the remainder of its revenue from user fees, which have collectively been reduced because of the re duction in number of transports. Steve Koontz, Lakes budget director, said the county previously had additional revenues left over from the Lake-Sumter EMS split after Sumter County dissolved its contract with the organization. Those reserves have been depleted, he said, adding a reduction in property values has also affected the alloca tion. Smith said the majority of the ambulance service costs are xed, including medical supplies, fuel costs and maintenance. There is little room to make more cuts oth er than what he has already done, he said. Next years budget does not include any funding for capi tal, Smith said, leaving many needs unmet. We need at least three quarters of a million dollars to get us on track ..., he said. Smith has to replace four truck chassis, 16 LifePaks (known as cardiac moni tors) and 14 stretchers by 2016. The cardiac monitors are $30,000 a piece and each stretcher is $14,000, according to Smith. He already has eliminated funding for travel for his em ployees in his budget. That has put us at a disad vantage, Smith said. We are not involved in discussions at conferences about what the leading edge in medicine is. To add to the gravity of the situation, there are also national shortages on intravenous uids and critical med ication paramedics must give during a cardiac arrest. This is going to cause the price of medications inevitably to go up, Smith said. In June, county commis sioners will be asked for at least an additional $1 mil lion for the organization, said Smith. We are proud that we have progressive protocols, he said. We would like to main tain a high level of patient care. Commissioner Jimmy Con ner, who serves as vice chair man of the Lake EMS board, said he would oppose cutting services to Lake EMS. We are going to address public safety in our budget, he said. That is all there is to it. It is my top priority, wheth er it is the sheriffs budget or Lake EMS. Funding the rescue coordinator position for Lake Animal Services is not my No. 1 priority.Lake Emergency Medical Services could face cuts

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10% OFFAll options with this couponrffnntb B1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 9, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTSSPORTS EDITOR . ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE . .............................. 365-8268 FAX . .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL . ......... sports@dailycommercial.comSPORTSandLEISURE FRANK JOLLEY | COLUMNISTfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comLake County en tered the world of professional golf last week. The Lake County Classic, a National Golf Association tour stop, was played at Harbor Hills County Club in Lady Lake, and featured a record-setting performance by tournament winner Dominic Bozzelli, who won his third straight tournament. In the annals of the NGA once known as the Hooters Tour only one player had previously notched three straight wins. Zach Johnson, the 2007 Masters winner and 11-time winner on the PGA Tour, accomplished a trifecta in 2001. Only a handful of golfers have won more tournaments in succession. Byron Nelson won 11 straight in 1945. Tiger Woods had three separate streaks of at least ve straight wins a seven-win streak beginning in the 2006 season and extending into the 2007 campaign, a stretch of six wins that began in 1999 and ended in 2000 and ve straight wins in the 2007 and 2008 seasons. In addition, Ben Hogan won six straight tournaments in 1948 and four straight in 1953, and Jack Burke Jr. captured four straight victories in 1952. So Bozzellis accomplishment vaulted him into pretty raried air. Bozzelli earned his win at Harbor Hills as a champion should by draining birdie putts on each of his nal three holes. He didnt hang on to win and he didnt outlast his closest competitor. He won by making more birdies than second-place nisher Jack Newman, who managed only one birdie over the closing three holes. Thats quality golf. And Harbor Hills was a worthy host for the tournament. Play ers and NGA ofcials raved about the conditions on the nearly 7,000-yard course that features numerous elevation changes and countless breathtaking views. I really enjoyed Har bor Hills this week, Bozzelli tweeted after his win. Nice venue. Tom Leimberger, director of golf at Harbor Lake County got pro golf, but did anyone really care? FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comThe Lake-Sumter State College softball team earned a doubleheader split with Eastern Florida State College on April 1 at the National Training Cen ter softball complex. Eastern Florida State won the opener 5-3 with solo runs in the sixth and seventh innings, but the Lakehawks rebounded in the nightcap to pick up a 5-3 win. In the second game, Savannah Lalande got the win for LSSC. She relieved Emily Johnson in the fourth inning and allowed no runs on three hits. Taylor Douglass paced the Lakehawks in both games. She went a com bined 6-for-6 with a triple, double and single in the second game. Douglass had a triple and two singles in the rst game. Makenzie Heggie had two hits in the rst game and nished the night with three hits. LSSC catcher Jackie Reich had two hits in the nightcap. In the rst game, in addition to Douglass and Heggie, Katie Hohman had multiple hits. Breezy Vanderzyl took the loss in the rst game. LSSC bumped its record to 22-25 overall and 7-9 in the Mid-Florida Confer ence. The Lakehawks are off until Saturday when they host Florida State Col lege-Jacksonville at 1 / p .m. at the LSSC softball com plex.Lakehawks split doubleheader with Eastern Florida State BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Lake-Sumter freshman Marissa Conde bats during the rst game of a doubleheader between Eastern Florida State College and Lake-Sumter State College at the National Training Center in Clermont on April 1.SEE JOLLEY | B3 PHOTO COURTESY OF DICKS SPORTING GOODS The Montverde Academy boys basketball team celebrates with the national championship trophy on Saturday after beating Mount of Wilson (Va.) Oak Hill Academy in the championship game at the High School National Tournament in Madison Square Garden in New York. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comThere have been a number of dynasties in sports. UCLA and Kentucky in college basketball qualify as a dynasty, with 19 national titles between them. The New York Yan kees, with 27 World Se ries titles, certainly qualies as a dynasty, as do the NFLs Pittsburgh Steelers of the 1970s and the Green Bay Packers in the 1960s. In addition, the Bill Russell-led Boston Celtics, with 11 championships in 13 seasons is the de nition of dominance. Montverde Academy might qualify for inclu sion in that exclusive club. The Eagles boys bas ketball team used suffocating defense to bust open a close game in the second quarter en route to a 71-62 win against Mouth of Wil son (Va.) Oak Hill Academy to win the nation al championship at the High School National Tournament at Madison Square Garden in New York. It was Montverde Academys second consecutive national championship. The Eagles beat Newark (N.J.) St. Benedicts Prep 67-65 in overtime in last years ti tle game. Montverde Academy They are the champions!Montverde wins second straight national titleSEE MVA | B3

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B2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 9, 2014 April 12, 2014Registration:5pm 6pmat Spanish Village-Clubhouse(Between Arlington Ridge & Plantation)1 El Presidente Blvd., Leesburg, FL 34748 TOP PRIZES INCLUDE*: 1st: $500 Gift Card 2nd: $250 Gift Card 3rd: $100 Gift Card Thomas Kinkade Painting Weekend Trip $50 Gift CardrPhone: (352) 326-0761 x1100 Email: info@MercyMail.org www.AngelFlightSE.orgSponsors COME PLAY WITH USLimited Seats Available Sign Up Today Sponsor a Table of 10 Call for InformationTo Register go to:www.AngelFlightSE.org/Events $60.00 Registration Includes FoodPlus Re-stacks and Add-on!Early Registration is Now Available Save $20.00 Off Your Entry!Deadline April 9th HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. OutdoorsFishing352-365-8268 sports@dailycommercial.com www.dailycommercial.com %  %  SOUTHERN TACKLEWORKS | TAVARESDespite the misconception that the crappie quit biting after the spawn is concluded, the angler that guides out of Southern Tackleworks caught and released 53 specks in Lake Dora on jigs tipped with minnows. Most of the bass have moved off the beds and are schooling on shad. Moving baits like worms and chatter baits are working well. Southern Tackleworks will be hosting a seminar on Sunday for more information contact the shop. The Wednesday night open bass tour nament has resumed with the time change. For anyone interested, they start at 5:30 on Wednesday evening. Sandys bass tournament, open to all, is held on the third Saturday monthly at the Buzzard Beach ramp. Sandys next regular bass tournament will be an open tournament held April 19 with the weigh in at Buzzard Beach at 2:30 p.m.; any questions about either tournament call the shop at 352-742-0036. %  %  PINE ISLAND CAMP | FRUITLAND PARKShell cracker are hitting on grass shrimp and worms. Many anglers are catching limits. Pine Island has a full supply of live baits including grass shrimp as well as a variety of articial baits. RV sites, camp sites boats and slips are available for rental. Check out the restaurant before going out or coming off the lake. %  %  PALM GARDENS | TAVARESSpecks are still being caught on mostly minnows and some jigs. They are still at the edge of the grass and shorelines and are back in the deeper water. Palm Gardens has pontoon boats available to rent. %  %  NELSONS FISH CAMP | WEIRSD ALEBluegill are starting to bite on grass shrimp. %  %  BLACK BASS RESORT-FISH CAMP Minnow and worms are still the top sellers. Water levels are up making the boat ramp accessible to more boats. If the sh arent biting why not rent a boat or canoe and just make the most of a great day enjoying nature. %  %  SORRENTO BAIT AND TACKLEThe best reports are coming in from the Saint Johns River. Lots of hybrid (Sunshine) bass are being caught in the deep holes and bends in the river, the mouth of the Wekiva River and the feeder creeks on shiners and buck tail jigs. Schooling bass are being caught over the shell beds on RatL-Traps and noisy top water baits. A few specks are still being caught in the Harris chain in the residential canals and the Apopka-Beauclaire Canal. Post spawn bass are biting early in the morning in the mouths of residential canals on lipless baits like RatL-Traps chrome blue is a good color choice. Stop in and get the latest daily report. LAKES REPORT a weekly update fromCHERYL STALEY-ARCHER rff ntbbbbbbbbbbbbf nrntf t f bbbbbbbbbbbb rf rff rf ntf nrntf tf bbbbbbbbbbbb r rffrff r rf nt nrntf t r FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comThe Lake-Sumter State College baseball team scored two runs in the eighth inning April 2 to beat Seminole State 4-3 at the LSSC baseball complex in Leesburg. LSSC improved to 1617 overall and 3-13 in the Mid-Florida Conference. Dakota Higdon singled to start the eighth and later scored on a triple by Tanner Elsber nd. A single by Jack Cur tis plated Elsbernd for the winning run. Walker Sheller got the win in relief with two scoreless innings. Da vid Wood started for the Lakehawks and went 6 2/3 innings. Anthony Mazzurco also pitched for LSSC. Elsbernd, Curtis and Chris Blanton had two hits for LSSC. High School Wesley Moulden tossed a one-hitter, while striking out nine on April 1 to lift Eustis to a 1-0 win against South Sumter at Stuart Cot trell Field. Moulden outlasted Garrett Cave, South Sumters highly touted hurler. Cave struck out 10 and, reportedly, hit 94 mph on the radar gun. Kerry Carpenter, Michael Koenig, Jere my Migliori, Matthew Lusignan and Jacob Monroe had hits for the Panthers (11-6). Mi gliori scored the games lone run on Lusignans base hit. Leesburg 3, Tavares 1 Tucker Smith im proved to 6-0 on April 1 following a 3-1 win against Tavares at Pat Thomas Stadium-Buddy Lowe Field. Smith allowed four hits and struck out six. Jason Baita, Craig Hampton and Jaden Langley scored for Leesburg (7-11). Alexis Martinez scored Tavares (4-13) only run. Leesburg managed only three hits off the Bulldogs hurlers. Austin Baskette started and ab sorbed the loss.LSSC rallies in eighth to beat Seminole State

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Wednesday, April 9, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B3 Hills, and his crew did a magnicent job getting the course ready for the professionals in the weeks leading up to the tournament. He extended the length of a few holes to make the course longer and force the NGA pros to use more than just their drivers and wedges. For local players looking for a real challenge, Leimberger hinted that he would keep the longer tees in play. On Saturday, after the course was deemed unplayable because of late morning and ear ly afternoon storms, Leimberger and his staff worked overtime to get the place ready for a golng marathon on Sunday. Not once did any player complain about substandard playing conditions, and the scores reected quality conditions. Scores were low and players moved up and down the leaderboard. Sunday was, arguably, as exciting as the Masters will be next week, sans the glitz, glitter, pomp and stodginess. The only blemish on the entire tournament was that just a handful of local golf fans were on hand to witness history. Bet the ranch, though, that if Bozzelli winds up winning 11 PGA Tour events, like Zach Johnson, thousands will tell their friends they saw Bozzelli when he set a record at Harbor Hills. But Im not using newshole to bury the Lake County golf fan. If I were to do that, then Id have to address the makeup of the area sports fan. Id have to write about how many like to coach from the bleachers and complain about their kids not getting enough playing time. Id have to remark about those who whine and write letters about the coaching or lack thereof at the various levels of organized sports in the county, but do nothing to help. Nope. I just nd it peculiar that a local golf course was lucky enough to secure a professional tournament with a total purse of more than $100,000 and attendance was far lower than it shouldve been. Admission was free. Parking was free. It couldve been a showcase event for Lake County and its golng enthusiasts. Instead, it was a showcase for the golf course and the Harbor Hills staff. They prepared an incredible playing eld for the pros to strut their stuff. Too bad, so relatively few of us made the effort to go out and support the show. Good thing the NGA liked what they saw and would like to come back to Lake County for future events. If they used the turnstile count to make their decision, then it might be 2114 before wed have another professional tournament come around. So many people like to boast about how well sports collectives are supported in Lake County. The Leesburg Lightning, for example, has led the Florida Collegiate Summer League in attendance for the last seven years. Professional shing tour naments draw solid crowds when theyre in the area. But not so much for the rst professional golf tournament in recent memory. Perhaps it just takes time, and next years event will create parking problems and the need for ropes on the fairways and the greens to hold back the gallery. I hope so. It would be a shame if Lake County bowed out of the professional golf business after only one or two years.Frank Jolley is a columnist for the Daily Commercial. Write to him at frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com. JOLLEY FROM PAGE B1 led by as many as 25 points after taking a three-point lead into the second quarter. The Eagles defense, led by tournament MVP Ben Simmons, along with DAngelo Russell, Chris Egi, Jordan Caroline an d Brendan Boyle, left Oak Hill Academy frustrated and in a 17-point hole at halftime. Simmons, who finished with 24 points and 12 rebounds, helped Montverde Academy to its largest lead midway through the third quarter. A scoring drought by the Eagles of more than four minutes at the start of the fourth quarter enabled Oak Hill Academy to briefly cut the lead to seven at 59-52 with 3 minutes, 52 seconds to play. Egi helped to snuff out any hopes Oak Hill Academy had of cutting into the lead any further with a putback that snapped the scoreless streak. Later, Egi scored on a layout and then stuffed a shot on Oak Hill Academys next possession with less than two minutes to play. Justin Bibbs had 17 points for Montverde Academy and Rus sell chipped in with 16 points and 11 rebounds. Cody Martin paced Oak Hill Academy with 14 points and 10 re bounds. Montverde Academy finished the season 28-0 and riding a 34 game winning streak. The Eagles lone loss in January against Chicago Curie was later tak en down when it was discovered Curie had used players who were academically ineligi ble. Oak Hill Academy wrapped up its season with a 41-4 record. MVAFROM PAGE B1

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B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 9, 2014 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 725344767 1318315974 921FREE SPACE5372 216424863 529395268ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N IB O G BINGO B I N G O SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Phillip Sigler WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! I 16 I 29 I 21 I 18 I 25

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Ann DupeeREMEMBER WHENA weekly column that reprints some of the more interesting news stories that have appeared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press.C1SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 9, 2014 www.southlakepress.comCOMMUNITYProudly servingCLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWSSTAFF WRITER . ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE . .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 EMAIL..... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com FROM THE FILES | 25 YEARS AGO 1989Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press SITE TALKS CONTINUE FOR FEDERAL PRISONCounty Commis sioner Richard Swartz said Lake County may still get a federal prison, but un less public sentiment changes drastically, it wont be located at the U.S. Highway 27/State Road 19/Florida Turn pike intersection. County commissioners opted to seek an alternative site after conducting an impromptu poll during a public hearing attended by more than 200 people in Clermont March 29. A new state law will soon go into effect requiring concurrency, meaning all utilities and roads must be in place before construction of any new development can begin. Because of this new law, and the decision to drop the US 27/SR 19 site from consideration for the prison, development at the site, slated for an expo center, sports complex and/or industrial park, could be delayed for eight to 10 years. In possibly the rst unanimous vote of the South Lake Development Council, members endorsed the proposed federal prison in Lake County on March 20. Three other possible sites were mentioned, although only one was offered. Private developer Bob Mandell of Greater Construction of Orlando reportedly was willing to present a choice of three locations on his 1,700-acre property on the east side of US 27 and south of County Road 561A. Rumored were sites along County Road 474 and near Okahumpka.LIBRARY CELEBRATES DIAMOND JUBILEEThis week marks Coo per Memorial Librarys 75th anniversary. While we salute the librarys Diamond Jubilee, we should also pay tribute to the driving force behind the librarys continued growth and success for nearly 25 of those years its cur rent president, Alice Til den, who is the South Lake Press Citizen of the Month for April. The library will hold a Diamond Jubilee celebration from 1-4 / p.m. Sunday afternoon. Plan to tour the former bank building at the cor ner of Montrose Street and Lake Avenue. Its remodeling was made possible from $80,000 in donations raised by the Library Board in 1980 from the giving people of this community.CENTRAL FLORIDA PARKWAY TOLLWAYApril 13 is Transpor tation Day, and Lake County businessman Dan Eastwood Jr. and his associates hope a proposed, mostly CINDY DIANSpecial to the Daily CommercialHead, hearts, hands and health are what 4-H stands for, and youngsters had to use their heads during the Goat Skill-a-Thon at the Lake County Fair. This year has been very good so far, said Megan Brew, livestock agent for the Lake County Extension Ofce. The kids have done very well and weve had many perfect scores. The Skill-a-Thon encourages kids to learn about the many differ ent aspects of agriculture. This years theme was health care. The kids are learn ing about biology and buyer security in a way that makes it interesting, Brew said. We keep track of the kids over the years and see their progress. This lets us know the best ways to help them learn the material. Brew has seen the test scores consistently improve with the use of study guides and workshops. Its been really grat ifying to see how they improve each year, she said. This test is just a reection of the skills theyve learned through their individual proj ects. The kids are divid ed into three groups based on their age, and given just two minutes at each of the four sta tions. All kids are encour aged to participate even if this is their rst year with their goat. It was fun and I ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comAdvancement Via Individual Determination, or AVID, was a program developed in Cal ifornia in 1980 to help mid dle-achieving students improve. Since then, it has branched out to schools in 45 states and 16 countries. East Ridge Middle School in Clermont is one of those, and its success rate has earned it the designation of a National Demonstration School, t for coaching, training and guiding other schools. East Ridge was awarded the designation earli er last week by a national AVID validation team from California. Schools chosen as demonstration sites have proven their ability to successfully imple ment the AVID academic elective course and take the strategies school-wide to impact all students, AVID Chief Executive Ofcer Sandy Husk said. East Ridge is only the eighth AVID school out of 461 in Flor ida to receive the designation, and the 141st out of 4,900 AVID schools worldwide. That tells you the level of quality you are doing here at this school, said Cathy Simmons, the state director of AVID. Youre one of the elite guys, the best of the best, and it takes leadership from students, teachers and principals. AVID helps students by teaching, and reinforcing study and organizational skills. Instructors and tutors encourage them to take more challenging cours es, not only for success in grade school, but with an eye toward college. The validation team spent an entire day touring class rooms and talking with stu dents, teachers, mentors and tutors before making recommendations. The protocol was part of the last step in the vali dation process, which has taken about 18 months for the school to complete. Lake County School Superintendent Susan Moxley called the designation a stellar accom plishment, while School Board Member Debbie Stivender beamed. How grateful we are and how proud we are of how dedicated to this you all were, Stivender said. You just rock. Thats all there is to it. East Ridge, which joined AVID in 2009, had a grade passage rate last year of between 97-99 percent, said Kelly Cousineau, the schools original AVID coor dinator. Ive been fortunate in my ca reer to be able to start and sup port a program Im passionate about, she said. Im glad I was given the freedom to think AVID was the biggest and most important thing in the world when I rst started, because to me, it was. I think I was able to East Ridge Middle School recognized for AVID achievement SUBMITTED PHOTO Students, teachers, administrators and AVID ofcials gather around a banner recently awarded to East Ridge Middle School by an AVID team of reviewers from California, designating the school as a National Demonstration School for the program. LAKE COUNTY FAIR SCHEDULETODAY5 p.m. Gates open 6 p.m. 4H Share Your Talent show, community stageTHURSDAY8 a.m. to noon Swine check-in Swine Skill-a-Thon 5 p.m. Gates open 7:30, 9:30 p.m. Neon TruckersFRIDAY5 p.m. Gates open 7 p.m. Swine show 7:30, 9:30 p.m. Neon TruckersSATURDAY1 p.m. Gates open 6 p.m. Youth plant sale 6:30 p.m. Swine awards 7 p.m. Swine sale 7:30 p.m. Talent show nals 10 to 11 p.m. Rabbit, poultry check-outAVID helps students by teaching, and reinforcing study and organizational skills. Instructors and tutors encourage them to take more challenging courses, not only for success in grade school, but with an eye toward college.EUSTISKids excel in Lake County Fairs Goat Skill-a-Thon CINDY DIAN / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIALFrom left, Hannah Jones, Billie Green, Breanna Creech and Nathan Heston compete in the intermediate division of a Goat Skill-a-Thon at the Lake County Fair. CLERMONTSEE AVID | C4SEE HISTORY | C4SEE FAIR | C4

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C2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 9, 2014 MUSICAL INTERPRETATIONBY PETER A. COLLINS / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZNo. 0330RELEASE DATE: 4/6/2014 ACROSS1 Start of the United Negro College Fund slogan6 Old lab burners11 Abbr. at the top of an email14 Something passed between the legs?19 ___ Domingo20 Now and again?21 Like an ode23 Kind of farming25 Like Neptune among the planets in the solar system26 ___ pro nobis27 Echelon28 With the circled letters, 1955 Bill Haley and His Comets hit?30 Sound of sweet nothings31 Having a beat33 Hall-of-Famer Ralph35 Purveyor of the Doublicious sandwich36 ___ Webster, Twains celebrated jumping frog37 With 43-Across, 1973 Deep Purple hit?39 Like Odin41 Sound engineers knob43 See 37-Across45 Brings in47 Some dreams50 Reverse, e.g.51 Dismissed53 Eternally nameless thing, in Eastern religion54 Bath accessories55 Dr Pepper alternative58 Former Disney president Michael60 Dreamy romantic quality62 Olympic leap64 Ring Lardners Alibi ___65 Its put on before takeoff66 1959 Dion and the Belmonts hit?69 Old mattress stuffing72 Pond denizen73 Phil who played 65-Down78 1984 Cyndi Lauper hit?79 Memorable series in Psycho81 Dawn-to-dusk82 The continents, e.g.83 Phooey!85 Kelly of morning TV87 Haughty affectation88 Rap sheet listing89 Query at the start of a poker game91 Verbally assault94 Rene of Thor96 Thumbing-the-nose gesture98 Challenge for F.D.R.99 Mideast V.I.P.101 Meatless day in W.W. II: Abbr.103 Some lawn mowers105 Pertaining to religious rites108 Bugs Bunny addressee109 Where to find screwdrivers and rusty nails111 Like peas in ___113 Suffix with salt114 Made bats116 Primer pair119 Info on a magazine cover120 Real dear121 More cool, in slang122 French thinkers?123 Winks partner124 ___ State (Mountain West Conference team)125 Runners in the cold? DOWN1 Org.2 Actress Tierney3 Suffering4 Some versions of Windows5 Quit stalling!6 Suffix with major7 Back it up, in a way8 Seduction of the Minotaur author9 Bank ID10 Listen, pal!11 Tea Partiers, e.g.12 Crack filler13 Casual summer wear14 Medium for love letters?15 Card reader, for short16 What fastidious people cant be17 ___ Scott Card, Enders Game writer18 Competitor of ZzzQuil22 Label for 28-Across24 Alaskan city29 Fake32 Chef Lagasse34 To sum up 36 No longer in fashion38 Info for an airport greeter, for short40 Victorian ___42 Summons, of a sort43 The T of Mr. T44 Prefix with thermal46 Long time ___48 Boss Tweed nemesis49 New York arrival of 50 BBC std.52 Bank in need of support?54 Where hello is sveiks56 Reinforces57 Muff a grounder59 Something you can believe61 Hands on deck63 Chicken ___ (Italian dish, informally)65 NCO of 1950s TV67 Former faddish exercise regimen68 Way off69 Oktoberfest quaff70 John Locke, philosophically71 Out-of-the-way way74 Brand of pickles75 Slanted writing76 Description on many eBay listings77 The s in Awacs: Abbr.78 Dose meas.79 Eastern religion80 Place for a mani-pedi84 Grazs land: Abbr.86 Rev (up)89 See 95-Down90 1969 Creedence Clearwater Revival hit?92 Quantum physics particle93 Rubber from Arabia?95 With 89-Down, 1968 Tammy Wynette hit?97 Twelfth Night duke99 ___ to the list100 Inspector of crime fiction102 One inspiring love of poetry?104 ___ alive!106 Bonne ___!107 Longing looks109 Some queens110 Didnt stop in time, say112 ___ ale115 French scene117 Hollywood special FX118 Selena star, to her fans 12345 6789101112131415161718 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 2829 30 31 32 3334 35 36 37 3839 404142 43 44 45 46 47 4849 50 51 5253 54 55 565758 59 6061 62 6364 65 66 67 68 697071 72 73 74757677 78 79 8081 82 8384 85 86 87 88 89 9091 9293 94 95 96 97 98 99100 101102103 104105 106107 108 109 110 111112 113 114 115 116117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Solution on page D4 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comJohn Malik Jr. said his dad, John Malik Sr., was all about Ameri can-made products, es pecially cars and motor cycles. If you didnt have a Harley-Davidson, (he) really didnt want it in the parking lot, Malik Jr. said. Malik Sr., the former owner of Gator Har ley-Davidson and the father of the current owner, died March 30 at the age of 82. The family bought the dealership in 1993 and turned it into Gator Har ley-Davidson, according to Malik Jr., after having worked with snow mo biles, ATVs, body shops and water crafts in the Chicagoland area. Malik Sr. and his wife, Arlene, owned the business as well as Stormy Hill Har ley-Davidson in Cler mont, until two years ago, when Malik Jr. and his sister, Janice Malik, took them over. Malik Jr. now runs the Leesburg store and Janice operates the Cl ermont store, which opened in 2002. Hes been in business his whole life, Malik Jr. said of his father. This was always just a family business and he was the main man. Despite retiring two years ago, his son said Malik Sr. still came into the store every day and acted like a goodwill ambassador. Everybody loved him, everybody (came) in here (to) see him, and talk to him, and hed go around telling jokes and doing his thing, Malik Jr. said. Malik Jr. said his dad had a stroke 16 years ago and had been in a wheelchair since. He said his father remained positive even after the stroke and came to work as soon as he could af ter rehab. Malik Jr. said his father was hospitalized on March 18 after fall ing out of his chair and hitting his head on concrete. He sustained another stroke while in the hospital, Malik Jr. said. A public service will be at 10:30 / a.m. today at St. Patrick Catholic Church in Mount Dora.Founder of local Harley-Davidson dealerships dies at 82 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comOne of the most popular fe male country singers from the 1980s, Janie Fricke, is eager to return to Orange Blos som Opry in Weirsdale to per form two shows on Saturday at a place that feels like home. Its a wonderful venue; its very homey, warm, and I love those types of theaters, she said in a phone interview, and she relishes music halls lled with character and charisma over the more modern facilities. It puts me at ease, for sure, Fricke said. You feel at home; you just feel like youre in your living room and you can reach out and visit with the fans and friends because you know that those folks are very tried and true to their traditional country music. Its like a family of friends and a family of music. Orange Blossom General Manager Suzanne Morgan, who also serves as the lead singer of the Orange Blos soms band, said she adores Frickes music and ability to project warmth and connect with her fans. Just about every song she does is a favorite, Morgan said. Shes very good with the audience; she reaches out to them. The last time Fricke per formed in Weirsdale was with The Roys last October, where she joined in singing blue grass. The audience is looking forward to her doing her tra ditional songs, and not blue grass. They like that she is coming as herself and doing her songs in the traditional style, Morgan said. And that is what were looking forward to, too. Fricke grew up singing at the church near her familys 400-acre farm in South Whit ley, Ind., followed by coffee house appearances and oth er gigs throughout college at Indiana University, where she earned a degree in ele mentary education. Her passion for singing be came her bread and butter, leading her to Los Angeles, Memphis and Dallas, where she rst found success sing ing jingles for United Air lines, 7-Up, Red Lobster and Coca-Cola. The music industry took notice of Frickes voice after she was heard in duets with Merle Haggard and oth er stars, which opened the doors for her rst major recording contract. She soon began topping the country charts with her hits Dont Worry Bout Me Baby, Hes a Heartache, and Your Hearts Not in It. Fricke also won awards and accolades, including Country Music Associations Fe male Vocalist of the Year, Mu sic City News Female Vocalist of the Year, Billboard Top Country Female Vocalist, and a coveted Grammy nomina tion for It Aint Easy Being Easy. She has 23 albums and 36 hit singles to her credit. Sometimes I will forget to do a song in a show or leave it out because I dont have enough room to do all of my songs, Fricke said. Sure enough, they will come up in the autograph line and say You were supposed to sing Tell Me a Lie, so why didnt you sing that? Fricke makes good by singing a line from requested songs for her fans. Ill sing a line for them right in the autograph line, she said with a chuckle. This is a people business and you end up getting to know a lot of special people, and weve been getting notes from cer tain fans who have been coming to my concerts for over 30 years. Frickes passion for music has never waned. It gets in your blood, she said. This is what I do, and its what I have been do ing for all of these years, so I guess Im pretty used to it by now. Following her two shows at Orange Blossom, shell be traveling to venues in Arkan sas, Montana, Texas, Nevada and Wisconsin. When Fricke is not per forming, shes home at her ranch in the Dallas, Tex as area where she has a re cording studio and recorded Roses & Lace with her band. Her Texas home is where Fricke also devotes time to her second love: designing and creating custom handsewn pillows, table runners and throws that she makes and provides exclusively to World Trade Center buyers in Dallas and on janiefricke. com. The website also features Frickes albums over the years, along with her Greatest Hits and Songs of the Silver Screen, where she has recorded what she calls the great classic mov ies theme songs that people have loved over the years, ranging from Over the Rainbow, Moon River and Ill Be Seeing You. Fricke is spotlighted in one of the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museums exhibits Radio Romance: Main stream Country in the 1980s that runs through April 2015, which shows the stage costume she wore when she per formed at Camp David for President Ronald Reagan in 1981. One of the singers favorite aspects of performing is min gling with fans after the show and hearing comments that her songs take them back to special and meaningful mo ments in their lives. Sometimes they might say, I remember when I got married, we used your songs for our wedding, Fricke said. You never know what people are going to say; there is that nice little surprise.WEIRSDALECountry singer praises Orange Blossoms home-like venue SUBMITTED PHOTO Janie Fricke IF YOU GOWHAT: Janie Fricke performing two shows WHEN: 2:30 / p.m. and 7:30 / p.m. Saturday WHERE: Orange Blossom Opry, 16439 SE 138th Terrace, Weirsdale TICKETS: $25 CALL: 352-821-1201LEESBURG

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C4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 9, 2014 CLERMONT BLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSAMILYELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time! IRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONTL Many Other Activities each week Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.org LIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLCHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm SOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary); 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.org ST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am (Rite I) 10:00 am (Rite II) 5:00 pm (Praise & Worship) Sunday School Youth Group Nursery Adult Bible Study Womens Bible Study Mens Prayer Breakfast WOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH GODINCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALE ERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for Children Groveland IRSTBAPTISTCHURCH GROVELAND Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pm MT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! MINNEOLA CONGREGATIONSMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club NEWLPRESBYTERIANCHURCH18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am TLIVINGGOD Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce Rowland MONTVERDE WOODLANDSLUTHERAN15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 am OAKLAND PRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforSouth Lake South LakeGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOMErfn tbt352-394-7121806 W. Minneola Ave.,Clermont,FL Cremation ChoicesDirect Cremation$675Plus Container Ron Becker,Director352-394-8228921 S.US Hwy 27,Minneola,FL learned a lot, Breanna Creech said. Some of it was a surprise but I did my best. First-timer Olivia Jones of Leesburg was awarded second place in her division. I went online and studied the different parts and diseases for my goat, she said. My 4H group also helped me so when I have my own herd I can better take care of them. Olivias sister, Hannah, also received second place in her division. The Skill-a-Thon awards will be handed out at each divi sions show, where they will receive a cash prize sponsored by the Lake County Cattleman As sociation and the Lake Country Farm Bureau. First prize in the Ju nior Division went to Ashlee Ellis, rst prize in the Intermediate Division went to Jordyn Ter ry and rst prize in the Senior Division went to DAyn Sayre. The fair continues through Saturday at the fairgrounds at the inter section of County Roads 44 and 452. FAIR FROM PAGE C1 help grow it because of that. Cousineau, who now shares the duties of coordinator with Melody Clark, who heads the sixth-grade program, said it has taken a lot of commitment for the entire team to meet every month and get vested in the program. Our successful, two-year journey re quired shared leadership, strong consistency and continuous innovation, she said of the validation pro cess. We were excited to celebrate with our district leaders, various school principals, staff, AVID Center friends, students, par ents, and tutors. Now we have to keep it going. Thats our goal. AVID FROM PAGE C1 privately funded Central Florida tollway will become more of a reality. The proposed route would run due south from the southeast corner of I-295 in Jacksonville on the Atlantic cost to an intersection with I-75, either north or south of Fort Myers on the west coast. Two alter natives were presented at the South Lake Development Council meeting. For Lake County, this could mean an eastern edge passage (near Mount Dora, Ferndale and east of Clermont) or a more centrally located stretch passing through the countys planned recreation and industrial park at US 27/SR19/Florida Turnpike entrance along the Dead River, west of Howeyin-the-Hills and between Clermont and Groveland. HISTORY FROM PAGE C1 SUBMITTED PHOTO Kathy Scherer poses with Alan Garcia, president of the Kiwanis Club of Clermont, at a recent meeting where Scherer, the business development ofcer for Centennial Bank and chairperson for the Eliminate (Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus) program at the Kiwanis Club of Clermont, addressed fellow Kiwanis members. Scherer gave a brief update on the status of the Eliminate program and stated that to date Kiwanians have raised $45 million, helping to eliminate maternal and neonatal tetanus in 34 countries. SCHERER VISITS KIWANIS CLUB OF CLERMONT

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Wednesday, April 9, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C5 Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...Enchanted Living Home DecorEnchanted Living Home Decor offers an enchanted world of unique items and furnishings in one shopBy Terri Wells Nestled on Eighth Street in Historic Downtown Clermont, Enchanted Living Home Decor invites visitors in with treasures carefully displayed in every corner. Whether you're looking for a gorgeous antique couch or a much smaller item to help pull your room together, chances are you'll find it here. While owners Anissa Mills and Tony Wallace just opened the shop in February of this year, their passion for antiques goes back much further. Wallace's mother ran an antique business in Saint Augustine, so he learned about it at her knee. Wallace has always been a collector. He's passing the passion on to the next generation, as daughter Ashley works in all aspects of this family-owned business. She does a little of everything, from picking out furniture to running the cash register to helping out at events. "She does it all," Mills declared. The family has been living in Clermont for three years, as the result of "an accident," as Mills described it. Wallace came down for a job, and Mills followed him three months later, but both of them fell in love with the area. "The scenery, the mountains, it's all so different from anywhere else in Florida," Mills reflected. It reminded her of her home state of Ohio. When not hunting out antique treasures for his customers, Wallace can be found fishing out on the lake or indulging his enthusiasm for motorcycles. He's also an enthusiastic and experienced chef, citing Jamaican cuisine as a favorite a passion he learned from his father, who is Jamaican. Asked about her favorite aspect of the business, Mills pointed to the people. She loves talking with them and learning their stories. The business attracts a diversity of customers, from residents who have lived here for years to visitors from out of the country. Wallace's favorite aspect of the business is finding and buying unusual items for those customers. In the future, Wallace and Mills hope to grow their business. "We've outgrown our space," Mills admitted. The couple hopes to open a second store in the future. Enchanted Living Home Decor is located at 639 Eighth Street in Historic Downtown Clermont. You can call the store at 352-243-8888, check out their Facebook page at www.facebook.com/pages/Enchanted-Living-HomeDecor/260209717442997, or visit their website at www.enchantedlivinghomedecor.com/default.html. rfnrtb Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! rffntCall today b fnfffr mprehensim i$59ions$99excludes w isdo m teeth (thi rd m ola rs)new pa tients only one time visit offer p anoramic xray required D0330 out of pocket expenseExpires: May 31, 2014 m 352-394-3071 *P anoramic x-ray and/or CT scan of the ja ws necessary for d ia gnos is and trea tment planning. It is our office policy tha t the pa tient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service. examina tion or trea tment which is performed as a result of a nd within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free discounted-offer or reduced-free service, ex ami na tion or trea tment MIn. Free ADA code D0210, D0150 m3 No More Dentures! THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comUnder bright oodlights with luminaries lighting the way, hundreds of cancer survivors, family members and friends walked around the track of Leesburg High School in the wee hours Sun day for the Relay for Life of Leesburg and Lady Lake, a 16-hour event to raise aware ness and funds for the Amer ican Cancer Society. The supporters wanted to show cancer doesnt sleep. They also wanted cancer vic tims to know theyre not alone. It was empowering to know that I am not the only one, said uterine cancer survivor Wanda Linger, 41, of Bushnell, who cherished meeting other survivors at her rst Relay for Life, an upbeat event lled with music, food, games and an Iron Man contest and prizes. Even though Linger was tired, she stayed for the en tire relay, which began at 2 / p.m. Saturday and ended with the 6 / a.m. closing cer e mony and nal lap. I am nine months cancer free, Linger said. The Re lay for Life was her chance to celebrate. Mary Shaner of Lady Lake was joined by her infant granddaughter, Tinslee Price, 4 months old, one of the youngest relay participants. She stayed all night and slept for a little while. This is her rst relay, rst of many, said Shaner, who has been involved in Relay for Life for 15 years. We relay for many friends affected by cancer, Shan er said, recalling she became more involved in Relay for Life in 2009 after her sons teenage girlfriend was diagnosed with bone cancer. Since then, we have been full blast into it, Shaner said of serving on committees and forming a family-and-friends relay team. The Family and Friends of Cops Against Cancer team, headed by Leesburg Police Captain Rob Hicks, was out in force, too. Its so wonderful to support American Cancer Society, Cops Against Cancer and Relay for Life. This is just a wonderful cause in trying to help raise awareness, and I feel honored to be a part of it, said Jeanine Rubino. Rubino walked with Erin Mann and Molly Rowe as they made their nal lap around the track. I think everybody has been affected by cancer one way or the other, Mann said. This is something that the community can do to get in volved to come out here and support people who are ghting cancer. Chuck Kirk, event chair for Relay for Life of Leesburg and Lady Lake, hailed the relay a success, bringing in an estimated $50,000 and up to 700 attendees at the peak of the event. This was awesome and a great day, Kirk said after the closing ceremony. We started out with a huge opening cer emony, better than we have had in a couple of years, and it went through the entire day. Even with the heat, people stayed out. This group of re ally passionate people really made a difference, and when you think of all the challenges, the economy, what they have done is just phenomenal. Leesburg Regional Medical Center employees were among the relays biggest supporters. Janice Collins of LRMC said she enjoys being able to cheer for the survivors at the event. Its showing them that we are here to help them and support them, she said, and thats what the relay is all about.LEESBURG Hundreds walk to raise funds, cancer awareness PHOTOS BY THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Erin Mann, Jeanine Rubino and Molly Rowe walk in the Relay for Life fundraiser for the American Cancer Society. BELOW: Mary Shaner, left of Lady Lake, shows her infant granddaughter, Tinslee Price, at the relay. We started out with a huge opening ceremony, better than we have had in a couple of years, and it went through the entire day. Even with the heat, people stayed out. This group of really passionate people really made a difference ... What they have done is just phenomenal.Chuck KirkEvent chair for Relay for Life of Leesburg and Lady Lake

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C6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 9, 2014

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Wednesday, April 9, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D1 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance rt t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital Classified IndexLegal Notices......................003 Announcements................100 At Your Service..................200 Financial............................300 Employment......................400 Pets/Animals......................500 Merchandise Mart..............600 Real Estate/For RENT........800 Real Estate/For SALE..........900 Manufactured Homes......1000 Recreation........................1100 Transportation..................1200 Cancellations for ads running Wednesday must be made by 4pm Monday.ADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since The Daily Commercial will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error call the classified department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error.TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde You are reading the local paper, the South Lake Press!

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D2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 9, 2014 Psychic Services A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services 352-431-9481Residential / Commercial rfnfftbrftb f Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Concrete Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Handyman Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. Irrigation Services 5% Off Any Svc. under $1,000 $150 Off Any Svc. $2,000 or more $75 Off Any Svc. $1,000 or moreLawn Maintenance, Hardscape, Patios, Retaining Walls, Maint., SoddingLeesburg 536-3708 Landscaping Services Lawn Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Painting Services Pressure Cleaning Airport Transportation Enclosure Screening Fencing Services Handyman Services Plumbing Services Marine Services HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314 Cleaning Services Electrical Services Free Est.Lic. & Ins.352.504.8207 rfn ftb Land Clearing Services Concrete Services HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314

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Wednesday, April 9, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D3 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 6 X 10.5 Black Restaurants JAMAICAN GEORGECARRIBBEAN & SOUL FOOD RESTAURANT (352) 455-18982502 W. Main St. Leesburg, FL 34748Goat Soup Curry Chicken Curry Goat Ox Tail & More Shower Doors Service Tree Service Veterinarian Services Window Services Roofing Services Window Services Roofing Services To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact Michelle in the Classified Department at (352) 365-8233 or by email michelle.fuller@dailycommercial.com Thank you for reading the local newspaper, the South Lake Press!

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D4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 9, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 6 X 4.75 Black Untitled art#: order#: 2 X 4 Black 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr Call the South Lake Press to get your ad in! 394-2183 AMINDETNASBCCBATON SANTOTWICELAUDATORY SUBSISTENCEOUTERMOST ORATIERTHECLOCKCOO CADENTKINERKFCDANL SMOKENORSEFADER THEWATEREARNSOMENS GEARAXEDTAOLOOFAS MRPIBBOVITZSTARDUST TOELOOPIKESEATBELT LOATEENAGERVE BEDSTRAWEFTSILVERS TIMETIMESTABSALLDAY SEPTETBAHRIPAAIRS PRIORYOUINLAMBASTE RUSSOSNOOKPOLIO AMIRTUETOROSSACRAL DOCBARROOMSAPODINE DRIVENMADDICKANDJANE ISSUEDATEANGELILLER TETESNODBOISENOSES Crossword puzzle is on page C2.



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SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | C1 SPORTS: Montverde wins second straight national title WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWSTAND INSIDE CLASSIFIED D1 CROSSWORDS C2 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN C1 SPORTS B1 VOICES A4 WORD ON THE STREE T A2 SO UTH LAKE PRE SS V OLUME 99, NO. 15 5 SECTIO N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reserved www. southlakepress.com PRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID Florida is banking on an underground reservoir for its water, but much is unknown about the Lower Floridan Aquifer LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com W ater experts caution that south Lake Coun ty has just ve years or so to nd an alternative water suppl y before withdrawals from the aquifer could begin impacting lakes, wetlands and springs. County leaders are look ing for answers deeper under ground in the largely un tapped Lower Floridan Aquifer although they acknowledge that much is not known about that water source and they predict there will be substan tial challenges in tapping it and using it. Still, the lower aquifer is seen by m any communities in Florida as the best hope for a cost-eff ective solution to the states approaching water shortage. On the front lines of this ef fort is the South Lake Region al Water Initiative (SLRWI), a coalition which includes the cities of Clermont, Groveland, Minneola, Mascotte, Mont verde, the South Lake Cham ber of Commerce and the county. Currently, most of the wa ter consumed by Floridians is drawn from the Upper Flor idan Aquifer, a meandering reservoir that sits just below the surface of the earth. Water experts say the upper aquifer cannot supply a grow ing state, including Central Florida, much longer, so many counties Orange, Marion, Polk and Lake among them are beginning to explore the lower aquifer deeper beneath the ground. One key challenge, however, WHITNEY WILLARD / STAFF GRAPHICS LOWER AQUIFERThe South Lake Water Initiative is considering drilling into the lower aquifer, which is largely untapped because it is expensive to reach but could yield an abundance of fresh water for years to come. SEPARATE AQUIFERTo use the lower aquifer, utilities must show that it is a separate source of water and not connected to the upper aquifer. UPPER AQUIFERAlmost all water wells in Florida draw from the upper aquifer. SALT WATER SINKHOLE SPRING LAKE CONFINING UNIT GROUNDWATER RECHARGE AREA CONFINING UNIT LOWER AQUIFER UPPER AQUIFER CONNECTED AQUIFERIf the lower and upper aquifers are connected, they are considered part of the same water source Hope down below SARAH WHITAKER / SMW GEOSCIENCES INC. DRILLING DOWN ON THE PROBLEM Water experts say Central Florida will need an additional 300 million gallons of water a day by 2035, but the Upper Floridan Aquifer will be able to provide only about 50 million gallons. The Lower Floridan Aquifer is considered the best hope for providing plentiful fresh water far in to the future, but tapping it and purifying it could be expensive, geologists say. The South Lake Regional Water Initiative is hoping the Florida Legislature will help fund a $500,000 study to convince state water regulators that the Lower Aquifer is a viable source of potable water for the region. GOING DEEP PAYING THE PRICE GETTING LOW 1 2 3 MISSISSIPPI ALABAMA GEORGIA FLORIDA SOUTH CAROLINA FLORIDA AQUIFER SYSTEM The Floridan Aquifer is the largest aquifer in the Southeastern United States. It runs beneath all of Florida and portions of Alabama, Georgia and South Carolina. More than 90 percent of people in northeast and east-central Florida use groundwater, which comes from an aquifer, as their water supply. SEE WATER | A2 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millardives@dailycommercial.com Lake County Sheriffs deputies have identied the body of a 28-year-old woman discovered in a wooded area just outside of Cler mont early Friday. Cheri Am ber Houston was from Newnan, Ga., sheriffs spokesman Lt. John Herrell said Saturday afternoon. Detectives believe that Houston had been in the Ocoee and Win ter Garden areas along the Highway 50 corri dor since March 31. Houston was a tran sient and over the past 8-10 weeks had moved from Miami to Nash ville, on to North Caro lina, and then to the Atlanta area before coming to the Orlando area. Detectives have also learned that she has a history of drug abuse. A woman walk ing her dog around 8:45 a.m. on Friday dis covered the body about 300 feet from the inter section of Hancock and CLERMONT Body found in woods identified HOUSTON ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Ask Dr. Len Lucero about Chris P. Bacon, the celebrated pig born with the withered hind legs, and youd think he was talking about a child, especially when he says its like a broth er to his own children. We (my family) have always been close to him, Lucero said of the pot-bellied porker, who will appear in a PBS documentary series Nature at 8 p.m. to night in an episode en titled My Bionic Pet. I was very excited about being contact ed for the show and cant wait to see it, Lu cero said. If you go to PBS Nature and type in Chris P. Bacon, they have some really good teasers out there. Weve been anticipat ing this for a while now, and Im anxious to see what ends up on the segment, because the shoot took a long time a whole day actually. For those who dont know Chris P. Bacons story, a lady came to the Eastside Veterinary Clinic in Clermont, where Lucero used to work, about 15 months SUMTERVILLE Chris P. Bacon to make appearance on PBS SEE BODY | A5 SEE BACON | A5

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 9, 2014 ORANGE COUNTY Clermont man seriously injured in car crash A 45-year-old Clermont man suf fered serious injuries early Sunday when his vehicle was hit by a driver who crossed over into his lane along the Western Beltway of the Wekiva Parkway in Orange County. The other driver died, the Florida Highway Patrol reported. The accident occurred just after midnight as Philip Joeckel III of Clermont was driving north in a 2013 KIA sports utility vehicle. The other driver, a 33-year-old Orlando man who has not been identied pending notication of relatives, was driving south in a 2004 Mazda sedan. According to the FHP, the Orlando man lost control of his vehicle, crossed the center median and hit Joeckels vehicle with its left side. Joeckel, a wedding professional, was admitted in serious condition at Orlando Regional Medical Center. The other driver was taken to Health Central Hospital in Ocoee, where he died of his injuries, the FHP reported. CLERMONT Cyclist struck and killed by car on Friday A Clermont bicyclist died Friday after being rear-ended by another Clermont motorist who blamed the crash on the setting sun, according to the Florida Highway Patrol. Larry Brantley, 59, died at Orlando Regional Medical Center. According to a FHP report, Brantley was riding his bike west on the edge of Oil Well Road near Alligator Road, just before 7:30 p.m. Friday. John Nussbaumer, 45, was driving a 2002 Ford F-150 somewhat behind him. Nussbaumer told troopers he didnt see Brantley due to the glare from the setting sun, when he struck the bike. Brantley was thrown off the bike as a result of the collision. The report adds the crash is still under investigation and charges are pending. LAKE PANASOFFKEE Lawyer disbarred over trust violations The Florida Supreme Court has dis ciplined 29 attorneys, including a Lake Panasoffkee lawyer disbarred be cause of allegations of trust account violations. Randall Norman Thornton, 2031 N. County Road 470, requested a dis ciplinary revocation that was grant ed immediately because he is no lon ger practicing law. The Florida Bar said a disciplinary revocation is the equiva lent to disbarment, although Thornton can seek readmission in ve years. However, Thornton, who has been practicing law for more than 35 years with an emphasis on real estate clos ings and litigation, probate and guardianship, and corporate law, has said he is retiring. No information was available about the complaint made against him re garding the alleged trust account violations. Thornton was admitted to The Florida Bar in 1974, one year after graduating from the University of Floridas Fredric G. Levin College of Law. He had no previous disciplinary actions. CLERMONT Lakeridge Winery to host Blues at the Winery event Lakeridge Winery & Vineyards will showcase popular local blues artists and award-winning Lakeridge wines during Blues at the Winery on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. A $2 donation will be accepted at the gate to benet the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, and parking is free for all guests. Seating is limited and guests are en couraged to bring lawn chairs or blan kets to sit on. Food and beverage ven dors will be on site and live music will be featured at the two-day event. There will also be a Lakeridge Winery booth on the grounds where guests can sign up for a chance to win a gift basket valued at $150. For information, go to www.laker idgewinery.com. Area Briefs What South Lake residents are saying about ... BUSINESS Consider the businesses already in south Lake County. What additional businesses would you like to see? Food a Longhorn, a Wafe House. What I would really like to see here in Clermont is a chil drens hospital. I have to take my son all the way to Lake Nona. Id like to see a Greek restaurant. Id like a Victorias Secret. SHERE ORDUNA CLERMONT I would like to see not a chain like a boutique with a handful of each item so everybody wont be buying the same thing. I just dont feel like I want to wear the same thing that everybody can get. JULIE KILEY GROVELAND Music and technology. We dont have an Apple Store. We have a music store, but it doesnt have a lot of variety. But I do feel weve got a lot in the area recently. We denite ly have more than we had before. CIARA HILL CLERMONT We have a communi ty theater, we have a mu sic store, we have a dance store, we have a cupcake shop, we have a cute little deli downtown. Honestly Im not sure what else we could want, except I think we should have more rec reation centers for our youth. LAVONTE ROGERS CLERMONT Word on the Street Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 is determining whether the two aquifers are truly separated by a conning layer of earth and are not simply part of the same aquifer system. Scott Laidlaw, the bu reau chief of Water Use Planning and Regulation for the St. Johns River Wa ter Management District, said data about the lower aquifer is limited. If the nature of the connement between the two units (the upper and lower aquifers) is leaky, drawing water from the lower Floridan may have the same impact to the minimum ows and lev els bodies as pulling wa ter from the Upper Flori dan, he said. The two units are hy drologically connected. The nature of that con nectivity varies across the region. Indeed, in Georgia, mu nicipalities have been withdrawing from the lower Floridan since 1998, having little impact on the upper Floridan, experts said. The geology of this aquifer system is different in Georgia, said James Reichard, professor of ge ology at Georgia Southern University. We have more conning layers that sep arate the upper and lower Floridan. But because the low er aquifer is largely un tapped, much about it remains a mystery to sci entists and geologists. We dont know what the local geology looks like in the lower Flori dan and whether you can withdraw a reasonable quantity of water, said Alan Oyler, the technical consultant for the SLRWI, who previously worked for the city of Orlando for 28 years in the waste wa ter department imple menting reclaimed water systems. Finding that out is not cheap. Oyler said there are ar eas can be pulled from that will have a smaller ef fect than other areas. Any withdrawal from the lower aquifer is bound to have some effect on the upper, he said. The question is how much. Even so, the SJRWMD has approved permits,, such as one to Niagara Bottling Co., to more than double the amount of wa ter it draws from the Flor idan Aquifer using the lower aquifer. Niagara contends that withdrawing water from the lower aquifer will have less impact on lake levels. In some places in Flori da, the conning unit (be tween the two aquifers) is less than 50 feet thick and composed of permeable limestone and dolomite, whereas Niagara con tends the area its looking at has a conning unit of clay up to 75 feet thick. A permit condition also was included in the agree ment that allows the per mit to be revoked or the withdrawal reduced if aquifer tests demonstrate that using water from the lower aquifer does not provide the benet antici pated, according to Water Management ofcials. Lake County Commis sioner Sean Parks said be fore the lower aquifer is utilized as a water source, the best modeling and scientic data will have to demonstrate it has no ef fect on the Upper Flori dan. I do believe any per mits issued for the Lower Floridan should be issued on a short-term basis, he said, so if it is determined it has an impact on the upper aquifer, the permit can be revoked. But studying the aqui fers to assure there is sep aration between the up per and lower will be expensive. Working in conjunction with the Central Florida Water Initiative, the SL RWI must come up with $300,000 to fund a study that will convince the Wa ter Management District that using the lower aqui fer is a viable option. The Florida Senate has recommended full fund ing for the study, while the House of Represen tatives must still approve the funding. Even so, all parties, with the excep tion of the Lake County Commission, have agreed to share in the cost of the study. The County Com mission is expected to vote for approval at an upcoming meeting. And even if studies prove the aquifers are separated, the costs of drilling deeper and pu rifying the water that comes from the lower aquifer will affect water users. Oyler said water rates across Central Florida will undoubtedly rise. Parks said nding an al ternative water source whether it is tapping the lower aquifer or some thing else can be just one part of a larger solu tion to the approaching water shortage. He also advocates conservation, water reuse, and captur ing storm water for use by consumers. LEADING THE CHARGE Polk County, Lakes neighbor to the south, is already seeking a permit to withdraw 30 million gallons a day from the lower aquifer. We have already done tests that will demonstrat ed no impact to the upper aquifer or surcial, said Gary Fries, Polks utilities director. The whole project is expected to cost $320 million because a ma jor pipeline must be in stalled, Fries said. Fries believes that the lower Floridan is the most cost-effective option for Polk County, even though they will have to treat the water because the quality is poor. It will probably impact our water rates by 15 per cent, he said. The further south you go in Florida, the poor er the quality of water, Oyler explained. He said there are eight wells in the south Lake region cur rently withdrawing wa ter needs from the lower aquifer. The water quality test ed in Minneola, Clermont and Groveland lower aquifer wells is excellent, but as you reach the Four Corners area, the quality gets worse, he said. That is a challenge to treat, he said. Drilling in the low er aquifer is like potluck, Oyler said, explaining that one area could pro duce good water quality and another area 15 miles away could have poorer quality. While Oyler said the Lower Floridan is a via ble option, the question is whether it will meet all of south Lakes needs. That is why it cannot be the only solution to solv ing the problem, he not ed. If you look at the gen eral use pattern of water, 50 percent of potable wa ter is used for irrigation, he said. If we can stop large-scale irrigation, we dont have a water prob lem right now. While some areas are connected to reclaimed water, with many cities in the south region, includ ing Groveland, expand ing its reclaimed water networks, conservation is also key, Oyler said. Groveland Mayor Tim Loucks said in the next few months the Eagle Ridge Reclaimed Distri bution System would be online, reducing ground water for irrigation by 400,000 gallons a day. Regardless, people should cut back on their use of water, said. We are not in Cos ta Rica, Oyler said. You cant grow a jungle. WATER FROM PAGE A1

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Wednesday, April 9, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3 Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) DEATH NOTICES Muriel E. Caccamise Muriel E. Caccamise, 84, of Lady Lake, died Thursday, April 3, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Eleanor Chatman Eleanor Chatman Neg, died, Wedneday, March 26, 2014. East side Funeral Home, Leesburg, FL Myra D. Edwards Myra D. Edwards, 79, of Leesburg, died Tues day, April 1, 2014. Bey ers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg Naomi L. Erbe Naomi L. Erbe, 88 of Avon Park, died Satur day, March 29, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Catherine Hardie Catherine Hardie, 96, of Astor, died Friday, April 4, 2014. Beyers Fu neral Home, Astor. Robert G. Keim Robert G. Keim, 77, of the Villages, died Sun day, March 30, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Sarah McDaniel Sarah McDaniel, 85, of Umatilla, died Friday March 28, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatil la Pearl C. Meurer Pearl C. Meurer, 85, of Mt. Dora, died Mon day, March 31, 2014. All Faiths Cremation Society Jack Odell Jack Odell, 88, of Ox ford, died Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Donald Edward Raber Donald Edward Ra ber, 93, of Leesburg, died Monday, March 31, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Leesburg. John Patrick Walsh John Patrick Walsh, 89, of Mount Dora died Thursday, April 3, 2014. Allen J. Harden Funeral Home, Mount Dora. Mary M. Ward Mary M. Ward, 50, of Clermont, died Wednes day, April 2, 2014. Mar vin C. Zanders Funeral Home, Inc. IN MEMORY

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 9, 2014 T he news l ast week that Lake County of cials may build a massive volleyball com plex on the waterfront in Tavares should sting any resident of Leesburg who cares about the citys growth and prosperity. The complex could become one of the larg est sites for beach volleyball tournaments in the Southeast if county commissioners approve the plan on April 8. The 20-court complex would be built in partnership with USA Volleyball, and it could draw thousands of spectators a year while infusing the local economy with hun dreds of thousands of dollars. Sadly for Leesburg, this opportunity was theirs for the taking, but the city fumbled the negotiations last year to site the complex at Ve netian Gardens on Lake Harris, so the plans supporters took their proposal down the road. Ironically, this all comes at a time when Leesburg ofcials are preparing a master plan for the future of Venetian Gardens, a sprawling 110-acre com plex on the shore of Lake Harris that features rec reational facilities and outstanding walking paths. They are asking residents to chime in their ideas in a series of meetings over the coming weeks. Many longtime Leesburg residents fondly re call a time when Venetian Gardens was a vi brant recreation destination and long for a return to those days. They envision boats off shore, parks teeming with picnickers and week end warriors playing basketball, football and Frisbee. And yet it hasnt happened. Some blame past and present city commission ers for caving in to the wishes of residents in up scale Palmora Park who want Venetian Gardens adjacent to their community to remain low-key and placid. There could be something to that criticism. Many ideas have been oated to the City Com mission in recent years, and none have taken root. And while many wish for Venetian Gardens to be a lively destination that draws people to the area, some of the commissions decisions seem designed to have the opposite effect, like the creation of a no-wake zone in the boat ba sin that has been blamed for driving away rec reational boaters. Leesburg really cannot afford to become comfortable and complacent. This is a city be ing challenged by The Villages for the consum er and entertainment dollars of its residents. It must do what it can to draw visitors, and Vene tian Gardens certain has the kind of star power to do that, if only city leaders would allow it. Perhaps there is momentum toward that. Mayor John Christian said the commission will take a thoughtful, deliberate look at Venetian Gardens with an eye toward energizing the area while also protecting the quality of life of those in Palmora Park. Lets hope so. Venetian Gardens is a valuable community asset that should not be permitted to languish. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD ........................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST O PINION WHATS YOUR OPINION? The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Letters to the Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711 By fax to: 352-394-8001 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. GUEST COLUMNS If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OUR VIEW S OUTH LAKE PRESS Your community newspaper for more than 100 years. 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001 The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Florida 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region. All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Harvest the potential from the gardens Our silly water policies What is going on with our water supply? If the Florida Senate is allocating $300,000 for a study to nd an alternate water supply for south Lake County and the St. Johns Water Management District and is permitting the Niagara bottler to increase the water amounts to be removed for their prot, does this sound strange to any one else? Taxpayers are spending $300,000 to nd an alternative source for the south Lake water supply while Niagara makes a prot from our very water. Whatever entity that has some say with this decision-making should step up and check into what is going on here. Who is it and why arent they concerned? The taxpayers of Lake County deserve to know, and now, before it is to late. SARA HALE | Tavares Squandering our tax dollars I cant help wonder why U.S. taxpayers are paying possibly $2 million dollars for Michelle Obama to y herself and her whole entourage over to China to discuss education in China. Also, the president just spent another $1 million or more to y to Orlando to discuss the econ omy. Im sure there must be a couple of million good reasons to squander tax dollars. I just happened to think, maybe Michelle is in China to get another loan to squander. Oh well, spend. The decit in America is still the fault of George Bush. DUANE HATCH | Leesburg Half a decade of deception It appears to me that William Campbell in a recent letter, Support the president, from March 16, lives in a different country than I do. After ve years of listening to lies, it seems that he hasnt been listening to the president or watching many of the things he has done. First, how about the pres ident saying that the troops in the military should pay for their own treatment? This shows how far he is from know ing anything about the mili tary. Campbell must not have read any of the Voices letters in the Daily Commercial that tell it like it is, with the Democrats in the Senate that hate the mil itary, and Barbara Boxers com ment that a general should ad dress her as Senator rather than maam, which is a respectable term that we learned to call la dies. Even for generals. I am also a veteran of World War II and a prisoner of war. I joined the Ohio Air National Guard in 1974 as a caretaker of the 166th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, and was called to active duty for the Korean War, 1952-1953. I stayed in the Air Force and served in the Strategic Air Command and was also squadron command er of the 351st Strategic Missile Transportation Squadron. I was sent from Germany to Vietnam in 1968, serving a year there, not four months like John Kerry. So, if you need to tell me more about this illegal alien in the White House, have at it. PAUL S. PHILLIPS | Leesburg Let the superintendent pay for the mistake During my 30 years as a public school teacher, I cannot remem ber having a superintendent that did not visit my classroom, ask about my program, class size and supplies needed for a successful program. If Dr. Susan Moxley were this kind of a superintendent, re porting wrong numbers for class sizes could not have happened. Therefore, I suggest the $20,000 cost for the review re quested by Dr. Moxley be paid by her. REV. NORMAN L. CONAWAY | Eustis Parents must be their childrens best teachers I frequently see and hear abo ut this or that the school system should be doing or teaching. As an adult and a survi vor of a local school system (Volusia County), I have to say enough. When the schools are required to teach that bullying and drugs are bad, someone has seriously misplaced their priorities. Once upon a time and not that long ago, parents accept ed the responsibility that their child or children were educat ed. Parents taught kids what was right and what was wrong. Parents made sure kids did their homework. Parents com municated with their kids schools and teachers. When you make the decision to bring a child into this world, you make a lifetime commit ment. In very large letters is the word responsibility. You are responsible for this child until he or she reaches adult hood. You can and sh ould ac cept help from family, friends, neighbors and yes even the school system. You should not, however, expect them to do your job. The school system is here to offer opportunities for your child to learn. Your child is with their teachers a few hours a day for approximately nine months out of the year. This same child is with you a whole lot more than that. So who do you think is going to have a greater inuence on what your child learns? That was a rhe torical question. The next time you see where the local school system ranks, ask yourself, What could I do? Its time that we as parents step up and do what needs to be done. Take responsibility. STEVE JENNELL | Sorrento LETTER of the WEEK If you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veter ans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to www.lakeveterans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANS YOUR VOICES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO

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Wednesday, April 9, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 Join us for Holy Week at South LakePalm Sunday, April 13th9:00 amContemporary, 11:00 amTraditionalMaundy Thursday, April 17th7:00 pm Communion ServiceEaster Sunday, April 20th9:00 amContemporary, 11:00 amTraditionalSouth Lake Presbyterian Church131 Chestnut Street Clermont, Fl 34711 Hartwood Marsh roads. The 5-foot, 2-inch strawberry blonde was found wearing denim Capri pants and a blue shirt. Detectives believe the body had been there fewer than 24 hours. The sheriffs ofce has not indicated there were any signs of foul play, but nevertheless are calling the death suspicious. According to ar rest logs published by the Times-Herald in Newnan, the Coweta County Sheriffs Ofce had booked Houston into its jail previous ly on charges of terror ist threats, loitering or prowling, disorderly conduct and felony vio lation of probation. Herrell said detectives have gone door-to-door in the area to in an ef fort to determine if any one saw or heard any thing suspicious during the approximate time of death. Anyone with informa tion can call the Lake County Sheriffs Of ce at 352-343-2101; or Central Florida CRIME LINE at 1-800-423TIPS, where callers may remain anonymous. BODY FROM PAGE A1 THANKS FOR READING THE SOUTH LAKE PRESS ago to inquire about putting down the animal. But one look at the piglet, who weighed less than 1 pound, stirred something in Lucero. I told her if she surrendered (the pig) to me, I would try to give it the best life possible, Lu cero said. The doctor took the pig to his Summerville home and built a tiny rear-end wheelchair out of KNex blocks, a childrens build ing toy similar to Legos. A video posted on YouTube showing Chris P. Bacon scooting around in his wheeled contraption went viral, and the pig got na tional television exposure (the Today show, Anderson Cooper, TMX, Discovery network, etc.), his own Facebook page with 107,174 likes and even world wide T-shirt sales. Hes healthy and happy and thats all you can ask for, Luce ro said. I guess I did my job. Be yond that, he inspires me, and as I keep seeing over and over again, he inspires many others as well. Once called a cute little pig, Chris P. Bacon is not that lit tle anymore, having added 72 pounds to his frame since Luce ro rst got him. The PBS episode is about an imals given a second chance at life through human intervention and prosthetics, or in Chris P. Ba cons case, the mobile device Lu cero built for him. A lot of people probably dont realize what goes into a 15to 20-minute segment, Lucero said of the TV shoot at his home. I know I didnt. It was take af ter take after take, and Im pretty sure Chris did better than I did. These days, Chris P. Bacon re mains a busy pig, making appear ances at schools and hospitals. I hope and really think Chris is inspiring a lot of people but, if nothing else, every person who meets him ends up with a huge smile on their face. Last weekend, Lucero and Chris P. Bacon made an appear ance at the MDA Muscle Walk in Orlando and, last month, partic ipated in the Boating and Beach Bash for people with disabilities in Boca Raton. Lucero has written a childrens book about acceptance, the rst of a three-part series featuring Chris P. Bacon, himself and his family. The doctor also hopes to drum up interest in a movie deal about the pig on wheels. BACON FROM PAGE A1 PHOTO COURTESY OF DR. LEN LUCERO Chris P. Bacon will appear in a PBS documentary series called Nature at 8 p.m. on Wednesday in an episode entitled My Bionic Pet. LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com Lake Emergency Medical Services is facing cuts to ser vice beginning in October, if the organization has to chop an additional $750,000 from its budget for scal year 2015. If I have to cut three quarters of a million dollars because of revenue projections, I have no other place to relate it to but to service, said Jerry Smith, ex ecutive director of Lake EMS. We have already cut into the bone. Any deeper cuts will re sult in an amputation. This budget year, Lake EMS had close to a $1 million shortfall in its budget, result ing in Smith paring expenses to avoid cutting service. Smith did not ll six posi tions and was forced to elim inate the deputy chief of op erations position. He also has put off purchasing two am bulances and IT equipment. A reduction in call volume and transport volume has re sulted in a $425,000 loss in anticipated revenue. Now, Smith said he was in formed the ambulances al location, which it receives through the Municipal Ser vice Taxing Unit, has been re duced by $400,000 for scal year 2014-15. One third of that funds the EMS budget, he said, ex plaining the ambulance ser vice collects the remainder of its revenue from user fees, which have collectively been reduced because of the re duction in number of trans ports. Steve Koontz, Lakes budget director, said the county previ ously had additional revenues left over from the Lake-Sumter EMS split after Sumter County dissolved its contract with the organization. Those reserves have been depleted, he said, adding a reduction in property values has also affected the alloca tion. Smith said the majority of the ambulance service costs are xed, including medi cal supplies, fuel costs and maintenance. There is little room to make more cuts oth er than what he has already done, he said. Next years budget does not include any funding for capi tal, Smith said, leaving many needs unmet. We need at least three quarters of a million dollars to get us on track ..., he said. Smith has to replace four truck chassis, 16 LifePaks (known as cardiac moni tors) and 14 stretchers by 2016. The cardiac monitors are $30,000 a piece and each stretcher is $14,000, accord ing to Smith. He already has eliminated funding for travel for his em ployees in his budget. That has put us at a disad vantage, Smith said. We are not involved in discussions at conferences about what the leading edge in medicine is. To add to the gravity of the situation, there are also na tional shortages on intrave nous uids and critical med ication paramedics must give during a cardiac arrest. This is going to cause the price of medications inevitably to go up, Smith said. In June, county commis sioners will be asked for at least an additional $1 mil lion for the organization, said Smith. We are proud that we have progressive protocols, he said. We would like to main tain a high level of patient care. Commissioner Jimmy Con ner, who serves as vice chair man of the Lake EMS board, said he would oppose cutting services to Lake EMS. We are going to address public safety in our budget, he said. That is all there is to it. It is my top priority, wheth er it is the sheriffs budget or Lake EMS. Funding the res cue coordinator position for Lake Animal Services is not my No. 1 priority. Lake Emergency Medical Services could face cuts

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10% OFFAll options with this couponrffnntb B1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 9, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTS SPORTS EDITOR ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE .............................. 365-8268 FAX .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL ......... sports@dailycommercial.com S PORTS and LEISURE FRANK JOLLEY | COLUMNIST frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com L ake County en tered the world of professional golf last week. The Lake Coun ty Classic, a Nation al Golf Association tour stop, was played at Harbor Hills County Club in Lady Lake, and featured a record-set ting performance by tournament winner Dominic Bozzelli, who won his third straight tournament. In the annals of the NGA once known as the Hooters Tour only one player had previously notched three straight wins. Zach Johnson, the 2007 Masters winner and 11-time winner on the PGA Tour, ac complished a trifecta in 2001. Only a handful of golfers have won more tournaments in suc cession. Byron Nel son won 11 straight in 1945. Tiger Woods had three separate streaks of at least ve straight wins a seven-win streak beginning in the 2006 season and ex tending into the 2007 campaign, a stretch of six wins that began in 1999 and ended in 2000 and ve straight wins in the 2007 and 2008 seasons. In addition, Ben Ho gan won six straight tournaments in 1948 and four straight in 1953, and Jack Burke Jr. captured four straight victories in 1952. So Bozzellis accom plishment vaulted him into pretty raried air. Bozzelli earned his win at Harbor Hills as a champion should by draining bird ie putts on each of his nal three holes. He didnt hang on to win and he didnt outlast his closest competitor. He won by making more birdies than sec ond-place nisher Jack Newman, who man aged only one birdie over the closing three holes. Thats quality golf. And Harbor Hills was a worthy host for the tournament. Play ers and NGA ofcials raved about the con ditions on the nearly 7,000-yard course that features numerous el evation changes and countless breathtaking views. I really enjoyed Har bor Hills this week, Bozzelli tweeted after his win. Nice venue. Tom Leimberger, di rector of golf at Harbor Lake County got pro golf, but did anyone really care? FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com The Lake-Sumter State College softball team earned a doubleheader split with Eastern Florida State College on April 1 at the National Training Cen ter softball complex. Eastern Florida State won the opener 5-3 with solo runs in the sixth and seventh innings, but the Lakehawks rebounded in the nightcap to pick up a 5-3 win. In the second game, Sa vannah Lalande got the win for LSSC. She relieved Emily Johnson in the fourth inning and allowed no runs on three hits. Taylor Douglass paced the Lakehawks in both games. She went a com bined 6-for-6 with a tri ple, double and single in the second game. Douglass had a triple and two singles in the rst game. Makenzie Heggie had two hits in the rst game and nished the night with three hits. LSSC catcher Jackie Reich had two hits in the nightcap. In the rst game, in ad dition to Douglass and Heggie, Katie Hohman had multiple hits. Breezy Vanderzyl took the loss in the rst game. LSSC bumped its record to 22-25 overall and 7-9 in the Mid-Florida Confer ence. The Lakehawks are off until Saturday when they host Florida State Col lege-Jacksonville at 1 p.m. at the LSSC softball com plex. Lakehawks split doubleheader with Eastern Florida State BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Lake-Sumter freshman Marissa Conde bats during the rst game of a doubleheader between Eastern Florida State College and Lake-Sumter State College at the National Training Center in Clermont on April 1. SEE JOLLEY | B3 PHOTO COURTESY OF DICKS SPORTING GOODS The Montverde Academy boys basketball team celebrates with the national championship trophy on Saturday after beating Mount of Wilson (Va.) Oak Hill Academy in the championship game at the High School National Tournament in Madison Square Garden in New York. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com There have been a number of dynasties in sports. UCLA and Kentucky in college basketball qualify as a dynasty, with 19 national titles between them. The New York Yan kees, with 27 World Se ries titles, certainly qualies as a dynasty, as do the NFLs Pittsburgh Steelers of the 1970s and the Green Bay Packers in the 1960s. In addition, the Bill Rus sell-led Boston Celtics, with 11 championships in 13 seasons is the de nition of dominance. Montverde Academy might qualify for inclu sion in that exclusive club. The Eagles boys bas ketball team used suf focating defense to bust open a close game in the second quarter en route to a 71-62 win against Mouth of Wil son (Va.) Oak Hill Acad emy to win the nation al championship at the High School Nation al Tournament at Mad ison Square Garden in New York. It was Montverde Academys second con secutive national cham pionship. The Eagles beat Newark (N.J.) St. Benedicts Prep 67-65 in overtime in last years ti tle game. Montverde Academy They are the champions! Montverde wins second straight national title SEE MVA | B3

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B2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 9, 2014 April 12, 2014Registration:5pm 6pmat Spanish Village-Clubhouse(Between Arlington Ridge & Plantation)1 El Presidente Blvd., Leesburg, FL 34748 TOP PRIZES INCLUDE*: 1st: $500 Gift Card 2nd: $250 Gift Card 3rd: $100 Gift Card Thomas Kinkade Painting Weekend Trip $50 Gift CardrPhone: (352) 326-0761 x1100 Email: info@MercyMail.org www.AngelFlightSE.orgSponsors COME PLAY WITH USLimited Seats Available Sign Up Today Sponsor a Table of 10 Call for InformationTo Register go to:www.AngelFlightSE.org/Events $60.00 Registration Includes FoodPlus Re-stacks and Add-on!Early Registration is Now Available Save $20.00 Off Your Entry!Deadline April 9th HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. Outdoors Fishing 352-365-8268 sports@dailycommercial.com www.dailycommercial.com SOUTHERN TACKLEWORKS | TAVARES Despite the misconception that the crappie quit biting after the spawn is concluded, the angler that guides out of Southern Tackleworks caught and released 53 specks in Lake Dora on jigs tipped with min nows. Most of the bass have moved off the beds and are schooling on shad. Moving baits like worms and chatter baits are working well. Southern Tackleworks will be host ing a seminar on Sunday for more information contact the shop. The Wednesday night open bass tour nament has resumed with the time change. For anyone interested, they start at 5:30 on Wednesday eve ning. Sandys bass tournament, open to all, is held on the third Sat urday monthly at the Buzzard Beach ramp. Sandys next regular bass tournament will be an open tourna ment held April 19 with the weigh in at Buzzard Beach at 2:30 p.m.; any questions about either tournament call the shop at 352-742-0036. PINE ISLAND CAMP | FRUITLAND PARK Shell cracker are hitting on grass shrimp and worms. Many anglers are catching limits. Pine Island has a full supply of live baits includ ing grass shrimp as well as a vari ety of articial baits. RV sites, camp sites boats and slips are available for rental. Check out the restaurant before going out or coming off the lake. PALM GARDENS | TAVARES Specks are still being caught on mostly minnows and some jigs. They are still at the edge of the grass and shorelines and are back in the deeper water. Palm Gardens has pontoon boats available to rent. NELSONS FISH CAMP | WEIRSD ALE Bluegill are starting to bite on grass shrimp. BLACK BASS RESORT-FISH CAMP Minnow and worms are still the top sellers. Water levels are up making the boat ramp accessible to more boats. If the sh arent biting why not rent a boat or canoe and just make the most of a great day enjoying nature. SORRENTO BAIT AND TACKLE The best reports are coming in from the Saint Johns River. Lots of hybrid (Sunshine) bass are being caught in the deep holes and bends in the riv er, the mouth of the Wekiva River and the feeder creeks on shiners and buck tail jigs. Schooling bass are be ing caught over the shell beds on RatL-Traps and noisy top water baits. A few specks are still being caught in the Harris chain in the residential ca nals and the Apopka-Beauclaire Ca nal. Post spawn bass are biting early in the morning in the mouths of resi dential canals on lipless baits like RatL-Traps chrome blue is a good color choice. Stop in and get the latest dai ly report. LAKES REPORT a weekly update from CHERYL STALEY-ARCHER rff ntbbbbbbbbbbbbf nrntf t f bbbbbbbbbbbb rf rff r f ntf nrntf t f bbbbbbbbbbbb r rf f rf f r rf nt nrntf t r FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com The Lake-Sumter State College baseball team scored two runs in the eighth inning April 2 to beat Seminole State 4-3 at the LSSC baseball complex in Leesburg. LSSC improved to 1617 overall and 3-13 in the Mid-Florida Conference. Dakota Higdon sin gled to start the eighth and later scored on a triple by Tanner Elsber nd. A single by Jack Cur tis plated Elsbernd for the winning run. Walker Sheller got the win in relief with two scoreless innings. Da vid Wood started for the Lakehawks and went 6 2/3 innings. Anthony Mazzurco also pitched for LSSC. Elsbernd, Curtis and Chris Blanton had two hits for LSSC. High School Wesley Moulden tossed a one-hitter, while striking out nine on April 1 to lift Eustis to a 1-0 win against South Sumter at Stuart Cot trell Field. Moulden outlast ed Garrett Cave, South Sumters highly tout ed hurler. Cave struck out 10 and, reportedly, hit 94 mph on the radar gun. Kerry Carpenter, Mi chael Koenig, Jere my Migliori, Matthew Lusignan and Jacob Monroe had hits for the Panthers (11-6). Mi gliori scored the games lone run on Lusignans base hit. Leesburg 3, Tavares 1 Tucker Smith im proved to 6-0 on April 1 following a 3-1 win against Tavares at Pat Thomas Stadium-Bud dy Lowe Field. Smith allowed four hits and struck out six. Jason Baita, Craig Hampton and Jaden Langley scored for Lees burg (7-11). Alexis Martinez scored Tavares (4-13) only run. Leesburg managed only three hits off the Bulldogs hurlers. Austin Baskette started and ab sorbed the loss. LSSC rallies in eighth to beat Seminole State

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Wednesday, April 9, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B3 Hills, and his crew did a magnicent job get ting the course ready for the profession als in the weeks lead ing up to the tourna ment. He extended the length of a few holes to make the course lon ger and force the NGA pros to use more than just their drivers and wedges. For local players looking for a real chal lenge, Leimberger hinted that he would keep the longer tees in play. On Saturday, after the course was deemed unplayable because of late morning and ear ly afternoon storms, Leimberger and his staff worked overtime to get the place ready for a golng marathon on Sunday. Not once did any player complain about substandard playing conditions, and the scores reected qual ity conditions. Scores were low and players moved up and down the leaderboard. Sunday was, argu ably, as exciting as the Masters will be next week, sans the glitz, glitter, pomp and stodginess. The only blemish on the entire tournament was that just a handful of local golf fans were on hand to witness his tory. Bet the ranch, though, that if Bozzel li winds up winning 11 PGA Tour events, like Zach Johnson, thou sands will tell their friends they saw Boz zelli when he set a re cord at Harbor Hills. But Im not using newshole to bury the Lake County golf fan. If I were to do that, then Id have to ad dress the makeup of the area sports fan. Id have to write about how many like to coach from the bleachers and com plain about their kids not getting enough playing time. Id have to remark about those who whine and write letters about the coaching or lack thereof at the vari ous levels of organized sports in the county, but do nothing to help. Nope. I just nd it peculiar that a local golf course was lucky enough to secure a professional tournament with a to tal purse of more than $100,000 and atten dance was far lower than it shouldve been. Admission was free. Parking was free. It couldve been a showcase event for Lake County and its golng enthusiasts. Instead, it was a showcase for the golf course and the Harbor Hills staff. They prepared an in credible playing eld for the pros to strut their stuff. Too bad, so relatively few of us made the effort to go out and support the show. Good thing the NGA liked what they saw and would like to come back to Lake Coun ty for future events. If they used the turn stile count to make their decision, then it might be 2114 before wed have another pro fessional tournament come around. So many people like to boast about how well sports collectives are supported in Lake County. The Leesburg Light ning, for example, has led the Florida Colle giate Summer League in attendance for the last seven years. Pro fessional shing tour naments draw solid crowds when theyre in the area. But not so much for the rst professional golf tournament in re cent memory. Perhaps it just takes time, and next years event will create park ing problems and the need for ropes on the fairways and the greens to hold back the gallery. I hope so. It would be a shame if Lake County bowed out of the professional golf business after only one or two years. Frank Jolley is a columnist for the Daily Commercial. Write to him at frank.jol ley@dailycommercial.com. JOLLEY FROM PAGE B1 led by as many as 25 points after taking a three-point lead into the second quarter. The Eagles defense, led by tournament MVP Ben Simmons, along with DAngelo Russell, Chris Egi, Jordan Caroline an d Brendan Boyle, left Oak Hill Academy frustrat ed and in a 17-point hole at halftime. Simmons, who fin ished with 24 points and 12 rebounds, helped Montverde Academy to its largest lead midway through the third quarter. A scoring drought by the Eagles of more than four minutes at the start of the fourth quarter enabled Oak Hill Academy to briefly cut the lead to seven at 59-52 with 3 minutes, 52 seconds to play. Egi helped to snuff out any hopes Oak Hill Acade my had of cutting into the lead any further with a putback that snapped the scoreless streak. Later, Egi scored on a layout and then stuffed a shot on Oak Hill Academys next pos session with less than two minutes to play. Justin Bibbs had 17 points for Montverde Academy and Rus sell chipped in with 16 points and 11 rebounds. Cody Martin paced Oak Hill Academy with 14 points and 10 re bounds. Montverde Acade my finished the season 28-0 and riding a 34 game winning streak. The Eagles lone loss in January against Chica go Curie was later tak en down when it was discovered Curie had used players who were academically ineligi ble. Oak Hill Academy wrapped up its season with a 41-4 record. MVA FROM PAGE B1

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B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 9, 2014 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 7 25 34 47 67 13 18 31 59 74 9 21FREE SPACE53 72 2 16 42 48 63 5 29 39 52 68ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N I B O G BINGO B I N G O SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Phillip Sigler WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! I 16 I 29 I 21 I 18 I 25

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Ann Dupee REMEMBER WHEN A weekly column that reprints some of the more interesting news stories that have appeared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press. C1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 9, 2014 www.southlakepress.com C OMMUNITY Proudly serving CLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWS STAFF WRITER ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 EMAIL ..... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com FROM THE FILES | 25 YEARS AGO 1989 Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press SITE TALKS CONTINUE FOR FEDERAL PRISON C ounty Commis sioner Richard Swartz said Lake County may still get a federal prison, but un less public sentiment changes drastically, it wont be located at the U.S. Highway 27/State Road 19/Florida Turn pike intersection. County commission ers opted to seek an al ternative site after con ducting an impromptu poll during a public hearing attended by more than 200 people in Clermont March 29. A new state law will soon go into effect re quiring concurren cy, meaning all utilities and roads must be in place before construc tion of any new devel opment can begin. Be cause of this new law, and the decision to drop the US 27/SR 19 site from consideration for the prison, develop ment at the site, slat ed for an expo center, sports complex and/or industrial park, could be delayed for eight to 10 years. In possibly the rst unanimous vote of the South Lake Develop ment Council, mem bers endorsed the pro posed federal prison in Lake County on March 20. Three other possible sites were mentioned, although only one was offered. Private devel oper Bob Mandell of Greater Construction of Orlando reportedly was willing to present a choice of three loca tions on his 1,700-acre property on the east side of US 27 and south of County Road 561A. Rumored were sites along County Road 474 and near Okahumpka. LIBRARY CELEBRATES DIAMOND JUBILEE This week marks Coo per Memorial Librarys 75th anniversary. While we salute the librarys Diamond Jubilee, we should also pay tribute to the driving force be hind the librarys con tinued growth and suc cess for nearly 25 of those years its cur rent president, Alice Til den, who is the South Lake Press Citizen of the Month for April. The library will hold a Diamond Jubilee cel ebration from 1-4 p.m. Sunday afternoon. Plan to tour the former bank building at the cor ner of Montrose Street and Lake Avenue. Its remodeling was made possible from $80,000 in donations raised by the Library Board in 1980 from the giving people of this commu nity. CENTRAL FLORIDA PARKWAY TOLLWAY April 13 is Transpor tation Day, and Lake County businessman Dan Eastwood Jr. and his associates hope a proposed, mostly CINDY DIAN Special to the Daily Commercial Head, hearts, hands and health are what 4-H stands for, and young sters had to use their heads during the Goat Skill-a-Thon at the Lake County Fair. This year has been very good so far, said Megan Brew, livestock agent for the Lake County Extension Of ce. The kids have done very well and weve had many perfect scores. The Skill-a-Thon en courages kids to learn about the many differ ent aspects of agricul ture. This years theme was health care. The kids are learn ing about biology and buyer security in a way that makes it interest ing, Brew said. We keep track of the kids over the years and see their progress. This lets us know the best ways to help them learn the material. Brew has seen the test scores consistently im prove with the use of study guides and work shops. Its been really grat ifying to see how they improve each year, she said. This test is just a reection of the skills theyve learned through their individual proj ects. The kids are divid ed into three groups based on their age, and given just two minutes at each of the four sta tions. All kids are encour aged to participate even if this is their rst year with their goat. It was fun and I ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Advancement Via Individu al Determination, or AVID, was a program developed in Cal ifornia in 1980 to help mid dle-achieving students improve. Since then, it has branched out to schools in 45 states and 16 countries. East Ridge Middle School in Clermont is one of those, and its success rate has earned it the designation of a National Demonstration School, t for coaching, training and guiding other schools. East Ridge was awarded the designation earli er last week by a national AVID validation team from California. Schools chosen as demon stration sites have proven their ability to successfully imple ment the AVID academic elec tive course and take the strate gies school-wide to impact all students, AVID Chief Executive Ofcer Sandy Husk said. East Ridge is only the eighth AVID school out of 461 in Flor ida to receive the designation, and the 141st out of 4,900 AVID schools worldwide. That tells you the level of quality you are doing here at this school, said Cathy Sim mons, the state director of AVID. Youre one of the elite guys, the best of the best, and it takes leadership from students, teachers and principals. AVID helps students by teach ing, and reinforcing study and organizational skills. Instruc tors and tutors encourage them to take more challenging cours es, not only for success in grade school, but with an eye toward college. The validation team spent an entire day touring class rooms and talking with stu dents, teachers, mentors and tutors before making recom mendations. The protocol was part of the last step in the vali dation process, which has taken about 18 months for the school to complete. Lake County School Superin tendent Susan Moxley called the designation a stellar accom plishment, while School Board Member Debbie Stivender beamed. How grateful we are and how proud we are of how dedicated to this you all were, Stivender said. You just rock. Thats all there is to it. East Ridge, which joined AVID in 2009, had a grade passage rate last year of between 97-99 percent, said Kelly Cousineau, the schools original AVID coor dinator. Ive been fortunate in my ca reer to be able to start and sup port a program Im passion ate about, she said. Im glad I was given the freedom to think AVID was the biggest and most important thing in the world when I rst started, because to me, it was. I think I was able to East Ridge Middle School recognized for AVID achievement SUBMITTED PHOTO Students, teachers, administrators and AVID ofcials gather around a banner recently awarded to East Ridge Middle School by an AVID team of reviewers from California, designating the school as a National Demonstration School for the program. LAKE COUNTY FAIR SCHEDULE TODAY 5 p.m. Gates open 6 p.m. 4H Share Your Talent show, community stage THURSDAY 8 a.m. to noon Swine check-in Swine Skill-a-Thon 5 p.m. Gates open 7:30, 9:30 p.m. Neon Truckers FRIDAY 5 p.m. Gates open 7 p.m. Swine show 7:30, 9:30 p.m. Neon Truckers SATURDAY 1 p.m. Gates open 6 p.m. Youth plant sale 6:30 p.m. Swine awards 7 p.m. Swine sale 7:30 p.m. Talent show nals 10 to 11 p.m. Rabbit, poultry check-out AVID helps students by teaching, and reinforcing study and organizational skills. Instructors and tutors encourage them to take more challenging courses, not only for success in grade school, but with an eye toward college. EUSTIS Kids excel in Lake County Fairs Goat Skill-a-Thon CINDY DIAN / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL From left, Hannah Jones, Billie Green, Breanna Creech and Nathan Heston compete in the intermediate division of a Goat Skill-a-Thon at the Lake County Fair. CLERMONT SEE AVID | C4 SEE HISTORY | C4 SEE FAIR | C4

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C2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 9, 2014 MUSICAL INTERPRETATIONBY PETER A. COLLINS / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZNo. 0330RELEASE DATE: 4/6/2014 ACROSS1 Start of the United Negro College Fund slogan6 Old lab burners11 Abbr. at the top of an email14 Something passed between the legs?19 ___ Domingo20 Now and again?21 Like an ode23 Kind of farming25 Like Neptune among the planets in the solar system26 ___ pro nobis27 Echelon28 With the circled letters, 1955 Bill Haley and His Comets hit?30 Sound of sweet nothings31 Having a beat33 Hall-of-Famer Ralph35 Purveyor of the Doublicious sandwich36 ___ Webster, Twains celebrated jumping frog37 With 43-Across, 1973 Deep Purple hit?39 Like Odin41 Sound engineers knob43 See 37-Across45 Brings in47 Some dreams50 Reverse, e.g.51 Dismissed53 Eternally nameless thing, in Eastern religion54 Bath accessories55 Dr Pepper alternative58 Former Disney president Michael60 Dreamy romantic quality62 Olympic leap64 Ring Lardners Alibi ___65 Its put on before takeoff66 1959 Dion and the Belmonts hit?69 Old mattress stuffing72 Pond denizen73 Phil who played 65-Down78 1984 Cyndi Lauper hit?79 Memorable series in Psycho81 Dawn-to-dusk82 The continents, e.g.83 Phooey!85 Kelly of morning TV87 Haughty affectation88 Rap sheet listing89 Query at the start of a poker game91 Verbally assault94 Rene of Thor96 Thumbing-the-nose gesture98 Challenge for F.D.R.99 Mideast V.I.P.101 Meatless day in W.W. II: Abbr.103 Some lawn mowers105 Pertaining to religious rites108 Bugs Bunny addressee109 Where to find screwdrivers and rusty nails111 Like peas in ___113 Suffix with salt114 Made bats116 Primer pair119 Info on a magazine cover120 Real dear121 More cool, in slang122 French thinkers?123 Winks partner124 ___ State (Mountain West Conference team)125 Runners in the cold? DOWN1 Org.2 Actress Tierney3 Suffering4 Some versions of Windows5 Quit stalling!6 Suffix with major7 Back it up, in a way8 Seduction of the Minotaur author9 Bank ID10 Listen, pal!11 Tea Partiers, e.g.12 Crack filler13 Casual summer wear14 Medium for love letters?15 Card reader, for short16 What fastidious people cant be17 ___ Scott Card, Enders Game writer18 Competitor of ZzzQuil22 Label for 28-Across24 Alaskan city29 Fake32 Chef Lagasse34 To sum up 36 No longer in fashion38 Info for an airport greeter, for short40 Victorian ___42 Summons, of a sort43 The T of Mr. T44 Prefix with thermal46 Long time ___48 Boss Tweed nemesis49 New York arrival of 50 BBC std.52 Bank in need of support?54 Where hello is sveiks56 Reinforces57 Muff a grounder59 Something you can believe61 Hands on deck63 Chicken ___ (Italian dish, informally)65 NCO of 1950s TV67 Former faddish exercise regimen68 Way off69 Oktoberfest quaff70 John Locke, philosophically71 Out-of-the-way way74 Brand of pickles75 Slanted writing76 Description on many eBay listings77 The s in Awacs: Abbr.78 Dose meas.79 Eastern religion80 Place for a mani-pedi84 Grazs land: Abbr.86 Rev (up)89 See 95-Down90 1969 Creedence Clearwater Revival hit?92 Quantum physics particle93 Rubber from Arabia?95 With 89-Down, 1968 Tammy Wynette hit?97 Twelfth Night duke99 ___ to the list100 Inspector of crime fiction102 One inspiring love of poetry?104 ___ alive!106 Bonne ___!107 Longing looks109 Some queens110 Didnt stop in time, say112 ___ ale115 French scene117 Hollywood special FX118 Selena star, to her fans 12345 6789101112131415161718 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 2829 30 31 32 3334 35 36 37 3839 404142 43 44 45 46 47 4849 50 51 5253 54 55 565758 59 6061 62 6364 65 66 67 68 697071 72 73 74757677 78 79 8081 82 8384 85 86 87 88 89 9091 9293 94 95 96 97 98 99100 101102103 104105 106107 108 109 110 111112 113 114 115 116117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Solution on page D4 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com John Malik Jr. said his dad, John Malik Sr., was all about Ameri can-made products, es pecially cars and motor cycles. If you didnt have a Harley-Davidson, (he) really didnt want it in the parking lot, Malik Jr. said. Malik Sr., the former owner of Gator Har ley-Davidson and the father of the current owner, died March 30 at the age of 82. The family bought the dealership in 1993 and turned it into Gator Har ley-Davidson, according to Malik Jr., after having worked with snow mo biles, ATVs, body shops and water crafts in the Chicagoland area. Malik Sr. and his wife, Arlene, owned the business as well as Stormy Hill Har ley-Davidson in Cler mont, until two years ago, when Malik Jr. and his sister, Janice Malik, took them over. Malik Jr. now runs the Leesburg store and Janice operates the Cl ermont store, which opened in 2002. Hes been in business his whole life, Malik Jr. said of his father. This was always just a family business and he was the main man. Despite retiring two years ago, his son said Malik Sr. still came into the store every day and acted like a goodwill ambassador. Everybody loved him, everybody (came) in here (to) see him, and talk to him, and hed go around telling jokes and doing his thing, Malik Jr. said. Malik Jr. said his dad had a stroke 16 years ago and had been in a wheelchair since. He said his father remained positive even after the stroke and came to work as soon as he could af ter rehab. Malik Jr. said his fa ther was hospitalized on March 18 after fall ing out of his chair and hitting his head on con crete. He sustained an other stroke while in the hospital, Malik Jr. said. A public service will be at 10:30 a.m. today at St. Patrick Catholic Church in Mount Dora. Founder of local Harley-Davidson dealerships dies at 82 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com One of the most popular fe male country singers from the 1980s, Janie Fricke, is ea ger to return to Orange Blos som Opry in Weirsdale to per form two shows on Saturday at a place that feels like home. Its a wonderful venue; its very homey, warm, and I love those types of theaters, she said in a phone interview, and she relishes music halls lled with character and cha risma over the more modern facilities. It puts me at ease, for sure, Fricke said. You feel at home; you just feel like youre in your living room and you can reach out and visit with the fans and friends because you know that those folks are very tried and true to their traditional country music. Its like a family of friends and a family of music. Orange Blossom General Manager Suzanne Morgan, who also serves as the lead singer of the Orange Blos soms band, said she adores Frickes music and ability to project warmth and connect with her fans. Just about every song she does is a favorite, Morgan said. Shes very good with the audience; she reaches out to them. The last time Fricke per formed in Weirsdale was with The Roys last October, where she joined in singing blue grass. The audience is looking forward to her doing her tra ditional songs, and not blue grass. They like that she is coming as herself and doing her songs in the traditional style, Morgan said. And that is what were looking forward to, too. Fricke grew up singing at the church near her familys 400-acre farm in South Whit ley, Ind., followed by coffee house appearances and oth er gigs throughout college at Indiana University, where she earned a degree in ele mentary education. Her passion for singing be came her bread and butter, leading her to Los Angeles, Memphis and Dallas, where she rst found success sing ing jingles for United Air lines, 7-Up, Red Lobster and Coca-Cola. The music industry took notice of Frickes voice af ter she was heard in duets with Merle Haggard and oth er stars, which opened the doors for her rst major re cording contract. She soon began topping the country charts with her hits Dont Worry Bout Me Baby, Hes a Heartache, and Your Hearts Not in It. Fricke also won awards and accolades, including Coun try Music Associations Fe male Vocalist of the Year, Mu sic City News Female Vocalist of the Year, Billboard Top Country Female Vocalist, and a coveted Grammy nomina tion for It Aint Easy Being Easy. She has 23 albums and 36 hit singles to her credit. Sometimes I will forget to do a song in a show or leave it out because I dont have enough room to do all of my songs, Fricke said. Sure enough, they will come up in the autograph line and say You were supposed to sing Tell Me a Lie, so why didnt you sing that? Fricke makes good by sing ing a line from requested songs for her fans. Ill sing a line for them right in the autograph line, she said with a chuckle. This is a people business and you end up getting to know a lot of special people, and weve been getting notes from cer tain fans who have been coming to my concerts for over 30 years. Frickes passion for music has never waned. It gets in your blood, she said. This is what I do, and its what I have been do ing for all of these years, so I guess Im pretty used to it by now. Following her two shows at Orange Blossom, shell be traveling to venues in Arkan sas, Montana, Texas, Nevada and Wisconsin. When Fricke is not per forming, shes home at her ranch in the Dallas, Tex as area where she has a re cording studio and record ed Roses & Lace with her band. Her Texas home is where Fricke also devotes time to her second love: designing and creating custom handsewn pillows, table runners and throws that she makes and provides exclusively to World Trade Center buyers in Dallas and on janiefricke. com. The website also fea tures Frickes albums over the years, along with her Greatest Hits and Songs of the Silver Screen, where she has recorded what she calls the great classic mov ies theme songs that peo ple have loved over the years, ranging from Over the Rain bow, Moon River and Ill Be Seeing You. Fricke is spotlighted in one of the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museums exhib its Radio Romance: Main stream Country in the 1980s that runs through April 2015, which shows the stage cos tume she wore when she per formed at Camp David for President Ronald Reagan in 1981. One of the singers favorite aspects of performing is min gling with fans after the show and hearing comments that her songs take them back to special and meaningful mo ments in their lives. Sometimes they might say, I remember when I got married, we used your songs for our wedding, Fricke said. You never know what people are going to say; there is that nice little surprise. WEIRSDALE Country singer praises Orange Blossoms home-like venue SUBMITTED PHOTO Janie Fricke IF YOU GO WHAT: Janie Fricke performing two shows WHEN: 2:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Saturday WHERE: Orange Blossom Opry, 16439 SE 138th Terrace, Weirsdale TICKETS: $25 CALL: 352-821-1201 LEESBURG

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C4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 9, 2014 CLERMONT BLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSAMILYELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time! IRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONTL Many Other Activities each week Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.org LIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLCHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm SOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary); 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.org ST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am (Rite I) 10:00 am (Rite II) 5:00 pm (Praise & Worship) Sunday School Youth Group Nursery Adult Bible Study Womens Bible Study Mens Prayer Breakfast WOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH GODINCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALE ERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for Children Groveland IRSTBAPTISTCHURCH GROVELAND Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pm MT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! MINNEOLA CONGREGATIONSMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club NEWLPRESBYTERIANCHURCH18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am TLIVINGGOD Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce Rowland MONTVERDE WOODLANDSLUTHERAN15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 am OAKLAND PRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforSouth Lake South LakeGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOMErfn tbt352-394-7121806 W. Minneola Ave.,Clermont,FL Cremation ChoicesDirect Cremation$675Plus Container Ron Becker,Director352-394-8228921 S.US Hwy 27,Minneola,FL learned a lot, Breanna Creech said. Some of it was a surprise but I did my best. First-timer Olivia Jones of Leesburg was awarded second place in her division. I went online and studied the different parts and diseases for my goat, she said. My 4H group also helped me so when I have my own herd I can better take care of them. Olivias sister, Hannah, also received second place in her division. The Skill-a-Thon awards will be hand ed out at each divi sions show, where they will receive a cash prize sponsored by the Lake County Cattleman As sociation and the Lake Country Farm Bureau. First prize in the Ju nior Division went to Ashlee Ellis, rst prize in the Intermediate Divi sion went to Jordyn Ter ry and rst prize in the Senior Division went to DAyn Sayre. The fair continues through Saturday at the fairgrounds at the inter section of County Roads 44 and 452. FAIR FROM PAGE C1 help grow it because of that. Cousineau, who now shares the duties of co ordinator with Melody Clark, who heads the sixth-grade program, said it has taken a lot of commitment for the entire team to meet every month and get vested in the program. Our successful, two-year journey re quired shared lead ership, strong consis tency and continuous innovation, she said of the validation pro cess. We were excited to celebrate with our district leaders, vari ous school principals, staff, AVID Center friends, students, par ents, and tutors. Now we have to keep it go ing. Thats our goal. AVID FROM PAGE C1 privately funded Cen tral Florida tollway will become more of a reality. The proposed route would run due south from the south east corner of I-295 in Jacksonville on the Atlantic cost to an intersection with I-75, either north or south of Fort Myers on the west coast. Two alter natives were present ed at the South Lake Development Council meeting. For Lake Coun ty, this could mean an eastern edge pas sage (near Mount Dora, Ferndale and east of Clermont) or a more centrally lo cated stretch passing through the countys planned recreation and industrial park at US 27/SR19/Flori da Turnpike entrance along the Dead Riv er, west of Howeyin-the-Hills and be tween Clermont and Groveland. HISTORY FROM PAGE C1 SUBMITTED PHOTO Kathy Scherer poses with Alan Garcia, president of the Kiwanis Club of Clermont, at a recent meeting where Scherer, the business development ofcer for Centennial Bank and chairperson for the Eliminate (Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus) program at the Kiwanis Club of Clermont, addressed fellow Kiwanis members. Scherer gave a brief update on the status of the Eliminate program and stated that to date Kiwanians have raised $45 million, helping to eliminate maternal and neonatal tetanus in 34 countries. SCHERER VISITS KIWANIS CLUB OF CLERMONT

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Wednesday, April 9, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C5 Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...Enchanted Living Home DecorEnchanted Living Home Decor offers an enchanted world of unique items and furnishings in one shopBy Terri Wells Nestled on Eighth Street in Historic Downtown Clermont, Enchanted Living Home Decor invites visitors in with treasures carefully displayed in every corner. Whether you're looking for a gorgeous antique couch or a much smaller item to help pull your room together, chances are you'll find it here. While owners Anissa Mills and Tony Wallace just opened the shop in February of this year, their passion for antiques goes back much further. Wallace's mother ran an antique business in Saint Augustine, so he learned about it at her knee. Wallace has always been a collector. He's passing the passion on to the next generation, as daughter Ashley works in all aspects of this family-owned business. She does a little of everything, from picking out furniture to running the cash register to helping out at events. "She does it all," Mills declared. The family has been living in Clermont for three years, as the result of "an accident," as Mills described it. Wallace came down for a job, and Mills followed him three months later, but both of them fell in love with the area. "The scenery, the mountains, it's all so different from anywhere else in Florida," Mills reflected. It reminded her of her home state of Ohio. When not hunting out antique treasures for his customers, Wallace can be found fishing out on the lake or indulging his enthusiasm for motorcycles. He's also an enthusiastic and experienced chef, citing Jamaican cuisine as a favorite a passion he learned from his father, who is Jamaican. Asked about her favorite aspect of the business, Mills pointed to the people. She loves talking with them and learning their stories. The business attracts a diversity of customers, from residents who have lived here for years to visitors from out of the country. Wallace's favorite aspect of the business is finding and buying unusual items for those customers. In the future, Wallace and Mills hope to grow their business. "We've outgrown our space," Mills admitted. The couple hopes to open a second store in the future. Enchanted Living Home Decor is located at 639 Eighth Street in Historic Downtown Clermont. You can call the store at 352-243-8888, check out their Facebook page at www.facebook.com/pages/Enchanted-Living-HomeDecor/260209717442997, or visit their website at www.enchantedlivinghomedecor.com/default.html. rfnrtb Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! rffntCall today b fnfffr mprehensim i$59ions$99excludes w i sdo m teeth (thi rd m ola rs)new pa t ients only one time visit offer p anoramic xray required D0330 out of pocket expenseExpires: May 31, 2014 m 352-394-3071 *P anoramic x-ray and/or CT scan of the ja ws necessary for d ia gnos is and trea tment planning. It is our office policy tha t the pa tient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service. examina tion or trea tment which is performed as a result of a nd within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free discounted-offer or reduced-free service, ex ami na tion or trea tment MIn. Free ADA code D0210, D0150 m3 No More Dentures! THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com Under bright oodlights with luminaries lighting the way, hundreds of cancer survivors, family members and friends walked around the track of Leesburg High School in the wee hours Sun day for the Relay for Life of Leesburg and Lady Lake, a 16-hour event to raise aware ness and funds for the Amer ican Cancer Society. The supporters wanted to show cancer doesnt sleep. They also wanted cancer vic tims to know theyre not alone. It was empowering to know that I am not the only one, said uterine cancer survivor Wanda Linger, 41, of Bushnell, who cherished meeting other survivors at her rst Relay for Life, an up beat event lled with music, food, games and an Iron Man contest and prizes. Even though Linger was tired, she stayed for the en tire relay, which began at 2 p.m. Saturday and ended with the 6 a.m. closing cere mony and nal lap. I am nine months cancer free, Linger said. The Re lay for Life was her chance to celebrate. Mary Shaner of Lady Lake was joined by her infant granddaughter, Tinslee Price, 4 months old, one of the youngest relay participants. She stayed all night and slept for a little while. This is her rst relay, rst of many, said Shaner, who has been involved in Relay for Life for 15 years. We relay for many friends affected by cancer, Shan er said, recalling she became more involved in Relay for Life in 2009 after her sons teenage girlfriend was diag nosed with bone cancer. Since then, we have been full blast into it, Shaner said of serving on committees and forming a family-and-friends relay team. The Family and Friends of Cops Against Cancer team, headed by Leesburg Police Captain Rob Hicks, was out in force, too. Its so wonderful to sup port American Cancer Soci ety, Cops Against Cancer and Relay for Life. This is just a wonderful cause in trying to help raise awareness, and I feel honored to be a part of it, said Jeanine Rubino. Rubino walked with Erin Mann and Molly Rowe as they made their nal lap around the track. I think everybody has been affected by cancer one way or the other, Mann said. This is something that the community can do to get in volved to come out here and support people who are ghting cancer. Chuck Kirk, event chair for Relay for Life of Leesburg and Lady Lake, hailed the relay a success, bringing in an esti mated $50,000 and up to 700 attendees at the peak of the event. This was awesome and a great day, Kirk said after the closing ceremony. We started out with a huge opening cer emony, better than we have had in a couple of years, and it went through the entire day. Even with the heat, people stayed out. This group of re ally passionate people really made a difference, and when you think of all the challenges, the economy, what they have done is just phenomenal. Leesburg Regional Medi cal Center employees were among the relays biggest supporters. Janice Collins of LRMC said she enjoys being able to cheer for the survivors at the event. Its showing them that we are here to help them and support them, she said, and thats what the relay is all about. LEESBURG Hundreds walk to raise funds, cancer awareness PHOTOS BY THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Erin Mann, Jeanine Rubino and Molly Rowe walk in the Relay for Life fundraiser for the American Cancer Society. BELOW: Mary Shaner, left of Lady Lake, shows her infant granddaughter, Tinslee Price, at the relay. We started out with a huge opening ceremony, better than we have had in a couple of years, and it went through the entire day. Even with the heat, people stayed out. This group of really passionate people really made a difference ... What they have done is just phenomenal. Chuck Kirk Event chair for Relay for Life of Leesburg and Lady Lake

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C6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 9, 2014

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Wednesday, April 9, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D1 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX 2255GENERAL EMPLOYMENTPUBLISHERS NOTICE rf ntr btb tnt t f rtt fbr tfb Employment Advertising Standards of Acceptance r t t rbb rrf tt t b bbr trtb brf tr br f marital Classified IndexLegal Notices......................003 Announcements................100 At Your Service..................200 Financial............................300 Employment......................400 Pets/Animals......................500 Merchandise Mart..............600 Real Estate/For RENT........800 Real Estate/For SALE..........900 Manufactured Homes......1000 Recreation........................1100 Transportation..................1200 Cancellations for ads running Wednesday must be made by 4pm Monday.ADJUSTMENTS Please check your ad for errors the first day it appears since The Daily Commercial will not be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. If you find an error call the classified department immediately at 314-3278 or 748-1955. The publisher assumes no financial responsibility for errors or for omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such error.TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN PRINT & ONLINE CALL352-314-FASTFind It, Buy It, Sell It, FAST! SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde You are reading the local paper, the South Lake Press

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D2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 9, 2014 Psychic Services A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services 352-431-9481Residential / Commercial rfnfftbrftb f Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Concrete Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Handyman Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. Irrigation Services 5% Off Any Svc. under $1,000 $150 Off Any Svc. $2,000 or more $75 Off Any Svc. $1,000 or m oreLawn Maintenance, Hardscape, Patios, Retaining Walls, Maint., SoddingLeesburg 536-3708 Landscaping Services Lawn Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Painting Services Pressure Cleaning Airport Transportation Enclosure Screening Fencing Services Handyman Services Plumbing Services Marine Services HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314 Cleaning Services Electrical Services Free Est.Lic. & Ins.352.504.8207 rfn ftb Land Clearing Services Concrete Services HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314

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Wednesday, April 9, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D3 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 6 X 10.5 Black Restaurants JAMAICAN GEORGECARRIBBEAN & SOUL FOOD RESTAURANT (352) 455-18982502 W. Main St. Leesburg, FL 34748Goat Soup Curry Chicken Curry Goat Ox Tail & More Shower Doors Service Tree Service Veterinarian Services Window Services Roofing Services Window Services Roofing Services To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact Michelle in the Classified Department at (352) 365-8233 or by email michelle.fuller@dailycommercial.com Thank you for reading the local newspaper, the South Lake Press

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D4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 9, 2014 DAY, MONTH XX, YEAR DAILY COMMERCIAL XX Untitled art#: order#: 6 X 4.75 Black Untitled art#: order#: 2 X 4 Black 6865PETS rrfntttbn fb r nfffbtttb frf rnffb rtttrfr tr Call the South Lake Press to get your ad in! 394-2183 A M I N D E T N A S B C C B A T O N S A N T O T W I C E L A U D A T O R Y S U B S I S T E N C E O U T E R M O S T O R A T I E R T H E C L O C K C O O C A D E N T K I N E R K F C D A N L S M O K E N O R S E F A D E R T H E W A T E R E A R N S O M E N S G E A R A X E D T A O L O O F A S M R P I B B O V I T Z S T A R D U S T T O E L O O P I K E S E A T B E L T L O A T E E N A G E R V E B E D S T R A W E F T S I L V E R S T I M E T I M E S T A B S A L L D A Y S E P T E T B A H R I P A A I R S P R I O R Y O U I N L A M B A S T E R U S S O S N O O K P O L I O A M I R T U E T O R O S S A C R A L D O C B A R R O O M S A P O D I N E D R I V E N M A D D I C K A N D J A N E I S S U E D A T E A N G E L I L L E R T E T E S N O D B O I S E N O S E S Crossword puzzle is on page C2.