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Sponsored by Fran Haasch lawfran.com Phone: 352-326-2623LEARN TO RIDE! April is CHECK YOUR HELMET MONTHwe are giving away a FREE Bandanawith the purchase of a Harley-Davidsonhelmet during the month of April.BUY DUNLOP TIRES AND GET A $40 GIFT CARD(See store for details, offer exp. April 30th)WEDNESDAY BIKE NIGHT AT BEEF O BRADYS Dont Miss It! SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | C1 SPORTS: Harbor Hills hosts Lake County Classic WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWSTAND INSIDE CLASSIFIED D1 CROSSWORDS C2 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN C1 SPORTS B1 VOICES A4 WORD ON THE STREE T A2 SO UTH LAKE PRE SS V OLUME 99, NO. 14 5 SECTIO N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reserved www. southlakepress.com PRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com P icture the 226-foot-tall Florida Citrus Tower in Cl ermont turned into a gi ant Muslim Mosque, where an Islamic call to worship would be broadcast from its speakers across the countryside. Its hard to imagine, but not for longtime resident Greg Ho man, who wants to sell the iconic tourist attraction to the city for $2.5 million. Although hes considered putting the tower on the market ofcially, the thought of unknown private buyers makes him nervous. Ive always said all along that Clermont, or the Chamber (of Commerce), or something along those lines, should be the next owners of the tow er, Homan said, fearing a private owner might let the tower fall into disrepair. The other thing I thought of is that if I found a worthy private investor of the tower, and they turned around and sold it to a Muslim mosque, and they did a call to wor ship off the top of it a couple of times a day Im just throwing (out) an example and not trying to spook you, but its important for the city that you control it, he told city council members at a workshop this week. The tower was built in 1956 to allow visitors to observe the miles of Central Florida orange groves before they turned into rooftops. At more than 500 feet above sea level, it is the highest observation point in the state. The tower was one of sever al attractions that tourists went out of their way to visit be fore Walt Disney ever consid ered building a theme park in CLERMONT Citrus Tower owner wants to sell to the city for $2.5M BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Greg Homan, owner of the Citrus Tower in Clermont, wants to sell the previously iconic tourist attraction to the city for $2.5 million. Ive always said all along that Clermont, or the Chamber (of Commerce), or something along those lines, should be the next owners of the tower. Greg Homan, Citrus Tower owner HOMAN LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com Lake County commis sioners are moving for ward with plans to ban the sale of synthetic marijuana countywide. Commissioners last week agreed to adver tise an ordinance ban ning the drug, which health experts and the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce say has an ad verse effect on children. Commonly marketed as potpourri, incense or bath salts, and pack aged in colorful cello phane wrappers with brand names like Mr. Happy, synthetic mari juana is frequently sold in convenience stores and smoke shops. Health experts say the substances can cause psychotic episodes in those that smoke them. Bath salts, mean while, are often sold as over-the-counter prod ucts used for bathing, but can be swallowed, snorted, smoked or in jected to obtain a eu phoric effect. Commissioner Sean Parks pushed for the or dinance after hearing about a child who went into cardiac arrest from taking the drug. The chemicals we are discussing today pose a big danger to our residents, he said. They are poisons that are being marketed to our kids. As the father of three young kids, it scares me. I think this will give the sheriffs de partment a tool to help tackle this issue. The drugs are sold as incense, with exot ic names like K2, Black Mamba and Spice. Oth er brands names appear to target children, like TAVARES Lake moving to ban synthetic marijuana KELLEY MCCALL / AP This photo shows a package of K2, a concoction of dried herbs sprayed with chemicals. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com While a proposed natural gas pipeline through Lake and Sum ter counties might bring jobs and reduce power plant emis sions, residents drilled home a common plea last week at a public meeting in Clermont: Can it go someplace else? We own 30 acres in Center Hill and we adamantly oppose the pipeline, said Diane Co chran, who along with husband, Joe, own 30 acres where they are building their retirement farm to fulll a lifelong dream. Federal Energy Regulato ry Commission (FERC) of cials hosted the last of 13 pub lic meetings in Central Florida March 27, this one at the Citrus Tower, as part of the review pro cess for Sabal Trail Transmis sions plans to build a 465-milelong natural gas pipeline from Tallapoosa County in Alabama to Osceola County. Some proj ect maps have it cutting straight across Sumter County and the southwestern corner of Lake County. Were here to hear the com ments, concerns and things people want to say about any part of these projects, because we realize that nobody knows the area like the people who live here, said Jessica Ha rris, a FERC Environmental Project Manager and Deputy Project Manager on this project. Hearing from resi dents give us insight as to things that are important to the area and lets us know what we need to be focusing on. For Cochran, it was important that another route for the pipe line be found. This big company wanting to build this pipeline has turned our dream into a nightmare, said Cochran, whose proper ty would be cut in half by the CLERMONT Residents air concerns on gas pipeline SEE CONCERN | A2 SEE SYNTHETIC | A2 SEE TOWER | A5

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 2, 2014 CLERMONT Public Works will discuss Oswalt Road at meeting The Lake County Public Works Department is hosting an open house forum regarding upcoming improve ments to Oswalt Road from 5 to 7 p.m. on Thursday at Pine Ridge Elementary School, 10245 County Road 561, Clermont. The road will remain two lanes but will have safety improvements. Road work is expected to begin in August and be completed by May 2015. There will be no formal presenta tion during the open house forum, but Public Works engineers will be on hand to discuss the improvement plans and accept public comment. For information, call Pat Magno at 352-483-9053. MASCOTTE Kindergarten registration scheduled for Thursday Kindergarten registration will take place on Thursday to enroll stu dents at Mascotte Elementary Charter School from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Parents/guardians will need to bring all health information, identication and proof of physical address. If a child is currently in a 201314 pre-k program, attendance is not required. Children must be 5 years of age by Sept. 1 to enroll. For information, call Carol A. Mayer at 352-429-2294, ext. 5812. CLERMONT South Lake Recreation celebrates 20 years South Lake Recreation, Inc. is cele brating its 20th year of providing com munity athletics through LC Hoops in Lake County, which has become a second home for over 10,000 kids through the years, fostered by a group of strong volunteers and community support. Stressing the importance of physi cal education, academics, respect and teamwork, the South Lake Recreation group is currently raising money so it can continue to offer kids schol arships and build a new state of the art community center, Arena on the Ridge. To support South Lake Recreation and its community scholarship program, go to www.gofundme. com/southlakerec, or for informa tion about Arena on the Ridge, go to www.arenaontheridge.org or call 321-236-0240. CLERMONT Guns-N-Hoses Chili Cook Off set for Sunday The inaugural Guns-N-Hoses Chili Cook-Off will be Sunday with festivi ties beginning at 9 a.m. A $5 wristband provides guests ac cess to taste chili entries and vote to determine the winner, with proceeds beneting charities of the Clermont re and police departments. Additional activities include a tug of war between the departments. For information or to purchase a wristband, call Betty Whittaker at 352874-9535 or go to www.clermont downtownpartnership.com. CLERMONT Bras for the Cause and Boxers Too is April 26 Real men do wear bras when they are reghters supporting the Greater Clermont Cancer Foundations 7th annual Bras for the Cause and Boxers Too on April 26 at Heritage Hills in Clermont. Igniting Hope is the theme for the event this year and it will be an eve ning of fun, food and fantasy. Doors open at 6 p.m., with the show at 7 p.m. Tickets are $30 in advance or $35 at the door. To design a bra for this event or be a sponsor, call Kay Simpson at 352-435-3202. The Greater Clermont Cancer Foundation receives funds raised from this event for the community. Go to www.brasforthecauseandbox erstoo.com for details. Area Briefs What South Lake residents are saying about ... UKRAINE What should the U.S. be doing about the situation between Russia and Ukraine? I think that with the Ukraine, we should be looking to the United Na tions, that the U.S. should be acting WITH the Unit ed Nations. We dont get a lot of support in that part of the world. PEGGY WEATHERBY CLERMONT Unless there are gross atrocities on the part of Russia, we dont have any business physically going over there but we can express our opinion. PETE BONASKIEWICH CLERMONT All we can do is sanc tion them. About getting involved, we seem to have our noses in everything. WAYNE WEATHERBY LEESBURG I dont think we should be making any deals with Putin. We shouldnt trust him. Hes not a truthful man. We need to be on our toes. OLGA FEDERICO CLERMONT Word on the Street Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 gas transmission line. It would be located only 121 feet from the couples wa ter well and less than that from their backyard re pit, putting them in dan ger, she said. Here we are trying to save our property from a big corporation whose sole intent is to make billions of dollars, while our land is forever destroyed if its put there, Cochran said. Some 70 percent of the pipeline will follow rightsof-way, leaving 30 percent crossing private proper ty, some of which is lo cated on environmental ly sensitive lands such as the Green Swamp. The swamp sits atop the Flori dan Aquifer, the states un derground water supply. Every drop of water counts and there are al ternate routes we think can work for everyone involved, resident Peg gy Cox said. If taken, (an alternate route), the wa ter will continue owing where it should be ow ing, so wed like them to move it (the pipeline). Ron Hart, Water Re sources Program Manag er with the Lake County Water Authority, said his main concern was the en vironment. Water ow is sensitive and the chosen path of the ow that goes in line with the big and little creek systems is historically north and south, he said. These are the creeks that feed into Withlacoochee and the Clermont Chain of Lakes. We want to make sure that when there is water owing, the same volume ows into the Cl ermont chain post pipeline construction as what is owing now. Jay W. Small, an Orlan do attorney representing private landowners, said people across the country who have had pipelines placed on their proper ties have had bad experi ences. If you have two pieces of property, one with the pipeline and one with out the pipeline, that you are seriously consider ing, which one would you buy? he asked. Its a con cern that people in the real estate market have about this in the future. To build the pipeline, the company has said it will need a corridor at least 100 feet wide for a 24to 36-inch pipeline that will eventually carry up to 1 billion cubic feet of natural gas per day. The pipe would be laid about eight feet below the sur face and, where neces sary, the company would tunnel beneath roads and waterways. FERC Environmen tal Project Manager John Peconom said the agen cys ve member board along with input from res idents and working with engineers, biologists and other specialists will ul timately decide wheth er or not to approve proj ect. We want to identify the impacts of projects and research how to minimize those impacts, Peconom said. Not everyone at the meeting was opposed to the project, like attorney Dan Robuck. Power companies are working to get rid of clouds from emission problems and go to gas, so we need this trail, be cause the more gas we have, the cheaper it will stay, Robuck said. But Cochrans main en vironmental concern was her farm, where she feared her farm equip ment could ignite a gas leak. My family and I will never feel safe on our property and will never feel safe having our chil dren and grandchildren visit us on our property, and that rocks me to my core, she said. FERC representative say people have until April 21 to le an Information Re quest form at www.ferc. gov. Work on the pipeline is still four years away, doc uments show. CONCERN FROM PAGE A1 Scooby Snacks, Mad Hat ter and Joker. The products are made from crushed leaves or garden trash and then sprayed with power ful concentrated laborato ry-synthesized chemicals that resemble THC, the ac tive mind-altering ingredi ent in marijuana, accord ing to Dr. Morton Levitt, senior associate dean for faculty affairs and profes sor of clinical biomedical science at Florida Atlantic University. In 2013, Florida outlawed more than 140 chemicals used in synthetic mari juana. Levitt said manu facturers have found ways around the ban by altering the chemical formulations minimally. The problem is they keep continuously chang ing the nomenclature of the chemical, said Cpl. Tom Willis with the nar cotics unit of the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce. Once the Florida Depart ment of Law Enforcement gets it on the list for illegal substances, the chemists change the chemical. Willis said there is a sixmonth gap between when law enforcement identi es the new s ubstance and when it is put on the list of banned substances. Children are using the drug more than adults, Willis said. The majority of our complaints are in refer ence to parents calling about the stuff, he said. Sheriff Gary Borders also appeared before the commission in support of the ordinance. Clinicians treating ad olescents at Lifestream, a behavioral health and so cial services organization that provides inpatient and outpatient treatment, reported they had 123 cli ents over the past year who used synthetic mari juana. The problem is enor mous among adoles cents, the clinicians who could not be iden tied because of con dentiality issues wrote in an email to the Daily Commercial Society is not as harsh as it used to be, said Lori Shallcross, child clini cal services director at Lifestream, referring to attitudes toward marijua na use in general. There fore, youth view it as not too bad or no worse than alcohol. Clinicians reported to Shallcross that the drug could have an effect on the brain. It is well document ed to be risky in that is hard to judge how much is too much, and what gets a teen high on one day might lead that child to the brink of death on the next day, the clini cian wrote. Debi MacIntyre, exec utive director of the Safe Climate Coalition of Lake County, a community co alition that focuses on youth substance abuse and violence prevention, said the use of synthetic marijuana causes psycho logical and physical side effects. With K2 or Spice you have everything from ex treme nervousness to hal lucinations and seizures, she told commissioners. Bath salts are more ex treme, causing paranoia, psychosis and violent be havior. Adolescents interest in drugs is starting at a young age with reports of children in an elemen tary school crushing up Smarties candies and try ing to snort them to rep licate drug behavior, Mac Intyre said. People are having psy chotic breaks and go ing into a deep psychosis they are not coming out of, she said. A recent 2012 Florida Youth Substance Abuse Survey of ninth to 12th graders in Lake and Sum ter counties found that 5.8 percent of Lake and 4.2 percent of Sumter stu dents reported synthetic marijuana use in the past 30 days. In the rst six months of 2012 there were 375 calls per month of people be coming ill on Spice, ac cording to the Florida Poi son Information Center. Those calls are trend ing upward, according to county ofcials. Hillsborough, Broward, Miami-Dade, Hernan do and Pasco counties have instituted similar ordinances, and ofcials claim these laws have been effective in deterring the problem. In Hillsborough Coun ty, the sale of the drug has almost been wiped out, according to Larry McK innon, detective with the Hillsborough County Sheriffs Ofce. If the ordinance is ad opted in the county, those who violate it will face a civil ne of $500 for the rst offense and $1,000 for any repeat violation within ve years of a pre vious offense, according to the ordinance. SYNTHETIC FROM PAGE A1 THANK YOU FOR READING THE SOUTH LAKE PRESS

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3 Pay our fees, enjoy our services David Hodgkins, in a recent letter, lamented how he was asked to leave the Eisenhower Center because he is not a resi dent of The Villages. Perhaps, The Villages will per mit him to be an exception and pay the $145 monthly amen ity fee (which residents and I pay) to get a Villages resident card and then he will be able to use all of The Villages recre ation centers and other ameni ties like the rest of us unfriend ly residents. CAROLE BURKE | The Villages Teachers should not coddle students In reply to a story from March 19, Grades can only go so low, by Livi Stanford, in the Daily Commercial : I nd it ridiculous that school teachers feel they have to coddle students so they dont drop out of school. When I was living in North Carolina, my daughter had very good schooling previously in Connecticut and when she was doing very well they refused to skip her to a grade up. They were teaching her how to add one plus one in the fth grade! Im sorry, but if a child cant pass the grade they are in, they have no excuse to move to the next grade. Also, why do we have to teach languages when we live in the United States? When I hear that profession al athletes can barely read at the fourth grade level and they graduate from college, it makes me sick. When I was in public school, the teaching was very deliber ate. Education was a top prior ity for my parents and no one changed grades. Coddling uneducated chil dren doesnt help them succeed. Whatever happened to earn ing your grades for a better life? DAWN LANDI | Leesburg Shame on the president I dont know why Russia and Uganda have chosen to outlaw homosexuality. Russia has a history of being a godless country and Uganda does not have a history of fol low ing Gods word. Maybe it is because they have knowledge of biblical history where God de stroyed people, cities, nations and even empires because they had embraced homosexuality and other immoral practices. Whatever their reasons, I sa lute their governments for re jecting it. And I condemn President Obama and his sup porters for their position and for trying to intimidate those people into following his example. Not only is Obama tempt ing God into destroying the USA, but he wants the whole world to go to hell with him. Shame on Obama and all of his supporters. The sad part of this story is that there are too many people who call themselves Christians who have supported him, and still do. They say that politics and religion do not mix. But Gods word should guide us through our entire life if we expect to avoid the res of hell. JAMES S. FRANKLIN Fruitland Park Making streets safer Thank you Sheriff Gary Borders and your ofcers and deputies for standing by your pledge to maintain and en hance the quality of life in Lake County, especially on Layton Street in Bassville Park. BUDDY DRAWDY | Leesburg F lorida is still grappling with a variety of mental health issues, and many of its resi dents need help. The 60-day legislative session runs through May 2. In that time, the state has some extra money to consider. Surplus estimates range as high as $1.2 billion. Much of the discussion so far has been of tax cuts and new education funding. And so it should be. However, mental health treatment and drug and alcohol rehabilitation have been kept at tight funding levels through the recession and recovery years, even as surpluses began to appear. Funding could have been worse, mental health ofcials concede, but progress often was not made as state lawmakers maintained the status quo on money, declining to break new ground for centers that offer drug rehabilita tion, crisis stabilization and mental health care. Gov. Rick Scott prides himself on removing fat from the annual state budget and deserves a reputation for being a pork cutter. However, facilities and programs for mental ly ill and emotionally distressed people are not pork. Such services are needed in every region, and they will need to be beefed up as the states population grows into the next decade. Here in Lake County, for example, ofcials at LifeStream, the largest provider of mental health services in the community, estimate a fraction of the people needing mental health services are receiving them. And about the time Scott came into ofce, in early 2011, Florida was known as the prescrip tion-pill capital of the United States. The majori ty of powerful painkillers in the nation were being prescribed in Florida. Addiction was growing. Now that Florida has cracked down on pre scription-pill abuse, addicts have turned to oth er narcotics and to alcohol. Methamphetamine addiction is a plague on the Sunshine State. Florida also is racked by a shortage of beds for victims of domestic violence. More than 2,000 people were turned away from domestic-vio lence shelters across Florida last year because there werent enough beds for those seeking ref uge from their abusers. Mental health challenges are broad and deep in Florida. That is why making reasonable increases to mental health funding in the state budget, ev ery year, makes sense. Such spending is an in vestment, not a money loser. For every Floridian treated for depression, addic tion, domestic abuse and other such problems, the likelihood of criminal behavior, unemployment, nancial distress, divorce, broken families or suicide decreases. Its an investment that the Legislature and Scott must keep in mind this year as they look at a budget that has extra money. From Ocala.com. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD ........................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST O PINION WHATS YOUR OPINION? The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Letters to the Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711 By fax to: 352-394-8001 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. GUEST COLUMNS If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OUR VIEW If you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veter ans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to to www.lake vet erans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANS S OUTH LAKE PRESS Your community newspaper for more than 100 years. 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001 The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Florida 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region. All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Mental health care a wise investment Some interesting reads in a recent morning paper. Mainta ining our district schools must be a priority, ac cording to the editorial board. Vital equipment and features of buildings need repair or re placement, including roofs and air conditioning units. School district ofcials have a backlog of maintenance re pair work and would do what is needed if they could afford it. It suggests that the legis lators of Lake County seek a solution promptly, but such a solution might prove hard to nd because not only do the Lake County schools rely on school funding but so do other county school districts, not to mention Floridas state col leges and universities. Then I turned to page B1 to nd that Florida coach Billy Donovan has received bonus es and raises so that his sal ary for this year will be $3.9 million. Obviously our priorities are somewhat misplaced. Should the basketball team win the NCAA championship trophy that and $1.79 will get other residents in the state a cup of coffee. Donovan also got a bonus of $250,000 for longevity. I guess that doesnt take into account that he once resigned to coach the Orlando Magic for one day before resigning that position to go back to the University of Florida. Where does it stop? We can pay millions to coaches, and to maintain sports facilities, but not the basic school struc tures? This leaves the children to suffer while the profession al sports farm teams soak up state dollars. When will the Legislature and various state ofcials stand up and say, Enough, our children deserve better. DONALD JEAN | Leesburg LETTER of the WEEK YOUR VOICES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR The states misplaced priorities: Athletic teams get rich while the education system decays HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 2, 2014 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com Koha n Retail Investment Group of Great Neck, N.Y., is the new owner of the Lake Square Mall, according to Mike Kohan of the group. The deal closed on March 17 for $13.28 million, Kohan said. He said he has plans to re vitalize the mall by bringing in more tenants, lling in va cancies, having more events and marketing and xing de ferred maintenance. Were gonna get our hands around it and (were going to) try to make the best out of it, Kohan said. He said he saw a lot of op portunity in the mall be cause of its location. Business tax registration documents led with the city of Leesburg show Kohan going by the last name of Ko hansieh. According to multiple me dia reports, Kohan has had mixed results with some of the malls he has bought, in cluding two that ofcials tried to close because they were so dilapidated. Kohan, though, has said that is part of the nature of buying dis tressed malls. Its a very, very challenging situation for you to bring an other anchor, which is close to impossible, but we are try ing. We are trying, he said in an interview in February. Built in 1980, the 470,943-square-foot mall has seen reduced foot trafc over the past few years, and two under-performing an chor stores, Target and J.C. Penney, both recently an nounced closings. Kohan said he is working with many potential tenants to replace J.C. Penney as an anchor, but he could not guarantee anything. Were just gonna do our best to try to facilitate a deal with some other anchors, Kohan said Wednesday. Target, which closed Feb. 1, owns its 87,842-square-foot store space and is actively marketing it with CBRE, a re al-estate services company with 332 ofces in 42 coun ties. It is listed with CBRE for a price of $2,250,000. Sandi Moore, the executive director of the Leesburg Area Chamber of Commerce, said the mall is one of the com munitys biggest challenges and that struggling malls are a common problem. She said she was hopeful that Kohan would be able to ll vacancies there. The mall, I think histor ically over the years, has kind of struggled. I hope that some new blood coming into the city (with) maybe a fresh vision will help the sit uation, Moore said. I real ly hope that they can do that and I hope that our commu nity will support that effort. Robert Chandler, Lake Countys director of econom ic development and tourism department, agreed that the older type of indoor malls nationally are struggling. Everybody now is going toward the outdoor kind of walkable town center-type things. Thats kind of the new model for these regional shopping centers, Chandler said. The indoor malls, you really have to be exceptional to continue to drive demand. He said from personal ob servation the demand at the mall has dropped in the last ve to 10 years. Its not the same type of a destination shopping center as maybe it was in the 90s, Chandler said. Robert Sargent, public in formation ofcer for the city of Leesburg, said the mall is a great commercial asset and he hopes with the sale things will grow from here. Sargent said the city spoke with Kohan after the initial auction of the mall. Our initial interaction that weve had with Mr. Kohan is that he is displaying a strong commitment to want to do something with that property. Not to just leave it as is, but to do somethin g to make a more effective use of the property, Sargent said. He believes Kohans expe rien ce in managing malls is an advantage. Kohan targets older malls. In fact, his companys website says, The Kohan Retail In vestment Group sees the fu ture of aging malls as a place of mixed use that is more than just for shopping. (Malls) are social settings where peo ple interact with one anoth er and small businesses can get a boost in a public and well-trafcked platform. The Daily Commercial pre viously reported that the mall sold in a November online auction for $13.6 million. The malls prior owner, Macerich of Phoenix, focus es on the acquisition, leasing, management, development and redevelopment of region al malls in 17 states through out the United States. Lake Square was the companys only mall in Florida, accord ing to the companys website. LEESBURG New York investor buys Lake Square Mall for $13.28M DID YOU KNOW? The 470,943-square-foot Lake Square Mall has been dropping in value over the past 34 years. In 1980, General Growth Properties built the mall at 10401 U.S. Highway 441. In 1984, General Growth Properties sold the mall to Equitable Life Assurance for $33.9 million. In 1998, Equitable Life As surance sold the mall to Mace rich for $28.9 million. In March, Macerich sold the mall to Kohan Retail Invest ment Group for $13.2 million. SOURCE: Lake County Property Appraisers Ofce. BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL A man walks into the Lake Square Mall in Leesburg Wednesday. The Kohan Retail Investment Group from New York recently purchased the mall for $13.28 million. Mike Kohan, owner of the group, said they are in talks with multiple tenants to replace the soon-to-close J.C. Penney store, and hope to ll other vacancies in the mall.

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5 Orlando. Other old-time at tractions still operating today include Bok Tower Gardens in Lake Wales, Sunken Gar dens in St. Petersburg, Ga torland in Orlando, Sarasota Jungle Gardens in Saraso ta, Monkey Jungle and Parrot Jungle in Miami, Marine land in St. Augustine, Cypress Gardens (now Legoland) in Winter Haven, Silver Springs in Ocala and Weeki Wachee Springs in Spring Hill. Homan said he won a scholarship to then-Lake Sumter Community College based on a picture he drew of the tower while attend ing Clermont High School. In 1995, he purchased the tower and, since then, its brought him both work, prot and the satisfaction of knowing that hes kept the structure in good condit ion. Now, at age 58, Homan said hes ready to sell but doesnt want just anyone purchasing the tower. Its been a good ride, but Ive reached my limit and wherewithal, nancially, agewise and mentally, regard ing what I can do with it, Homan said. I need some one to take it to the next lev el and in my opinion, the city of Clermont is the only wor thy buyer. I know Im prob ably shooting myself in the foot for saying that, but, in my heart, I feel its true. Homan said he and his wife, Suzie, purchased the tower for $750,000 in 1995 in order to nurse it back to health. He said the previous owners did not maintain the tower. A roof replacement, extensive cleaning, renova tions, paint and other things cost him an additional $1 million. The tower comes with 11,000 square feet of ofce space, a 1,000-square-foot kitchen and an elevator to the observation decks, Ho man said. He also disclosed he pays about $6,000 in taxes on the property each year. According to Homan, the tower cannot be torn down because of agreements with companies that have placed antennas on the top of it. Mayor Hal Turville, a life long resident of Clermont, questioned the towers prof itability and whether it was the citys place to take on the task of running a business. Mayor Pro Tem Keith Mull ins said he would like to hear what people in the area had to say about the issue. I think Id rather see it in quasi-government hands, he said. City Manager Darren Gray and Councilman Tim Bates were worried about the cost. I agree with Greg that the Citrus Tower is a landmark for us, Gray said. But I just look at nances and how there are other needs the community wants, and other needs out there, and do we have the funding to actually purchase this? Gray asked. Im not saying we cant work with other groups. At the end of the work shop, the consensus among council members since no votes can be taken at work shops was to advance the issue to a future coun cil meeting, where council members, with public input, can discuss whether or not to purchase. TOWER FROM PAGE A1 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL The citrus tower is shown in Clermont on December 10, 2013.

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A6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 2, 2014 HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. DEATH NOTICES Robert Owen Boom Robert Owen Boom, 82, Woonsocket, SD, died Friday, March 21, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Patricia Boyd Patricia Boyd, 76, of Wildwood, died Friday, March 28, 2014. Banks/ Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wild wood. Forrest Bruce Forrest Bruce, 63, of Coleman, died Satur day, March 22, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatilla. James D. Coleman James D. Coleman, 83, of Sumterville, died Sunday, March 23, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Samuel A. Davis Samuel A. Davis, 72, of Eustis, died Sunday, March 23, 2014. Mar vin C. Zanders Funeral Home, Inc., Apopka. Nancy S. Evans Nancy S. Evans, 72, of Umatilla, died Tuesday, March 25, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatil la. Viola Gunderson Viola Gunderson, 94, of Leesburg, died Thurs day, March 27, 2014. Ella Mae Harris Ella Mae Harris, 72, of Mount Dora, died Fri day, March 28, 2014. Marvin C. Zanders Fu neral Home. Reese A. Ivancovich Reese Ann-Marie Iv ancovich, 4 days old, died Wednesday, March 26, 2014. Banks /PageTheus, Wildwood. William Kelley William Kelley, 72, of Astor, died Wednesday, March 26, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Astor Marcile B. LaBruno Marcile B. LaBruno, 86, of Leesburg, died Monday, March 24, 2014. Page-Theus Fu nerals & Cremations. Leesburg. Claire Smith Reilly Claire Smith Reilly, 83, of The Villages, died Sat urday, March 22, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Esther Sheehy Esther Sheehy, 90, of Leesburg, died Tuesday, March 25, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home and Cre matory, Leesburg. Judy Shook Judy Shook, 74, of Leesburg, died Satur day, March 29, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations. Margaret E. Silva Margaret E. Silva, 86, of Wildwood, died Sat urday, March 22, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Arlene Louise Wiesen butter Arlene Louise Wi esenbutter, 78, of Fruit land Park, died Satur day, March 22, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Lees burg. John Thomas Yancey, Jr. John Thomas Yanc ey, Jr., 80, of Leesburg, died Saturday, March 22, 2014. Beyers Funer al Home, Leesburg. IN MEMORY ROXANNE BROWN and LIVI STANFORD news@dailycommercial.com Clermont City Coun cil members expressed interest last week in holding a public forum about the Wellness Way Sector Plan to give city ofcials and the pub lic a chance to weigh in on plans for the 16,000acre project. City Manager Darren Gray said he had spoken to Lake County Commis sioner Sean Parks, one of the key movers behind the Wellness Way effort, to relay concerns the council had about public input and the amount of time, that we dont want to be rushed or pushed. He noted that a con sultant working on the plan a mix of homes and businesses that will transform that corner of the county has pro posed some changes. You know when we rst heard that, about three or four months ago, by a consultant that came here, we were all not in favor of it the way it was presented. Gray said the consul tant wanted to make that presentation to the county commissioners and to the council at the same time. After Grays appeal, the council considered having a regular City Council meeting fol lowing the presenta tion, then scheduling a public forum between the county and the city, but that idea was dis missed quickly. You know, this is the future of the city and to try to cut and not have any public input is wrong, Councilman Ray Goodgame said. Council members ultimately agreed to have Gray set up a joint meeting with the coun ty directly following the presentation by the consultant. The meeting with the county could occur on April 22 at the com munity center rather than the council cham bers and would be the nights city council meeting, with the sec tor plan as the only item on the agenda. I dont care what the county commission ers say, the ones that want to stay can stay, Goodgame said. If they dont want to stay past 6 oclock then ne, but I think we ought to start at 7 oclock and have public input and dis cuss the sector plan and discuss the sector plan with the public, give them our ideas, because theyll probably be a lit tle different than what the county wants to do. Goodgame even said he wouldnt mind fore going a city meeting on that night to have the joint meeting instead. Goodgame, however, expressed reservations about whether the coun ty was really interested in the citys opinions about the project, or those of Clermont residents. I dont think the county wants to hear what we have to say, he said. Councilman Rick Van Wagner agreed with Goodgame and said its exactly why the joint meeting and public fo rum is a must. However, county of cials said it is prema ture to say Clermonts concerns have not been heard because the plan has not been nalized. There have been sev eral public meetings on Wellness Way, coun ty ofcials also said, where public comment has been allowed. The concerns that were raised by the city of Clermont and resi dents several months ago were all heard by our staff, Commission er Leslie Campione said. I dont think anyone is withholding informa tion. The nal product is going to be presented to both boards on April 22. Campione added, There were a series of public meetings so we could get input from property owners, stake holders, and everyone that cared enough to at tend those meetings had an opportunity to have their concerns heard. There has been an ample opportunity for concerns and issues to be raised. There will be a public hearing on the plan be fore it is adopted. CLERMONT Council members request public forum for Wellness Way plan I dont think anyone is withholding information. The final product is going to be presented to both boards on April 22. There were a series of public meetings so we could get input from property owners, stakeholders, and everyone that cared enough to attend those meetings had an opportunity to have their concerns heard. There has been an ample opportunity for concerns and issues to be raised. Leslie Campione Clermont city commissioner THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com For three decades, from No vember to March, the Southern Palms RV Resort in Eustis has offered Sunday worship service for travelers from all over the country and Canada. Sundays 10 a.m. service was the last of the 30th season, with a closing service and communion in the parks fellowship hall, led by the Rev. Charles Granger, 82, of DeLand. An average of 150 to 200 people just about all of the RVers have attended on Sundays over the years. I love meeting such a won derful group of people, a cross-section of Americana and the number of Canadians who come down here, too, Grang er said. Christmas Eve is one of the biggest services, along with a memorial service on the rst Sunday in February. We me morialize all of the people who have died the previous year who were a part of this fellowship here, the pastor said. They call it a church, but there is no membership, Granger said of the services at the resort, located near Lake County Fairgrounds. This is just people coming together. Granger recalled the park be longed to the city of Eustis be fore it was sold to individuals who owned parks all over the country. Granger had been serv ing as interim pastor at the First Baptist Church in Eustis when he was asked if he could preach at the RV park. My rst Sunday, 82 people were sitting here, Granger said. And what they told me was 80 percent of the people who were here for that service did not go to church anywhere on Sunday. I came back the next Sunday and we had 150 or so. During his time of ministering at Southern Palms, Granger was serving as chaplain and campus minister at Stetson University. It was a great time; I was working with both age groups, he said of ministering to college kids during the week and to se niors on Sundays. I was 52 when I started (at Southern Palms) and I thought they were a bunch of old folks, and now Im older than most of them over here. In those early years, he ar ranged for some Stetson stu dents to preach at the RV park. Every one of them would come to my ofce on Mon day morning saying, Let me go again! They loved coming over here, Granger said. He re mained at the private college for 21 years before retiring in 1996 at age 65. The Florida native recalled liv ing three blocks from a Jackson ville church during his youth as the oldest of ve children, yet THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Pastor Charles Granger, 82, and his wife, Joyce, center, greet New York visitors Yvonne Webster, left, and her husband Ardell at Southern Palms RV Resort in Eustis. EUSTIS RV park church draws hundreds SEE CHURCH | A7

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESSZ A7 We want to thank everyone for attending Aarons Memorial Service at Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church along with all the prayers, flowers, cards, words of encouragement, Kindness and support. It has helped carry us through during this very sad and difficult time. God Bless you.With Sincere Appreciation, The Family of Aaron Kjenslie 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 Tour and educate yourself on options available in Clermont when your loved ones are no longer able to live and provide care for themselves. This tour is led by Dr. Marholin D.O., Dr. Sam M.D. and C.O.R.E. Florida Licensed trained administrator to give you objective guidance & direction in a non-threatening and no sale pressure environment. per person TOUR INCLUDES:Breakfast, Lunch and Snack Dr. MarholinWE WILL COVER continuing care based on different needs. from independent living, Assisted Nursing & Hospice. Utilizing resources to maintain your best quality of life and provide in the home. rfntbrrrt his family did not at tend church. We had never been in anybodys church, he said. No one ever in vited me to church be cause of my language. I used to cuss as good as any sailor at Jackson ville Naval Air Station, he said. I could outcuss them. The turning point in Grangers life was his ju nior year of high school. God spoke to me in a Jewish grocery store on a Saturday afternoon, said Granger, who was sacking potatoes when he heard an audible voice saying, You go to church tomorrow. I looked around the store because I thought there was a ventriloquist prac ticing a voice. I looked around the store and there wasnt a soul in sight near where I was. I was in the produce sec tion all by myself. He put the message out of his mind. I went out and raised hell, caroused with the guys, just like I did ev ery Saturday night with a bunch of high school boys, he said. The next morning I was wide awake by 8 oclock. It was just gnawing at me that I had to go to church, and I literal ly sneaked out of the house and went up to the little Baptist church three blocks away. When I walked in the church, people said, What is he doing here? Granger was bap tized that same school year, in December of 1946. Eventually, all four of my siblings and my mother and father came into the church, he said. He was working in a shop repairing tele phones when he said the Lord spoke to him a second time. I got stopped in my tracks when I heard, I want you to go preach. And I thought I didnt want to be a part of it, he said. Now the Baptist min ister is glad he listened to the Lord. And that is what I en courage people to do listen to the spirit that is speaking to you, not what somebody else is telling you, Granger said. The pastor has gone through hip and knee re placements and a battle with lymphoma cancer, but strives to continue inspiring people with his tell-it-like-it-is sermons. Pastor Granger is just wonderful. Thirty years he has been with us, said Judy Kryder of Michigan, who sings in the choir and cherish es the friendship she has forged with others at Southern Palms, the park that has been her winter home since 1998. Floridas glorious weather is what brings her back each year, she said, and she and hun dreds of others hope to reunite with their pas tor in November for the parks 2014-15 season. CHURCH FROM PAGE A6 THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Bill Myer, at microphone, leads prayer at Southern Palms RV Resort, joined by Ruth Karper, Dave Walcott and Marian Shank. Halifax Media Group The way textbooks are selected for Flor ida classrooms could undergo major chang es this year, partly in response to the way protests over a world history book played out last fall. State Sen. Alan Hays, R-Umatilla, has led a bill that would eliminate the state from its long time role in short-list ing which textbooks are acceptable for dis tricts. Hays proposal which is drawing mixed reviews would make textbook selection a lo cal responsibility from start to nish. The purpose of this bill is to make sure the people who are mak ing the decision on se lection of instructional materials are held ac countable by the peo ple of that communi ty, Hays said. I want to guarantee citizens have input and school board members will be held responsible at the bal lot box. Hays said he decid ed to le the bill after talking to some school board members in the four Central Florida counties he represents about complaints that the World History text book published by Prentice Hall is biased in favor of Islam. That was the basis of the Volusia complaints which ultimately were rejected by the Volu sia School Board and similar objections in Palm Beach, Brevard and Marion schools. The school boards feel their hands are somewhat tied to select instructional materials approved by Tallahas see, Hays said. That, he said, puts too much power in the hands of Florida Department of Education bureaucrats who oversee the state adoption process that includes material re views by committees including teachers from around the state and opportunity for public comment. His bill would require individual districts or voluntarily formed groups of districts to review available text books for compliance with Floridas academic standards, online post ing of prospective ma terials for public com ment and a school board hearing before nal adoption. Putting that process totally in the hands of local districts would be a huge mistake, said Volusia School Board Chairwoman Candace Lankford, who believes the current state text book adoption process allows adequate op portunities for parents, teachers, administra tors and others to make their viewpoints known. We need to have a clearinghouse to bring in the big picture stuff, Lankford said. With all the mobility we have in our state, it would be nuts to have some coun ty looking one way at instructional stuff and another looking at it a different way. Other school ofcials worry about the extra expense to districts of starting from scratch on textbook adoptions instead of having a state-level screening. Hays brushes aside those criticisms, say ing theres a large pool of retired educators living in Florida who could help with the dis trict level material re views and local control is more important than volume buying power with publishers. The publishers are going to scream and be upset, Im sure, he said. I dont care. My responsibility is to the students and school systems of Florida. My accountability is to the people paying the bill. Yet some of the Flor ida taxpayers who pay that bill are opposed to Hays proposal and its companion in the House, both now being reviewed by legislative committees. Senator Hays textbook proposal draws criticism The purpose of this bill is to make sure the people who are making the decision on selection of instructional materials are held accountable by the people of that community. Sen. Alan Hays R-Umatilla

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A8 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 2, 2014 Platinum Sponsors Galinski Drywall, Inc.Gold Sponsors Tony Hubbard RealtySilver Sponsors Crown Patrons Doubloon Patrons Donations & Prizes Beta Thetas 10th Annual Mardi Gras Event The Sisters of Beta Theta would like to Thank Everyone for a Huge Success! JIM TURNER The News Service of Florida Red-light cameras wont be turned off in Florida this year. Without enough votes lined up, Senate Transporta tion Chairman Jeff Brandes put the brakes last week on a bill (SB 144) that focused on repealing the states redlight camera law. Instead, he proposed changes to in crease regulations on the use of the devices. But Brandes Transporta tion Committee on March 26 didnt act on the pro posed changes, deciding to postpone a vote on his re written bill. That shows you the pow er of this (red light camera) industry, said Brandes who maintained his opposition to the Mark Wandall Trafc Safety Act of 2010, the states red-light camera law, after the postponement. What youre seeing is municipalities that have become addicted to the funds, and in many of these cities its not about safety, Brandes added. Its become a backdoor tax increase. While moving away from a repeal, Brandes proposed changes that would allow new cameras at intersec tions but only if their use is justied through trafc en gineering studies a re quirement that is included in a House bill. Also, mon ey generated from redlight camera tickets would have to be used for trafc safety im provements, and jurisdictions wouldnt be able to use the cameras if they fail to provide annu al camera-enforcement re ports to the state. In early February, Brandes and Rep. Frank Ar tiles, R-M iami, held a press conference in the Capitol to highlight a report from the Ofce of Program Pol icy Analysis & Government Accountability, the Legis latures non-partisan poli cy ofce. The report found there were fewer fatalities but more crashes at elec tronically monitored inter sections and that nes is sued due to the technology cost motorists nearly $119 million last year. That is the central ques tion fueling a debate over red light cameras in Cler mont. City ofcials imple mented cameras at six in tersections in January in what they said was an ef fort to improve safety at State Road 50 intersec tions. The public outcry was al most immediate, however. Ninety percent of the more th an 3,000 citations issued between early January and mid-February were to mo torists turning right on red, which city ofcials said was not their intent when they installed the cameras. Clermont ofcials re viewed video of all the in fractions and ended up dismissing 70 percent. They further pledged to exercise more discretion in issuing citations for righton-red turns. Brandes, R-St. Petersburg, views the cameras as simply a revenue generator for lo cal communities. But he ac knowledged that there isnt enough support in the Sen ate to repeal the cameras. That was evident Wednes day when he couldnt get his own committee to approve three amendments to his rewritten bill. The committee also re jected, by a 5-3 vote, an amendment that would have required only warn ings to be issued to own ers of vehicles caught on camera going through traf c signals 0.5 seconds after the colors changed from yellow to red. Brandes said he might reintroduce the amend ments when the bill re turns this week. TALLAHASSEE Senate will not repeal red-light cameras HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO Henry Bentley of Apopka holds a sign during a protest against red light ticket cameras on the corner of Memorial Blvd. and South Florida Ave. in Lakeland. MILLARD IVES | Staff Writer millard.ives@dailycommercial.com A state review of a deputys shoot ing of a knife-wielding man has been forwarded to the State Attor neys Ofce for evaluation, accord ing to Florida Department of Law Enforcement ofcials. A spokeswoman with FDLE would not provide details of the investiga tion into the January shooting of Ian Saum, pending the completion of the State Attorneys Ofce review. Walter Forgie, supervisor for the State Attorneys Ofce in Lake Coun ty, last week wouldnt reveal what possible charges the deputy could face, citing his ofces pending re view of the case. The Lake County Sheriffs Ofce conducted its own administrative re view and cleared the deputy of any wrongdoing, but the nal word will come from the State Attorneys Ofce. The shooting occurred Jan. 22 in the 10700 block of Aria Court, near the end of a cul-de-sac in Lake Cres cent Pines East outside of Clermont. Deputies said they responded to a report of a suicidal subject. When they reached the Aria Court address, they reportedly found Saum armed with a large knife. It appeared that he had injured himself with the weap on prior to the deputies arrival. Deputies shot 24-year-old Saum after he approached them in a threatening manner and a stun gun failed to stop him, Sgt. James Vachon, sheriffs spokesman, said. The deputy was placed on admin istrative leave and FDLE was called in to investigate. According to a document dated Jan. 29 from sheriffs Chief Deputy Peyton Grinnell, a preliminary ad ministrative review determined that the deputy was found to be within the statutory authority given to law enforcement ofcers for the use of force, consistent with the agencys use-of-force training. State Attorney reviewing shooting of armed man

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10% OFFAll options with this couponrffnntb B1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 2, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTS SPORTS EDITOR ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE .............................. 365-8268 FAX .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL ......... sports@dailycommercial.com S PORTS and LEISURE FRANK JOLLEY | STAFF WRITER frankjolley@dailycommercial.com The Montverde Acad emy softball team ad vanced to the Florida High School Athletic As sociation Class 3A state seminals last year. After outscoring three opponents by a com bined score of 30-4 at last weeks Montverde Academy Invitation al Softball Tournament, the Eagles might be gearing up for a return trip. The one-day tour nament, played at the Montverde Academy Softball complex, in cluded teams from Eu stis, Apopka and Hol lywood Sheridan Hills Christian, in addition to the tournament hosts. The Eagles took the tournament title with a 5-2 win against Apop ka, which had beaten Montverde 8-0 earlier this season. The Eagles earned a berth in the tour naments champion ship tilt with a 10-2 win against Eustis and a 15-0 drubbing of Hol lywood Sheridan Hills Christian. Apopka punched its ticket for the title game with a 15-0 win against Montverde Academy softball team wins tournament FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com The best softball season in recent memory at Lake-Sumter State Col lege continued on March 26 against Seminole State College at the LSSC softball complex. LSSC got a gritty pitching perfor mance from Mellissa Webb in the opener and the Lakehawks scored three runs in the sixth to pick up a 3-2 win against the Raiders, lifting LSSCs record temporarily to 21-21 on the season and 6-5 in the Mid-Florida Conference. Seminole State rebounded in the nightcap behind a six-run rst inning to earn a doubleheader split with a 12-1 win in ve innings. In the night cap, the Raiders pounded out 15 hits and the Lakehawks committed ve errors. In the opener, Webb came out of the gate quickly. She didnt give up a hit until Taylor Duggan bunted her way on with one out in the third. Seminole State got to Webb in the fourth for two runs on four hits. After the shaky frame, Webb settled down and did not allow a hit over the nal three innings. For the game, she gave up ve hits while striking out two and tossed 100 pitches. LSSC trailed until the sixth, when the Lakehawks found their swing. Michelle Breen opened the inning with a double and Kayla Fuller was walked. Zoe Hart then hammered a double, scoring Breen. Taylor Dou glass followed with the third dou ble of the inning, scoring Fuller and Hart with the tying and game-win ning runs. In the seventh, Webb sent the Raid ers down in order with a pair of in eld putouts and a y ball to left. The Lakehawks totaled ve hits against Seminole starter Stephanie Adkins. She walked four and struck Lakehawks split with Seminole State FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Making history isnt supposed to be easy. Dominic Bozzellis drive to establish himself as one of the best golfers in National Golf As sociation history was about as difcult as it gets. Bozzelli birdied his nal three holes on Sunday to nish with a four-day total of 269, 19-un der-par, to win the Lake Coun ty Classic at Harbor Hills Coun ty Club by two shots over Jack Newman. With the win, he is only the second golfer in NGA history to win three straight tournaments. Zach Johnson, an 11-time winner on the PGA Tour and the 2007 Masters champion, was the rst to do so, having won three straight in 2001. Bozzelli had to battle through the pack for the win under sun ny skies over the nearly 7,000yard par 72 layout. Unable to nish his third round on Sat urday due to inclement weath er, Bozzelli was forced to com plete it on Sunday and then immediately begin his nal loop. He responded to the chal lenge of a golng marathon by carding a 5-under-par 67 in his third round for a two -shot lead over Newman at 15-under. He backed that up with a 4 -under 68 in his fourth round to secure the win. Bozzelli and Newman battled for the lead throughout the nal round, with each player owning it on multiple occasions. Both players were tied at 17 under af ter exchanging birdies on the par-3 16th hole, the longest par 3 on the course at 210 yards and one that involved a carry over water to an undulating green. On the 17th, a 400-yard par 4, Bozzelli set himself up for a makeable putt that would put him in the drivers seat head ing to the nal hole. The Pitts ford, N.Y., golfer drained the putt and took a one -shot lead to the 18th. Newman was able to look down the fairway and watch Bozzellis nearly awless play down the stretch. On the 18th, a 579-yard n ishing hole that was set up for scoring, Bozzelli worked his way down the fairway and drained an insurance birdie, forcing Newman to make an eagle to take the tournament to sudden death. Newman put himself in posi tion for an eagle from the fair way with his third shot, but missed left, giving Bozzelli a shared entry with Johnson in the NGA Pro Tour history books. He will have chance to win an unprecedented four straight tournaments beginning Thurs day at the Ocala/Marion Coun ty NGA Pro Golf tour at Ocala National. In his nal round, Bozzelli n ished with six birdies and two LADY LAKE Bozzelli wins at Harbor Hills BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Dominic Bozzelli, of Pittsford, N.Y., drives the ball at the Lake County Classic golf tournament at Harbor Hills Country Club in Lady Lake, on Thursday. SEE NGA| B4 SEE LSSC| B4 FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com SANFORD Lake Countys entrants in the Florida League High School Invitation al baseball tournament are proving to be formi dable foes. In seven tournament games through Thurs day afternoon involving Leesburg, Eustis and Montverde Academy, six have gone at least seven innings with the largest margin of vic tory being four runs or less. On three occasions, area teams have battled to a one-run decision. That was the case in Thursdays morning session when Leesburg got solid pitching from Ryan Halstead and Ja son Baita, but the Yel low Jackets dropped a 2-1 contest in nine in nings against Weston Cypress Bay at Sanford Seminole High School. Leesburg fell to 6-10 with the loss, while Weston Cypress Bay im proved to 8-4. Weston Cypress Bay scored the winning run when Jose Natera scored on a two-out sin gle by Enzo Clemente against Baita. It was the only hit allowed by Bai ta in 1 2/3 innings of re lief. The Lightning man aged only ve hits against Halstead and Baita. Weston Cypress Bay took an early lead with a run in the rst against Halstead when Nat era scored on a dou ble by Thomas Quinte ro. Halstead stranded Quintero at third when he struck out Diego Maceda to end the in ning. Halstead pitched sev en innings and allowed one run on four hits. He walked three and struck LHS gets clipped in extra innings SEE EAGLES | B4 SEE LHS | B4

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B2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 2, 2014 A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services 352-431-9481Residential / Commercial rfnfftbrftb f Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Concrete Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Handyman Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. Irrigation Services 5% Off Any Svc. under $1,000 $150 Off Any Svc. $2,000 or more $75 Off Any Svc. $1,000 or moreLawn Maintenance, Hardscape, Patios, Retaining Walls, Maint., SoddingLeesburg 536-3708 Landscaping Services r fntbb Lawn Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Painting Services Airport Transportation Enclosure Screening Fencing Services Bathroom Remodeling Handyman Services BOYDSYou call it, We haul it!352 460-7186 Marine Services HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314 HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314 Cleaning Services Land Clearing Services Electrical Services Free Est.Lic. & Ins.352.504.8207 rfn ftb Concrete Services Land Clearing Services

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B3 Psychic Services Pressure Cleaning Restaurants JAMAICAN GEORGECARRIBBEAN & SOUL FOOD RESTAURANT (352) 455-18982502 W. Main St. Leesburg, FL 34748Goat Soup Curry Chicken Curry Goat Ox Tail & More Tile Service Shower Doors Service Tree Service Veterinarian Services Window Services Steve and Brenda Rizer have owned Blinds 4 Less since 2000. The business is still in its original location in Lady Lake. The company focuses on strong customer service and also selling the best brand names in the industry at very competitive prices. Chris Carnes Landscape has been in business since 2005 along with over 30 yrs experience in everything from hardscapes such as patios, retaining walls, to sod repair and installations, to ripout of old landscapes and design. We also can provide maintainence to your newly installed landscape or even mowing maintainence services to even sprinkler repairs. We serve all projects big or small create landscapes one lawn at a time". Mention this bio ad and receive 15 percent off when you call for your estimate on any of our services. Emerson Street Automotive has been family owned and operated for nearly 30 years. Lori and Michael Farfaglia purchased the business from Loris family in 2010. Loris father, Terrill Davis stayed as the onsite manager. Emerson Street is located at 1406 Emerson Street, right next to the Post Office in Leesburg, Florida. We are opened Monday-Friday 7:30-5:30 and Saturday 7:30-3:00. Phone: 352-326-2400. We do all kinds of automotive repair including light body work. We have state of the art diagnostic equipment that takes the guess out of repairing your car. We service all makes and models including SUVs, ATVs, and RVs. To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact Michelle in the Classified Department at (352) 365-8233 or by email michelle.fuller@dailycommercial.com Plumbing Services Tree Service Roofing Services Window Services

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B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 2, 2014 Outdoors Fishing 352-394-2183 slpress@dailycommercial.com www.southlakepress.com SANDYS BAIT AND TACKLE | TAVARES Now is a great time to be out on the lake shing. Many are still re porting catching limits. Lake Dora has been a good location for crap pie catches of 30 to 40 sh has not been unusual. Some sh are still on the beds, sh that have moved off the beds are still feeding in schools. Shell cracker and blue gill are start ing to move in and are biting on yellow tail worms. The Wednesday night open bass tournament has re sumed with the time change. Last Wednesday nights winners were Tim Fredericks for rst place and the team of JoJo and Zack Hood for second place. For anyone in terested, they start at 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday. Sandys bass tourna ment, open to all, is held on the third Saturday monthly at the Buz zard Beach ramp. Sandys next regu lar bass tournament will be an open tournament held April 19 with the weigh in at Buzzard Beach at 2:30 p.m. Any questions about either tournament call the shop at 352742-0036. PINE ISLAND CAMP | FRUITLAND PARK Several patrons are catching bass on shiners and articial worms. Crappie are biting on grass shrimp and minnows. Catsh are biting on night crawlers. Pine Island has a full supply of live baits including grass shrimp as well as a variety of arti cial baits. RV sites, camp sites, boats and slips are available for rental. Check out the restaurant before go ing out or coming off the lake. PALM GARDENS | TAVARES Specks are still being caught on mostly minnows and some jigs. They are still at the edge of the grass and shorelines and are back in the deeper water. A few stripers are be ing caught at the ends of Dead Riv er on silver lures and silver spoons baited with salt water shrimp. Palm Gardens has pontoon boats avail able to rent. NELSONS FISH CAMP | WEIRSD ALE Speck activity has been very good; they are biting on minnows and jigs. Bass have been slow with the most recent weather change. Bream are starting to bite on worms and min nows. Come check out the next gen eration bass in the pond by Nelsons. BLACK BASS RESORT-FISH CAMP Guests are catching bass and crap pie. Several large bass have been caught in Haynes Creek at the locks. The bass are hitting on articial baits primarily while the crappie are bit ing on minnows and jigs. Minnows and worm sales have been very good. Small boats can launch from Black Bass boat ramps. SORRENTO BAIT AND TACKLE Crappie shing has been good, weather permitting. Good jig col ors have been chartreuse, orange and hot pink. Bass have been biting on top water baits like Rat-L-Traps and medium shiners. Bow shing season is getting ready to start. It is beauti ful weather to get out on the lake and catch a few. Stop in and get the lat est daily report. LAKES REPORT a weekly update from CHERYL STALEY-ARCHER rrrr fntb nrtt fn rbrtr bbrr fbbrr fb trt bbbrrr fnbrr nrrtr fn r b r ftrtt frtb rf f rf f tttt tbttt fntttbb nttbr fn tttbbb t tt t f tr t r fttbtb NGA FROM PAGE B1 bogeys. The three birdies he had on his nal three holes of the tournament were, ironi cally, the only time he put to gether three red numbers in succession. For the tournament, Boz zelli carded 20 birdies, three eagles and seven bogeys. He played par-3 holes to aver age score of 2.79 and par 4s to 3.93. On the par 5s, how ever, Bozzelli averaged near ly a full stroke below par at 4.19. He had seven birdies, three eagles and ve pars on the four par 5 holes on the course. He did not have bo gey on a par 5. Bozzelli earned $16,000 for the win, giving him $52,700 for the year and an exemp tion in the Web.com Tour Price Cutter Charity Cham pionship in August in Spring eld, Mo. Newman won $8,000 for nishing second to raise his season total to $12,200. Boz zelli extended his lead over Crawford Reeves, No. 2 on the money list by more than $30,000. Brian Richey nished third at 272 after a nal round 66, the low round of the day. Da vid Skinns was 274, good for a fourth place tie with Phil lip Mollica. Skinns and Molli ca began the nal round in a three way tie with Newman for second place. Phillip Hutchinson, the rstand secondround leader, struggled to 76 in his nal round. Formerly known as the Hooters Tour, the NGA Tour is the No. 3-mens profes sional tour in the U.S. af ter the PGA and Web.com Tours, and has proven to be the top developmen tal tour by PGA and Web. com Tour Professionals. The NGA Tour has helped hundreds of profession als acquire their cards PGA TOUR, European, Web.com, and Champions Tour. NGA Tour alumni include: Johnson, Bubba Watson, the 2012 Masters cham pion Jim Furyk, the 2010 PGA Tour Player of the Year and 2003 U.S. Open cham pion Keegan Bradley, 2011 PGA championship winner 2009 British Open cham pion Stewart Cink 2009 U.S. Open champion Lucas Glover 2003 PGA Champion Shaun Micheel, 2003 British Open champion Ben Cur tis and two time U.S. Open champion Lee Janzen. Founded in 1988, the NGA Tour predates the Web.com Tour as the longest running developmental tour in golf. In 2013, the NGA Tour was awarded five Web.com Tour event exemptions and two PGA Tour event exemptions Reno Tahoe Open and the Sanderson Farms Champi onship the most of any tour in the history of devel opmental golf. LSSC FROM PAGE B1 out three. Baseball LSSC led by as many as four runs on March 26 and held off a ninth-inning rally to pick up a 7-5 road win against Florida State College-Jacksonville, snapping a 10-game losing streak. David Wood (2-3) started and got credit for the win. He went six innings and allowed ve hits and three runs one earned. He struck out 10 without walking a batter. Tyler Reker got the loss for FSC-Jackson ville. LSSC had 10 hits, in cluding three by Tanner Elsbernd. Taylor Saris added two hits. Elsbernd and Saris also scored two runs apiece. Five Lakehawks pitchers combined for the win. Walker Sheller wrapped with an inning of work and allowed two runs on one hit. Dylan Jones, Antho ny Mazzurco and Steve McClellan also pitched for LSSC. LSSC beneted from ve errors by FSC-Jack sonville. The Lake hawks also struggled in the eld and committed four errors. The Lakehawks im proved to 15-14 over all and 2-10 in the Mid-Florida Confer ence with the win. BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Lake Sumter sophomore Melissa Webb (11) pitches the ball during game one of a doubleheader between Lake-Sumter State College and Seminole State College at Lake-Sumter State College in Leesburg on Thursday. EAGLES FROM PAGE B1 Hollywood Sheridan Hills Christian and a 4-0 win against Eustis. Against the Blue Darters, Montverde Academy hurler Jes se Dreswick led the way to the win. Dre swick, who will at tend Boston College in the fall, was named the tournaments De fensive Most Valu able Player. The offen sive MVP was Apopka slugger Cassidy Brew er. Montverde Acade my improved to 15-3 on the season with the three tournament wins. The Eagles took Lake Countys spring break off and returned to ac tion late on March 25 against Orlando Bish op Moore at the Lake Fairview sports com plex in Orlando. LHS FROM PAGE B1 out ve. The Yellow Jackets to taled seven hits against Quintero and Ben Fritts. Quintero gave up three hits and Lees burgs lone run in four innin gs and Fritts sur rendered four hits in ve innings of work. Leesburg scored its lone run in the third inning when Baita crossed the plate on an error by Natera, the Lightning second base man. Baita reached base on a single and reached third on a sin gle by Tucker Smith prior to Nateras eld ing miscue. Smith was eventually stranded at third. Baita, who made 33 pitches, absorbed the loss for the Yellow Jack ets. Fritts, who made 57 pitches, picked up the win. Smith (2-for-4) was the only Yellow Jack ets with multiple hits. Baita, Garrett Vathrod er, Halstead, Kyle Bra na, and Turner Long had Leesburgs hits all singles. Danny Cepeda went 2-for-4 for Weston Cy press Bay. He was the Lightnings only player with multiple hits. Leesburg has gone 1-2 in the weeklong tournament, beat ing Jensen Beach on March 24 and drop ping a 6-3 decision to Naples Bar ron Collier on March 25.

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Ann Dupee REMEMBER WHEN A weekly column that reprints some of the more interesting news stories that have appeared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press. C1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 2, 2014 www.southlakepress.com C OMMUNITY Proudly serving CLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWS STAFF WRITER ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 EMAIL ..... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com HOMETOWN: Minneola OCCUPATION: Ofce manager at Doc tors Weight Control FAMILY: My husband is Kelly McEach ern. I have two daughters, Amber Jessee (husband, Nathan Jessee, and sons Kel ly and Rowan) and Britteny Schruefer (hus band, Michael Schruefer). What do you enjoy most about south Lake County? I like the hometown feel it still has, com pared to Orange County. 1) If you had to summarize your philosophy of life in one sentence, what would it be? With God and your family and friends around you, live well, laugh a lot and love deeply! 2) Name a person or incident youve come across recently thats touched you in some way. Why did this person or incident im press you so much? A person Ive been touched by is Rosemary DeMott of Not Just Dance. She is one of the busiest women I have ever seen. She has her studio where she teaches children ages 4 to 18, and then she goes to the colleges and teaches. She is the choreographer for the high school, and she still makes time to be at Moonlight Players to choreograph all the shows there as well. She cares about each and every one one of her students as if they were her own children. She is a true mentor. 3) How does what you do contribute to the welfare of the area? I work at Doctors Weight Control, and I help men and women every day to learn to lose weight and live a healthier life. I am also a member of the Moonlight Players. I have been with Moonlight from the start, going on 20 years. 4) Name one of your greatest accomplish ments so far. My family, my two girls, Amber and Britteny, and every time I get to direct a show at Moonlight. 5) Whats something youve always wanted to do but havent yet? Go to Ireland. FROM THE FILES | 25 YEARS AGO 1989 Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press Meet Your NEIGHBOR CATHY M c EACHERN E aster Sunday din ners. Rusty Fox: Prime Rib, $8.95; L.J. Grunts, 801 City Grill: Prime rib au jus, baked boneless breast of chicken, fresh sh of the day, roast leg of lamb, Virginia baked ham, BBQ baby back ribs, $8.95-$10.95; The Crown Restau rant: Prime rib, roast leg of lamb, boneless pork loin with stufng, chicken Oscar, roast duckling, honey glazed ham, baby back BBQ ribs, fresh bay scallops, fresh sh of the day, jumbo shrimp stuffed with lump crab meat, $10.95-$14.95. NEWS OF NOTE Mike Kelley, 22, is state senator Rich ard Langleys new leg islative aide. He is the son of Mary and Da vid Branson, the for mer district manager for Florida Power in Cl ermont. South Lake Press re porter Lucie Blake at tended the Orlando Sentinel s 10th annual Letter Writers Forum in the Ivanhoe Ballroom at the Radisson Hotel. This annual event rec ognizes readers whose Letters to the Editor have been among the best the past year. Lucies letter that re sulted in her invitation to the forum was print ed December 24, 1987, and recalled the last Christmas spent with her late husband, Ger ry, before he died. Luc ie and Gerry moved to Minneola when he was hired as Minneola city manager. The Clermont Wom ans Club put on quite a show at its annual luncheon and fashion show at the First Baptist Church Christian Life Center. It served 395 lunches, by far the larg est number ever served in the Clermont area. Tables were placed down either side of the room, leaving a nice walkway for club ladies who modeled fashions from Larsens in Lees burg. The granddaughters of member Polly Dun can and ve of mem ber Ruby Abels grand children started off the show with childrens fashions. Minneola City Coun cil passed an ordinance raising the mayors sal ary from $100 to $200 per month. FIX OUR SCHOOLS, PRINCIPAL APPOINTMENTS The Lake Coun ty School Board was presented a petition signed by 210 south Lake teachers and par ents, many of whom were in the audience. A representative of the group spoke at length regarding conditions of the schools, show ing videotapes of struc tural problems, lack ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Seven years ago, Becky Parks, the physical edu cation teacher at Cypress Ridge Elementary School, was participating in a pop ular evening event there called Family Reading Night. She looked around, saw families interacting, and thats when a light came on in her head. I thought, if there can be a family reading night, there can be a family walk night, Parks said, pleased the event has grown into something hundreds of families participate in ev ery year. With the help of Pam Hamilton and Trish Sprou le, Parks has been inviting Cypress Ridge teachers, administrators, parents, students and other fami ly members to Waterfront Park in Clermont to walk the trail together one night each month. The event not only creates bonds be tween families, but boosts their overall health and t ness. In September, when the school year starts, par ticipants begin by walk ing one mile, then every month after that, agree to increase their distances by a quarter-mile each time. By the end of the school year, participants, includ ing students, are walking three miles. Parks said each month sees more than 100 partic ipants on average, a num ber that she said some times dwindles slightly as the walking distance in creases. (Family Walk Night) gives us a reason to exer cise together. It provides us with an incentive be cause, truthfully, some times we need to be forced into it, said parent Mat thew Gosselin, who came after work to meet his wife, Nicole Gosselin, and their children Evan, Aiden and Emma. When we can, we come together as a family, Ni cole Gosselin said. Melanie Ressler, a moth er of three students, called the program a great initia tive to help kids be active. It gets them out of the house and keeps them from being in front of the television or playing video games all afternoon, she said. Katie Ciccotelli, also there with her two girls CLERMONT Family Walk Night strengthens participants bonds and bodies PHOTOS BY ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Sherie Ismain and her daughter, Rafeeye Hussein, 8, at left, attend Cypress Ridge Elementary Schools Family Walking night for March, led by physical education teacher Becky Parks. BELOW: Becky Parks helps Fred Owusu-Ofori and his daughter, Paige, 9, sign in at Marchs Family Walking Night at Waterfront Park. SEE WALKERS | C2 SEE HISTORY | C2

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C2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 2, 2014 BRIGHT IDEASBY IAN LIVENGOOD / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZNo. 0323RELEASE DATE: 3/30/2014 ACROSS1 Expands, in a way7 Sister of Helios10 ___ room13 Elite unit18 Gambling mecca19 Saints home, for short22 Venomous African tree-dweller23 Start of a motivational comment attributed to 86-Across26 Justin Timberlakes Cry ___ River27 [That makes me so uncomfortable]28 Lockup29 Middle of the comment37 Toolbar feature38 Director Nicolas39 Record40 Facial moisturizing brand41 Power suffix42 Sticks in the closet?43 End of the comment48 College major, briefly49 Commercial lead-in to Pen50 Rocket51 Cousin of Ugh!52 Osaka-to-Sapporo dir.53 Law firm department55 Fired on57 Good-for-nothing59 Resort city in 1945 news60 Small scene61 Restricted part of an urban area63 Ball player?64 Prominent feature of an Obama caricature65 Ray Charles hosted it in 1977: Abbr.66 Couple at the altar?69 Start to show ones real potential72 So73 Birthplace of Buddha, now75 Pitcher Mike with 270 wins78 Christmas cookie ingredient80 Plagues81 Eponymous German physicist82 Combined with83 Watering hole for Homer and Barney84 Coin collector85 Pelicans home, for short86 See 23-Across90 The Durbeyfield girl, in literature91 Dr. Seuss animal92 It has paper denominations from 5 to 50093 Ex-Fed head Bernanke94 Some body work, in slang95 Zippo alternatives96 Nickname for 86-Across103 Barrel of fun?104 Saffron-flavored dish105 Brow line?106 Development of 86-Across as depicted in the middle of this grid115 World capital on the slope of an active volcano116 Dolph of Rocky IV117 More chilling118 Throw around119 D.C. mover and shaker: Abbr.120 Scandinavian coin121 Actor Christian DOWN1 French kiss recipient, maybe2 How silly of me!3 Bit of a code4 Stockpile5 View that may cost you extra6 Security Council veto7 Ins8 Near future9 Hardly enough10 The French way?11 It may be delayed by a storm: Abbr.12 United Center team13 Update, say14 Garden State casino, informally, with the15 Outback native16 Crunches crunch them17 Yoga base20 ___ of relief21 Nondairy item in the dairy aisle24 Ones without a leg to stand on?25 Part of a moving line29 Blues Brothers wear30 Nosedives31 Utmost: Abbr.32 Farm mother33 My word!34 Stag, maybe35 The fish that got away and others36 Comic Wanda37 Hurried42 Death Magnetic band43 Drinking binge44 Accessory for the 91-Across45 Many an Al Jazeera viewer46 Pioneer org.47 Five-time Super Bowl champions, informally50 Baraks successor54 Sharp pains55 Travel agency listings56 Cabooses58 Starts of news articles60 Deli stock with seeds62 Tight67 What an electric current does not flow through68 Relaxed, say70 Difficult weight71 Appropriate flowers for Mothers Day?72 Bootleggers banes74 Exams offered four times a yr.75 Certain Bach composition76 For sure77 Gooey campfire treat79 Not ___ shabby!80 Cesare Angelotti in Tosca, e.g.84 It gets you off schedule87 Place to store hay88 German article89 Third line on many a ballot: Abbr.90 Sunbathing evidence94 One with bills piling up?95 My Name Is ___, gold album of 196597 Tell me about it!98 One of two parts of a British puzzle?99 ___ page100 Canine101 D.C. mover102 Pi ___, Life of Pi protagonist106 100s of ordinary people?107 Fanatic108 Geometry fig.109 Had something110 Bring into court111 ___ = Politics (TV slogan)112 Guys113 Food Network host Sandra114 Its f-f-freezing! 123456 789 1011121314151617 18 19 2021 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 3132 33343536 37 38 39 40 41 42 434445 4647 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 5657 58 59 60 6162 63 64 65 666768 6970 7172 73 74 757677 7879 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 8889 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 9798 99100101 102 103 104 105 106107108109 110111 112 113114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). When this puzzle is done, the circled letters, reading counterclockwise from the top, will spell a phrase relating to the puzzles theme. Solution on D3 COMMUNITY CALENDAR TODAY SAC MEETING AT PINE RIDGE ELEMENTARY: At 7 p.m., in the media cen ter. THURSDAY PASTFINDERS GENE ALOGY GROUP MEET ING: From 5 to 7 p.m., in the upstairs Genealogy Room in Cooper Memo rial Library in Clermont. SATURDAY EAT THE WEEDS HEALTHY AND EDIBLE NATIVE PLANTS WITH THE LAKE BEAUTYBERRY CHAPTER OF THE FLORIDA NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY: At 10 a.m., Cooper Memo rial Library, 2525 Oakley Seaver Dr., in Clermont. Admission is free. COOPER MEMORIAL LI BRARYS 3RD ANNUAL TEEN BATTLE OF THE BANDS: From 2 to 5:30 p.m. on the grounds of Lake-Sumter State Col lege. Registration is free and band members should be between the ages of 12 and 18. Call 352-536-2275 or email lpiper@lakeline.lib..us to sign up. MONDAY MASCOTTE ELEMEN TARY CHARTER BOARD SAC MEETING: At 5 p.m., in the media center. Call 352-429-2294. TUESDAY PASTFINDERS GENEAL OGY GROUP HELP SES SION: From 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., in the Genealogy Room in Cooper Memo rial Library, in Clermont. APRIL 10 HOLOCAUST REMEM BRANCE DAY AT THE COO PER MEMORIAL LIBRARY: A presentation of com ics, cartoons and chil dren of the Holocaust with Dr. Seuss, and Su perman as an anti-Nazi allegory in a special pro gram at 5 p.m. in room 108. Dr. Sheryl Needle Cohn, Ed.D., is the guest speaker. Call the library at 352-536-2275 for de tails. APRIL 11 SPRING FLING EASTER CELEBRATION AT CAGAN CROSSINGS FARMERS MARKET: From 4 to 8 p.m., with an Easter Egg Scav enger Hunt for the kids. For $3 each, kids can dec orate an Easter craft at the South Lake Art Leagues Artist Boutique. Regular vendors with produce, food and more will be on hand, at Cagan Town Center, Cagan Crossings Blvd. Email cagancross ingsfarmersmarket@ gmail.com. APRIL 13 EASTER EVENTS AT WINDERMERE UNION CHURCH, UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST: Palm Sunday service at 10 a.m. April 13. Good Friday ser vice on April 18 at 7:30 p.m., and Easter Sun day celebration on April 20 at 10 a.m., with spe cial music and an Eas ter message. Easter cel ebration also includes an Easter egg hunt for kids through the sixth grade accompanied by parents. All events are held at the church, 10710 Park Ridge-Gotha Rd. Call 407-876-2112 or go to www.windermere union.org. APRIL 15 SOUTH LAKE HIGH SCHOOL SAC MEETING: At 6:30 p.m. in the culi nary arts room. Call 352394-3644. APRIL 16 CHAPTER 188 OF THE KOREAN WAR VETERANS ASSOCIATION OF SOUTH LAKE COUNTY SUPPORT ING HOMELESS VETERANS MEETING: At 1:30 p.m., Lake David City Build ing in Groveland. For in formaton, call David Litz at 352-536-9022. To place an item on the calen dar, send an email to pam.fen nimore@dailycommercial.com. and with Resslers fam ily, has participated ev ery month since the start of school. Cicco telli said she also likes the venue (Waterfront Park) because of its nat ural beauty. After walk ing, the kids enjoy play ing on the beach and in park areas. The two moms also like that participating counts as school volun teer hours for parents. Coming keeps us in shape and then after wards, we can spend time with our families, friends and play with each other, Sebastien Ressler, 9, said. Joshua Phillips, there with his 6-year-old daughter Elizabeth, said he feels the program provides a great oppor tunity to get some ex ercise, spend time with family and friends and show support for the school, but most of all, he likes the challenge. They lay it out for you and they increase it each time we come. It gets tougher, and its ex citing to see how far we can go, Phillips said. In March, in honor of the city of Clermont police departments newly instated water front/downtown Cl ermont task force pa trol initiative, the kids, parents and teachers at Family Walk Night were greeted by Ofcers James Rooney, Brenda Teets and Chief Charles Broadway. They con gratulated the walkers for their efforts and re warded the students with wrist bands. WALKERS FROM PAGE C1 of library books, overcrowded classrooms and general lack of maintenance. The petition asked that the public be made aware of the numerous problems facing their schools. Board member Chip Deems advised the group the problem was not unique to south Lake County. With the failure of the bond referendum last May, the board is seeking alternative solutions. School Superintendent Dr. Tom Sanders announced ap pointments to the districts 1989 bargaining team: Carmen Arnold, David Coggshall, Jim Hollings, Bob Eyerly and Bob Miller. Edward Pauley was moved from principal of Groveland El ementary to district supervisor of elementary education and James Gant was moved from principal of Treadway Elemen tary to principal of Groveland Elementary. Appointed assistant princi pals were James Dandridge, Clermont High; Grover Mar tin, Clermont Junior High; Ray Sewell, Groveland High and Henry Thacker, Groveland Mid dle. William Bill Sullivan, Cl ermont High, will retire June 30. DICK HARRIS DAY Clermont Mayor Bob Pool presented Richard E. Dick Harris a framed proclamation honoring his service to the res idents of the city and naming Friday, March 31, Dick Harris Day in Clermont. Dick, a pharmacist for 42 years, has been an active par ticipant in work with the First United Methodist Church; the Clermont-Minneola Lions Club, which awarded him Lion of the Year; Girls Scouts and Boy Scouts and American Legion. HISTORY FROM PAGE C1 SUBMITTED PHOTO A group from the Sandspurs Circle of the Clermont Garden Club went on a eld trip to the Albin Polasek Museum in Winter Park recently and took a tour of the gardens and house on the grounds to learn about Polasek, a sculptor and artist. For information about the club, go to www.clermontgardenclub.com. SANDSPURS VISIT WINTER PARK

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C3 Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...Totally UniqueTotally Unique is proud to be Clermonts first ORGANIC hair salon. We care about your beauty, your wellness, the environment and our community, so we use organic and sustainably harvested products whenever possible. We specialize in organic hair color, hair care products, nail and skin care lines. Our salon is one of the oldest salons in Clermont and is located at 786 W Montrose Street in Historic Downtown Clermont. Our stylists are experienced in all phases of hair care including color, straighteners, cuts, texture and styles. Hair stylists are Marjorie Morphet, Tina Foote, Sherie Wolkens and Jamie Rhoades. Our nail techs, Jennifer Vandergrift and Jamie Rhoades, perform pedicures and manicures using Zoya nail products (which are Big 5 free). Shellac manicures, lasting up to three weeks, are also available by Jennifer and Jamie. We have two pedicure chairs in a private room for your relaxation and enjoyment. Relaxing and therapeutic facials are available by Jennifer in our private upstairs facial room. Massage services include chair massage, Swedish and Deep Tissue. Massage services are also done in a private room in our upstairs area. We utilize several massage therapists and provide massage by appointment only. We also offer a small boutique with handcrafted jewelry and hair accessories, Art by Tina Foote and Jamie Rhoades, and other unique items. Salon hours are 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Saturday and open Sundays by appointment only. Evening hours are also available by appointment. We pride ourselves in providing a friendly, relaxing environment for our clients and friends. Stop by and visit or call 352-394-5005 for more information. We are also on Facebook and www.TotallyUniqueSalon.com. rfnrtb Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! rffntCall today b fnfffr mprehensim i$59ions$99excludes w i sdo m teeth (thi rd m ola rs)new pa t ients only one time visit offer p anoramic xray required D0330 out of pocket expenseExpires: May 31, 2014 m 352-394-3071 *P anoramic x-ray and/or CT scan of the ja ws necessary for d ia gnos is and trea tment planning. It is our office policy tha t the pa tient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service. examina tion or trea tment which is performed as a result of a nd within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free discounted-offer or reduced-free service, ex ami na tion or trea tment MIn. Free ADA code D0210, D0150 m3 No More Dentures! SUBMITTED PHOTO Terric Kids at Mascotte Elementary Charter for March are: Alaina Martinez, Nathan King, Elijah Rodriguez, Nahiara Velez, Jasmine Kaliszewski, Krystaline Valdez, Anika Adams, Leslie Padilla, Kassidy Stephens, Jorge Cervantes, Jasmine Cervantes, Aracelie Gonzalez, Madelis Cruz, Genesis Garcia, Kaylee Underwood, Arinn Freeman, Audrey Altman, Mayra-Liz Bravo, Vanessa Betancourt, Alfredo Rivero, Jesus Padilla, Samantha Ruiz, Spring Fequiere, Titus Hayes, Janely Jaramillo, Jose Alvarado, Skyler Fequiere, Anthony Ramsawack, Shaddin Ahmad, Julie Colon, Elizabeth, Luna, Elizabeth Singh, Roxana Gonzalez, Sylvia Sanchez, Eduardo Baez, Tyler Seepersaud, Marleni Martinez, Cody Smith, Damien Mancini and Viviana Rodriguez. Kiwanis Members Mr. Garcia and Mr. Thomas, and Principal Wayne Cockcroft are also pictured. Not pictured: Kolten Harper. MASCOTTE ELEMENTARY CHARTER TERRIFIC KIDS SUBMITTED PHOTO Terric Kids at Cypress Ridge Elementary School for March are: Samantha Poreda, Troy Saha, Collin Stebbins, Kristopher Malave, Jared Hogan, Justin Hitte, Kayla Schweitzer, Adrian Marquez, Rachel Marks, Sydney Benson, Janki Patel, Kyla Altmeyer, Sammy Taylor, Morgan Pitcher, Alie Sunseri, Colin Bishman, Owen Himschoot, Keira Votava, Emma DiGennaro, Sydney Foster, Emily Horn, Kaluki Kithome, Alex Gonzalez, Tayler Roberson, Josh Montero, Noah Echavarria, Elle Fuller, Carson Brookes, Ariana Umana, Lucas Donnelly, Madyson Matthews, Garcelle Williams, Jill Orlando, McCall McMullen, Hannah Herbert, Sabrina Martinez, Calvin Carlson and assistant principal Jan Nappi. CYPRESS RIDGE ELEMENTARY TERRIFIC KIDS SUBMITTED PHOTO Freddy Williams, president/CPO of The Boys & Girls Clubs of Lake and Sumter Counties, addressed the Kiwanis Club of Clermont recently, about the organizations history, dating back to its formation in 1860, in Hartford, Conn. The presentation included information about the local club, formed in Clermont three years ago, and how the clubs positively affect kids between the ages of 5 and 18 years in the community. He also discussed a study presently being conducted to nd a permanent home for the South Lake Boys and Girls Club in Clermont. WILLIAMS SPEAKS AT KIWANIS CLERMONT BJs Charitable Foundation presents grant to United Way United Way of Lake and Sumter Counties re cently received a $5,000 grant from the BJs Char itable Foundation and will use the grant at Cler mont Elementary School as part of the Rally for Reading Program. The BJs Charitable Foundation is dedicated to supporting hunger prevention, self-sufcien cy, health care and education in the communities surrounding our Clubs, said Jessica Newman, ex ecutive director of the foundation. BJs Charitable Foundation also contributed 92 grants totaling $569,160 to various local nonprot organizations that support the health and overall well-being of children and families residing in the communities surrounding BJs Wholesale Clubs across the state.

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C4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 2, 2014 Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) rfnftnbrbnrfn rfrntfbbrrfrntfbbrrfnt rf rfnfntbnf April 12, 2014Registration:5pm 6pmat Spanish Village-Clubhouse(Between Arlington Ridge & Plantation)1 El Presidente Blvd., Leesburg, FL 34748 TOP PRIZES INCLUDE*: 1st: $500 Gift Card 2nd: $250 Gift Card 3rd: $100 Gift Card Thomas Kinkade Painting Weekend Trip $50 Gift CardrPhone: (352) 326-0761 x1100 Email: info@MercyMail.org www.AngelFlightSE.orgSponsors COME PLAY WITH USLimited Seats Available Sign Up Today Sponsor a Table of 10 Call for InformationTo Register go to:www.AngelFlightSE.org/Events $60.00 Registration Includes FoodPlus Re-stacks and Add-on!Early Registration is Now Available Save $20.00 Off Your Entry!Deadline April 9th THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com Melon Patch Play house in Leesburg is breaking away from its norm by showcas ing a dark musical dra ma, Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, by Ste phen Sondheim, which features a murderous barber, a cannibalistic pie maker and glorious music. The show runs through April 6. A lot of people write off this musical because of the murder and be cause of the darkness of it, but if you can get past the subject matter, this is one of the most beau tiful musicals that you will ever hear, Director John Turcotte said. The music is glorious and sung so well. This real ly is an operetta of more music than it is actually dialogue. The director, who also is a local schoolteach er, said he worked to tone down some of the scenes so they would not be offensive. We have made this as much of a fami ly-friendly Sweeney Todd as Sweeney Todd can be made, Turcotte said. We are not put ting blood and guts in your face. Ive toned down a lot of that to make it more accessible to the general public so that they can enjoy the show and not get totally freaked out by the sub ject matter. He believes teens can handle Melon Patchs Sweeney Todd. It has no more than what kids would see at 8 oclock at night on a crime drama, Turcotte said. He believes audienc es are bound to nd themselves cheering for the evil duo of Sweeney Todd (Nathan Jessee) and Mrs. Lovett (Jolene Sheets) and their plot against Judge Turpin (Cliff Barrineau) and Beadle Bamford (Tad Kincade). The arriv al of Adolfo Pirelli (Kyle Stone) and his servant boy Tobias (Manolo Hernandez) adds com plications to Sweeneys plot for revenge and re sults in the rst blood shed of the show. Not to worry, there is no real blood. We do not shed one drop of blood; we do it all very theatrically with the lights. This is not the Johnny Depp movie made gloriously bathed in blood, Turcotte said. This is a much more theatrical production, and much more of a representational pro duction. The plot also revolves around the love affair between Judge Turpins ward Johanna (Stepha nie Hutchison) and the sailor Anthony (Daniel Roscoe). And how does the beggar woman (Jes sa Dodds) t into this murder thriller? Tur cotte said audiences will have to wait until the end for the answer. The ensemble of this show acts as a Greek chorus and often com ments on the action as the sinister story un folds. Members include Alan Terry, Kristian Ware, Derek Wallman, Heath er Franklin, Trista Fouts, Meagan Nee, Mike Bai ley, Lindsay Koons, Kath leen Byrd, Charlotte Jar dine, Jessica Shinn and Lavonte Rogers. Turcotte praised his cast and noted they are relishing the intensi ty of the show and their chance to perform a dark drama. They are really enjoy ing being in something that is a little bit off the beaten path, Turcotte said. Its not often that you nd a musical dra ma. I hope the audi ence walks away enjoy ing the fact that they can enjoy something very different. Turcotte said no one fainted or complained from last weekends opening shows. We have not lost one person because of the production or the sub ject matter, so I think we are handling it quite well as far as not offend ing anybody, Turcotte said, who was relieved to hear praise about the talented cast. The director said he has always adored Sweeney Todd, and was pleased to have the opportunity to show it at Melon Patch for the rst time. He performed in the show twice before in the role of Beadle at IceHouse in Mount Dora. Now that I have transformed to doing more directing than anything, I am look ing at all the different shows that I love and that I have done out there, he said. Swee ney Todd was one that had not been done at Melon Patch. The Leesburg the ater has focused more on musical comedies of Rodgers and Hammer stein, he said. People didnt think Melon Patch was as ca pable of doing a dark show. This is a very dif ferent departure from our norm for us, and people werent sure that we could pull it off, and we seem to be able to very well, Turcotte said. Im very proud of my cast and crew. The production staff for Sweeney Todd in cludes Linda Charlton (accompanist), Michael Winternheimer (techni cal director), Sally Gage (choreographer), Jenni fer Fink (stage manag er), Joshua Eads-Brown (costumes) and Pauline Judge (prop mistress). Melon Patch is locat ed at 311 N. 13th St., in Leesburg. Tickets for the show are $18 for adults and $9 for stu dents. Tickets can be reserved by calling the box ofce at 352-7873013. Since the musical deals with adult themes and subject matter, pa rental discretion is ad vised. Melon Patch debuts dark musical drama Sweeney Todd THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Manolo Hernandez, left, portrays servant boy, Tobias, and Jolene Sheets stars as Mrs. Lovett in Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street.

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NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 7 25 34 47 67 13 18 31 59 74 9 21FREE SPACE53 72 2 16 42 48 63 5 29 39 52 68ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N I B O G BINGO B I N G O SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Rosemarie Alexander WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! B 13 B 2 B 5 B 9 B 7 Wednesday, April 2, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C5

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C6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 2, 2014 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com Lake County ofcials say they are struggling to come up with fund ing to make needed re pairs at county build ings and to replace obsolete technology. With 41 percent of the countys buildings more than 20 years old, the HVAC controls system and IT le servers must be replaced to avoid system and operation al failure in the future, they say. Some of those build ings include the Lake County Administration Building, Lake County Sheriffs Ofce and the jail. We are not talking about iPads and laptops or anything like that, County Manager Da vid Heath said. We are talking about the guts of the system, referring to the network and serv ers. If we have servers that go down, we will have departments not able to function. Heath added: This stuff is very low bud get and not extravagant. These are truly needs. The decline in prop erty values over the last few years has tightened and reduced budget al locations in Lake Coun tys Facilities and In formation Technology departments. Facilities has 17 fewer employees than it did in 2010. Kristian Swenson, Fa cilities and Fleet Man agement director, said there is a backlog of $12.2 million of facili ties needs, while IT is reporting $950,000 for critical updates to le servers, data storage units and telephone systems. Ofcials said many building components in need of repair, such as HVAC controls system, chillers and boilers, are at the end of their life span or are obsolete. If funding is not al located long-term, Sw enson said those needs will continue to grow, adding to the large backlog. You dont want an operational failure in the building, he said. For example, if you have heating and air conditioning disrup tion in the courthouse it could affect the court system. Facilities has made two separate budget requests of $500,000 for this years and next years budget; IT has requested $200,000 for immediate needs. But nding reve nue to meet long-term needs could become a challenge as the coun ty grapples with a $7 million shortfall in the 2014-15 budget. Last year, the county used $1.1 million from the infrastructure pen ny sales tax fund to pay debt on capital rather than taking it from the general fund. The quandary fac ing commissioners is whether to use $5.74 million available next year from the penny sales tax to pay debt on capital, which would make up the shortfall, or use the revenue to address facility main tenance needs over the long-term. County struggles with millions in repairs BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Mark Wrigley troubleshoots a water heater that supplies the water for inmate showers at Lake County Detention Center in downtown Tavares, Thursday. SEE REPAIRS | C7

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C7 CLERMONT BLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSAMILYELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time! IRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONTL Many Other Activities each week Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.org LIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLCHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm SOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary); 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.org ST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am (Rite I) 10:00 am (Rite II) 5:00 pm (Praise & Worship) Sunday School Youth Group Nursery Adult Bible Study Womens Bible Study Mens Prayer Breakfast WOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH GODINCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALE ERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for Children Groveland IRSTBAPTISTCHURCH GROVELAND Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pm MT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! MINNEOLA CONGREGATIONSMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club NEWLPRESBYTERIANCHURCH18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am TLIVINGGOD Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce Rowland MONTVERDE WOODLANDSLUTHERAN15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 am OAKLAND PRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforSouth Lake South LakeGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOMErfn tbt352-394-7121806 W. Minneola Ave.,Clermont,FL Cremation ChoicesDirect Cremation$675Plus Container Ron Becker,Director352-394-8228921 S.US Hwy 27,Minneola,FL Even so, county ofcials say some needs in different areas could go unmet. For example, if the commission decides to use all the reve nue available to pay down the debt, it could displace projects such as South Lake Regional Park. Swenson said there are hundreds of parts that have to be changed out in re alarm systems, boilers, lighting protection systems, switchgears, kitchen equip ment and laundry electron ic components. And as technology contin ues to change, the systems the county uses are also be coming obsolete because the industry no longer sup ports it or sells replacement parts, according to Steve Earls, IT director. Servers are what hold our main business applications that everyone uses, and we have electronic data storage units that house data infor mation user les, he said. A third of those are over six years old. We have already had hard drive failures. The current racks that house the countys hard drives are no longer made, as technology has moved to a smaller design. With everything today In ternet-based, Heath said upgrades are critical, be cause the public relies on the countys website for on line permitting and watch es the County Commission meetings made possible by the audiovisual equipment. We are asking for funding to replace a 20-plus-yearold system providing vid eo and sound for the board chambers, Earls said. We cant get replacements with the current system we have. Earls said the county also accepts electronic submis sions for building plans and architecture drawings, which could affect these of ferings if the servers are not replaced. County Commission er Tim Sullivan said fund ing should be allocated for the immediate needs for those departments. As for the long-term needs, he suggested the county piece together a capital improve ment plan to evaluate the highest priorities. While concerned about how antiquated the systems have become, Commission Chairman Jimmy Conner said the majority of the pen ny sales tax in the future, af ter it comes up for renewal potentially in 2015, should go primarily toward public safety and include parks and sidewalks. It most denitely comes down to priorities, he said, explaining there is a need for patrol cars for the sher iff and ambulances for Lake EMS. Understanding IT and fa cility maintenance needs is essential to the opera tion and have to be funded, Commissioner Sean Parks said at the same time he hopes to keep funding intact for South Lake Regional Park and public safety needs. Some needs will be un met, he said. Heath said the county can either address the facilities and IT needs now or have the system eventually col lapse and cost 10 times as much to replace it. REPAIRS FROM PAGE C6 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL A chiller at the Lake County Detention Center is responsible for supplying several buildings with cooled air. SOURCE: Lake County Government IN NEED OF REPAIR A list of items that county ofcials say must be replaced in the coming years: FACILITIES Replace plumbing at the jail for numerous leaks Replace two hot boilers at the jail Update re alarm systems Replace jail kitchen appliances Replace HVAC controls, which are obsolete in numerous buildings TOTAL: $12.2M TECHNOLOGY Replace critical le servers and power supplies Replace old data storage devices Replace Commission chambers audiovisual system Network components for remote ofces Replace 26 outdated telephone systems TOTAL: $950,000

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C8 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 2, 2014 SUBMITTED PHOTO Pictured are, from left to right, Michael Nix, Grace DAmico, teacher Jeannette Smith, Ashley Allen and Anna Blake after competing in a statewide competition in classical and sacred piano at the Sunshine State Association of Christian Schools competition, March 7 in Tampa. The talented group are piano students at the Smith School of Music, Inc., under Jeannette Smith in Clermont. Wins for the students include a rst place nish for DAmico in the Classical Piano Solo Division playing Un Sospiro by Franz Liszt, and in the Sacred Piano Solo Division playing Glorious Things of Thee are Spoken, arranged by Heather Sorenson. DAmico and Nix both won rst place in the Classical Piano Duet Division playing Hummelug by Rimsky-Korsakov (Flight of the Bumblebee), arranged by Uwe Korn. Allen and Blake won second place in the Sacred Piano Duet Division, playing Blessed Assurance, arranged by Rebecca Bonam. For information about the school, call Jeannette Smith at 352-394-2530 or go to www.smithschoolofmusic.com. LOCAL PIANO STUDENTS WIN BIG SUBMITTED PHOTO Jeanette Rescoe talks with some of the more than 300 students from Imagine Charter Elementary School who toured the Historic Village Museum in Clermont recently. Half of the students visited on March 13 and the others came on March 18, learning about how early settlers did chores, entertained themselves and went to school. IMAGINE CHARTER SCHOOL VISITS HISTORIC VILLAGE

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D1 rfntbrr r f n t b n b n n b n n t b n b n n b n t n n n b b n n t n b b b n t n t b n n b n t n b t b n n t b n b n t n n n b n b n n n t t b n t t n t b b n t b b b b b n t n b n b n n b n n n b t n t b t b b b n t n b n b f b n b b n n b n t n b n n b n t b b n n t b t n n b f t b b b n b b n b n n b n b t t b t b b n b t b b n b n n b n b b n t n b n b b b n n n n b b t b b n n n t b b n t n b n b n b n b n t f f f r frr nrtr n n b n n n n f f br n b t n b n b b n t n n b n n n b n b n n b b n n t n b n t b b b b n b t n b n b b n t t t b n b n t b n t t n n n b f t b b n b b t b rt n n n n t b b b n t b n n n b b n t t t n t b b n b b b n n t b b n n b n b t n n b n b n n b n n b b n b n b t b b b n b b n b b b t f b n f f t n b r rt nnnb nnn tbnbb nnnb b n n b b n b n b n n n t b n rr f f tr rt t n b n t t t b t n n n b t nnnb nbtb tbtnntt nbtbb nnnbnbnbn nnbtnbnbnn ntnnbnnt n nbbnt nnb f bnbt bbnn ntnbnb f nf bf nbnnbnb bnnbnf bnbnbn nnnb tnbb bnnn bnnf nbnnntn tbtbtnnnb nnnbfff bnnbbt nnnnbn nbt bnbn tbnnb n bbf rt nf nbn bnnn nn btbfbt ntbnbntnbbn nbnn nb bnbn bbbn bbnbbnbn bnbnnb bnnb nnnn nbtbnbtb ntb nbbnbnnb bnnb tb ntb nbtnnn bf nbnbbnb nbbnff nbn ff n nbnnn nb nbnnnn bnb bnnbff nff bf nbtnnn bf nbnbbnb nbbnff nbn ff n nbnnn nb nbnnnn bnb bnnbff nf bf rt nf nbn bnnn nn btbfbt ntbnbntnbbn nbnn nb bnbn bbbn bbnbbnbn bnbnnb bnnb nnnn nbtbnbtb ntb nbbnbnnb bnnb tb ntb nf nbbbb nn nbnnbnnn bbnbntnb bbn nntnntb nbnntnbn bnnnntbnbnb nbnnfff tnbnntnb nt ntbbtbnbnnntb bn nbtnb nfbnf nnnb nbbbnbn tnnnb bnntbbnbbn nbnbbb nbtb ntnbbn nbff bnntb tb n bbf bn nbtnb nfbnf nnnb nbbbnbn tnnnb bnntbbnbbn nbnbbb nbtb ntnbbn nbff bnntb tb n bbf rt nf nbbbb n t nn nbnnbnnn bbnbntnb bbn nntnffn tbnbnbn nnntbnbnb nbnnfft nbnntnb nt ntbbtbnbnnntb nf nbbbb n t f nn nbnnbnnn bbnbntnb bbnf nntnfn tbnbnbn nnntbnbnb nbnnfft nbnntnb nt ntbbtbnbnnntb bn nbtnb nfbnnbf nnnb nbbbnbn tnnnb bnntbbnbbn nbnbbb nbtb ntnbbn nbff bnntb tb n bbf rt b rt rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrff nrrrrrrrrrrff ttbrrrrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rfntbbt rfrntn nnnftbnbn brfbnrb bnbtn b rnnrtnftbn tbrbttb nnnrfrbtb nbb n fbfn tbrbnbbbtn nnnntnbbtr bbbfrf rtfnbtr rrbrfnnnrfnt t rf

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D2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 2, 2014 rfntbf r f n n t b r b n b n b b r b b bbn bbtbnn nrbbn bn nn br bbt btr b b b r b b b frbnbttb tn bbtbnr b r n n t b r b n b n b b r b n n r r b r r b b n bnbtn rr t b b r r b r r f nbtttbb bbft n btt r r f r f r n b b b r r b r n b bbtbf r bbr btbbn nr bb bbbr n r b

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D3 rfntbrr r f nrr nfft n n n r fbnt trn r r f frrfrr rfntbn rffn tbbbbbbb ttb b rrnrr tb t b b b b br tb f rrff rrf tt rrr frnbrr bbb brrbt rnrrrf fnb ff bbtbbb tft nbrtt fffrf bb rfrr rtt ff fnb frrf t rf n rrrftb tb fn trrtt r f b t rrbb brrtb rr bnbbt tf frr frf rfnb tbbf r rrbb rftbbbt rff rnf rrrfbbtb nfr fbtt rftttbbrr b rrtb tbbbt rrtb tbbbt rrttbb rff tbrfr frf t trfbr rfrftbb bt n rfbtbb rff bt n r r f t r b b bb rfn bbbb r f nfb nrbb fr nbbb b tf tb rrfrf fntbbtb fnf rf b rrrf tt ffff rtb rf rbbfrnbtb rfn frtbbt fttt r b b n n b t t rrfrff nrfnb rfnr tt rr f b nn bbtb ffnb rff rrb rrf tbbt rrtb fnbbtb n b b b rftrb f n t r t b b t rnff rffb fbr rbb t f t b btbb brrf r frrb rb ff fbbt r r nfnf b fnrr bt fbrr rfbt t b b b frrrb rrnbb r t tb rrtfb brf rrrfbtb nfrn rtb f bf f r r f r b t b fnb bbt n b fnbb b fnbb b frbrr tt t brbbr bt r rftb t ftbrbt tbrffn frbrrbb rr rrfnnr tbbtttttr trr tbb r rbt t f f rrbbt rrrfb rf bb tn rfb rb f rfftbbb ff rrf rr r fff rft rtt bf t rr rtbbrb tt ftb fnt tbbbb nrrfnrf ftbb bbfrnrr nnt rrf btt rff fnfr tbbrrb t r rtbbttt frb rr rrf tbbtbbtbb f trr fft bt b rfrfb rrfnbb bt t bt fnr frnrbtbb rfbr tbbbtb b t nn bt frf nb ftbbb t frtbbb ff tbtb rrr tbbb rr rf r b r f r r f f f f f r n t t b rfr fnbbbt ff t nn tbb fb tt ff ftbrr rftbrf rrrt rftbb frr rftbb rnrr nb b fn rftb rr rb r fffftbb tt rrfn nrb nrrf rnf t bt t tbbbb rf nrftbbttbb nr rbb fnrfr bb ffrr rftbbbb nbt rrrfb t r rnrr b rr nrrb rrrrrf tbb rfr fntbb n t nrrnf r f fntbbt bb t nrrr ttbt fn t r f n b b n t b t t b t f r r f f r f r r f r r f r r b f r t b tr bt ff r t f t b b t b r f f f f f n f r b rrfb fb rr rtbt ff ftbbb ftbb b ttfrf frfrfb ftbb b f t rff b b b r f r f r f r f r r f f r ffr rrfn r r f r r f r r f f r r f r f r r r f r r f t t b b b f r f n f r r f f r b n r r r f r r r r f f r f f f r r f r t r t r n f f r f f f n f b r f t r r rn frrfrrf frfrfr frfnr rr frfff fr f r r f r r r r t t r f r f t f r r f r f r t f r r r f r f f f n f f f f r r f f f f f f r f f r f r t b f b b t r r r f f r r r r t n fnf rff rf b rrf fr nf rrf r r b b t t rrrff nrrf r r r f r t r r rrfr fff frrf ffrff rffff rr rfrff nrfrrf b b f n r rnff rrfrrfr rf b b f r r t

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D4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 2, 2014 rfntbf rfr ntbbtr nnt ff t b n n f f nn nf ffrtf r nnnn rr nftff rf bnnnb frr f b r f rrf n t n t n n b n b ntbf nt nf rf r f f r f r t nfnt tbnbttnb trf bf tbtnb bnr nr b f f n r r nt tbtrt frrrf nrrf f nn rrf r t ftnttntbnt nb rfrr nbt brfr n rrf f nbbt bb tffr r f f f n nn tbt tt nbnrrr ttn nbnrr f rf nbtf b bf ftnbbntn nnnn brrfr rfbt frrf bbnnr nnn nbbntn rn fb ffbn nnnn nbn nfr n rfrb nbn rfrfr n nn frfbt nn f t f rftbnn bnntnn btb rrff ffnf nnnnn nnrbnbb rrr n r n t n b n n n b n n t n r f n n n t t n n b f r r ttn rrtntn bfbr rfbnn ntbtt fnrfr bnnttt nrff rrbnb nbtnr ntttnn bffffr fntbbnn nnnbbt nb ntt r trnttt ttnb f rr nnf f nn tbn n t t rnf n b t t b frnn r nnnb r nnf f nnntrf f r r nttf r n n t t f r n t r n f f f b b n n b n b n t b f f f f f b b n n b n b n t b f f nf f nnff f n r n t n b n n n b n ftt rrn rtnnb tnrfr n r n t n b n n n b n r f n n n t t n n b f n t t r r nn tbn n t t rnf n b t t b frnn r nnnb r trf fft n b b t b r f r n t t f f f r b n b t n f f r bnb bnbtnb nnbnf ntbtn nbtttr tbrnbnntb ffn nnrt trrnnttbnnt fbtntbt trn nnbtbtbbn tntf nbnbnn ttffrn tbnn bbntn fbtntbt trn ntnnt fnbnn ffntb nnb b ntn frb f n t b b t t t n b t b n b r r f r f nntnr nttr rr ft nn tbn n t t rnf n b t t b frnn r nnnb r n ff n r n t n b n n n b n f n t n t t t t r f n t r r f r r f fftt bbn rf rf nft tbf b t b r r n n n t b n t b f r n t b f b n t n b f r n n n r f r f n t t t t t b t r f n t n b t f f n b t r r r t f r b n t r r f nn tbn n t t rnf n b t t b frnn r nnnb r nft ttbf r b n n t n nn tbn n t t rnf n b t t b frnn r nnnb r nf ttbf nnff ft tb ntbtbf r t frrff nn fbtf rbtbtfr rr rb rbtntr f nbn brrf rbtf



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Sponsored by Fran Haasch lawfran.com Phone: 352-326-2623LEARN TO RIDE! April is CHECK YOUR HELMET MONTHwe are giving away a FREE Bandanawith the purchase of a Harley-Davidsonhelmet during the month of April.BUY DUNLOP TIRES AND GET A $40 GIFT CARD(See store for details, offer exp. April 30th)WEDNESDAY BIKE NIGHT AT BEEF O BRADYS Dont Miss It! SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | C1SPORTS:Harbor Hills hosts Lake County Classic WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWST AND INSIDE CLASSIFIED D1 CROSSWORDS C2 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN C1 SPORTS B1 VOICES A4WORD ON THE STREE T A2SOUTH LAKE PRESSV OLUME 99, NO. 14 5 SECTIOn N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reservedwww. southlakepress.comPRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comPicture the 226-foot-tall Florida Citrus Tower in Cl ermont turned into a gi ant Muslim Mosque, where an Islamic call to worship would be broadcast from its speakers across the countryside. Its hard to imagine, but not for longtime resident Greg Homan, who wants to sell the iconic tourist attraction to the city for $2.5 million. Although hes considered putting the tower on the market ofcially, the thought of unknown private buyers makes him nervous. Ive always said all along that Clermont, or the Chamber (of Commerce), or something along those lines, should be the next owners of the tower, Homan said, fearing a private owner might let the tower fall into disrepair. The other thing I thought of is that if I found a worthy private investor of the tower, and they turned around and sold it to a Muslim mosque, and they did a call to wor ship off the top of it a couple of times a day Im just throwing (out) an example and not trying to spook you, but its important for the city that you control it, he told city council members at a workshop this week. The tower was built in 1956 to allow visitors to observe the miles of Central Florida orange groves before they turned into rooftops. At more than 500 feet above sea level, it is the highest observation point in the state. The tower was one of sever al attractions that tourists went out of their way to visit before Walt Disney ever considered building a theme park in CLERMONTCitrus Tower owner wants to sell to the city for $2.5M BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Greg Homan, owner of the Citrus Tower in Clermont, wants to sell the previously iconic tourist attraction to the city for $2.5 million.Ive always said all along that Clermont, or the Chamber (of Commerce), or something along those lines, should be the next owners of the tower.Greg Homan, Citrus Tower owner HOMAN LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comLake County commis sioners are moving for ward with plans to ban the sale of synthetic marijuana countywide. Commissioners last week agreed to adver tise an ordinance banning the drug, which health experts and the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce say has an ad verse effect on children. Commonly marketed as potpourri, incense or bath salts, and pack aged in colorful cellophane wrappers with brand names like Mr. Happy, synthetic marijuana is frequently sold in convenience stores and smoke shops. Health experts say the substances can cause psychotic episodes in those that smoke them. Bath salts, meanwhile, are often sold as over-the-counter products used for bathing, but can be swallowed, snorted, smoked or injected to obtain a eu phoric effect. Commissioner Sean Parks pushed for the or dinance after hearing about a child who went into cardiac arrest from taking the drug. The chemicals we are discussing today pose a big danger to our residents, he said. They are poisons that are being marketed to our kids. As the father of three young kids, it scares me. I think this will give the sheriffs department a tool to help tackle this issue. The drugs are sold as incense, with exotic names like K2, Black Mamba and Spice. Oth er brands names appear to target children, like TAVARESLake moving to ban synthetic marijuana KELLEY MCCALL / AP This photo shows a package of K2, a concoction of dried herbs sprayed with chemicals. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comWhile a proposed natural gas pipeline through Lake and Sumter counties might bring jobs and reduce power plant emis sions, residents drilled home a common plea last week at a public meeting in Clermont: Can it go someplace else? We own 30 acres in Center Hill and we adamantly oppose the pipeline, said Diane Co chran, who along with husband, Joe, own 30 acres where they are building their retirement farm to fulll a lifelong dream. Federal Energy Regulato ry Commission (FERC) of cials hosted the last of 13 pub lic meetings in Central Florida March 27, this one at the Citrus Tower, as part of the review pro cess for Sabal Trail Transmissions plans to build a 465-milelong natural gas pipeline from Tallapoosa County in Alabama to Osceola County. Some proj ect maps have it cutting straight across Sumter County and the southwestern corner of Lake County. Were here to hear the comments, concerns and things people want to say about any part of these projects, because we realize that nobody knows the area like the people who live here, said Jessica Harris, a FERC Environmental Project Manager and Deputy Project Manager on this project. Hearing from resi dents give us insight as to things that are important to the area and lets us know what we need to be focusing on. For Cochran, it was important that another route for the pipeline be found. This big company wanting to build this pipeline has turned our dream into a nightmare, said Cochran, whose proper ty would be cut in half by the CLERMONTResidents air concerns on gas pipelineSEE CONCERN | A2SEE SYNTHETIC | A2SEE TOWER | A5

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 2, 2014 CLERMONT Public Works will discuss Oswalt Road at meetingThe Lake County Public Works Department is hosting an open house forum regarding upcoming improvements to Oswalt Road from 5 to 7 / p.m. on Thursday at Pine Ridge Elementary School, 10245 County Road 561, Clermont. The road will remain two lanes but will have safety improvements. Road work is expected to begin in August and be completed by May 2015. There will be no formal presentation during the open house forum, but Public Works engineers will be on hand to discuss the improvement plans and accept public comment. For information, call Pat Magno at 352-483-9053.MASCOTTE Kindergarten registration scheduled for ThursdayKindergarten registration will take place on Thursday to enroll students at Mascotte Elementary Charter School from 9 / a.m. to 6 / p.m. Parents/guardians will need to bring all health information, identication and proof of physical address. If a child is currently in a 201314 pre-k program, attendance is not required. Children must be 5 years of age by Sept. 1 to enroll. For information, call Carol A. Mayer at 352-429-2294, ext. 5812.CLERMONT South Lake Recreation celebrates 20 yearsSouth Lake Recreation, Inc. is celebrating its 20th year of providing com munity athletics through LC Hoops in Lake County, which has become a second home for over 10,000 kids through the years, fostered by a group of strong volunteers and community support. Stressing the importance of physical education, academics, respect and teamwork, the South Lake Recreation group is currently raising money so it can continue to offer kids scholarships and build a new state of the art community center, Arena on the Ridge. To support South Lake Recreation and its community scholarship program, go to www.gofundme. com/southlakerec, or for information about Arena on the Ridge, go to www.arenaontheridge.org or call 321-236-0240.CLERMONT Guns-N-Hoses Chili Cook Off set for SundayThe inaugural Guns-N-Hoses Chili Cook-Off will be Sunday with festivities beginning at 9 / a.m. A $5 wristband provides guests access to taste chili entries and vote to determine the winner, with proceeds beneting charities of the Clermont re and police departments. Additional activities include a tug of war between the departments. For information or to purchase a wristband, call Betty Whittaker at 352874-9535 or go to www.clermontdowntownpartnership.com.CLERMONT Bras for the Cause and Boxers Too is April 26Real men do wear bras when they are reghters supporting the Greater Clermont Cancer Foundations 7th annual Bras for the Cause and Boxers Too on April 26 at Heritage Hills in Clermont. Igniting Hope is the theme for the event this year and it will be an evening of fun, food and fantasy. Doors open at 6 / p.m., with the show at 7 / p .m. Tickets are $30 in advance or $35 at the door. To design a bra for this event or be a sponsor, call Kay Simpson at 352-435-3202. The Greater Clermont Cancer Foundation receives funds raised from this event for the community. Go to www.brasforthecauseandboxerstoo.com for details. Area Briefs What South Lake residents are saying about ...UKRAINEWhat should the U.S. be doing about the situation between Russia and Ukraine?I think that with the Ukraine, we should be looking to the United Nations, that the U.S. should be acting WITH the Unit ed Nations. We dont get a lot of support in that part of the world. PEGGY WEATHERBY CLERMONT Unless there are gross atrocities on the part of Russia, we dont have any business physically going over there but we can express our opinion. PETE BONASKIEWICH CLERMONT All we can do is sanction them. About getting involved, we seem to have our noses in everything. WAYNE WEATHERBY LEESBURG I dont think we should be making any deals with Putin. We shouldnt trust him. Hes not a truthful man. We need to be on our toes. OLGA FEDERICO CLERMONT Word on theStreet Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 gas transmission line. It would be located only 121 feet from the couples water well and less than that from their backyard re pit, putting them in dan ger, she said. Here we are trying to save our property from a big corporation whose sole intent is to make billions of dollars, while our land is forever destroyed if its put there, Cochran said. Some 70 percent of the pipeline will follow rightsof-way, leaving 30 percent crossing private proper ty, some of which is lo cated on environmentally sensitive lands such as the Green Swamp. The swamp sits atop the Flori dan Aquifer, the states un derground water supply. Every drop of water counts and there are al ternate routes we think can work for everyone involved, resident Peg gy Cox said. If taken, (an alternate route), the wa ter will continue owing where it should be ow ing, so wed like them to move it (the pipeline). Ron Hart, Water Resources Program Manag er with the Lake County Water Authority, said his main concern was the en vironment. Water ow is sensitive and the chosen path of the ow that goes in line with the big and little creek systems is historically north and south, he said. These are the creeks that feed into Withlacoochee and the Clermont Chain of Lakes. We want to make sure that when there is water owing, the same volume ows into the Cl ermont chain post pipeline construction as what is owing now. Jay W. Small, an Orlan do attorney representing private landowners, said people across the country who have had pipelines placed on their proper ties have had bad experiences. If you have two pieces of property, one with the pipeline and one without the pipeline, that you are seriously consider ing, which one would you buy? he asked. Its a con cern that people in the real estate market have about this in the future. To build the pipeline, the company has said it will need a corridor at least 100 feet wide for a 24to 36-inch pipeline that will eventually carry up to 1 billion cubic feet of natural gas per day. The pipe would be laid about eight feet below the sur face and, where neces sary, the company would tunnel beneath roads and waterways. FERC Environmental Project Manager John Peconom said the agen cys ve member board along with input from res idents and working with engineers, biologists and other specialists will ultimately decide wheth er or not to approve project. We want to identify the impacts of projects and research how to minimize those impacts, Peconom said. Not everyone at the meeting was opposed to the project, like attorney Dan Robuck. Power companies are working to get rid of clouds from emission problems and go to gas, so we need this trail, because the more gas we have, the cheaper it will stay, Robuck said. But Cochrans main en vironmental concern was her farm, where she feared her farm equip ment could ignite a gas leak. My family and I will never feel safe on our property and will never feel safe having our chil dren and grandchildren visit us on our property, and that rocks me to my core, she said. FERC representative say people have until April 21 to le an Information Re quest form at www.ferc. gov. Work on the pipeline is still four years away, doc uments show. CONCERN FROM PAGE A1 Scooby Snacks, Mad Hat ter and Joker. The products are made from crushed leaves or garden trash and then sprayed with power ful concentrated laboratory-synthesized chemicals that resemble THC, the ac tive mind-altering ingredient in marijuana, according to Dr. Morton Levitt, senior associate dean for faculty affairs and profes sor of clinical biomedical science at Florida Atlantic University. In 2013, Florida outlawed more than 140 chemicals used in synthetic mari juana. Levitt said manu facturers have found ways around the ban by altering the chemical formulations minimally. The problem is they keep continuously changing the nomenclature of the chemical, said Cpl. Tom Willis with the nar cotics unit of the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce. Once the Florida Depart ment of Law Enforcement gets it on the list for illegal substances, the chemists change the chemical. Willis said there is a sixmonth gap between when law enforcement identies the new s ubstance and when it is put on the list of banned substances. Children are using the drug more than adults, Willis said. The majority of our complaints are in refer ence to parents calling about the stuff, he said. Sheriff Gary Borders also appeared before the commission in support of the ordinance. Clinicians treating ad olescents at Lifestream, a behavioral health and so cial services organization that provides inpatient and outpatient treatment, reported they had 123 clients over the past year who used synthetic mari juana. The problem is enor mous among adolescents, the clinicians who could not be iden tied because of con dentiality issues wrote in an email to the Daily Commercial Society is not as harsh as it used to be, said Lori Shallcross, child clinical services director at Lifestream, referring to attitudes toward marijua na use in general. Therefore, youth view it as not too bad or no worse than alcohol. Clinicians reported to Shallcross that the drug could have an effect on the brain. It is well documented to be risky in that is hard to judge how much is too much, and what gets a teen high on one day might lead that child to the brink of death on the next day, the clinician wrote. Debi MacIntyre, executive director of the Safe Climate Coalition of Lake County, a community coalition that focuses on youth substance abuse and violence prevention, said the use of synthetic marijuana causes psycho logical and physical side effects. With K2 or Spice you have everything from ex treme nervousness to hallucinations and seizures, she told commissioners. Bath salts are more ex treme, causing paranoia, psychosis and violent be havior. Adolescents interest in drugs is starting at a young age with reports of children in an elemen tary school crushing up Smarties candies and try ing to snort them to rep licate drug behavior, MacIntyre said. People are having psy chotic breaks and go ing into a deep psychosis they are not coming out of, she said. A recent 2012 Florida Youth Substance Abuse Survey of ninth to 12th graders in Lake and Sumter counties found that 5.8 percent of Lake and 4.2 percent of Sumter stu dents reported synthetic marijuana use in the past 30 days. In the rst six months of 2012 there were 375 calls per month of people becoming ill on Spice, ac cording to the Florida Poison Information Center. Those calls are trend ing upward, according to county ofcials. Hillsborough, Broward, Miami-Dade, Hernando and Pasco counties have instituted similar ordinances, and ofcials claim these laws have been effective in deterring the problem. In Hillsborough County, the sale of the drug has almost been wiped out, according to Larry McK innon, detective with the Hillsborough County Sheriffs Ofce. If the ordinance is adopted in the county, those who violate it will face a civil ne of $500 for the rst offense and $1,000 for any repeat violation within ve years of a previous offense, according to the ordinance. SYNTHETIC FROM PAGE A1 THANK YOU FOR READING THE SOUTH LAKE PRESS

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3Pay our fees, enjoy our servicesDavid Hodgkins, in a recent letter, lamented how he was asked to leave the Eisenhower Center because he is not a resident of The Villages. Perhaps, The Villages will per mit him to be an exception and pay the $145 monthly amenity fee (which residents and I pay) to get a Villages resident card and then he will be able to use all of The Villages recreation centers and other amenities like the rest of us unfriendly residents. CAROLE BURKE | The VillagesTeachers should not coddle studentsIn reply to a story from March 19, Grades can only go so low, by Livi Stanford, in the Daily Commercial: I nd it ridiculous that school teachers feel they have to coddle students so they dont drop out of school. When I was living in North Carolina, my daughter had very good schooling previously in Connecticut and when she was doing very well they refused to skip her to a grade up. They were teaching her how to add one plus one in the fth grade! Im sorry, but if a child cant pass the grade they are in, they have no excuse to move to the next grade. Also, why do we have to teach languages when we live in the United States? When I hear that professional athletes can barely read at the fourth grade level and they graduate from college, it makes me sick. When I was in public school, the teaching was very deliber ate. Education was a top prior ity for my parents and no one changed grades. Coddling uneducated children doesnt help them succeed. Whatever happened to earning your grades for a better life? DAWN LANDI | LeesburgShame on the presidentI dont know why Russia and Uganda have chosen to outlaw homosexuality. Russia has a history of being a godless country and Uganda does not have a history of follow ing Gods word. Maybe it is because they have knowledge of biblical history where God destroyed people, cities, nations and even empires because they had embraced homosexuality and other immoral practices. Whatever their reasons, I salute their governments for rejecting it. And I condemn President Obama and his supporters for their position and for trying to intimidate those people into following his example. Not only is Obama tempting God into destroying the USA, but he wants the whole world to go to hell with him. Shame on Obama and all of his supporters. The sad part of this story is that there are too many people who call themselves Christians who have supported him, and still do. They say that politics and religion do not mix. But Gods word should guide us through our entire life if we expect to avoid the res of hell. JAMES S. FRANKLIN Fruitland ParkMaking streets saferThank you Sheriff Gary Borders and your ofcers and deputies for standing by your pledge to maintain and enhance the quality of life in Lake County, especially on Layton Street in Bassville Park. BUDDY DRAWDY | Leesburg Florida is still grappling with a variety of mental health issues, and many of its resi dents need help. The 60-day legislative session runs through May 2. In that time, the state has some extra money to consider. Surplus estimates range as high as $1.2 billion. Much of the discussion so far has been of tax cuts and new education funding. And so it should be. However, mental health treatment and drug and alcohol rehabilitation have been kept at tight funding levels through the recession and recovery years, even as surpluses began to appear. Funding could have been worse, mental health ofcials concede, but progress often was not made as state lawmakers maintained the status quo on money, declining to break new ground for centers that offer drug rehabilitation, crisis stabilization and mental health care. Gov. Rick Scott prides himself on removing fat from the annual state budget and deserves a reputation for being a pork cutter. However, facilities and programs for mentally ill and emotionally distressed people are not pork. Such services are needed in every region, and they will need to be beefed up as the states population grows into the next decade. Here in Lake County, for example, ofcials at LifeStream, the largest provider of mental health services in the community, estimate a fraction of the people needing mental health services are receiving them. And about the time Scott came into ofce, in early 2011, Florida was known as the prescription-pill capital of the United States. The majority of powerful painkillers in the nation were being prescribed in Florida. Addiction was growing. Now that Florida has cracked down on prescription-pill abuse, addicts have turned to other narcotics and to alcohol. Methamphetamine addiction is a plague on the Sunshine State. Florida also is racked by a shortage of beds for victims of domestic violence. More than 2,000 people were turned away from domestic-violence shelters across Florida last year because there werent enough beds for those seeking refuge from their abusers. Mental health challenges are broad and deep in Florida. That is why making reasonable increases to mental health funding in the state budget, every year, makes sense. Such spending is an investment, not a money loser. For every Floridian treated for depression, addiction, domestic abuse and other such problems, the likelihood of criminal behavior, unemployment, nancial distress, divorce, broken families or suicide decreases. Its an investment that the Legislature and Scott must keep in mind this year as they look at a budget that has extra money.From Ocala.com. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . ........................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTOPINION WHATS YOUR OPINION?The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to: Letters to the Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711By fax to: 352-394-8001EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed.GUEST COLUMNSIf you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OURVIEWIf you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veter-ans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to to www.lakeveterans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANS SOUTH LAKE PRESSYour community newspaper for more than 100 years.732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Florida 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region.All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Mental health care a wise investmentSome interesting reads in a recent morning paper. Maintaining our district schools must be a priority, according to the editorial board. Vital equipment and features of buildings need repair or replacement, including roofs and air conditioning units. School district ofcials have a backlog of maintenance repair work and would do what is needed if they could afford it. It suggests that the legislators of Lake County seek a solution promptly, but such a solution might prove hard to nd because not only do the Lake County schools rely on school funding but so do other county school districts, not to mention Floridas state colleges and universities. Then I turned to page B1 to nd that Florida coach Billy Donovan has received bonuses and raises so that his salary for this year will be $3.9 million. Obviously our priorities are somewhat misplaced. Should the basketball team win the NCAA championship trophy that and $1.79 will get other residents in the state a cup of coffee. Donovan also got a bonus of $250,000 for longevity. I guess that doesnt take into account that he once resigned to coach the Orlando Magic for one day before resigning that position to go back to the University of Florida. Where does it stop? We can pay millions to coaches, and to maintain sports facilities, but not the basic school structures? This leaves the children to suffer while the professional sports farm teams soak up state dollars. When will the Legislature and various state ofcials stand up and say, Enough, our children deserve better. DONALD JEAN | Leesburg LETTER of the WEEK YOURVOICESLETTERS TO THE EDITORThe states misplaced priorities: Athletic teams get rich while the education system decays HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 2, 2014 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comKohan Retail Investment Group of Great Neck, N.Y., is the new owner of the Lake Square Mall, according to Mike Kohan of the group. The deal closed on March 17 for $13.28 million, Kohan said. He said he has plans to revitalize the mall by bringing in more tenants, lling in vacancies, having more events and marketing and xing de ferred maintenance. Were gonna get our hands around it and (were going to) try to make the best out of it, Kohan said. He said he saw a lot of opportunity in the mall be cause of its location. Business tax registration documents led with the city of Leesburg show Kohan going by the last name of Kohansieh. According to multiple me dia reports, Kohan has had mixed results with some of the malls he has bought, in cluding two that ofcials tried to close because they were so dilapidated. Kohan, though, has said that is part of the nature of buying dis tressed malls. Its a very, very challenging situation for you to bring an other anchor, which is close to impossible, but we are try ing. We are trying, he said in an interview in February. Built in 1980, the 470,943-square-foot mall has seen reduced foot trafc over the past few years, and two under-performing an chor stores, Target and J.C. Penney, both recently announced closings. Kohan said he is working with many potential tenants to replace J.C. Penney as an anchor, but he could not guarantee anything. Were just gonna do our best to try to facilitate a deal with some other anchors, Kohan said Wednesday. Target, which closed Feb. 1, owns its 87,842-square-foot store space and is actively marketing it with CBRE, a re al-estate services company with 332 ofces in 42 coun ties. It is listed with CBRE for a price of $2,250,000. Sandi Moore, the executive director of the Leesburg Area Chamber of Commerce, said the mall is one of the com munitys biggest challenges and that struggling malls are a common problem. She said she was hopeful that Kohan would be able to ll vacancies there. The mall, I think histor ically over the years, has kind of struggled. I hope that some new blood coming into the city (with) maybe a fresh vision will help the sit uation, Moore said. I really hope that they can do that and I hope that our commu nity will support that effort. Robert Chandler, Lake Countys director of econom ic development and tourism department, agreed that the older type of indoor malls nationally are struggling. Everybody now is going toward the outdoor kind of walkable town center-type things. Thats kind of the new model for these regional shopping centers, Chandler said. The indoor malls, you really have to be exceptional to continue to drive demand. He said from personal observation the demand at the mall has dropped in the last ve to 10 years. Its not the same type of a destination shopping center as maybe it was in the 90s, Chandler said. Robert Sargent, public in formation ofcer for the city of Leesburg, said the mall is a great commercial asset and he hopes with the sale things will grow from here. Sargent said the city spoke with Kohan after the initial auction of the mall. Our initial interaction that weve had with Mr. Kohan is that he is displaying a strong commitment to want to do something with that property. Not to just leave it as is, but to do somethin g to make a more effective use of the property, Sargent said. He believes Kohans expe rience in managing malls is an advantage. Kohan targets older malls. In fact, his companys website says, The Kohan Retail Investment Group sees the future of aging malls as a place of mixed use that is more than just for shopping. (Malls) are social settings where peo ple interact with one anoth er and small businesses can get a boost in a public and well-trafcked platform. The Daily Commercial pre viously reported that the mall sold in a November online auction for $13.6 million. The malls prior owner, Macerich of Phoenix, focus es on the acquisition, leasing, management, development and redevelopment of region al malls in 17 states throughout the United States. Lake Square was the companys only mall in Florida, according to the companys website.LEESBURGNew York investor buys Lake Square Mall for $13.28M DID YOU KNOW? %  enThe 470,943-square-foot Lake Square Mall has been dropping in value over the past 34 years. %  enIn 1980, General Growth Properties built the mall at 10401 U.S. Highway 441. %  enIn 1984, General Growth Properties sold the mall to Equitable Life Assurance for $33.9 million. %  enIn 1998, Equitable Life Assurance sold the mall to Macerich for $28.9 million. %  enIn March, Macerich sold the mall to Kohan Retail Investment Group for $13.2 million.SOURCE: Lake County Property Appraisers Ofce. BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIALA man walks into the Lake Square Mall in Leesburg Wednesday. The Kohan Retail Investment Group from New York recently purchased the mall for $13.28 million. Mike Kohan, owner of the group, said they are in talks with multiple tenants to replace the soon-to-close J.C. Penney store, and hope to ll other vacancies in the mall.

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5 Orlando. Other old-time attractions still operating today include Bok Tower Gardens in Lake Wales, Sunken Gar dens in St. Petersburg, Gatorland in Orlando, Sarasota Jungle Gardens in Sarasota, Monkey Jungle and Parrot Jungle in Miami, Marineland in St. Augustine, Cypress Gardens (now Legoland) in Winter Haven, Silver Springs in Ocala and Weeki Wachee Springs in Spring Hill. Homan said he won a scholarship to then-Lake Sumter Community College based on a picture he drew of the tower while attending Clermont High School. In 1995, he purchased the tower and, since then, its brought him both work, prot and the satisfaction of knowing that hes kept the structure in good condition. Now, at age 58, Homan said hes ready to sell but doesnt want just anyone purchasing the tower. Its been a good ride, but Ive reached my limit and wherewithal, nancially, agewise and mentally, regarding what I can do with it, Homan said. I need someone to take it to the next level and in my opinion, the city of Clermont is the only wor thy buyer. I know Im probably shooting myself in the foot for saying that, but, in my heart, I feel its true. Homan said he and his wife, Suzie, purchased the tower for $750,000 in 1995 in order to nurse it back to health. He said the previous owners did not maintain the tower. A roof replacement, extensive cleaning, renovations, paint and other things cost him an additional $1 million. The tower comes with 11,000 square feet of ofce space, a 1,000-square-foot kitchen and an elevator to the observation decks, Homan said. He also disclosed he pays about $6,000 in taxes on the property each year. According to Homan, the tower cannot be torn down because of agreements with companies that have placed antennas on the top of it. Mayor Hal Turville, a lifelong resident of Clermont, questioned the towers profitability and whether it was the citys place to take on the task of running a business. Mayor Pro Tem Keith Mullins said he would like to hear what people in the area had to say about the issue. I think Id rather see it in quasi-government hands, he said. City Manager Darren Gray and Councilman Tim Bates were worried about the cost. I agree with Greg that the Citrus Tower is a landmark for us, Gray said. But I just look at nances and how there are other needs the community wants, and other needs out there, and do we have the funding to actually purchase this? Gray asked. Im not saying we cant work with other groups. At the end of the workshop, the consensus among council members since no votes can be taken at workshops was to advance the issue to a future council meeting, where council members, with public input, can discuss whether or not to purchase. TOWER FROM PAGE A1 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL The citrus tower is shown in Clermont on December 10, 2013.

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A6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 2, 2014 HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. DEATH NOTICESRobert Owen BoomRobert Owen Boom, 82, Woonsocket, SD, died Friday, March 21, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Patricia BoydPatricia Boyd, 76, of Wildwood, died Friday, March 28, 2014. Banks/ Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Forrest BruceForrest Bruce, 63, of Coleman, died Satur day, March 22, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatilla.James D. ColemanJames D. Coleman, 83, of Sumterville, died Sunday, March 23, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Samuel A. DavisSamuel A. Davis, 72, of Eustis, died Sunday, March 23, 2014. Mar vin C. Zanders Funeral Home, Inc., Apopka.Nancy S. EvansNancy S. Evans, 72, of Umatilla, died Tuesday, March 25, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatil la.Viola GundersonViola Gunderson, 94, of Leesburg, died Thurs day, March 27, 2014.Ella Mae HarrisElla Mae Harris, 72, of Mount Dora, died Friday, March 28, 2014. Marvin C. Zanders Fu neral Home.Reese A. IvancovichReese Ann-Marie Ivancovich, 4 days old, died Wednesday, March 26, 2014. Banks /PageTheus, Wildwood.William KelleyWilliam Kelley, 72, of Astor, died Wednesday, March 26, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, AstorMarcile B. LaBrunoMarcile B. LaBruno, 86, of Leesburg, died Monday, March 24, 2014. Page-Theus Fu nerals & Cremations. Leesburg.Claire Smith ReillyClaire Smith Reilly, 83, of The Villages, died Saturday, March 22, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Esther SheehyEsther Sheehy, 90, of Leesburg, died Tuesday, March 25, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg.Judy ShookJudy Shook, 74, of Leesburg, died Satur day, March 29, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations.Margaret E. SilvaMargaret E. Silva, 86, of Wildwood, died Saturday, March 22, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Arlene Louise WiesenbutterArlene Louise Wiesenbutter, 78, of Fruit land Park, died Satur day, March 22, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Leesburg.John Thomas Yancey, Jr.John Thomas Yancey, Jr., 80, of Leesburg, died Saturday, March 22, 2014. Beyers Funer al Home, Leesburg.IN MEMORY ROXANNE BROWN and LIVI STANFORD news@dailycommercial.comClermont City Council members expressed interest last week in holding a public forum about the Wellness Way Sector Plan to give city ofcials and the pub lic a chance to weigh in on plans for the 16,000acre project. City Manager Darren Gray said he had spoken to Lake County Commis sioner Sean Parks, one of the key movers behind the Wellness Way effort, to relay concerns the council had about public input and the amount of time, that we dont want to be rushed or pushed. He noted that a consultant working on the plan a mix of homes and businesses that will transform that corner of the county has pro posed some changes. You know when we rst heard that, about three or four months ago, by a consultant that came here, we were all not in favor of it the way it was presented. Gray said the consul tant wanted to make that presentation to the county commissioners and to the council at the same time. After Grays appeal, the council considered having a regular City Council meeting fol lowing the presentation, then scheduling a public forum between the county and the city, but that idea was dis missed quickly. You know, this is the future of the city and to try to cut and not have any public input is wrong, Councilman Ray Goodgame said. Council members ultimately agreed to have Gray set up a joint meeting with the county directly following the presentation by the consultant. The meeting with the county could occur on April 22 at the com munity center rather than the council chambers and would be the nights city council meeting, with the sector plan as the only item on the agenda. I dont care what the county commission ers say, the ones that want to stay can stay, Goodgame said. If they dont want to stay past 6 oclock then ne, but I think we ought to start at 7 oclock and have public input and dis cuss the sector plan and discuss the sector plan with the public, give them our ideas, because theyll probably be a lit tle different than what the county wants to do. Goodgame even said he wouldnt mind foregoing a city meeting on that night to have the joint meeting instead. Goodgame, however, expressed reservations about whether the county was really interested in the citys opinions about the project, or those of Clermont residents. I dont think the county wants to hear what we have to say, he said. Councilman Rick Van Wagner agreed with Goodgame and said its exactly why the joint meeting and public fo rum is a must. However, county of cials said it is prema ture to say Clermonts concerns have not been heard because the plan has not been nalized. There have been sev eral public meetings on Wellness Way, county ofcials also said, where public comment has been allowed. The concerns that were raised by the city of Clermont and resi dents several months ago were all heard by our staff, Commissioner Leslie Campione said. I dont think anyone is withholding information. The nal product is going to be presented to both boards on April 22. Campione added, There were a series of public meetings so we could get input from property owners, stake holders, and everyone that cared enough to at tend those meetings had an opportunity to have their concerns heard. There has been an ample opportunity for concerns and issues to be raised. There will be a public hearing on the plan be fore it is adopted. CLERMONTCouncil members request public forum for Wellness Way planI dont think anyone is withholding information. The final product is going to be presented to both boards on April 22. There were a series of public meetings so we could get input from property owners, stakeholders, and everyone that cared enough to attend those meetings had an opportunity to have their concerns heard. There has been an ample opportunity for concerns and issues to be raised.Leslie CampioneClermont city commissioner THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comFor three decades, from November to March, the Southern Palms RV Resort in Eustis has offered Sunday worship service for travelers from all over the country and Canada. Sundays 10 / a.m. ser vice was the last of the 30th season, with a closing service and communion in the parks fellowship hall, led by the Rev. Charles Granger, 82, of DeLand. An average of 150 to 200 people just about all of the RVers have attended on Sundays over the years. I love meeting such a won derful group of people, a cross-section of Americana and the number of Canadians who come down here, too, Grang er said. Christmas Eve is one of the biggest services, along with a memorial service on the rst Sunday in February. We me morialize all of the people who have died the previous year who were a part of this fellowship here, the pastor said. They call it a church, but there is no membership, Granger said of the services at the resort, located near Lake County Fairgrounds. This is just people coming together. Granger recalled the park be longed to the city of Eustis be fore it was sold to individuals who owned parks all over the country. Granger had been serv ing as interim pastor at the First Baptist Church in Eustis when he was asked if he could preach at the RV park. My rst Sunday, 82 people were sitting here, Granger said. And what they told me was 80 percent of the people who were here for that service did not go to church anywhere on Sunday. I came back the next Sunday and we had 150 or so. During his time of ministering at Southern Palms, Granger was serving as chaplain and campus minister at Stetson University. It was a great time; I was working with both age groups, he said of ministering to college kids during the week and to se niors on Sundays. I was 52 when I started (at Southern Palms) and I thought they were a bunch of old folks, and now Im older than most of them over here. In those early years, he ar ranged for some Stetson stu dents to preach at the RV park. Every one of them would come to my ofce on Mon day morning saying, Let me go again! They loved coming over here, Granger said. He re mained at the private college for 21 years before retiring in 1996 at age 65. The Florida native recalled liv ing three blocks from a Jackson ville church during his youth as the oldest of ve children, yet THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Pastor Charles Granger, 82, and his wife, Joyce, center, greet New York visitors Yvonne Webster, left, and her husband Ardell at Southern Palms RV Resort in Eustis. EUSTISRV park church draws hundredsSEE CHURCH | A7

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESSZ A7 We want to thank everyone for attending Aarons Memorial Service at Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church along with all the prayers, flowers, cards, words of encouragement, Kindness and support. It has helped carry us through during this very sad and difficult time. God Bless you.With Sincere Appreciation, The Family of Aaron Kjenslie 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 Tour and educate yourself on options available in Clermont when your loved ones are no longer able to live and provide care for themselves. This tour is led by Dr. Marholin D.O., Dr. Sam M.D. and C.O.R.E. Florida Licensed trained administrator to give you objective guidance & direction in a non-threatening and no sale pressure environment. per person TOUR INCLUDES:Breakfast, Lunch and Snack Dr. MarholinWE WILL COVER continuing care based on different needs. from independent living, Assisted Nursing & Hospice. Utilizing resources to maintain your best quality of life and provide in the home. rfntbrrrt his family did not at tend church. We had never been in anybodys church, he said. No one ever in vited me to church because of my language. I used to cuss as good as any sailor at Jacksonville Naval Air Station, he said. I could outcuss them. The turning point in Grangers life was his ju nior year of high school. God spoke to me in a Jewish grocery store on a Saturday afternoon, said Granger, who was sacking potatoes when he heard an audible voice saying, You go to church tomorrow. I looked around the store because I thought there was a ventriloquist prac ticing a voice. I looked around the store and there wasnt a soul in sight near where I was. I was in the produce sec tion all by myself. He put the message out of his mind. I went out and raised hell, caroused with the guys, just like I did ev ery Saturday night with a bunch of high school boys, he said. The next morning I was wide awake by 8 oclock. It was just gnawing at me that I had to go to church, and I literally sneaked out of the house and went up to the little Baptist church three blocks away. When I walked in the church, people said, What is he doing here? Granger was baptized that same school year, in December of 1946. Eventually, all four of my siblings and my mother and father came into the church, he said. He was working in a shop repairing tele phones when he said the Lord spoke to him a second time. I got stopped in my tracks when I heard, I want you to go preach. And I thought I didnt want to be a part of it, he said. Now the Baptist min ister is glad he listened to the Lord. And that is what I en courage people to do listen to the spirit that is speaking to you, not what somebody else is telling you, Granger said. The pastor has gone through hip and knee re placements and a battle with lymphoma cancer, but strives to continue inspiring people with his tell-it-like-it-is sermons. Pastor Granger is just wonderful. Thirty years he has been with us, said Judy Kryder of Michigan, who sings in the choir and cherishes the friendship she has forged with others at Southern Palms, the park that has been her winter home since 1998. Floridas glorious weather is what brings her back each year, she said, and she and hun dreds of others hope to reunite with their pastor in November for the parks 2014-15 season. CHURCHFROM PAGE A6THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIALBill Myer, at microphone, leads prayer at Southern Palms RV Resort, joined by Ruth Karper, Dave Walcott and Marian Shank. Halifax Media GroupThe way textbooks are selected for Flor ida classrooms could undergo major chang es this year, partly in response to the way protests over a world history book played out last fall. State Sen. Alan Hays, R-Umatilla, has led a bill that would eliminate the state from its long time role in short-list ing which textbooks are acceptable for districts. Hays proposal which is drawing mixed reviews would make textbook selection a lo cal responsibility from start to nish. The purpose of this bill is to make sure the people who are making the decision on se lection of instructional materials are held ac countable by the peo ple of that community, Hays said. I want to guarantee citizens have input and school board members will be held responsible at the bal lot box. Hays said he decided to le the bill after talking to some school board members in the four Central Florida counties he represents about complaints that the World History textbook published by Prentice Hall is biased in favor of Islam. That was the basis of the Volusia complaints which ultimately were rejected by the Volu sia School Board and similar objections in Palm Beach, Brevard and Marion schools. The school boards feel their hands are somewhat tied to select instructional materials approved by Tallahassee, Hays said. That, he said, puts too much power in the hands of Florida Department of Education bureaucrats who oversee the state adoption process that includes material reviews by committees including teachers from around the state and opportunity for public comment. His bill would require individual districts or voluntarily formed groups of districts to review available textbooks for compliance with Floridas academic standards, online posting of prospective materials for public comment and a school board hearing before nal adoption. Putting that process totally in the hands of local districts would be a huge mistake, said Volusia School Board Chairwoman Candace Lankford, who believes the current state textbook adoption process allows adequate op portunities for parents, teachers, administrators and others to make their viewpoints known. We need to have a clearinghouse to bring in the big picture stuff, Lankford said. With all the mobility we have in our state, it would be nuts to have some county looking one way at instructional stuff and another looking at it a different way. Other school ofcials worry about the extra expense to districts of starting from scratch on textbook adoptions instead of having a state-level screening. Hays brushes aside those criticisms, say ing theres a large pool of retired educators living in Florida who could help with the dis trict level material re views and local control is more important than volume buying power with publishers. The publishers are going to scream and be upset, Im sure, he said. I dont care. My responsibility is to the students and school systems of Florida. My accountability is to the people paying the bill. Yet some of the Flor ida taxpayers who pay that bill are opposed to Hays proposal and its companion in the House, both now being reviewed by legislative committees.Senator Hays textbook proposal draws criticismThe purpose of this bill is to make sure the people who are making the decision on selection of instructional materials are held accountable by the people of that community.Sen. Alan Hays R-Umatilla

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A8 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 2, 2014 Platinum Sponsors Galinski Drywall, Inc.Gold Sponsors Tony Hubbard RealtySilver Sponsors Crown Patrons Doubloon Patrons Donations & Prizes Beta Thetas 10th Annual Mardi Gras Event The Sisters of Beta Theta would like to Thank Everyone for a Huge Success! JIM TURNERThe News Service of FloridaRed-light cameras wont be turned off in Florida this year. Without enough votes lined up, Senate Transportation Chairman Jeff Brandes put the brakes last week on a bill (SB 144) that focused on repealing the states redlight camera law. Instead, he proposed changes to in crease regulations on the use of the devices. But Brandes Transportation Committee on March 26 didnt act on the pro posed changes, deciding to postpone a vote on his re written bill. That shows you the pow er of this (red light camera) industry, said Brandes who maintained his opposition to the Mark Wandall Trafc Safety Act of 2010, the states red-light camera law, after the postponement. What youre seeing is municipalities that have become addicted to the funds, and in many of these cities its not about safety, Brandes added. Its become a backdoor tax increase. While moving away from a repeal, Brandes proposed changes that would allow new cameras at intersec tions but only if their use is justied through trafc engineering studies a re quirement that is included in a House bill. Also, mon ey generated from redlight camera tickets would have to be used for trafc safety im provements, and jurisdictions wouldnt be able to use the cameras if they fail to provide annual camera-enforcement re ports to the state. In early February, Brandes and Rep. Frank Ar tiles, R-M iami, held a press conference in the Capitol to highlight a report from the Ofce of Program Pol icy Analysis & Government Accountability, the Legis latures non-partisan poli cy ofce. The report found there were fewer fatalities but more crashes at elec tronically monitored inter sections and that nes is sued due to the technology cost motorists nearly $119 million last year. That is the central question fueling a debate over red light cameras in Cler mont. City ofcials imple mented cameras at six in tersections in January in what they said was an effort to improve safety at State Road 50 intersections. The public outcry was al most immediate, however. Ninety percent of the more th an 3,000 citations issued between early January and mid-February were to mo torists turning right on red, which city ofcials said was not their intent when they installed the cameras. Clermont ofcials re viewed video of all the in fractions and ended up dismissing 70 percent. They further pledged to exercise more discretion in issuing citations for righton-red turns. Brandes, R-St. Petersburg, views the cameras as simply a revenue generator for lo cal communities. But he ac knowledged that there isnt enough support in the Sen ate to repeal the cameras. That was evident Wednesday when he couldnt get his own committee to approve three amendments to his rewritten bill. The committee also re jected, by a 5-3 vote, an amendment that would have required only warn ings to be issued to own ers of vehicles caught on camera going through traf c signals 0.5 seconds after the colors changed from yellow to red. Brandes said he might reintroduce the amend ments when the bill returns this week.TALLAHASSEESenate will not repeal red-light cameras HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO Henry Bentley of Apopka holds a sign during a protest against red light ticket cameras on the corner of Memorial Blvd. and South Florida Ave. in Lakeland. MILLARD IVES | Staff Writermillard.ives@dailycommercial.comA state review of a deputys shoot ing of a knife-wielding man has been forwarded to the State Attor neys Ofce for evaluation, according to Florida Department of Law Enforcement ofcials. A spokeswoman with FDLE would not provide details of the investiga tion into the January shooting of Ian Saum, pending the completion of the State Attorneys Ofce review. Walter Forgie, supervisor for the State Attorneys Ofce in Lake County, last week wouldnt reveal what possible charges the deputy could face, citing his ofces pending review of the case. The Lake County Sheriffs Ofce conducted its own administrative review and cleared the deputy of any wrongdoing, but the nal word will come from the State Attorneys Ofce. The shooting occurred Jan. 22 in the 10700 block of Aria Court, near the end of a cul-de-sac in Lake Crescent Pines East outside of Clermont. Deputies said they responded to a report of a suicidal subject. When they reached the Aria Court address, they reportedly found Saum armed with a large knife. It appeared that he had injured himself with the weap on prior to the deputies arrival. Deputies shot 24-year-old Saum after he approached them in a threatening manner and a stun gun failed to stop him, Sgt. James Vachon, sheriffs spokesman, said. The deputy was placed on administrative leave and FDLE was called in to investigate. According to a document dated Jan. 29 from sheriffs Chief Deputy Peyton Grinnell, a preliminary ad ministrative review determined that the deputy was found to be within the statutory authority given to law enforcement ofcers for the use of force, consistent with the agencys use-of-force training.State Attorney reviewing shooting of armed man

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10% OFFAll options with this couponrffnntb B1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 2, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTSSPORTS EDITOR . ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE . .............................. 365-8268 FAX . .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL . ......... sports@dailycommercial.comSPORTSandLEISURE FRANK JOLLEY | STAFF WRITERfrankjolley@dailycommercial.comThe Montverde Academy softball team advanced to the Florida High School Athletic Association Class 3A state seminals last year. After outscoring three opponents by a combined score of 30-4 at last weeks Montverde Academy Invitational Softball Tournament, the Eagles might be gearing up for a return trip. The one-day tour nament, played at the Montverde Academy Softball complex, included teams from Eustis, Apopka and Hol lywood Sheridan Hills Christian, in addition to the tournament hosts. The Eagles took the tournament title with a 5-2 win against Apopka, which had beaten Montverde 8-0 earlier this season. The Eagles earned a berth in the tour naments championship tilt with a 10-2 win against Eustis and a 15-0 drubbing of Hollywood Sheridan Hills Christian. Apopka punched its ticket for the title game with a 15-0 win against Montverde Academy softball team wins tournament FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comThe best softball season in recent memory at Lake-Sumter State Col lege continued on March 26 against Seminole State College at the LSSC softball complex. LSSC got a gritty pitching perfor mance from Mellissa Webb in the opener and the Lakehawks scored three runs in the sixth to pick up a 3-2 win against the Raiders, lifting LSSCs record temporarily to 21-21 on the season and 6-5 in the Mid-Florida Conference. Seminole State rebounded in the nightcap behind a six-run rst inning to earn a doubleheader split with a 12-1 win in ve innings. In the nightcap, the Raiders pounded out 15 hits and the Lakehawks committed ve errors. In the opener, Webb came out of the gate quickly. She didnt give up a hit until Taylor Duggan bunted her way on with one out in the third. Seminole State got to Webb in the fourth for two runs on four hits. After the shaky frame, Webb settled down and did not allow a hit over the nal three innings. For the game, she gave up ve hits while striking out two and tossed 100 pitches. LSSC trailed until the sixth, when the Lakehawks found their swing. Michelle Breen opened the inning with a double and Kayla Fuller was walked. Zoe Hart then hammered a double, scoring Breen. Taylor Dou glass followed with the third dou ble of the inning, scoring Fuller and Hart with the tying and game-winning runs. In the seventh, Webb sent the Raid ers down in order with a pair of in eld putouts and a y ball to left. The Lakehawks totaled ve hits against Seminole starter Stephanie Adkins. She walked four and struck Lakehawks split with Seminole State FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comMaking history isnt supposed to be easy. Dominic Bozzellis drive to establish himself as one of the best golfers in National Golf As sociation history was about as difcult as it gets. Bozzelli birdied his nal three holes on Sunday to nish with a four-day total of 269, 19-un der-par, to win the Lake Coun ty Classic at Harbor Hills Coun ty Club by two shots over Jack Newman. With the win, he is only the second golfer in NGA history to win three straight tournaments. Zach Johnson, an 11-time winner on the PGA Tour and the 2007 Masters champion, was the rst to do so, having won three straight in 2001. Bozzelli had to battle through the pack for the win under sun ny skies over the nearly 7,000yard par 72 layout. Unable to nish his third round on Sat urday due to inclement weath er, Bozzelli was forced to com plete it on Sunday and then immediately begin his nal loop. He responded to the chal lenge of a golng marathon by carding a 5-under-par 67 in his third round for a two -shot lead over Newman at 15-under. He backed that up with a 4 -under 68 in his fourth round to secure the win. Bozzelli and Newman battled for the lead throughout the nal round, with each player owning it on multiple occasions. Both players were tied at 17 under af ter exchanging birdies on the par-3 16th hole, the longest par 3 on the course at 210 yards and one that involved a carry over water to an undulating green. On the 17th, a 400-yard par 4, Bozzelli set himself up for a makeable putt that would put him in the drivers seat head ing to the nal hole. The Pitts ford, N.Y., golfer drained the putt and took a one -shot lead to the 18th. Newman was able to look down the fairway and watch Bozzellis nearly awless play down the stretch. On the 18th, a 579-yard n ishing hole that was set up for scoring, Bozzelli worked his way down the fairway and drained an insurance birdie, forcing Newman to make an eagle to take the tournament to sudden death. Newman put himself in position for an eagle from the fair way with his third shot, but missed left, giving Bozzelli a shared entry with Johnson in the NGA Pro Tour history books. He will have chance to win an unprecedented four straight tournaments beginning Thursday at the Ocala/Marion Coun ty NGA Pro Golf tour at Ocala National. In his nal round, Bozzelli n ished with six birdies and two LADY LAKEBozzelli wins at Harbor Hills BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Dominic Bozzelli, of Pittsford, N.Y., drives the ball at the Lake County Classic golf tournament at Harbor Hills Country Club in Lady Lake, on Thursday.SEE NGA| B4SEE LSSC| B4 FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comSANFORD Lake Countys entrants in the Florida League High School Invitation al baseball tournament are proving to be formi dable foes. In seven tournament games through Thursday afternoon involving Leesburg, Eustis and Montverde Academy, six have gone at least seven innings with the largest margin of vic tory being four runs or less. On three occasions, area teams have battled to a one-run decision. That was the case in Thursdays morning session when Leesburg got solid pitching from Ryan Halstead and Jason Baita, but the Yel low Jackets dropped a 2-1 contest in nine in nings against Weston Cypress Bay at Sanford Seminole High School. Leesburg fell to 6-10 with the loss, while Weston Cypress Bay im proved to 8-4. Weston Cypress Bay scored the winning run when Jose Natera scored on a two-out sin gle by Enzo Clemente against Baita. It was the only hit allowed by Baita in 1 2/3 innings of re lief. The Lightning man aged only ve hits against Halstead and Baita. Weston Cypress Bay took an early lead with a run in the rst against Halstead when Natera scored on a dou ble by Thomas Quintero. Halstead stranded Quintero at third when he struck out Diego Maceda to end the in ning. Halstead pitched sev en innings and allowed one run on four hits. He walked three and struck LHS gets clipped in extra inningsSEE EAGLES | B4SEE LHS | B4

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B2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 2, 2014 A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services 352-431-9481Residential / Commercial rfnfftbrftb f Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Concrete Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Handyman Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. Irrigation Services 5% Off Any Svc. under $1,000 $150 Off Any Svc. $2,000 or more $75 Off Any Svc. $1,000 or moreLawn Maintenance, Hardscape, Patios, Retaining Walls, Maint., SoddingLeesburg 536-3708 Landscaping Services r fntbb Lawn Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Painting Services Airport Transportation Enclosure Screening Fencing Services Bathroom Remodeling Handyman Services BOYDSYou call it, We haul it!352 460-7186 Marine Services HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314 HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314 Cleaning Services Land Clearing Services Electrical Services Free Est.Lic. & Ins.352.504.8207 rfn ftb Concrete Services Land Clearing Services

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B3 Psychic Services Pressure Cleaning Restaurants JAMAICAN GEORGECARRIBBEAN & SOUL FOOD RESTAURANT (352) 455-18982502 W. Main St. Leesburg, FL 34748Goat Soup Curry Chicken Curry Goat Ox Tail & More Tile Service Shower Doors Service Tree Service Veterinarian Services Window Services Steve and Brenda Rizer have owned Blinds 4 Less since 2000. The business is still in its original location in Lady Lake. The company focuses on strong customer service and also selling the best brand names in the industry at very competitive prices. Chris Carnes Landscape has been in business since 2005 along with over 30 yrs experience in everything from hardscapes such as patios, retaining walls, to sod repair and installations, to ripout of old landscapes and design. We also can provide maintainence to your newly installed landscape or even mowing maintainence services to even sprinkler repairs. We serve all projects big or small create landscapes one lawn at a time". Mention this bio ad and receive 15 percent off when you call for your estimate on any of our services. Emerson Street Automotive has been family owned and operated for nearly 30 years. Lori and Michael Farfaglia purchased the business from Loris family in 2010. Loris father, Terrill Davis stayed as the onsite manager. Emerson Street is located at 1406 Emerson Street, right next to the Post Office in Leesburg, Florida. We are opened Monday-Friday 7:30-5:30 and Saturday 7:30-3:00. Phone: 352-326-2400. We do all kinds of automotive repair including light body work. We have state of the art diagnostic equipment that takes the guess out of repairing your car. We service all makes and models including SUVs, ATVs, and RVs. To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact Michelle in the Classified Department at (352) 365-8233 or by email michelle.fuller@dailycommercial.com Plumbing Services Tree Service Roofing Services Window Services

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B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 2, 2014OutdoorsFishing352-394-2183 slpress@dailycommercial.com www.southlakepress.com %  %  SANDYS BAIT AND TACKLE | TAVARESNow is a great time to be out on the lake shing. Many are still reporting catching limits. Lake Dora has been a good location for crappie catches of 30 to 40 sh has not been unusual. Some sh are still on the beds, sh that have moved off the beds are still feeding in schools. Shell cracker and blue gill are starting to move in and are biting on yellow tail worms. The Wednesday night open bass tournament has resumed with the time change. Last Wednesday nights winners were Tim Fredericks for rst place and the team of JoJo and Zack Hood for second place. For anyone interested, they start at 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday. Sandys bass tournament, open to all, is held on the third Saturday monthly at the Buzzard Beach ramp. Sandys next regular bass tournament will be an open tournament held April 19 with the weigh in at Buzzard Beach at 2:30 p.m. Any questions about either tournament call the shop at 352742-0036. %  %  PINE ISLAND CAMP | FRUITLAND PARKSeveral patrons are catching bass on shiners and articial worms. Crappie are biting on grass shrimp and minnows. Catsh are biting on night crawlers. Pine Island has a full supply of live baits including grass shrimp as well as a variety of articial baits. RV sites, camp sites, boats and slips are available for rental. Check out the restaurant before going out or coming off the lake. %  %  PALM GARDENS | TAVARESSpecks are still being caught on mostly minnows and some jigs. They are still at the edge of the grass and shorelines and are back in the deeper water. A few stripers are being caught at the ends of Dead River on silver lures and silver spoons baited with salt water shrimp. Palm Gardens has pontoon boats available to rent. %  %  NELSONS FISH CAMP | WEIRSD ALESpeck activity has been very good; they are biting on minnows and jigs. Bass have been slow with the most recent weather change. Bream are starting to bite on worms and minnows. Come check out the next generation bass in the pond by Nelsons. %  %  BLACK BASS RESORT-FISH CAMP Guests are catching bass and crappie. Several large bass have been caught in Haynes Creek at the locks. The bass are hitting on articial baits primarily while the crappie are biting on minnows and jigs. Minnows and worm sales have been very good. Small boats can launch from Black Bass boat ramps. %  %  SORRENTO BAIT AND TACKLECrappie shing has been good, weather permitting. Good jig colors have been chartreuse, orange and hot pink. Bass have been biting on top water baits like Rat-L-Traps and medium shiners. Bow shing season is getting ready to start. It is beautiful weather to get out on the lake and catch a few. Stop in and get the latest daily report. LAKES REPORT a weekly update fromCHERYL STALEY-ARCHER rrrr fntb nrtt fnrbrtr bbrr fbbrr fb trt bbbrrr fnbrr nrrtr fnrb r ftrtt frtb rffrff tttt tbttt fntttbb nttbr fntttbbb tttt ftrtr fttbtb NGAFROM PAGE B1bogeys. The three birdies he had on his nal three holes of the tournament were, ironically, the only time he put together three red numbers in succession. For the tournament, Bozzelli carded 20 birdies, three eagles and seven bogeys. He played par-3 holes to aver age score of 2.79 and par 4s to 3.93. On the par 5s, how ever, Bozzelli averaged near ly a full stroke below par at 4.19. He had seven birdies, three eagles and ve pars on the four par 5 holes on the course. He did not have bo gey on a par 5. Bozzelli earned $16,000 for the win, giving him $52,700 for the year and an exemption in the Web.com Tour Price Cutter Charity Championship in August in Springeld, Mo. Newman won $8,000 for nishing second to raise his season total to $12,200. Boz zelli extended his lead over Crawford Reeves, No. 2 on the money list by more than $30,000. Brian Richey nished third at 272 after a nal round 66, the low round of the day. Da vid Skinns was 274, good for a fourth place tie with Phil lip Mollica. Skinns and Molli ca began the nal round in a three way tie with Newman for second place. Phillip Hutchinson, the rstand secondround leader, struggled to 76 in his nal round. Formerly known as the Hooters Tour, the NGA Tour is the No. 3-mens profes sional tour in the U.S. af ter the PGA and Web.com Tours, and has proven to be the top developmental tour by PGA and Web. com Tour Professionals. The NGA Tour has helped hundreds of profession als acquire their cards PGA TOUR, European, Web.com, and Champions Tour. NGA Tour alumni include: Johnson, Bubba Watson, the 2012 Masters cham pion Jim Furyk, the 2010 PGA Tour Player of the Year and 2003 U.S. Open cham pion Keegan Bradley, 2011 PGA championship winner 2009 British Open champion Stewart Cink 2009 U.S. Open champion Lucas Glover 2003 PGA Champion Shaun Micheel, 2003 British Open champion Ben Cur tis and two time U.S. Open champion Lee Janzen. Founded in 1988, the NGA Tour predates the Web.com Tour as the longest running developmental tour in golf. In 2013, the NGA Tour was awarded five Web.com Tour event exemptions and two PGA Tour event exemptions Reno Tahoe Open and the Sanderson Farms Championship the most of any tour in the history of devel opmental golf. LSSCFROM PAGE B1out three. Baseball LSSC led by as many as four runs on March 26 and held off a ninth-inning rally to pick up a 7-5 road win against Florida State College-Jacksonville, snapping a 10-game losing streak. David Wood (2-3) started and got credit for the win. He went six innings and allowed ve hits and three runs one earned. He struck out 10 without walking a batter. Tyler Reker got the loss for FSC-Jacksonville. LSSC had 10 hits, including three by Tanner Elsbernd. Taylor Saris added two hits. Elsbernd and Saris also scored two runs apiece. Five Lakehawks pitchers combined for the win. Walker Sheller wrapped with an inning of work and allowed two runs on one hit. Dylan Jones, Antho ny Mazzurco and Steve McClellan also pitched for LSSC. LSSC beneted from ve errors by FSC-Jack sonville. The Lakehawks also struggled in the eld and committed four errors. The Lakehawks improved to 15-14 over all and 2-10 in the Mid-Florida Confer ence with the win. BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Lake Sumter sophomore Melissa Webb (11) pitches the ball during game one of a doubleheader between Lake-Sumter State College and Seminole State College at Lake-Sumter State College in Leesburg on Thursday. EAGLESFROM PAGE B1Hollywood Sheridan Hills Christian and a 4-0 win against Eustis. Against the Blue Darters, Montverde Academy hurler Jesse Dreswick led the way to the win. Dre swick, who will at tend Boston College in the fall, was named the tournaments Defensive Most Valuable Player. The offensive MVP was Apopka slugger Cassidy Brew er. Montverde Academy improved to 15-3 on the season with the three tournament wins. The Eagles took Lake Countys spring break off and returned to action late on March 25 against Orlando Bishop Moore at the Lake Fairview sports complex in Orlando. LHSFROM PAGE B1out ve. The Yellow Jackets totaled seven hits against Quintero and Ben Fritts. Quintero gave up three hits and Lees burgs lone run in four innings and Fritts sur rendered four hits in ve innings of work. Leesburg scored its lone run in the third inning when Baita crossed the plate on an error by Natera, the Lightning second baseman. Baita reached base on a single and reached third on a single by Tucker Smith prior to Nateras eld ing miscue. Smith was eventually stranded at third. Baita, who made 33 pitches, absorbed the loss for the Yellow Jack ets. Fritts, who made 57 pitches, picked up the win. Smith (2-for-4) was the only Yellow Jackets with multiple hits. Baita, Garrett Vathroder, Halstead, Kyle Bra na, and Turner Long had Leesburgs hits all singles. Danny Cepeda went 2-for-4 for Weston Cy press Bay. He was the Lightnings only player with multiple hits. Leesburg has gone 1-2 in the weeklong tournament, beating Jensen Beach on March 24 and drop ping a 6-3 decision to Naples Barron Collier on March 25.

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Ann DupeeREMEMBER WHENA weekly column that reprints some of the more interesting news stories that have appeared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press.C1SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 2, 2014 www.southlakepress.comCOMMUNITYProudly servingCLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWSSTAFF WRITER . ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE . .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 EMAIL..... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com %  en HOMETOWN: Minneola %  en OCCUPATION: Ofce manager at Doctors Weight Control %  en FAMILY: My husband is Kelly McEachern. I have two daughters, Amber Jessee (husband, Nathan Jessee, and sons Kelly and Rowan) and Britteny Schruefer (husband, Michael Schruefer). What do you enjoy most about south Lake County? I like the hometown feel it still has, compared to Orange County. 1) If you had to summarize your philosophy of life in one sentence, what would it be? With God and your family and friends around you, live well, laugh a lot and love deeply! 2) Name a person or incident youve come across recently thats touched you in some way. Why did this person or incident impress you so much? A person Ive been touched by is Rosemary DeMott of Not Just Dance. She is one of the busiest women I have ever seen. She has her studio where she teaches children ages 4 to 18, and then she goes to the colleges and teaches. She is the choreographer for the high school, and she still makes time to be at Moonlight Players to choreograph all the shows there as well. She cares about each and every one one of her students as if they were her own children. She is a true mentor. 3) How does what you do contribute to the welfare of the area? I work at Doctors Weight Control, and I help men and women every day to learn to lose weight and live a healthier life. I am also a member of the Moonlight Players. I have been with Moonlight from the start, going on 20 years. 4) Name one of your greatest accomplishments so far. My family, my two girls, Amber and Britteny, and every time I get to direct a show at Moonlight. 5) Whats something youve always wanted to do but havent yet? Go to Ireland. FROM THE FILES | 25 YEARS AGO 1989Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press Meet YourNEIGHBORCATHY M c EACHERN Easter Sunday din ners. Rusty Fox: Prime Rib, $8.95; L.J. Grunts, 801 City Grill: Prime rib au jus, baked boneless breast of chicken, fresh sh of the day, roast leg of lamb, Virginia baked ham, BBQ baby back ribs, $8.95-$10.95; The Crown Restau rant: Prime rib, roast leg of lamb, boneless pork loin with stufng, chicken Oscar, roast duckling, honey glazed ham, baby back BBQ ribs, fresh bay scallops, fresh sh of the day, jumbo shrimp stuffed with lump crab meat, $10.95-$14.95.NEWS OF NOTEMike Kelley, 22, is state senator Richard Langleys new legislative aide. He is the son of Mary and David Branson, the for mer district manager for Florida Power in Clermont. South Lake Press reporter Lucie Blake attended the Orlando Sentinels 10th annual Letter Writers Forum in the Ivanhoe Ballroom at the Radisson Hotel. This annual event recognizes readers whose Letters to the Editor have been among the best the past year. Lucies letter that resulted in her invitation to the forum was printed December 24, 1987, and recalled the last Christmas spent with her late husband, Ger ry, before he died. Lucie and Gerry moved to Minneola when he was hired as Minneola city manager. The Clermont Womans Club put on quite a show at its annual luncheon and fashion show at the First Baptist Church Christian Life Center. It served 395 lunches, by far the largest number ever served in the Clermont area. Tables were placed down either side of the room, leaving a nice walkway for club ladies who modeled fashions from Larsens in Leesburg. The granddaughters of member Polly Duncan and ve of member Ruby Abels grandchildren started off the show with childrens fashions. Minneola City Council passed an ordinance raising the mayors salary from $100 to $200 per month.FIX OUR SCHOOLS, PRINCIPAL APPOINTMENTSThe Lake County School Board was presented a petition signed by 210 south Lake teachers and par ents, many of whom were in the audience. A representative of the group spoke at length regarding conditions of the schools, showing videotapes of structural problems, lack ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comSeven years ago, Becky Parks, the physical edu cation teacher at Cypress Ridge Elementary School, was participating in a pop ular evening event there called Family Reading Night. She looked around, saw families interacting, and thats when a light came on in her head. I thought, if there can be a family reading night, there can be a family walk night, Parks said, pleased the event has grown into something hundreds of families participate in ev ery year. With the help of Pam Hamilton and Trish Sprou le, Parks has been inviting Cypress Ridge teachers, administrators, parents, students and other family members to Waterfront Park in Clermont to walk the trail together one night each month. The event not only creates bonds be tween families, but boosts their overall health and tness. In September, when the school year starts, par ticipants begin by walk ing one mile, then every month after that, agree to increase their distances by a quarter-mile each time. By the end of the school year, participants, includ ing students, are walking three miles. Parks said each month sees more than 100 partic ipants on average, a num ber that she said some times dwindles slightly as the walking distance in creases. (Family Walk Night) gives us a reason to exer cise together. It provides us with an incentive because, truthfully, some times we need to be forced into it, said parent Matthew Gosselin, who came after work to meet his wife, Nicole Gosselin, and their children Evan, Aiden and Emma. When we can, we come together as a family, Nicole Gosselin said. Melanie Ressler, a moth er of three students, called the program a great initia tive to help kids be active. It gets them out of the house and keeps them from being in front of the television or playing video games all afternoon, she said. Katie Ciccotelli, also there with her two girls CLERMONTFamily Walk Night strengthens participants bonds and bodies PHOTOS BY ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Sherie Ismain and her daughter, Rafeeye Hussein, 8, at left, attend Cypress Ridge Elementary Schools Family Walking night for March, led by physical education teacher Becky Parks. BELOW: Becky Parks helps Fred Owusu-Ofori and his daughter, Paige, 9, sign in at Marchs Family Walking Night at Waterfront Park.SEE WALKERS | C2SEE HISTORY | C2

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C2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 2, 2014 BRIGHT IDEASBY IAN LIVENGOOD / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZNo. 0323RELEASE DATE: 3/30/2014 ACROSS1 Expands, in a way7 Sister of Helios10 ___ room13 Elite unit18 Gambling mecca19 Saints home, for short22 Venomous African tree-dweller23 Start of a motivational comment attributed to 86-Across26 Justin Timberlakes Cry ___ River27 [That makes me so uncomfortable]28 Lockup29 Middle of the comment37 Toolbar feature38 Director Nicolas39 Record40 Facial moisturizing brand41 Power suffix42 Sticks in the closet?43 End of the comment48 College major, briefly49 Commercial lead-in to Pen50 Rocket51 Cousin of Ugh!52 Osaka-to-Sapporo dir.53 Law firm department55 Fired on57 Good-for-nothing59 Resort city in 1945 news60 Small scene61 Restricted part of an urban area63 Ball player?64 Prominent feature of an Obama caricature65 Ray Charles hosted it in 1977: Abbr.66 Couple at the altar?69 Start to show ones real potential72 So73 Birthplace of Buddha, now75 Pitcher Mike with 270 wins78 Christmas cookie ingredient80 Plagues81 Eponymous German physicist82 Combined with83 Watering hole for Homer and Barney84 Coin collector85 Pelicans home, for short86 See 23-Across90 The Durbeyfield girl, in literature91 Dr. Seuss animal92 It has paper denominations from 5 to 50093 Ex-Fed head Bernanke94 Some body work, in slang95 Zippo alternatives96 Nickname for 86-Across103 Barrel of fun?104 Saffron-flavored dish105 Brow line?106 Development of 86-Across as depicted in the middle of this grid115 World capital on the slope of an active volcano116 Dolph of Rocky IV117 More chilling118 Throw around119 D.C. mover and shaker: Abbr.120 Scandinavian coin121 Actor Christian DOWN1 French kiss recipient, maybe2 How silly of me!3 Bit of a code4 Stockpile5 View that may cost you extra6 Security Council veto7 Ins8 Near future9 Hardly enough10 The French way?11 It may be delayed by a storm: Abbr.12 United Center team13 Update, say14 Garden State casino, informally, with the15 Outback native16 Crunches crunch them17 Yoga base20 ___ of relief21 Nondairy item in the dairy aisle24 Ones without a leg to stand on?25 Part of a moving line29 Blues Brothers wear30 Nosedives31 Utmost: Abbr.32 Farm mother33 My word!34 Stag, maybe35 The fish that got away and others36 Comic Wanda37 Hurried42 Death Magnetic band43 Drinking binge44 Accessory for the 91-Across45 Many an Al Jazeera viewer46 Pioneer org.47 Five-time Super Bowl champions, informally50 Baraks successor54 Sharp pains55 Travel agency listings56 Cabooses58 Starts of news articles60 Deli stock with seeds62 Tight67 What an electric current does not flow through68 Relaxed, say70 Difficult weight71 Appropriate flowers for Mothers Day?72 Bootleggers banes74 Exams offered four times a yr.75 Certain Bach composition76 For sure77 Gooey campfire treat79 Not ___ shabby!80 Cesare Angelotti in Tosca, e.g.84 It gets you off schedule87 Place to store hay88 German article89 Third line on many a ballot: Abbr.90 Sunbathing evidence94 One with bills piling up?95 My Name Is ___, gold album of 196597 Tell me about it!98 One of two parts of a British puzzle?99 ___ page100 Canine101 D.C. mover102 Pi ___, Life of Pi protagonist106 100s of ordinary people?107 Fanatic108 Geometry fig.109 Had something110 Bring into court111 ___ = Politics (TV slogan)112 Guys113 Food Network host Sandra114 Its f-f-freezing! 123456 789 1011121314151617 18 19 2021 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 3132 33343536 37 38 39 40 41 42 434445 4647 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 5657 58 59 60 6162 63 64 65 666768 6970 7172 73 74 757677 7879 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 8889 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 9798 99100101 102 103 104 105 106107108109 110111 112 113114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). When this puzzle is done, the circled letters, reading counterclockwise from the top, will spell a phrase relating to the puzzles theme. Solution on D3 COMMUNITY CALENDAR TODAYSAC MEETING AT PINE RIDGE ELEMENTARY: At 7 p.m., in the media cen -ter. THURSDAY PASTFINDERS GENE ALOGY GROUP MEET -ING: From 5 to 7 p.m., in the upstairs Genealogy Room in Cooper Memo -rial Library in Clermont. SATURDAY EAT THE WEEDS HEALTHY AND EDIBLE NATIVE PLANTS WITH THE LAKE BEAUTYBERRY CHAPTER OF THE FLORIDA NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY: At 10 a.m., Cooper Memo rial Library, 2525 Oakley Seaver Dr., in Clermont. Admission is free.COOPER MEMORIAL LI -BRARYS 3RD ANNUAL TEEN BATTLE OF THE BANDS: From 2 to 5:30 p.m. on the grounds of Lake-Sumter State Col-lege. Registration is free and band members should be between the ages of 12 and 18. Call 352-536-2275 or email lpiper@lakeline.lib..us to sign up. MONDAYMASCOTTE ELEMEN TARY CHARTER BOARD SAC MEETING: At 5 p.m., in the media center. Call 352-429-2294. TUESDAYPASTFINDERS GENEAL -OGY GROUP HELP SES -SION: From 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., in the Genealogy Room in Cooper Memo -rial Library, in Clermont. APRIL 10HOLOCAUST REMEM -BRANCE DAY AT THE COOPER MEMORIAL LIBRARY: A presentation of com -ics, cartoons and chil dren of the Holocaust with Dr. Seuss, and Su-perman as an anti-Nazi allegory in a special pro -gram at 5 p.m. in room 108. Dr. Sheryl Needle Cohn, Ed.D., is the guest speaker. Call the library at 352-536-2275 for de -tails. APRIL 11 SPRING FLING EASTER CELEBRATION AT CAGAN CROSSINGS FARMERS MARKET: From 4 to 8 p.m., with an Easter Egg Scav -enger Hunt for the kids. For $3 each, kids can dec -orate an Easter craft at the South Lake Art Leagues Artist Boutique. Regular vendors with produce, food and more will be on hand, at Cagan Town Center, Cagan Crossings Blvd. Email cagancross -ingsfarmersmarket@ gmail.com. APRIL 13EASTER EVENTS AT WINDERMERE UNION CHURCH, UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST: Palm Sunday service at 10 a.m. April 13. Good Friday ser -vice on April 18 at 7:30 p.m., and Easter Sun -day celebration on April 20 at 10 a.m., with spe -cial music and an Eas -ter message. Easter cel-ebration also includes an Easter egg hunt for kids through the sixth grade accompanied by parents. All events are held at the church, 10710 Park Ridge-Gotha Rd. Call 407-876-2112 or go to www.windermere -union.org. APRIL 15SOUTH LAKE HIGH SCHOOL SAC MEETING: At 6:30 p.m. in the culi -nary arts room. Call 352-394-3644. APRIL 16 CHAPTER 188 OF THE KOREAN WAR VETERANS ASSOCIATION OF SOUTH LAKE COUNTY SUPPORT -ING HOMELESS VETERANS MEETING: At 1:30 p.m., Lake David City Build -ing in Groveland. For in -formaton, call David Litz at 352-536-9022. To place an item on the calendar, send an email to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com.and with Resslers fam ily, has participated ev ery month since the start of school. Cicco telli said she also likes the venue (Waterfront Park) because of its nat ural beauty. After walk ing, the kids enjoy play ing on the beach and in park areas. The two moms also like that participating counts as school volunteer hours for parents. Coming keeps us in shape and then after wards, we can spend time with our families, friends and play with each other, Sebastien Ressler, 9, said. Joshua Phillips, there with his 6-year-old daughter Elizabeth, said he feels the program provides a great oppor tunity to get some ex ercise, spend time with family and friends and show support for the school, but most of all, he likes the challenge. They lay it out for you and they increase it each time we come. It gets tougher, and its ex citing to see how far we can go, Phillips said. In March, in honor of the city of Clermont police departments newly instated water front/downtown Clermont task force pa trol initiative, the kids, parents and teachers at Family Walk Night were greeted by Ofcers James Rooney, Brenda Teets and Chief Charles Broadway. They congratulated the walkers for their efforts and re warded the students with wrist bands. WALKERS FROM PAGE C1 of library books, overcrowded classrooms and general lack of maintenance. The petition asked that the public be made aware of the numerous problems facing their schools. Board member Chip Deems advised the group the problem was not unique to south Lake County. With the failure of the bond referendum last May, the board is seeking alternative solutions. School Superintendent Dr. Tom Sanders announced appointments to the districts 1989 bargaining team: Carmen Arnold, David Coggshall, Jim Hollings, Bob Eyerly and Bob Miller. Edward Pauley was moved from principal of Groveland Elementary to district supervisor of elementary education and James Gant was moved from principal of Treadway Elementary to principal of Groveland Elementary. Appointed assistant principals were James Dandridge, Clermont High; Grover Mar tin, Clermont Junior High; Ray Sewell, Groveland High and Henry Thacker, Groveland Middle. William Bill Sullivan, Clermont High, will retire June 30.DICK HARRIS DAYClermont Mayor Bob Pool presented Richard E. Dick Harris a framed proclamation honoring his service to the residents of the city and naming Friday, March 31, Dick Harris Day in Clermont. Dick, a pharmacist for 42 years, has been an active par ticipant in work with the First United Methodist Church; the Clermont-Minneola Lions Club, which awarded him Lion of the Year; Girls Scouts and Boy Scouts and American Legion. HISTORY FROM PAGE C1 SUBMITTED PHOTO A group from the Sandspurs Circle of the Clermont Garden Club went on a eld trip to the Albin Polasek Museum in Winter Park recently and took a tour of the gardens and house on the grounds to learn about Polasek, a sculptor and artist. For information about the club, go to www.clermontgardenclub.com.SANDSPURS VISIT WINTER PARK

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C3 Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...Totally UniqueTotally Unique is proud to be Clermonts first ORGANIC hair salon. We care about your beauty, your wellness, the environment and our community, so we use organic and sustainably harvested products whenever possible. We specialize in organic hair color, hair care products, nail and skin care lines. Our salon is one of the oldest salons in Clermont and is located at 786 W Montrose Street in Historic Downtown Clermont. Our stylists are experienced in all phases of hair care including color, straighteners, cuts, texture and styles. Hair stylists are Marjorie Morphet, Tina Foote, Sherie Wolkens and Jamie Rhoades. Our nail techs, Jennifer Vandergrift and Jamie Rhoades, perform pedicures and manicures using Zoya nail products (which are Big 5 free). Shellac manicures, lasting up to three weeks, are also available by Jennifer and Jamie. We have two pedicure chairs in a private room for your relaxation and enjoyment. Relaxing and therapeutic facials are available by Jennifer in our private upstairs facial room. Massage services include chair massage, Swedish and Deep Tissue. Massage services are also done in a private room in our upstairs area. We utilize several massage therapists and provide massage by appointment only. We also offer a small boutique with handcrafted jewelry and hair accessories, Art by Tina Foote and Jamie Rhoades, and other unique items. Salon hours are 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Saturday and open Sundays by appointment only. Evening hours are also available by appointment. We pride ourselves in providing a friendly, relaxing environment for our clients and friends. Stop by and visit or call 352-394-5005 for more information. We are also on Facebook and www.TotallyUniqueSalon.com. rfnrtb Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! rffntCall today b fnfffr mprehensim i$59ions$99excludes w isdo m teeth (thi rd m ola rs)new pa tients only one time visit offer p anoramic xray required D0330 out of pocket expenseExpires: May 31, 2014 m 352-394-3071 *P anoramic x-ray and/or CT scan of the ja ws necessary for d ia gnos is and trea tment planning. It is our office policy tha t the pa tient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service. examina tion or trea tment which is performed as a result of a nd within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free discounted-offer or reduced-free service, ex ami na tion or trea tment MIn. Free ADA code D0210, D0150 m3 No More Dentures! SUBMITTED PHOTO Terric Kids at Mascotte Elementary Charter for March are: Alaina Martinez, Nathan King, Elijah Rodriguez, Nahiara Velez, Jasmine Kaliszewski, Krystaline Valdez, Anika Adams, Leslie Padilla, Kassidy Stephens, Jorge Cervantes, Jasmine Cervantes, Aracelie Gonzalez, Madelis Cruz, Genesis Garcia, Kaylee Underwood, Arinn Freeman, Audrey Altman, Mayra-Liz Bravo, Vanessa Betancourt, Alfredo Rivero, Jesus Padilla, Samantha Ruiz, Spring Fequiere, Titus Hayes, Janely Jaramillo, Jose Alvarado, Skyler Fequiere, Anthony Ramsawack, Shaddin Ahmad, Julie Colon, Elizabeth, Luna, Elizabeth Singh, Roxana Gonzalez, Sylvia Sanchez, Eduardo Baez, Tyler Seepersaud, Marleni Martinez, Cody Smith, Damien Mancini and Viviana Rodriguez. Kiwanis Members Mr. Garcia and Mr. Thomas, and Principal Wayne Cockcroft are also pictured. Not pictured: Kolten Harper.MASCOTTE ELEMENTARY CHARTER TERRIFIC KIDS SUBMITTED PHOTO Terric Kids at Cypress Ridge Elementary School for March are: Samantha Poreda, Troy Saha, Collin Stebbins, Kristopher Malave, Jared Hogan, Justin Hitte, Kayla Schweitzer, Adrian Marquez, Rachel Marks, Sydney Benson, Janki Patel, Kyla Altmeyer, Sammy Taylor, Morgan Pitcher, Alie Sunseri, Colin Bishman, Owen Himschoot, Keira Votava, Emma DiGennaro, Sydney Foster, Emily Horn, Kaluki Kithome, Alex Gonzalez, Tayler Roberson, Josh Montero, Noah Echavarria, Elle Fuller, Carson Brookes, Ariana Umana, Lucas Donnelly, Madyson Matthews, Garcelle Williams, Jill Orlando, McCall McMullen, Hannah Herbert, Sabrina Martinez, Calvin Carlson and assistant principal Jan Nappi.CYPRESS RIDGE ELEMENTARY TERRIFIC KIDS SUBMITTED PHOTO Freddy Williams, president/CPO of The Boys & Girls Clubs of Lake and Sumter Counties, addressed the Kiwanis Club of Clermont recently, about the organizations history, dating back to its formation in 1860, in Hartford, Conn. The presentation included information about the local club, formed in Clermont three years ago, and how the clubs positively affect kids between the ages of 5 and 18 years in the community. He also discussed a study presently being conducted to nd a permanent home for the South Lake Boys and Girls Club in Clermont.WILLIAMS SPEAKS AT KIWANISCLERMONT BJs Charitable Foundation presents grant to United WayUnited Way of Lake and Sumter Counties re cently received a $5,000 grant from the BJs Char itable Foundation and will use the grant at Cler mont Elementary School as part of the Rally for Reading Program. The BJs Charitable Foundation is dedicated to supporting hunger prevention, self-sufcien cy, health care and education in the communities surrounding our Clubs, said Jessica Newman, ex ecutive director of the foundation. BJs Charitable Foundation also contributed 92 grants totaling $569,160 to various local nonprot organizations that support the health and overall well-being of children and families residing in the communities surrounding BJs Wholesale Clubs across the state.

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C4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 2, 2014 Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) rfnftnbrbnrfn rfrntfbbrrfrntfbbrrfnt rf rfnfntbnf April 12, 2014Registration:5pm 6pmat Spanish Village-Clubhouse(Between Arlington Ridge & Plantation)1 El Presidente Blvd., Leesburg, FL 34748 TOP PRIZES INCLUDE*: 1st: $500 Gift Card 2nd: $250 Gift Card 3rd: $100 Gift Card Thomas Kinkade Painting Weekend Trip $50 Gift CardrPhone: (352) 326-0761 x1100 Email: info@MercyMail.org www.AngelFlightSE.orgSponsors COME PLAY WITH USLimited Seats Available Sign Up Today Sponsor a Table of 10 Call for InformationTo Register go to:www.AngelFlightSE.org/Events $60.00 Registration Includes FoodPlus Re-stacks and Add-on!Early Registration is Now Available Save $20.00 Off Your Entry!Deadline April 9th THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comMelon Patch Play house in Leesburg is breaking away from its norm by showcas ing a dark musical drama, Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, by Ste phen Sondheim, which features a murderous barber, a cannibalistic pie maker and glorious music. The show runs through April 6. A lot of people write off this musical because of the murder and be cause of the darkness of it, but if you can get past the subject matter, this is one of the most beau tiful musicals that you will ever hear, Director John Turcotte said. The music is glorious and sung so well. This real ly is an operetta of more music than it is actually dialogue. The director, who also is a local schoolteacher, said he worked to tone down some of the scenes so they would not be offensive. We have made this as much of a fami ly-friendly Sweeney Todd as Sweeney Todd can be made, Turcotte said. We are not putting blood and guts in your face. Ive toned down a lot of that to make it more accessible to the general public so that they can enjoy the show and not get totally freaked out by the sub ject matter. He believes teens can handle Melon Patchs Sweeney Todd. It has no more than what kids would see at 8 oclock at night on a crime drama, Turcotte said. He believes audienc es are bound to nd themselves cheering for the evil duo of Sweeney Todd (Nathan Jessee) and Mrs. Lovett (Jolene Sheets) and their plot against Judge Turpin (Cliff Barrineau) and Beadle Bamford (Tad Kincade). The arriv al of Adolfo Pirelli (Kyle Stone) and his servant boy Tobias (Manolo Hernandez) adds com plications to Sweeneys plot for revenge and re sults in the rst blood shed of the show. Not to worry, there is no real blood. We do not shed one drop of blood; we do it all very theatrically with the lights. This is not the Johnny Depp movie made gloriously bathed in blood, Turcotte said. This is a much more theatrical production, and much more of a representational production. The plot also revolves around the love affair between Judge Turpins ward Johanna (Stephanie Hutchison) and the sailor Anthony (Daniel Roscoe). And how does the beggar woman (Jessa Dodds) t into this murder thriller? Tur cotte said audiences will have to wait until the end for the answer. The ensemble of this show acts as a Greek chorus and often com ments on the action as the sinister story un folds. Members include Alan Terry, Kristian Ware, Derek Wallman, Heather Franklin, Trista Fouts, Meagan Nee, Mike Bailey, Lindsay Koons, Kathleen Byrd, Charlotte Jar dine, Jessica Shinn and Lavonte Rogers. Turcotte praised his cast and noted they are relishing the intensi ty of the show and their chance to perform a dark drama. They are really enjoy ing being in something that is a little bit off the beaten path, Turcotte said. Its not often that you nd a musical dra ma. I hope the audi ence walks away enjoy ing the fact that they can enjoy something very different. Turcotte said no one fainted or complained from last weekends opening shows. We have not lost one person because of the production or the sub ject matter, so I think we are handling it quite well as far as not offend ing anybody, Turcotte said, who was relieved to hear praise about the talented cast. The director said he has always adored Sweeney Todd, and was pleased to have the opportunity to show it at Melon Patch for the rst time. He performed in the show twice before in the role of Beadle at IceHouse in Mount Dora. Now that I have transformed to doing more directing than anything, I am look ing at all the different shows that I love and that I have done out there, he said. Sweeney Todd was one that had not been done at Melon Patch. The Leesburg theater has focused more on musical comedies of Rodgers and Hammer stein, he said. People didnt think Melon Patch was as capable of doing a dark show. This is a very dif ferent departure from our norm for us, and people werent sure that we could pull it off, and we seem to be able to very well, Turcotte said. Im very proud of my cast and crew. The production staff for Sweeney Todd includes Linda Charlton (accompanist), Michael Winternheimer (technical director), Sally Gage (choreographer), Jennifer Fink (stage manag er), Joshua Eads-Brown (costumes) and Pauline Judge (prop mistress). Melon Patch is locat ed at 311 N. 13th St., in Leesburg. Tickets for the show are $18 for adults and $9 for stu dents. Tickets can be reserved by calling the box ofce at 352-7873013. Since the musical deals with adult themes and subject matter, parental discretion is ad vised.Melon Patch debuts dark musical drama Sweeney Todd THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Manolo Hernandez, left, portrays servant boy, Tobias, and Jolene Sheets stars as Mrs. Lovett in Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street.

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NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 725344767 1318315974 921FREE SPACE5372 216424863 529395268ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N IB O G BINGO B I N G O SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Rosemarie Alexander WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! B 13 B 2 B 5 B 9 B 7 Wednesday, April 2, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C5

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C6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 2, 2014 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comLake County ofcials say they are struggling to come up with fund ing to make needed repairs at county build ings and to replace obsolete technology. With 41 percent of the countys buildings more than 20 years old, the HVAC controls system and IT le servers must be replaced to avoid system and operation al failure in the future, they say. Some of those build ings include the Lake County Administration Building, Lake County Sheriffs Ofce and the jail. We are not talking about iPads and laptops or anything like that, County Manager David Heath said. We are talking about the guts of the system, referring to the network and serv ers. If we have servers that go down, we will have departments not able to function. Heath added: This stuff is very low bud get and not extravagant. These are truly needs. The decline in prop erty values over the last few years has tightened and reduced budget al locations in Lake Coun tys Facilities and Information Technology departments. Facilities has 17 fewer employees than it did in 2010. Kristian Swenson, Fa cilities and Fleet Man agement director, said there is a backlog of $12.2 million of facili ties needs, while IT is reporting $950,000 for critical updates to le servers, data storage units and telephone systems. Ofcials said many building components in need of repair, such as HVAC controls system, chillers and boilers, are at the end of their life span or are obsolete. If funding is not al located long-term, Sw enson said those needs will continue to grow, adding to the large backlog. You dont want an operational failure in the building, he said. For example, if you have heating and air conditioning disrup-tion in the courthouse it could affect the court system. Facilities has made two separate budget requests of $500,000 for this years and next years budget; IT has requested $200,000 for immediate needs. But nding reve nue to meet long-term needs could become a challenge as the county grapples with a $7 million shortfall in the 2014-15 budget. Last year, the county used $1.1 million from the infrastructure penny sales tax fund to pay debt on capital rather than taking it from the general fund. The quandary fac ing commissioners is whether to use $5.74 million available next year from the penny sales tax to pay debt on capital, which would make up the shortfall, or use the revenue to address facility maintenance needs over the long-term.County struggles with millions in repairs BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Mark Wrigley troubleshoots a water heater that supplies the water for inmate showers at Lake County Detention Center in downtown Tavares, Thursday.SEE REPAIRS | C7

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C7 CLERMONT BLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSAMILYELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time! IRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONTL Many Other Activities each week Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.org LIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLCHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm SOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary); 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.org ST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am (Rite I) 10:00 am (Rite II) 5:00 pm (Praise & Worship) Sunday School Youth Group Nursery Adult Bible Study Womens Bible Study Mens Prayer Breakfast WOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH GODINCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALE ERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for Children Groveland IRSTBAPTISTCHURCH GROVELAND Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pm MT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! MINNEOLA CONGREGATIONSMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club NEWLPRESBYTERIANCHURCH18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am TLIVINGGOD Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce Rowland MONTVERDE WOODLANDSLUTHERAN15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 am OAKLAND PRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforSouth Lake South LakeGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOMErfn tbt352-394-7121806 W. Minneola Ave.,Clermont,FL Cremation ChoicesDirect Cremation$675Plus Container Ron Becker,Director352-394-8228921 S.US Hwy 27,Minneola,FL Even so, county ofcials say some needs in different areas could go unmet. For example, if the commission decides to use all the revenue available to pay down the debt, it could displace projects such as South Lake Regional Park. Swenson said there are hundreds of parts that have to be changed out in re alarm systems, boilers, lighting protection systems, switchgears, kitchen equip ment and laundry electron ic components. And as technology continues to change, the systems the county uses are also becoming obsolete because the industry no longer sup ports it or sells replacement parts, according to Steve Earls, IT director. Servers are what hold our main business applications that everyone uses, and we have electronic data storage units that house data infor mation user les, he said. A third of those are over six years old. We have already had hard drive failures. The current racks that house the countys hard drives are no longer made, as technology has moved to a smaller design. With everything today In ternet-based, Heath said upgrades are critical, because the public relies on the countys website for on line permitting and watch es the County Commission meetings made possible by the audiovisual equipment. We are asking for funding to replace a 20-plus-yearold system providing vid eo and sound for the board chambers, Earls said. We cant get replacements with the current system we have. Earls said the county also accepts electronic submissions for building plans and architecture drawings, which could affect these offerings if the servers are not replaced. County Commissioner Tim Sullivan said fund ing should be allocated for the immediate needs for those departments. As for the long-term needs, he suggested the county piece together a capital improve ment plan to evaluate the highest priorities. While concerned about how antiquated the systems have become, Commission Chairman Jimmy Conner said the majority of the pen ny sales tax in the future, af ter it comes up for renewal potentially in 2015, should go primarily toward public safety and include parks and sidewalks. It most denitely comes down to priorities, he said, explaining there is a need for patrol cars for the sher iff and ambulances for Lake EMS. Understanding IT and fa cility maintenance needs is essential to the opera tion and have to be funded, Commissioner Sean Parks said at the same time he hopes to keep funding intact for South Lake Regional Park and public safety needs. Some needs will be un met, he said. Heath said the county can either address the facilities and IT needs now or have the system eventually collapse and cost 10 times as much to replace it. REPAIRSFROM PAGE C6 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL A chiller at the Lake County Detention Center is responsible for supplying several buildings with cooled air.SOURCE: Lake County Government IN NEED OF REPAIRA list of items that county ofcials say must be replaced in the coming years:FACILITIES %  enReplace plumbing at the jail for numerous leaks %  enReplace two hot boilers at the jail %  enUpdate re alarm systems %  enReplace jail kitchen appliances %  enReplace HVAC controls, which are obsolete in numerous buildings TOTAL: $12.2MTECHNOLOGY %  enReplace critical le servers and power supplies %  enReplace old data storage devices %  enReplace Commission chambers audiovisual system %  enNetwork components for remote ofces %  enReplace 26 outdated telephone systems TOTAL: $950,000

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C8 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 2, 2014 SUBMITTED PHOTO Pictured are, from left to right, Michael Nix, Grace DAmico, teacher Jeannette Smith, Ashley Allen and Anna Blake after competing in a statewide competition in classical and sacred piano at the Sunshine State Association of Christian Schools competition, March 7 in Tampa. The talented group are piano students at the Smith School of Music, Inc., under Jeannette Smith in Clermont. Wins for the students include a rst place nish for DAmico in the Classical Piano Solo Division playing Un Sospiro by Franz Liszt, and in the Sacred Piano Solo Division playing Glorious Things of Thee are Spoken, arranged by Heather Sorenson. DAmico and Nix both won rst place in the Classical Piano Duet Division playing Hummelug by Rimsky-Korsakov (Flight of the Bumblebee), arranged by Uwe Korn. Allen and Blake won second place in the Sacred Piano Duet Division, playing Blessed Assurance, arranged by Rebecca Bonam. For information about the school, call Jeannette Smith at 352-394-2530 or go to www.smithschoolofmusic.com.LOCAL PIANO STUDENTS WIN BIG SUBMITTED PHOTO Jeanette Rescoe talks with some of the more than 300 students from Imagine Charter Elementary School who toured the Historic Village Museum in Clermont recently. Half of the students visited on March 13 and the others came on March 18, learning about how early settlers did chores, entertained themselves and went to school. IMAGINE CHARTER SCHOOL VISITS HISTORIC VILLAGE

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D1 rfntbrr r f n t b n b n n b n n t b n b n n b n t n n n b b n n t n b b b n t n t b n n b n t n b t b n n t b n b n t n n n b n b n n n t t b n t t n t b b n t b b b b b n t n b n b n n b n n n b t n t b t b b b n t n b n b f b n b b n n b n t n b n n b n t b b n n t b t n n b f t b b b n b b n b n n b n b t t b t b b n b t b b n b n n b n b b n t n b n b b b n n n n b b t b b n n n t b b n t n b n b n b n b n t f f f r frr nrtr n n b n n n n f f br n b t n b n b b n t n n b n n n b n b n n b b n n t n b n t b b b b n b t n b n b b n t t t b n b n t b n t t n n n b f t b b n b bt b rt n n n n t b b b n t b n n n b b n t t t n t b b n b b b n n t b b n n b n b t n n b n b n n b n n b b n b n b t b b b n b b n b b b t f b n f f t n br rt nnnb nnn tbnbb nnnb b n n b b n b n b n n n t b n rr f f tr rt t n b n t t t b t n n n b t nnnb nbtb tbtnntt nbtbb nnnbnbnbn nnbtnbnbnn ntnnbnnt n nbbnt nnb f bnbt bbnn ntnbnb f nf bf nbnnbnb bnnbnf bnbnbn nnnb tnbb bnnn bnnf nbnnntn tbtbtnnnb nnnbfff bnnbbt nnnnbn nbt bnbn tbnnb n bbf rt nf nbn bnnn nn btbfbt ntbnbntnbbn nbnn nb bnbn bbbn bbnbbnbn bnbnnb bnnb nnnn nbtbnbtb ntb nbbnbnnb bnnb tb ntb nbtnnn bf nbnbbnb nbbnff nbn ff n nbnnn nb nbnnnn bnb bnnbff nff bf nbtnnn bf nbnbbnb nbbnff nbn ff n nbnnn nb nbnnnn bnb bnnbff nf bf rt nf nbn bnnn nn btbfbt ntbnbntnbbn nbnn nb bnbn bbbn bbnbbnbn bnbnnb bnnb nnnn nbtbnbtb ntb nbbnbnnb bnnb tb ntb nf nbbbb nn nbnnbnnn bbnbntnb bbn nntnntb nbnntnbn bnnnntbnbnb nbnnfff tnbnntnb nt ntbbtbnbnnntb bn nbtnb nfbnf nnnb nbbbnbn tnnnb bnntbbnbbn nbnbbb nbtb ntnbbn nbff bnntb tb n bbf bn nbtnb nfbnf nnnb nbbbnbn tnnnb bnntbbnbbn nbnbbb nbtb ntnbbn nbff bnntb tb n bbf rt nf nbbbb n t nn nbnnbnnn bbnbntnb bbn nntnffn tbnbnbn nnntbnbnb nbnnfft nbnntnb nt ntbbtbnbnnntb nf nbbbb n t f nn nbnnbnnn bbnbntnb bbnf nntnfn tbnbnbn nnntbnbnb nbnnfft nbnntnb nt ntbbtbnbnnntb bn nbtnb nfbnnbf nnnb nbbbnbn tnnnb bnntbbnbbn nbnbbb nbtb ntnbbn nbff bnntb tb n bbf rt b rt rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrff nrrrrrrrrrrff ttbrrrrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rfntbbt rfrntn nnnftbnbn brfbnrb bnbtn b rnnrtnftbn tbrbttb nnnrfrbtb nbb n fbfn tbrbnbbbtn nnnntnbbtr bbbfrf rtfnbtr rrbrfnnnrfnt t rf

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D2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 2, 2014 rfntbf r f n n t b r b n b n b b r b b bbn bbtbnn nrbbn bn nn br bbt btr b b b r b b b frbnbttb tn bbtbnr b r n n t b r b n b n b b r b n n r r b r r b b n bnbtn rr t b b r r b r r f nbtttbb bbft n btt r r f r f r n b b b r r b r n b bbtbf r bbr btbbn nr bb bbbr n r b

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D3 rfntbrr r f nrr nfft n n n r fbnt trn r r f frrfrr rfntbn rffn tbbbbbbb ttb b rrnrr tb t b b b b br tb f rrff rrf tt rrr frnbrr bbb brrbt rnrrrf fnb ff bbtbbb tft nbrtt fffrf bb rfrr rtt ff fnb frrf t rf n rrrftb tb fn trrtt r f b t rrbb brrtb rr bnbbt tf frr frf rfnb tbbf r rrbb rftbbbt rff rnf rrrfbbtb nfr fbtt rftttbbrr b rrtb tbbbt rrtb tbbbt rrttbb rff tbrfr frf t trfbr rfrftbb bt n rfbtbb rff bt n r r f t r b b bb rfn bbbb r f nfb nrbb fr nbbb b tf tb rrfrf fntbbtb fnf rf b rrrf tt ffff rtb rf rbbfrnbtb rfn frtbbt fttt r b b n n b t t rrfrff nrfnb rfnr tt rr f b nn bbtb ffnb rff rrb rrf tbbt rrtb fnbbtb n b b b rftrb f n t r t b b t rnff rffb fbr rbb t f t b btbb brrf r frrb rb ff fbbt r r nfnf b fnrr bt fbrr rfbt t b b b frrrb rrnbb r t tb rrtfb brf rrrfbtb nfrn rtb f bf f r r f r b t b fnb bbt n b fnbb b fnbb b frbrr tt t brbbr bt r rftb t ftbrbt tbrffn frbrrbb rr rrfnnr tbbtttttr trr tbb r rbt t f f rrbbt rrrfb rf bb tn rfb rb f rfftbbb ff rrf rr r fff rft rtt bf t rr rtbbrb tt ftb fnt tbbbb nrrfnrf ftbb bbfrnrr nnt rrf btt rff fnfr tbbrrb t r rtbbttt frb rr rrf tbbtbbtbb f trr fft bt b rfrfb rrfnbb bt t bt fnr frnrbtbb rfbr tbbbtb b t nn bt frf nb ftbbb t frtbbb ff tbtb rrr tbbb rr rf r b r f r r f f f f f r n t t b rfr fnbbbt ff t nn tbb fb tt ff ftbrr rftbrf rrrt rftbb frr rftbb rnrr nb b fn rftb rr rb r fffftbb tt rrfn nrb nrrf rnf t bt t tbbbb rf nrftbbttbb nr rbb fnrfr bb ffrr rftbbbb nbt rrrfb t r rnrr b rr nrrb rrrrrf tbb rfr fntbb n t nrrnf r f fntbbt bb t nrrr ttbt fn t r f n b b n t b t t b t f r r f f r f r r f r r f r r b f r t b tr bt ff r t f t b b t b r f f f f f n f r b rrfb fb rr rtbt ff ftbbb ftbb b ttfrf frfrfb ftbb b f t rff b b b r f r f r f r f r r f f r ffr rrfn r r f r r f r r f f r r f r f r r r f r r f t t b b b f r f n f r r f f r b n r r r f r r r r f f r f f f r r f r t r t r n f f r f f f n f b r f t r r rn frrfrrf frfrfr frfnr rr frfff fr f r r f r r r r t t r f r f t f r r f r f r t f r r r f r f f f n f f f f r r f f f f f f r f f r f r t b f b b t r r r f f r r r r t n fnf rff rf b rrf fr nf rrf r r b b t t rrrff nrrf r r r f r t r r rrfr fff frrf ffrff rffff rr rfrff nrfrrf b b f n r rnff rrfrrfr rf b b f r r t

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D4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, April 2, 2014 rfntbf rfr ntbbtr nnt ff t b n n f f nn nf ffrtf r nnnn rr nftff rf bnnnb frr f b r f rrf n t n t n n b n b ntbf nt nf rf r f f r f r t nfnt tbnbttnb trf bf tbtnb bnr nr b f f n r r nt tbtrt frrrf nrrf f nn rrf r t ftnttntbnt nb rfrr nbt brfr nrrf f nbbt bb tffr r f f f n nn tbt tt nbnrrr ttn nbnrr f rf nbtf b bf ftnbbntn nnnn brrfr rfbt frrf bbnnr nnn nbbntn rn fb ffbn nnnn nbn nfr n rfrb nbn rfrfr n nn frfbt nn f t f rftbnn bnntnn btb rrff ffnf nnnnn nnrbnbb rrr n r n t n b n n n b n n t n r f n n n t t n n b f r r ttn rrtntn bfbr rfbnn ntbtt fnrfr bnnttt nrff rrbnb nbtnr ntttnn bffffr fntbbnn nnnbbt nb ntt r trnttt ttnb f rr nnf f nn tbn n t t rnf n b t t b frnn r nnnb r nnf f nnntrf f r r nttf r n n t t f r n t r n f f f b b n n b n b n t b f f f f f b b n n b n b n t b f f nf f nnff f n r n t n b n n n b n ftt rrn rtnnb tnrfr n r n t n b n n n b n r f n n n t t n n b f n t t r r nn tbn n t t rnf n b t t b frnn r nnnb r trf fft n b b t b r f r n t t f f f r b n b t n f f r bnb bnbtnb nnbnf ntbtn nbtttr tbrnbnntb ffn nnrt trrnnttbnnt fbtntbt trn nnbtbtbbn tntf nbnbnn ttffrn tbnn bbntn fbtntbt trn ntnnt fnbnn ffntb nnb b ntn frb f n t b b t t t n b t b n b r r f r f nntnr nttr rr ft nn tbn n t t rnf n b t t b frnn r nnnb r nff n r n t n b n n n b n f n t n t t t t r f n t r r f r r f fftt bbn rf rf nft tbf b t b r r n n n t b n t b f r n t b f b n t n b f r n n n r f r f n t t t t t b t r f n t n b t f f n b t r r r t f r b n t r r f nn tbn n t t rnf n b t t b frnn r nnnb r nft ttbf r b n n t n nn tbn n t t rnf n b t t b frnn r nnnb r nf ttbf nnff ft tb ntbtbf r t frrff nn fbtf rbtbtfr rr rb rbtntr f nbn brrf rbtf