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SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | C1 SPORTS: Bulldogs sponsor shing tourney WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWSTAND INSIDE CLASSIFIED D1 CROSSWORDS C2 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN C1 SPORTS B1 VOICES A4 WORD ON THE STREE T A2 SO UTH LAKE PRE SS V OLUME 99, NO. 13 5 SECTIO N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reserved www. southlakepress.com PRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID In Wellness Way Sector Plan, landowners and county hope to avoid headaches of massive development Taming the beast BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL John Arnold, owner of Showcase Citrus, checks on his oranges in Clermont on Thursday. Arnold, one of the landowners in the Wellness Way Sector Plan, believes the highly planned concept should have enough exibility to respond to changes in the housing market. We have one shot at this, he said. Once it is approved and development starts coming in, if we make any mistakes, we are going to have to live with that for eternity. LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com A s Lake County ofcials creep toward approv al of the massive Wellness Way Sector Plan near Clermont, supporters say it is carefully designed to prevent the kinds of headaches communities ex perience from scattershot, low-density development. At the same time, several landowners in the sector plan area say exibility and the mar ket should dictate the plans di rection. While county ofcials agree parts of the plan should include exibility, there are aspects of the plan that are ironclad, they say. The plan will allow for mar ket exibility but there are key planning principles that cant be compromised such as the protection of water resources and topography and the jobs to housing ratio, Commissioner Sean Parks said. Jobs is one of them. The plan allows for 16,000 residential units and requires 1.5 jobs per house hold. And ofcials do not want po table water used for irrigating landscaping. The sector plan area, which has multiple landowners, has been called the last big chunk of undeveloped land in the county. The area is bounded by State Road 50 to the north, U.S. Highway 192 to the south, U.S. Highway 27 to the west and the Orange County line to the east). Surrounded by major throughways and within close proximity to the city of Orlan do and the theme parks, it is the prime spot to bring jobs to the ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com City ofcials who reviewed more than about 3,000 citations written for turning right on red have re jected 2,373 of them, or about 70 percent of all the tickets written since the citys contro versial red light camer as went live in January. Some 52 of these vi olations were already paid and $8,216 in nes will be refunded. The review, called for by City Manag er Darren Gray near ly a month ago, cov ered all right-on-red violations recorded by the cameras between Jan. 3, when they rst became operational, through Feb. 11, when city ofcials respond ed to complaints by ticketed drivers. Beginning Feb. 12, Clermont police said they would use more discretion when re viewing violations forwarded to them by the camera compa ny, American Trafc Solutions. Now that the pro cess is complete, we believe we have a sound public-safety program that is bet ter understood by the public, because we now have very few complaints, Gray said. Arnold Ceballos of Clermont was one of those drivers who be lieves he was wrong fully ticketed at the intersection of State Road 50 and Hancock Road, where the ma jority of right-on-red violations were re corded. He said he stopped at the red light, couldnt see ve hicles coming from his left because of a car next to him, and inched forward to get a better look before turning right. Thats when the camera snapped his picture, Ceballos said. They dismissed my case and so many others because we shouldnt have gotten them since the begin ning, he said. But its not only Cl ermont where this is happening, its all over Florida. Ofcials previous ly said they would dis miss tickets if driv ers made right-on-red turns in a careful and prudent manner at CLERMONT About 70 percent of citys red-light tickets dismissed Staff Report Twenty-four years ago, fac ing a possible four-year prison term, Robert Eugene Hendrix killed his cousin and the mans wife in Sorrento to prevent him from testifying in court. The murders landed the now 47-year-old Hendrix on death row where, after 23 years, he has been given an April 23 exe cution date. Hendrix and his cousin, Elmer Scott, were arrested for break ing into a house in 1990. Scott accepted a plea deal that would keep him out of prison if he tes tied against Hendrix, who was offered a plea agreement of four years in prison and ve years probation. Hendrix did not want to accept a plea and told several friends prior to his court date that he was going to kill Scott to keep him from testifying, court doc uments state. Hendrix didnt want to go back to prison, where he had spent 15 months beginning in 1986 after being convicted of burglary, grand theft and deal ing in stolen property in Orange County, the documents state. On Aug. 27, 1990, the day be fore his court date, Hendrix went to Scotts home in Sorrento and shot him in the head. His wife, Mi chelle, tried to intervene and Hendrix slashed her throat. The deaths or phaned the couples 5-month-old daughter. Several witnesses, including (Hendrixs girlfriend) Denise (Turbyville), testied that Hen drix admitted committing the murders to silence Scott, the documents state. He was con victed of two counts of premed itated rst-degree murder, two counts of conspiracy to com mit murder, and one count of armed burglary. SORRENTO Robert Hendrix faces April 23 execution date HENDRIX Beginning Feb. 12, Clermont police said they would use more discretion when reviewing violations forwarded to them by the camera company, American Traffic Solutions. SEE WELLNESS | A2 SEE TICKETS | A5

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 26, 2014 CLERMONT South Lake Recreation celebrates 20 years South Lake Recreation, Inc. is cele brating its 20th year of providing com munity athletics through LC Hoops in Lake County, which has become a sec ond home for over 10,000 kids through the years, fostered by a group of strong volunteers and community support. Stressing the importance of physi cal education, academics, respect and teamwork, the South Lake Recreation group is currently raising money so it can continue to offer kids scholarships and build a new state of the art com munity center, Arena on the Ridge. To support South Lake Recreation and its community scholarship pro gram, go to www.gofundme.com/ southlakerec, or for information about Arena on the Ridge, go to www.arena ontheridge.org or call 321-236-0240. CLERMONT Informational Meeting for South Lake Dragon Boat Fest An informational meeting for par ticipation in the Dragon Boat Festival in Clermont will be from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. April 1 at the Highlander Hut in Clermont. Attendees will learn about forming a team, individual par ticipation, sponsorship and vendor opportunities. The South Lake Dragon Boat event is May 2-3 on Lake Minneola in Clermont. For information, call 352-617-8788. CLERMONT Guns-N-Hoses Chili Cook Off set for April 6 The inaugural Guns-N-Hoses Chili Cook-Off will be April 6 with festivities beginning at 9 a.m. A $5 wristband pro vides guests access to taste chili entries and vote to determine the winner, with proceeds beneting charities of the Clermont re and police departments. Additional activities include a tug of war between the departments. For in formation or to purchase a wristband, call 352-874-9535 or go to www.cler montdowntownpartnership.com. CLERMONT Public Works will discuss Oswalt Road at meeting The Lake County Public Works Department is hosting an open house forum regarding upcoming improve ments to Oswalt Road from 5 to 7 p.m. on April 3 at Pine Ridge Elementary School, 10245 County Road 561, Clermont. The road will remain two lanes but will have safety improvements. Road work is expected to begin in August and be completed by May 2015. There will be no formal presenta tion during the open house forum, but Public Works engineers will be on hand to discuss the improvement plans and accept public comment. For information, call 352-483-9053. CLERMONT Angels of Mercy Thrift Store seeks donations Proceeds from the sale of commu nity donations help support the onsite emergency food pantry at Angels of Mercy, serving Clermont, Ferndale, Minneola and Montverde families in need for over 14 years. The store has many items, including clothing, home decor items and toys. The store is open from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., Mon.Fri., 1330 Millholland Dr., Clermont. For information call 352394-4094. MASCOTTE Mascotte Charter pre-k registration is April 3 Kindergarten registration will take place on April 3 to enroll students at Mascotte Elementary Charter School, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Parents/guard ians will need to bring all health in formation, identication and proof of physical address. If a child is current ly in a 2013-14 pre-k program, atten dance is not required. Children must be ve years of age by September 1, 2014 to enroll. For information, call 352-429-2294, ext. 5812. Area Briefs What South Lake residents are saying about ... THE AQUIFER Who owns the aquifer? The State of Florida owns it, as far as I know. This is a subject that has come up here. A while back the county came here and told me Id have to cap down my 6-inch to a four-inch well, at my ex pense. So I built another house. Otherwise I would have had to cap the well. JOSEPH STEED MONTVERDE I really dont know very much about mineral rights, but I would think it would be like a nation al park a public asset to be protected in some way. TONY HILL CLERMONT The State, I think. It controls the people who are in charge of the aqui fer, keeping it clean and controlling how much water is used. NICK ANDREWS CLERMONT The state of Florida the natural state of Flor ida, the landscape -be cause its so shallow. Nature owns the aquifer, in short. KYLE STONE CLERMONT Word on the Street Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 region, Parks said We have one shot at this, said John Arnold, one of the landown ers who owns Showcase of Citrus, which grows 60 varieties of citrus. Once it is approved and develop ment starts coming in, if we make any mistakes we are going to have to live with that for eternity. Arnold agreed with county of cials that the area should include both housing and commercial. But he wants county ofcials heading the charge to be exible enough to adapt to the changing market, al lowing apartments, for instance, if the need arises years from now. Parks said the plan is exible. Developers will submit propos als for developing pieces of the 16,000-acre tract. Each propos al will be a planned development that will have to adhere to the con cepts overarching principles but can differ in many other ways. You have to plan out for com mercial space, open space and the infrastructure, he said, but within each PUD, a developer can decide the type of development. The ex ibility lies entirely within the de tailed specic area plan process. With each plan, density will be determined based on a number of factors, primarily the open space requirements and jobs-to-hous ing ratio. Scott Bollens, professor of ur ban planning at the University of California, Irvine, said if housing is clustered and development in cludes both a mixture of homes and businesses, it would prevent urban sprawl, a planning term that describes scattershot, low-density development. In particular, Bollens said the open space requirements are going to encourage builders to build at pretty high densities because half the area is going to be open space. That would lead to a denser and clustered development pat tern, he said. Sprawl is low den sity and unclustered, characterless development. Wellness Way requires 50 per cent open space in each develop ment. The jobs-to-housing ratio is im portant as well, said Bollens, who has taught urban planning for 26 years and has read a previous arti cle on the sector plan. They are trying to prevent it from being built out as a bunch of homes, he said. That is an at tempt to create a balanced, inte grated community out there where there are homes and also jobs. Bollens said having the jobs closer to housing will minimize commutes for residents. People will live closer to their jobs sites and stores they shop in, he said. They are creating a bal anced community of multiple uses. Jim Karr, another landown er in the sector plan area, said he wanted to make sure there are more single-family homes than multi-family homes. We dont want to see multi-sto ry family housing dominate the housing down there, he said. The real estate values for residential portions is dramatically affected by having all multi-family units. Rex Clonts, a landowner who owns Clonts Groves Inc., ex pressed concerns about the jobsto-housing ratio. We want to make sure that it is not overly restrictive for what the market wants, he said. This, however, will not be changed in the plan, ofcials have noted. Commissioner Leslie Campione said she preferred lower densities for housing. I am not a proponent of high densities in the majority of the sector plan, she said. I would think there are particular areas that it might be appropriate. Campione said staff is making sure there is exibility within the plan. When people on one hand say they want exibility and on the other hand there are people con cerned about sprawl and overde velopment (that think) exibili ty means that anything goes, she said. That is the delicate balance you have to strike between any thing goes and having exibility. Robert Chandler, Lakes Eco nomic Development Director of Tourism, said health and life sci ences, warehouse and distribu tion, business services and nance and light manufacturing are the target industries for the area. If the maximum number of res idential units are built, the min imum number of jobs created would be 24,300, county ofcials said. Parks said if the plan was not in place you would have 100-acre to 500-acre subdivisions being built haphazardly over the next 25 years. This plan will prohibit the low est common denominator growth patterns we have, he said. It will encourage visionary leadership for growth into the next generation. WHITNEY WILLARD /STAFF GRAPHIC ON THE WAY The Wellness Way Sector Plan has to clear several hurdles before it breaks ground. On April 22, the Lake County Com mission meets with the City of Clermont to discuss the plan. In June, the commission votes on the plan. If approved, the plan goes to the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity for review and comments. A branding and marketing campaign will then take place to advertise the plan, inviting developers to submit pro posals. 91 19 44 19 27 441 33 50 27 LEESBURG TAVARES MOUNT DORA UMATILLA GROVELAND CLERMONT N Wellness Way Sector Plan WELLNESS FROM PAGE A1 Staff Report A Lake County Tax Col lectors Ofce ofcial is calling the use of new software, which stream lines the tourist tax re turn process for local businesses, a win-win for those taxpayers. Instead of submitting Tourist Development Tax payments and paper re turns by mail, they are now processed online via a secure web portal called TouristExpress, of ce Chief Deputy David Jordan said in a press re lease. The system saves both the Tax Collectors Ofce, and the business es in Lake County, time and money, Jordan said. In fact, local businesses and users can save up to $30 each time they use the program, Jordan noted. The program incor porates a system that is as efcient as it is easy to use, he said. Jordan said the Tax Col lectors Ofce worked with its tax system soft ware vendor, Grant Street Group, in order to streamline the tourist tax return process at no cost to the residents of Lake County. The program is available 24 hours a day for businesses to report and remit Tourist Devel opment Taxes. For more information, businesses can register by going to www.lake.coun ty-taxes.com/tourist or contact the Lake Coun ty Tax Collectors Ofce at 352-253-2117 TAVARES Tourist tax return process streamlined

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Wednesday, March 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3 PHOTOS BY ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Boy Scout/Cub Scout Pack 957 of Clermont, led by Mark Heyl and Ann Sheridan, held its 2014 Pinewood Derby races at Lowes of Clermont. Lowes sponsored a new digital track to clock the speed of each car to the 100th of a second. The pack, in its fourth year, started out with 12 boys and now has over 50 members. More than 30 cars competed in the race, with Logan Justynski coming in rst, Jimmy Pecorilli placing second and Cameron Cladwell nishing third. Best in Show was awarded to Nicolas Ferdico. The pack meets Thursdays at 6:30 p.m. at Sawgrass Elementary School. PINEWOOD DERBY LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com The Florida Department of Education will not ne Lake County schools for class-size violations because the dis trict conducted a self-audit and corrected its numbers on its own. The district determined, based on the audit, that they needed to submit updat ed data, said Cheryl Etters, spokeswoman for the FL DOE, in an email. They did so within the appeal win dow. They were never out of compliance. During a press conference in February, Superintendent Susan Moxley called for an independent review of all schools in the district to de termine whether any classsize violations were know ingly made. This follows the determi nation that six school prin cipals broke the law by inac curately reporting their class sizes to the state. During the appeals pro cess, the district submitted data revisions that resulted in 64.45 full-time equivalent stu dents out of compliance and a reduction of $191,174 in the class size operating categor ical allocation, wrote Lin da Champion, deputy com missioner for the FDOE, in a letter to the superintendent. Subsequent to the data revi sions, the unexpected growth adjustments resulted in no nancial adjustment to the dis tricts class size categorical operating allocation. Moxley said in an email the school had an increase of 401.42 full-time equiv alent (FTE) over what the state projected. School Board members voted 3-1 recently to ap prove a $20,000 contract with Carr, Riggs and Ingram LLC to review the school dis tricts class-size compliance policies and procedures. Board members Debbie Stivender, Rosanne Brande burg and Tod Howard vot ed to approve the contract. Kyleen Fischer dissented and Mathias was absent. Several School Board members previously said while the costs of the in dependent review are nec essary to address whether principals knowingly co erced teachers to falsify their class rosters during FTE week, when schools are re quired to provide an accu rate count of student enroll ment to the state. By Florida law, pub lic schools are not permit ted to exceed certain classsize limits: 18 students per class in grades prekindergar ten through grade 3, 22 per class in grades 4 through 8 and 25 in grades 9 through 12. Schools that violate the class-size limits are subject to nes. Simone Maduro-Ferguson, a teacher at Lake Minneola High School, recently tipped off the state about the classsize violations. In her complaint, she claims she was asked to re move kids from her class roster during FTE counting week. School district ofcials subsequently launched an investigation and found ad ditional reporting problems in ve other schools. TAVARES State will not fine Lake County over class-size violations

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 26, 2014 T he recent news that Florida schools will mandate instruction in cursive writing next school year was a head scratcher, principally because many of us werent aware schools arent teaching this most basic skill. In reality, schools havent quit teaching cur sive completely. The state Board of Education currently requires that students begin learning cursive writing in the third grade, but the pol icy isnt explicit. Individual school districts de termine how much to emphasize cursive. But some school administrators admit there has been a signicant shift away from it to ac commodate anti-drug and anti-bullying in struction now required by the state. One par ent told Daily Commercial Staff Writer Millard Ives last week that her fth grader didnt start learning cursive until she pulled her out of public school, and another said her child couldnt sign his name. It might seem progressive at some level to de-emphasize handwriting in favor of more contemporary skills. This generation is grow ing up in the technology age, after all, and so much of their communication occurs through keyboards. And yet the entire business world still re quires this skill. You cant apply for a mortgage, get a drivers license or ll out a basic job ap plication without signing your name. We have to wonder about an education sys tem that skimps on instruction for such a fun damental skill. That, and the recent revelation that most schools in Lake County wont give any child a grade less than 50 in hopes of im proving students chances of passing, gives us reason to pause and reect on the direction of public education. Schools exist to pass knowledge to children, to teach them critical thinking skills and to help them learn to socialize. But t hey also exist to prepare students for the adult world, where they will need basic skills to compete in the job market and where merit is rewarded. When we fail to provide adequate instruc tion in something as basic as cursive writing, and when we give students signicant handi caps that enable them to pass without putting forth strong effort, we impede their growth and diminish their chances of success later. That is not to say that the public education system is failing. It continues to produce some of the brightest minds in the world. But at a time when educators are forced to adapt to changing cultural and social norms, they would be wise to carefully assess what skills and values remain relevant in todays world and continue to teach those aggressively. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD ........................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST O PINION WHATS YOUR OPINION? The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the ed itor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be origi nal, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Letters to the Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711 By fax to: 352-394-8001 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. GUEST COLUMNS If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OUR VIEW S OUTH LAKE PRESS Your community newspaper for more than 100 years. 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001 The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Flori da 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region. All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Keeping education relevant and challenging Progress has a price I wanted to say what a good article it was on Wildwood being a boom town and that many people do not realize that The Villages isnt the only grow ing area. Progress is going faster and faster. The concern is the added drain on the aquifer, not only from many thousands of new homes in Central Florida but from the granting of per mits to bottlers of water. We are going to be begging other states for water in time. Not in my time because Im 82 years old, but it will come sooner than later. BROOKY PETERS | Wildwood LETTER of the WEEK BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL New buildings are being added to Brownwood Paddock Square in Wildwood. OTHER VOICES F lorida has a proud recent history of strong open gov ernment laws, and so it is appropriate as the nation cele brates Sunshine Week to raise awareness about the impor tance of government in the sunshine, that the Sunshine State remains a leader in ensur ing public access to the deal ings and decision-making of its elected and appointed ofcials. It is also appropriate that last week the Florida Senate moved along Senate bill 1648 that would strengthen Flori das Sunshine Law. A nal vote is expected next week. While our states Sunshine Law and Open Government laws pro vide broad access to both pub lic records and meetings, there are always efforts afoot in the Legislature to weaken them, as there are this year. But SB 1648 has been praised by open government advocates as one of the more meaningful advances in Floridas Sunshine Law since the 1990s. Among other things, it would limit fees for record searches so govern ment ofcials could not intim idate people through overpric ing. It also would dene more clearly what records are ex empt, based on court rulings. And, an element of SB 1648 that is maybe its most import ant one, is that it would require training on public records laws for all public employees. We urge the Senate, then the House, to approve SB 1648 and its House counterpart, HB 1151, to further the cause of providing relatively easy and affordable access to city, county and state public records. It is important for not only the news media but everyday citizens to have access to information about how their government is doing the peo ples business and why. Simply, without an informed citizenry, government cannot be held ac countable or responsive. James Madison, the father of the Constitution whose birth day on Sunday marked the be ginning of Sunshine Week, put it this way: A popular govern ment without popular informa tion or the means of acquiring it, is but a prologue to a farce, or a tragedy, or perhaps both. Knowledge will forever govern ignorance, and a people who mean to be their own governors must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives. Madison would undoubted ly be amazed at not only the amount of government that ex ists today but the amount of in formation about our government that is available. The abundance and relative access to public in formation is a tribute to, rst, technology, and, second, the ide als of the Sunshine Law and the vigilance of its supporters. Awareness and support for open government, of course, should not be limited to a sin gle week a year. How govern ment regulates our daily lives, protects our community and spends our money affects our daily life. Making sure such de cisions are made in the open and not in back rooms is the only way we the people can be sure to have a say in them. From Ocala.com. Celebrating the Sunshine How government regulates our daily lives, protects our community and spends our money affects our daily life. Making sure such decisions are made in the open and not in back rooms is the only way we the people can be sure to have a say in them.

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Wednesday, March 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5 Tour and educate yourself on options available in Clermont when your loved ones are no longer able to live and provide care for themselves. This tour is led by Dr. Marholin D.O., Dr. Sam M.D. and C.O.R.E. Florida Licensed trained administrator to give you objective guidance & direction in a non-threatening and no sale pressure environment. per person TOUR INCLUDES:Breakfast, Lunch and Snack Dr. MarholinWE WILL COVER continuing care based on different needs. from independent living, Assisted Nursing & Hospice. Utilizing resources to maintain your best quality of life and provide in the home. rfntbrrrt 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 less than 12 mph or if they stopped behind the white line at an in tersection. This (installing the cameras) is the big gest mistake and the city never educated the public properly before doing it, Ceballos said. Since the camer as became operation al on Jan. 3, roughly 90 percent of the citations have been for right-onred turns. At the City Council meeting in February, some 59 drivers com plained about their right-on-red tickets and Gray asked Police Chief Charles Broadway to review those citations. Broadway later rescind ed 51 of those, causing Gray to call for all cita tions to be reviewed. The city recently in stalled signs at inter sections to warn driv ers about turning right on red with cameras present. Broadway said of cers are seeing fewer vi olations, so something is working. We believe more drivers are now obey ing the law, he said. We continue to em phasize that driv ers should stop before turning right on red. Ceballos said he sim ply avoids the camer as by taking alternative routes and suspects other drivers are doing that, too. TICKETS FROM PAGE A1 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millard.ives@dailycommercial.com I t is a dying art that will be resuscitated next school year. The emphasis on cursive writing has di minished over the years but will be mak ing a comeback in Florida elementary schools in 2014-15 af ter suggestions from a number of teachers and parents convinced the states Board of Ed ucation to support this. Kristi Patterson said her 5th-grade daugh ter didnt start learn ing cursive writing un til she pulled her out of public schools and enrolled her into Lake Montessori in Lees burg this school season a private school that starts to teach cursive to students in the rst grade. I couldnt believe she couldnt write in cur sive, said Patterson, looking at her daugh ter, Ryann Price, study slabs of cursive letters during an after-school lesson last week. Tiffany Cowie, a spokeswoman with the states Department of Education, said cur rently the Board of Ed ucation dictates that students should be gan learning cursive writing in the third grade, but the policy isnt explicit. Individual school districts deter mine how much to em phasize cursive. Like typewriters and cassette tapes, cur sive has fallen by the wayside in the digital era and focus has in creased on how well students can use a key board. Experts on cur sive handwriting say the written form has been hit hard because its viewed as formal. Cheryl Bloom, owner of Blooms Baking House & Restaurant in down town Leesburg, said the bulk of cakes she dec orates are in print, es pecially for children. A cake for a wedding an niversary is one of the rare orders she has re cently decorated with cursive writing etched in the frosting. Print is just easier to read, said the 53-yearold Bloom, who learned how to write in cursive in the rst grade. The lack of cur sive taught in schools was brought in to liv ing rooms last year during the murder tri al of George Zimmer man, who shot and killed Sanford teen Trayvon Martin. Many in the courtroom were shocked when Martins 19-year-old friend, Ra chel Jeantel, admitted on the stand that she could not read a docu ment a lawyer handed to her because it was written in cursive. Although it is debat able which is the fast est, writing in print or cursive, it does take more time to learn cur sive. At Beacon College, a small private school in Leesburg that is ex clusively for students with dyslexia, ADHD or other specic learning disabilities students arent required to write in cursive, even when signing their name. It can be difcult for them, said Dr. Shelly Chandler, the schools vice-president of aca demic affairs. Cowie said cursive writing did not appear in the Common Core standards for schools the state adopted in 2010. It was left up to individual school dis tricts to determine how much of an emphasis to put on the writing art form in their curric ulum. Debbie Moftt, di rector of K-12 curricu lum for Sumter County Schools, said the time devoted to school pro grams such as drug and bullying education, has decreased the teaching of cursive writing in her schools. At a Sumter Coun ty Chamber of Com merce meeting last week, where Moftt discussed the need of cursive writing lessons in schools, one parent complained about his child not being able to sign his name in cur sive. Moftt said the lack of cursive writ ing also prevents chil dren from being able to read important histori cal documents written in cursive. Its important that our students know what they are looking at and reading when shown one of these documents written in cursive, Moftt said. Researchers say cur sive also appears to im prove reading and oth er learning skills. Cowie added it helps children to read cherished cards and letters from grandma and grand pa. Hugo Hormazabal, headmaster at Lake Montessori, said cur sive writing helps de velop motor skills and hand-eye coordination. It helps students de velop more condence in their writing, he said. Apparently, par ents statewide share the same concerns. In a 2013 online poll by Harris Interactive, 79 percent of adults and 68 percent of children said cursive should still be taught. Keyboarding skills, not cursive writing, are part of the Common Core academic stan dards adopted last year by more than 40 states, including Florida. But as Florida tweaks its Com mon Core, parents and educators asked at pub lic forums and through email that cursive still be taught, and state ed ucation leaders listened. The request for more instructions on cursive comprised a big bulk of the 19,000 comments on the Common Core. As a result, Cowie said the states Board of Ed ucation has adopted cursive writing stan dards for fourthand fth-grade classrooms in 2014-15, with the ex pectation that students should be able to write legibly and uently in cursive upon gradua tion from elementary school. Sitting in a Lake Mon tessori classroom, Lau ren Newman, cur riculum director for the school, displayed similar looking cur sive letters dotted on slabs in front of Price. Then Newman turned around and had the stu dent practice drawing the letters with her n gers on her back before writing them on paper. Price seemed eager to learn the writing form. This is fun, Price said. Source: parentingsquad.com and education.cu-portland.edu Cursive writing will return next school year MILLARD K. IVES / DAILY COMMERCIAL Lauren Newman, curriculum director for Lake Montessori, uses slabs of cursive letters with 5th-grader Ryann Price during an after-school lesson.

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A6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 26, 2014

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10% OFFAll options with this couponrffnntb B1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 26, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTS SPORTS EDITOR ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE .............................. 365-8268 FAX .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL ......... sports@dailycommercial.com S PORTS and LEISURE FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com The second annual Tava res High School football sh ing tournament will be held April 19 at Buzzard Beach in Tavares. Registration is $50 per boat with a maximum of two anglers per boat. Additional anglers can be added for $35. Deadline for registration is April 16 and there will be a $10 fee for late registration. Fishing hours for the tour nament will be from 7 a.m. until 3 p.m. Weigh-in will be gin at 3 p.m. at Lakeside Bait and Tackle, 1000 W. Burleigh Blvd. in Tavares. A $300 cash prize will go to the winning team, with sec ond place get ting $150. The third-place team will receive shing gear. The prize for landing the tourna ments Big Fish will be a $100 gift card. Checks should be made out to the Tava res High School Athletic Boosters. Anglers can register at Tavares High School or at Lakeside Bait and Tackle. The tournament is one of many fundraising activities by the booster club to raise money for the schools ath letic programs. For information, email Ta vares football coach Chris Gauntlett at gauntlettc@ lake.k12..us. Bulldogs football team sponsors fishing tournament TAVARES FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Montverde Academys Cruyff Court has become a popular fa cility for area youngsters. Since opening in January, the miniature soccer eld has pro vided students at the school and various groups with a place to rene their soccer skills or get some exercise. It also has become a place for youth groups to come togeth er and develop a love for the sport. The Soccer Institute of Mont verde Academy (SIMA) recent ly helped elementary school members of the Boys and Girls Clubs of Central Floridas Walt Disney World Clubhouse to the Cruyff Court and led them through a variety of drills. For many of the youngsters, it marked their introduction to soccer under the tutelage of Montverde Academy Athletic Director and boys soccer coach Mike Potempa. In addition, SIMA welcomed a group from the Boys and Girls Club of Clermont recently, which included children with Down syndrome. Potempa said he already has noticed how word has spread about the Cruyff Court and how it is helping local youth build an interest in soccer. Its great for us to come out with children of the communi ty and provide an exercise and play the game we have a pas sion for, Potempa said. Most importantly, its great to see so many youngsters having fun and spend an hour or hourand-a-half with smiles on their faces. (The Cruyff Court) has allowed Montverde Academy to give back something to the community and children from surrounding regions of Central Florida learn more about the game of soccer. Its really great to see them having fun. The visit by the Boys and Girls Clubs of Central Flori da actually served a number of functions, according to Yesenia Maysonet, program director for the organization. She said it allowed many of the young sters an opportunity to travel away from their homes for the rst time, and a chance to learn Montverde Academys Cruyff Court proving to be popular PHOTO COURTESY OF MONTVERDE ACADEMY Montverde Academy Athletic Director and boys soccer coach Mike Potempa speaks with and instructs area youth using the schools Cruyff Court facility. Since opening in January, the miniature soccer eld has become a popular addition to the school. Its great for us to come out with children of the community and provide an exercise and play the game we have a passion for. Most importantly, its great to see so many youngsters having fun and spend an hour or hour-anda-half with smiles on their faces. (The Cruyff Court) has allowed Montverde Academy to give back something to the community and children from surrounding regions of Central Florida learn more about the game of soccer. Mike Potempa Montverde Academy Athletic Director and boys soccer coach FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com The future of the Eu stis High School girls basketball program appears to be bright, considering the recent success of the middle school team. Eustis Middle Schools girls team completed the 2013-14 season with an undefeated record and powered through the postseason, claim ing the county cham pionship with a 53-30 win against Gray Mid dle School. Honestly, I was told we werent going to be good this season, said Eustis coach Mandy Mapp. I was shocked when I was told that. I always thought our girls had potential. Mapp, a former stand out at Tavares High School, said she spent a lot time in the presea son teaching her players how to play the game, since many had never played before. She also concentrated on con ditioning and teaching them how to react in game situations. They were nervous, and it took some time to get used to playing against other teams, Mapp said. Mapp said she made certain every player on the team had a role. Some were called on to shoot 3-pointers and others cleaned up in the paint. She also counted on her players to grow into a cohesive unit. They all worked so hard to help us suc ceed, Mapp said. They showed up to Middle school girls basketball finishes unbeaten, county champions EUSTIS FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Professional golf comes to Lake County next week. The Lake County Classic, a stop on the Nation al Golf As sociation Profes sional Golf Tour will be played at Harbor Hills Coun try Club in Lady Lake this week, the highlight event of a week chock full of golf-related activ ities. A 72-hole event, the Lake County Classic, is set to begin at 7:30 a.m. on Thursday and will conclude on Sunday. In addition, an open qual ier, a free clinic and a pro-am is scheduled for the week. As is the case with all NGA tour stops, admis sion for the Lake Coun ty class is free and open to the public. The main purpose LADY LAKE NGA Tour coming to Harbor Hills Country Club SEE CRUYFF | B2 SEE EUSTIS | B3 SEE TOUR | B3

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B2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 26, 2014 Outdoors Fishing 352-365-8268 sports@dailycommercial.com www.dailycommercial.com SANDYS BAIT AND TACKLE | TAVARES Crappie are being caught by spi der-rigging rods baited with pink or ch artreuse jigs tipped with min nows. Lake Dora has been partic ularly good. Bass are biting well, they have moved into deeper wa ter. They are being caught on RatL-Traps and soft plastics in June bug or green pumpkin colors. Shell cracker are starting to bite on red worms and crickets. Bill Brook er and Mike Strauss won the open bass tournament sponsored by San dys Bait& Tackle last Saturday with 19.49 pounds. Vern Kemp and Ran dy Hamrick took second place with 15.25 pounds. Dick Fonda and Matt Gee claimed dual honors with third place at 14.04 pounds and big sh at 7.59 pounds. Sandys bass tour nament, open to all, is held on the 3rd Saturday monthly at the buz zard beach ramp. Sandys next reg ular bass tournament will be an open tournament held April 19 with the weigh-in at Buzzard Beach at 2:30pm. Any questions about the tournament call the shop at 352742-0036. PINE ISLAND CAMP | FRUITLAND PARK Several patrons are catching bass on minnows, shrimp and worms. Pine Island has a full supply of live baits, including grass shrimp, as well as a variety of articial baits. RV sites, campsites, boats and slips are available for rental. Check out the restaurant before going out or com ing off the lake. PALM GARDENS | TAVARES Specks are still being caught on mostly minnows and some jigs. They have moved outside of the grass and shorelines and are back in the deeper water, but could still go to the beds one more time if nice weather prevails. Bass and striper action has fallen off. Palm Gardens has pontoon boats available to rent. NELSONS FISH CAMP | WEIRSD ALE Speck activity has been very good; they are biting on minnows and jigs. Bass have been slow with the most recent weather change. The bass bedding appears to have subsid ed and they have moved back out into open water. Come check out the next generation bass in pond by Nelsons. BLACK BASS RESORT-FISH CAMP Guests are catching bass and crappie. Several large bass have been caught in Haynes Creek at the locks. The bass are hitting on arti cial baits primarily, while the crap pie are biting on minnows and jigs. Fish are starting to bite in Lake Yale. Minnows and worm sales have been very good. Small boats can launch from Black Bass boat ramps. SORRENTO BAIT AND TACKLE Crappie shing has been good, weather permitting. Lake Dora and the Apopka-Beauclaire canal have been noteworthy. So good in fact, limits caught on jigs tipped min nows are being reported. Good jig colors have been chartreuse, or ange and hot pink. Quite a few crap pie are being caught in Lake Mon roe, Lake Dora, Lake Beauclaire and Lake Carlton. Fish are on the beds and biting on jigs, lizards, crawdads, small worms and small baits in gen eral. Remember to practice catch/ release with bedding bass. Colors of baits for bass are crawdad colors, black/blue or watermelon red. It is beautiful weather to get out on the lake and catch a few. Stop in and get the latest daily report. LAKES REPORT a weekly update from CHERYL STALEY-ARCHER rfntn b nn b n ttn rf nntnt bnn n b t tt ttt ntnnt rf f rf f tnt rfttt btt ttn b ttn t t t t t tttt SUBMITTED PHOTO Leesburg High School girls soccer players Chelsea Mudd (left) and Sarah McKinney signed national letters of intent recently with Polk State College in Winter Haven. AREA STUDENT-ATHLETES SIGN SUBMITTED PHOTO South Lake bowler Katie Stark (third from left) the 2012 state champion, signed with Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn. more about a game that is considered the most popu lar sport in the world. Maysonet also said it in troduced the children to the concept of an international private school. We serve elementa ry, middle school and high school youth in Orange, Os ceola, Seminole and Brevard counties, said Maysonet. We have 13 tradition al clubs and 13 middle school-specic clubs, with programs that range in inter ests in the arts, technology, sports, tness and healthy habits. This trip exposed our youth to nearly all of those interests. The Cruyff Court at Mont verde Academy is the only one of its kind in the Unit ed States and is one of only 180 scattered throughout the world, according to the Johan Cruyff Foundation (JCF). The court is, essentially, a miniature soccer eld de signed to help children learn the game and improve their physical tness. While it is used predomi nantly as a soccer facility at Montverde Academy, Cruyff Courts have been used to help disadvantaged youth and youngsters with disabil ities by providing an area for others sports, such as wheel chair hockey. All Cruyff Court facilities promote healthy living and provide opportunities for youngsters to improve their physical health and personal development to increase ac tivity and combat childhood obesity, Potempa said. Started in 1997, the JCF was started by Cruyff, a Eu ropean soccer legend and standout in the 1970s and 1980s in the now-defunct North American Soccer League. The idea for the JCF, Cruyff said, began when he was playing in the NASL. A neighbor had a child with Down syndrome who was always alone, watching oth er kids playing and having fun. Over time, Cruyff said he befriended the boy and taught him basic soccer skills to help him become more active. As time passed, Cruyff said, he began playing soc cer with the rest of the kids in the neighborhood. Through the JCF, Cruyff said he has realized his dream of giving more chil dren, including those with disabilities, the opportuni ty to play together through sport while making a con tribution to healthy living, quality of life and values. The JCF also supports sports projects for children with disabilities and organizes unique sporting events for youth, according to the JCF website. Potempa said SIMA oper ates independently from the Montverde Academy boys soccer team and is accessible to all the academys students. SIMA was established as an elite-level soccer-specic training experience for any one who possesses the pas sion to challenge themselves at the highest level academ ically and athletically, Po tempa said. It also provides a profes sional training environment for any passionate athlete with the desire to work hard and improve. CRUYFF FROM PAGE B1

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Wednesday, March 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B3 HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. practices at 6 a.m. and for practices that were held during holiday breaks. Our girls put forth the ef fort to become the best they could be. By the time the postseason rolled around, Mapp said her team was ring on all cylinders. All the work they put in early in the season, she said, paid off with an impressive run to the champi onship game. No other team had the talent or played with the de termination that our girls had, Mapp said. They did a great job all season from start to nish and earned the right to call them selves an unde feated team. They showed the kind of effort and work ethic that will win on the basketball court and in the classroom. EUSTIS FROM PAGE B1 of the NGA Tour is to prepare our players to move on to the Web.com and PGA Tours, said Robin L. Wa ters, NGA Tour president. By adding another top-notch course like Harbor Hills Country Club, our players will have yet an other opportunity to prepare them selves for the next level. The weeklong presence of the NGA begins Monday with a qualier round for players who arent previ ously entered. On Tuesday, a free golf clinic will by offered and a one-day pro-am tournament on Wednesday will cap off the list of activities head ing into the Lake County Classic. Like most pro-ams, the Lake County Classic Pro-Am will consist of teams made up of three amateurs and one NGA professional compet ing in a scramble format that often produces an array of exciting shots and clutch putts. The NGA Tour is the No. 3 Mens pro fessional tour in the U.S. after the PGA and Web.com Tours, and has proven to be the top developmental tour by PGA and Web.com Tour Professionals. The NGA Tour has helped hun dreds of professionals acquire their cards for the PGA TOUR, European, Web.com, and Champions Tour. On average, more than 40 percent of ev ery PGA Tour eld and more than 60 percent of every Web.com Tour eld have played on the NGA Tour. In fact, NGA alumni have won an incredible 15 Major championships. NGA Tour alumni include: 2012 Masters champion Bubba Watson; 2011 PGA Championship winner Keegan Bradley; 2010 PGA TOUR Player of the Year and 2003 US Open champion Jim Furyk; 2009 British Open champion Stewart Cink; 2009 U.S. Open champion Lucas Glover; 2007 Masters champion Zach John son; 2003 PGA champion Shaun Mi cheel; 2003 British Open champi on Ben Curtis; two-time U.S. Open champion Lee Janzen; British Open and PGA champion John Daly. Founded in 1988, the NGA Tour predates the Web.com Tour as the longest running developmental tour in golf. In 2013, the NGA Tour was awarded ve Web.com Tour event exemptions and two PGA Tour event exemptions Reno-Tahoe Open and the Sanderson Farms Champi onship the most of any tour in the history of developmental golf. Harbor Hills Country Club is a par72 championship layout designed by Lloyd Clifton. The course has a 72.5 rating and carries a 126 slope rating. Area ofcials welcome the NGA to Lake County and hope the tourna ment becomes an annual affair. Lake County is a golfers paradise and we are thrilled to welcome the NGA to Harbor Hills, one of the coun tys premier golf course, said Robert Chandler, director of Lake Countys Economic Development and Tourism Department. TOUR FROM PAGE B1 Just like it led them to winning the champi onship. For Mapp, the season also represented a pe riod of growth, as well. In addition to teach ing her players, Mapp learned the nuances of coaching in her rst season on the bench. It proved to be an op portunity that could make Mapp a xture on the sidelines for years to come. These girls were a joy to coach. The entire experience of working with them as a coach was a great learning ex perience for me, and I enjoyed it very much. Members of the Eus tis Middle School girls basketball team were: Iberia Smith, Nylah Brown, Nijah Brown, Destiny Spikes, Brian na Hall, Madison Toft, Kianna Lester, Kadaria Walker, Amaya Tay lor, Rashe Morris and Ajjaria Washington.

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B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 26, 2014 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 7 25 34 47 67 13 18 31 59 74 9 21FREE SPACE53 72 2 16 42 48 63 5 29 39 52 68ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N I B O G BINGO B I N G O SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Ellen Rochat WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! N 39 FREE N 42 N 31 N 34

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Wednesday, March 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B5

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B6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 26, 2014 CHAMBER AWARDS & NEWS www.southlakechamber-fl.com Julia Buddendorff, a senior at Montverde Academy was named the February 2014 Chamber Student of the Month. The sponsor of the award, Wesley Reed from Ameriprise Financial, recognizes South Lake students for their outstanding academic and volunteer endeavors. Ms. Buddendorff is involved in many activities at Montverde Academy such as the STEM Club, the MVA swim varsity team (captain), Key Club, and more. She has a 4.30 GPA in honors courses and has been accepted at UNC Chapel Hill, Florida Atlantic University, Florida State University, University of Miami, and William & Mary College. Congratulations and well-deserved for this honor! Surrounding Julia, pictured from L to R: Montverde Academy Headmaster Kasey Kesselring, parents Kristine & Dr. Kenneth Buddendorff, Wesley Reed from Ameriprise Financial. Dr. Kasey Kesselring was awarded the Chamber GEM of the Hills Award for February 2014. Since he became the Headmaster for Montverde Academy in 1999, the school has grown from 103 students to well over 1000 and has become a one of the top college preparatory schools in the country and world. He has served the South Lake Community in many different ways such as the 2012 Chairman of the South Lake Chamber, the Chairman of the South Lake Hospital District Board of Trustees, Chairman of the American Cancer Societys Lake-Sumter Cattle Barons Ball, and Cochair for the Boy Scouts of America Golden Eagles Dinner for Lake County. Dr. Kesselring is pictured with 2014 South Lake Chamber Chair Wendy Terry.The 20th Annual Chamber Ambassadors Breakfast was recently held at the First United Methodist Church in downtown Clermont. The event is held each year to celebrate the volunteer efforts of the Chamber Ambassador Committee in welcoming new businesses to the South Lake Community. Kathy Scherer from Centennial Bank is the Ambassador Chair for 2014 and was welcomed in by the 2013 Chair Cuqui Whitehead. There is also a festive atmosphere for the event as sponsors compete in a themed table-decorating contest this years winner was the Greater Clermont Cancer Foundation. The Chamber Ambassadors along with many guests & fellow members welcomed Store Manager Brad Montgomery and his team from Advance Auto Parts to their newly built store location located at 2655 East Hwy 50 in Clermont (SE corner of Hwy 50 & Hancock Rd.) The Chamber Ambassadors welcomed Dr. Lorna Bennett & her great staff from Bennett Pediatrics to their new location at 365 Citrus Tower Blvd in Clermont. Feel free to stop by and welcome Dr. Bennett or you can also see her at www.bennettpediatrics.com. The Chamber Ambassadors welcomed Pastor Juan Rivera with Better Life Worship Center along with his Associate Pastors, staff, and members of their congregation to their new location at 332 Mohawk Road in Clermont. Feel free to stop by and welcome them or you can also see them online at www.betterlifeworship.com. Despite the ironic weather conditions at the time, a large gathering of Chamber Ambassadors, visiting girls lacrosse players, elected officials, and community leaders celebrated Florida Tourism Day and the opening of the beautiful NTC/LiveWell multipurpose fields located on Legends Way in Clermont. The celebration also served to highlight and spread awareness of the many positive economic impacts which the Sports and Tourism sector brings to our South Lake Community. Bridgette Bennett and her staff from Bennett Law Center were welcomed to the Chamber at their offices located at 302 W. Orange St. in Groveland. Immediately following the ribbon cutting, Bennett also hosted the March Chamber Business After Hours where fellow members enjoyed a wonderful evening of food, drink, music, and networking outside of their offices on the shore of Lake David. You can see them at www.bennettlawcenter.com. The Chamber Ambassadors were a part of the Grand Opening festivities held at the newly constructed Benton House assisted living and memory care facility located at 16401 Good Hearth Blvd. Clermont FL 34711. Benton House corporate officials were also on hand to welcome the dozens of people who attended to take guided tours of the facility. A buffet brunch was also served. You can see their beautiful facility online and you can also set up your own tour at www.bentonhouse.com.

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Ann Dupee REMEMBER WHEN A weekly column that reprints some of the more interest ing news stories that have ap peared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press. C1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 26, 2014 www.southlakepress.com C OMMUNITY Proudly serving CLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWS STAFF WRITER ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 EMAIL ..... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com HOMETOWN: Winter Garden OCCUPATION: Cosmetologist FAMILY: Lisa Rhoades and William Ray What do you enjoy most about south Lake County? The laid back country atmo sphere, meeting new people at the wine walk, festivals and work ing at Totally Unique Organic Day Spa. 1) If you had to summarize your philosophy of life in one sen tence, what would it be? A forever-changing festival of lov ing, learning and growing as a stylist and esthetician. 2) Name a person or incident youve come across recently thats touched you in some way. Why did this person or incident impress you so much? Seeing my aunt Norma make it through breast cancer has made me realize you should never take life for granted. 3) How does what you do contrib ute to the welfare of the area? Working at Totally Unique helps me bring business and new people to the community. 4) Name one of your greatest ac complishments so far. Buying a house and getting a job at Totally Unique Organic Day Spa, where I work with amazing co workers. 5) Whats something youve al ways wanted to do but havent yet? Go on a European cruise. 6) What advice would you give to people who want to help out in the community? Whatever you give in life, you get back tenfold. FROM THE FILES | 25 YEARS AGO 1989 Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press Meet Your NEIGHBOR JAMIE RHOADES K yle Promotions, Clermonts spe cialty advertising and printing company, has moved from West gate Ofce Plaza near City Hall to 748 West Ave. Additional seating and better stadium ac cess will greet fans as the Kansas City Roy als open their second spring training sea son at Boardwalk and Baseball, just south of I-4 on U.S. Highway 27. Myth About Beef from Gatorland Meats at 627 8th St., in Clermont. Myth: Beef will not t into a low-calorie diet. Fact: Three ounces of cooked, lean beef con tains only 189 calories. In comparison, three ounces of roasted chick en without skin con tains 162 calories, three ounces of fried chicken with skin contains 246 calories and three ounc es of pork contains 198 calories. Bay Lake Beef and Swine 4-H Clubs new ofcers are: Jerry Os teen, president; Man dy Carter, treasurer; Deann Carlton, sec retary; Joe Symmes, reporter. Other club members are Clay Burns, Missy Carter, Jamie and Julie Eley, Matthew and Ryan Godwin, Jeremy and Kristy Newman, Steven Park, Andy Tomlinson, Jayson Tootle. Spon sors are Linda and Ter rell Newman. Where citrus was once king, grapes might just be heir ap parent, especially if the new Lakeridge Win ery and Vineyards on US 27 is as success ful as owners plan it to be. Community leaders from south Lake Coun ty enjoyed a pre-open ing tour and wine tast ing in late January as the winery played host to the Clermont Cham ber of Commerce and South Lake and Cler mont Kiwanis Clubs. Once completed, the winery will feature a 50-foot wooden horse shoe bar inside its main foyer. The second oor foyer will double as a museum, featur ing artifacts and pho tographs from Lake Countys history. Twen ty-one acres of vines are planted to date. Jo Fleming, a native of Miami Beach, pro vides the Friends of Cooper Memorial Li brary display. Shown are items on which pressed owers have been attached, includ ing cards, pictures, tal lies, bookmarks and candles. The owers are dried and arranged on the desired surface, covered with sheer rice paper and then brushed with diluted clear glue. Groveland City Council approved a $2 fee hike for monthly residential refuse ser vice, from $6.25 per ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com As their business has grown, Jack and Dianne Stellhorns ties to the community and the people in it, have as well. Thats because the Stellhorns own ers of Ritters Frozen Custard are cel ebrating 10 years serving south Lake residents the frozen concoction many in the area have gotten to know well from visiting the store and sampling various avors at events and gather ings theyve worked throughout the years. We started back in 2004 and think ing back, there was dirt everywhere you looked. We were the rst store in Hancock Village and there was no through-road on Hancock going north. Weve seen it grow from that, Jack Stellhorn said. Diane Stellhorn said she loves the feel of Clermont. I grew up in a small town in Indi ana and being in Clermont reminds so much of it, she said. Ritters is located at 2560 E. State Road 50, Suite 114. The custard has an ice-cream quality to it, but Jack said its different because of the much low er air quantity in it. The custard ends up with less than 10 percent air quantity because the process we use allows us to control it compared to making soft serve, which usually contains close to 100 percent air, Jack said previously. It makes a difference and you can instantly taste it in the custard because it is so creamy, rich and smooth. Jack Stellhorn also said the custard is much lower in calories than ice cream because the butter fat in the Ritters brand is less than 10 percent. A small 6-ounce has under 200 calories, and a kiddie cup only 100. The store features staples like vanil la, chocolate, strawberry and light va nilla among the 150 avors of custard, sherbets and Italian ices that rotate in depending upon the availability of in-season ingredients like fruit. Whatever they are doing is working because their store has been the high est selling in-line store in the entire Ritters/Tru Foods system for the last two years. Greg Ochiogrosso, interim presi dent and chief development ofcer of TRUFOODS, LLC the parent com pany of Ritters said he is pleased that the Stellhorns continue. We love Jack and Diane, Ochio grosso said. We have 24 operating units in the U.S. and four more in the pipeline, and of those, Jack and Diane have the number one in-line shop. SEE HISTORY | C3 CLERMONT Ritters Frozen Custard celebrating 10 years serving south Lake County LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL/ ABOVE, RIGHT: Jack and Dianne Stellhorn have owned and operated Ritters Frozen Custard on State Road 50 in Clermont for 10 years. SEE RITTERS | C3 We love Jack and Diane. We have 24 operating units in the U.S. and four more in the pipeline, and of those, Jack and Diane have the number one in-line shop. They are great people and their success underscores their passion and commitment for the Ritters brand, it reinforces the quality and longevity statement we are trying to promote as a company and we appreciate it. Greg Ochiogrosso Interim president and chief development ofcer of TRUFOODS, LLC

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C2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 26, 2014 ITS BETTER THIS WAY By JEREMY NEWTON / Edited by Will ShortzNo. 0316RELEASE DATE: 3/23/2014 ACROSS1 So over 7 Touching words? 14 Gently floats 19 Seinfeld cohort 20 1965 R&B #1 song with the repeated lyric Cant you see that Im lonely? 22 Too rich for me 23 *He bested Leonidas at Thermopylae 25 Nick of Lorenzos Oil 26 Medicinal qty. 27 Dashed ID 28 Monitor setting, for short 29 Balloon 31 *Off-roader, often 35 What an iPod plays in 36 Stuff in sacks 39 Flying fisher 40 Roughhousing 41 Jokester 44 Glassfuls in restaurantes 45 Country buggy 47 Places for studs 48 Air 49 *Annual draw for snocross fans 52 Union leader? 53 Close up 54 Like Advil or Aleve: Abbr. 55 That may be true, but 57 Its low for gas guzzlers: Abbr. 60 Home to King Harald V 62 ___ good cheer! 64 Doesnt bring up 65 *Iconic feature of comedy 69 Line at the Louvre 70 Bomb shelter? 71 Sub side, maybe 72 D.D.E. challenger 73 Revenge R Us author 75 Suffix with peace 76 Bent beam 78 Biting remark? 79 *Founder of Marvels School for Gifted Youngsters87 Of two minds 88 TALK LIKE THIS! 89 Teen headache 90 Got back to, in a way 91 Prefix with cycle 92 Give ones O.K. 93 Google datum 94 Robed performer 95 Nothing seems to go my way 97 *Frequent problem faced by algebra students 100 Pump up 102 Chichi getaway 103 A street drug, briefly 104 Rural call 107 Stoop 108 *Horror flick starring Humphrey Bogart as a mad scientist, with The 114 Something LOL-worthy 115 Water, wryly 116 Canadian coin named for a bird 117 The ___ Project (Fox comedy) 118 In hot water? 119 Thrive DOWN1 Something dirty kept in a cell? 2 ___ de la Socit 3 Complain, complain, complain 4 Kid-tested breakfast cereal 5 50/50 6 Admit it! 7 J.Los birthplace 8 Shot caller 9 Danger for Indiana Jones 10 Spring river breakup 11 Siren, say 12 Not so great 13 Member of the music industrys former Big Four 14 Part of a Napa Valley tour 15 Whack-___ 16 With 58-Down, a patient process? or a hint to two consecutive letters in the answer to each of the seven starred clues 17 What one might go for a spin in? 18 Any cha in the cha-cha-cha 21 How lines of latitude run 24 Mount Zions land: Abbr. 30 Couples 31 Scratch, say 32 Rest stop 33 The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind per H. P. Lovecraft 34 Cousin of a gazelle35 Drink with two lizards in its logo 36 Club 37 Bleah! 38 Have second thoughts about 40 Clueless and Bridget Joness Diary 42 Sponsorships 43 Serengeti prey 45 Put away for safekeeping 46 Hugs and kisses, at times 47 Paint variety 48 Type-A friend from Friends 50 One turning to the right 51 Lose everything 52 Certain bean 56 Hair-razing stuff? 57 Loud beast heard in theaters 58 See 16-Down 59 Bamboozled 61 Like gathering storm clouds 63 No-holds-barred 66 ___ and Thummim (sacred Judaic objects) 67 Need ___? (query to hitchhikers) 68 Barons blade 73 Theyre 18 to 21 74 Things for here and now 77 More pink, perhaps 80 It can be prickly 81 Jib, e.g. 82 John Candys old comedy program 83 Motor with some muscle 84 You might get stuck with them 85 Book after Galatians: Abbr. 86 Nutritional info 88 Photogs choices 92 It may help catch a fugitive 93 Like Brandos Don Corleone 94 Disappear, as a trail 96 Good heavens! 97 Eject, as froth 98 Retired govt. agent 99 Co. making arrangements 100 Dutch wheels 101 Member of the old Chero-Cola product line 102 Chop-chop! 104 Radius, e.g. 105 Seed casing 106 Jump on ice 109 Jet crew, briefly 110 Quick time-out 111 Scream at a ring 112 Bit of love talk 113 Drag 123456 78910111213 1415161718 19 20 2122 23 24 25 26 27 28 2930 3132 3334 35 363738 39 40 414243 44 4546 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 5556 57585960 6162 6364 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 7475 76 77 78 7980 8182 83848586 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 9596 97 9899 100101 102 103 104105106 107 108109 110111 112113 114 115 116 117 118 119 Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Solution on D3 Staff Report Christian Brothers Au tomotive, a fast-grow ing automotive service and repair franchise sys tem, opened a new lo cation this week at 2659 E. Highway 50 in Cler mont. Located just east of the Clermont Water Tower, directly across from Super Target, the nearly 5,000-squarefoot location includes nine service bays, as well as an upscale lob by with artwork, hard wood oors and Wi-Fi. We are excited to serve the Clermont community with integ rity and excellence, and provide the Nice Dif ference that Christian Brothers is known for, Bryce Merideth, who co-owns the new shop with his wife Shannon, said in a press release. Never again will you have to worry about being taken advantage of in the automotive in dustry. Christian Brothers Automotive provides full-service automotive diagnostic testing and evaluation, mainte nance programs and re pair work for all domes tic and foreign vehicles at each of their loca tions nationwide. All Christian Brothers Au tomotive facilities are staffed with technicians certied in automotive service excellence. The Merideths were both born and raised in Central Florida. Bryce worked for the largest rubber manufacturer in the world and was the customer service representative for their Florida commercial ac counts. Shannon cur rently works part time in a dental ofce near downtown Orlando. Opening the new Christian Brothers shop is the culmina tion of Bryces lifelong dream to own an auto motive service facility, he said. Christian Brothers Automotive features more than 120 loca tions and an additional 25 under development in 18 states, including Alabama, Arizona, Ar kansas, Colorado, Flor ida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Lou isiana, Michigan, Mis sissippi, Missouri, Ne braska, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Texas. Christian Broth ers Automotive began selling franchises in 1996 and continues to grow at a pace of 15 to 20 stores annually, the company says. For information about Christian Broth ers Automotive in Cler mont, go to www.cbac. com/store/clermontor nd them on Face book at www.facebook. com/CBAClermont. CLERMONT New auto repair shop opening SUBMITTED PHOTO Bryce Merideth co-owns Christian Brothers Automotive in Clermont with his wife Shannon. The Merideths have a 6-month-old daughter named Aubrey. Staff Report A fundraiser will be held Saturday in Groveland to help Henrietta, the ema ciated beagle/walker hound who gave birth to her puppies via Caesarean section at the Lake County An imal Services shelter last month. The 6-year-old dog was located by Ani mal Services ofcers in Umatilla, already in labor, and rushed into the shelter where veterinarian Dr. Ju lie-Anne Corda per formed the emer gency surgery to save Henrietta and her tiny puppies, Elisha Pap pacoda, county pub lic information ofcer, said in a press release. Animal Services volunteer and pho tographer Whitney Luckhart has been fostering Henriet ta ever since, and re ports Henrietta is gaining weight and perking up on her special high fat, high protein diet. Henrietta, who is be ing treated for heart worms, and her pup pies, will all be put up for adoption through the South Lake An imal League (SLAL) when they are healthy. I think she will make some family very hap py, Luckhart said. In the meantime, Luckhart has or ganized a pet pho to shoot fundraiser to benet Henrietta and her puppies. The event will be Satur day 29 at the SLAL, 4648 Baptist Island Road, Groveland. For a $10 donation, pet owners will receive a mini-photo session with their animals. TAVARES Fundraiser planned for dog found in labor PHOTO COURTESY OF LAKE COUNTY ANIMAL SERVICES Six-year-old Henrietta was located by Lake County Animal Services ofcers in Umatilla, already in labor and rushed to the shelter. SUBMITTED PHOTO February Terric Kids at Groveland Elementary School were: Madelyn Dykes, Faith Richardson, Payton Branner, Allyson Vidal, Santiago Rodriguez, Sadie Fountain, Akari Durham West, Jamarkis Harvey, Caleb Sells, Barbara Frazier, Anthony Iorio, Emilie Taylor, Malachi Akrong, Skylar Tarquine, Avalee Lane, KaMora Dorsey, Rionn Roy, Brianna Milner, Nayeli Jaimes, Kendall Brackey, Joannie Rodriguez, Sophia Carrier, Haleigh Lewis, Chelsie Hubbard, Kasey Tyson, Datcha Charles, Jaipaul Singh, Jessica Jordan, Reynaldo Morado, Adrian Gutierrez, Chandani Narain, Santos Aguilar, Denise Martinez, Carla Armas, Shayla Jenkins, Reginal Boyd, Olimey Arroyo, Andres Acosta, Sebasitan Gonell, Thomas Hopper. Principal, Kimberly Sneed-Jarvis. Kiwanians of the Club in Clermont: Fred Fallman, Dave Lofgren and Alan Garcia. GROVELAND ELEMENTARY TERRIFIC KIDS

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Wednesday, March 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C3 residence to $8.25. Clermont High School senior Stacy Spradlin won the the Victorian Pageant at the Ramada Inn in Al tamonte Springs. Imagine This was the January bulletin board theme created by Mrs. Sandra Reaves rstgrade class at Grove land Elementary. In tegrating disciplines of social studies, lan guage, creative writing, science, math, reading and art, students imag ined what it would be like if it snowed in Florida in the winter. Ed Fleming and Green Valley Coun try Clubs Tournament Committee had a new tournament. Members played the front nine twice, with handicap, to gure the low net for just one, the best nine. Reporter Betty Mohan said it was great; you played your own game and tried to better your score, but it didnt keep you from encouraging your partner. Clermonts Ricardo Lewis set the Flagler College scoring record with a 40-point perfor mance against Edward Waters at the Saints gymnasium in St. Au gustine. Honors keep rolling in for Clermont ath lete Cedric Jones, son of Mary Jones, as he closes out his career at Western Kentucky Uni versity. The most re cent award was the Most Outstanding Spe cial Team plaque for the 1988 season. Ced ric participated in the NCAA 1988 Division 1-AA quarternals and was Offensive Player of the Week in the Austin Peay game for his kick ing efforts. Jeff Ladd, cur rent president of South Lake (Break fast) Kiwanis, pre sented 1987-88 presi dent Steve Grimm with a handsome plaque. Ladd also present ed a plaque to 1986-87 president Mike Conley. Clermont Junior High Schools student publication, The Iron Feather, asked stu dents, What is the most needed facili ty for teens in Cler mont? Shawn Tier ney: movie theater and park for skaters. Melis sa McGibbon: ice skat ing palace. Angie Cost ly: a mall (with at least a Belk-Lindsay includ ed). Brett Green: wa ter park and movie theater. Christi Vance: larger, better schools. In 1929 Harry Stokes and Leonard Fields started Stokes and Fields Insurance Agen cy upstairs in the Roe Building. Fred B. Kreider bought it in January 1946, and Axel Olivenbaum was em ployed as an agent, and bought the com pany in October 1950. During the years Ol ivenbaum served on active duty with the U.S. Air Force in the Korean War, his sister, Mrs. Anna Braddock, operated the agency. In February 1966, it was purchased by the Milli can and Beseke Agency. Olivenbaums son, Glenn, joined the agency in 1971, after being discharged after ve years in the U.S. Air Force. The agen cy was incorporat ed in 1978 as Oliven baum Insurance, Inc. with Axel as president, Glenn as vice president and Ruth Harrison as secretary/treasurer. Another of Oliven baums sons, Donald, joined the agency in 1979 as an agent and became vice president in 1980. Glenn moved up to president and Axel became secretary/ treasurer. In 1980, the rm moved next door from 776 Montrose St. (now home to South Lake Art League) to 892 Montrose St. On Sep tember 1, 1981, the rm purchased Don Meeker Insurance. In 1989, Donald had just completed 20 years service in the 20th Spe cial Services Army Na tional Guard. Glenn and Don, who were active mem bers of the Cler mont-Minneola Lions Club, sold the agency and are retired. HISTORY FROM PAGE C1 They are great people and their success un derscores their pas sion and commitment for the Ritters brand, it reinforces the quali ty and longevity state ment we are trying to promote as a compa ny and we appreciate it. In early March, the Stellhorns took the mobile Ritters truck to various events, in cluding Pig on the Pond for the Kids, a signature communi ty event. Since then, they have been work ing with the Nation al Training Centers softball tournament, where they have been offering free custard to team members. The Stellhorns are planning a celebra tion for later this spring in honor of their 10-year anniver sary in Clermont. Ritters Frozen Cus tard was founded by John and Bonnie Rit ter in 1989 in Frank lin, Ind., after perfect ing their own frozen custard recipe. RITTERS FROM PAGE C1 SUBMITTED PHOTO Clermont Toastmasters would like to congratulate, left to right, Greg Antill, Best Speaker and Most Improved; Gordie Allen, Best Evaluator and Best Table Topics and Dr. Thomas Spencer, Club President, at the March 3 meeting. Clermont Toastmasters meets Mondays at 6:30 p.m. at the SDA Church at 100 Minnehaha Ave. in Clermont. Call 352-234-6495. TOASTMASTERS WINNERS

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C4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 26, 2014 CLERMONT BLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSAMILYELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time! IRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONTL Many Other Activities each week Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.org LIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLCHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm SOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary); 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.org ST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am (Rite I) 10:00 am (Rite II) 5:00 pm (Praise & Worship) Sunday School Youth Group Nursery Adult Bible Study Womens Bible Study Mens Prayer Breakfast WOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH GODINCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALE ERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for Children Groveland IRSTBAPTISTCHURCH GROVELAND Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pm MT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! MINNEOLA CONGREGATIONSMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club NEWLPRESBYTERIANCHURCH18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am TLIVINGGOD Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce Rowland MONTVERDE WOODLANDSLUTHERAN15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 am OAKLAND PRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforSouth Lake South LakeGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOMErfn tbt352-394-7121806 W. Minneola Ave.,Clermont,FL Cremation ChoicesDirect Cremation$675Plus Container Ron Becker,Director352-394-8228921 S.US Hwy 27,Minneola,FL SUBMITTED PHOTO The men and women of Kings Ridge in Clermont call themselves the Friends of Mike Conley Hospice House and recently raised $25,933 at a gala beneting the Cornerstone Mike Conley Hospice House, surpassing last years amount. Pictured from left to right are Friends of Mike Conley Hospice House President Carol Diesl, Cornerstone Hospice Foundation Regional Development Director Carol Felder and Cornerstone Hospice Foundation Executive Director Nick Buchholz. KINGS RIDGE CHECK PRESENTATION SUBMITTED PHOTO Pictured is Bill Weckerly, president of the Rotary Club of South Lake County, presenting a childrens book to be given to a local elementary school in honor of guest Jennifer Tierna, pharmacy manager at Walgreens in Clermont. Tierna spoke at the meeting on the importance of pharmacist/consumer relations in taking medications. The Rotary meets at noon every Tuesday at the Golden Corral restaurant at State Road 50 in Clermont. TIERNA GUEST AT SOUTH LAKE ROTARY

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Wednesday, March 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C5 TODAY MINNEOLA CHARTER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ONGOING REGISTRATION FOR PRE-K FOR 20142015: Call the school, 320 E. Pearl St., at 352394-2600 and ask for Marilyn Hampton for information and new registration procedures. THURSDAY SOUTH LAKE 912 PROJ ECT HOSTS KRAIG MC LANE: At 7 p.m., Cl ermont Community Center in downtown Cl ermont. McLane from the St. Johns River Wa ter Management Dis trict will address water issues in Lake County and Central Florida. SATURDAY CLERMONT KIWANIS ANNUAL CHICKEN BARBE CUE AT CLERMONT COM MUNITY CENTER: From 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. at 620 W. Montrose St., in Cl ermont. $7 per person. Proceeds provide funds for Kiwanis youth pro grams in the schools of south Lake County. For ticket information, call 352-394 6098. TUESDAY SOUTH LAKE ART LEAGUE JEWELRY WORK SHOP: Learn to make your own earrings and necklaces from 2 to 4:30 p.m., at the Cagan Art ists Boutique Studio, 16640 Cagan Cross ings Blvd., in Clermont. Class fee is $20 with a $5 materials fee. Pre-regis tration required at the studio or by calling 352638-3736. APRIL 5 EAT THE WEEDS HEALTHY AND EDIBLE NATIVE PLANTS WITH THE LAKE BEAUTYBERRY CHAPTER OF THE FLORIDA NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY: At 10 a.m., Cooper Memo rial Library, 2525 Oakley Seaver Dr., in Clermont. Free event. To place an item on the calen dar, send an email to pam.fen nimore@dailycommercial.com. Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...Totally UniqueTotally Unique is proud to be Clermonts first ORGANIC hair salon. We care about your beauty, your wellness, the environment and our community, so we use organic and sustainably harvested products whenever possible. We specialize in organic hair color, hair care products, nail and skin care lines. Our salon is one of the oldest salons in Clermont and is located at 786 W Montrose Street in Historic Downtown Clermont. Our stylists are experienced in all phases of hair care including color, straighteners, cuts, texture and styles. Hair stylists are Marjorie Morphet, Tina Foote, Sherie Wolkens and Jamie Rhoades. Our nail techs, Jennifer Vandergrift and Jamie Rhoades, perform pedicures and manicures using Zoya nail products (which are Big 5 free). Shellac manicures, lasting up to three weeks, are also available by Jennifer and Jamie. We have two pedicure chairs in a private room for your relaxation and enjoyment. Relaxing and therapeutic facials are available by Jennifer in our private upstairs facial room. Massage services include chair massage, Swedish and Deep Tissue. Massage services are also done in a private room in our upstairs area. We utilize several massage therapists and provide massage by appointment only. We also offer a small boutique with handcrafted jewelry and hair accessories, Art by Tina Foote and Jamie Rhoades, and other unique items. Salon hours are 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Saturday and open Sundays by appointment only. Evening hours are also available by appointment. We pride ourselves in providing a friendly, relaxing environment for our clients and friends. Stop by and visit or call 352-394-5005 for more information. We are also on Facebook and www.TotallyUniqueSalon.com. LOOKING FOR PARTS? SEE JULIE (352) 394-6111 Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! COMMUNITY CALENDAR SUBMITTED PHOTO Mascotte Elementary School Terric Kids for February are: Isabella Campbell, Kylie Kieft, Shamariyah Peterson, Itzel Reyna, Ian Moua, Carson Van Den Bogaert, Noah Vargas, Adan Cabrera, David Silva, Alyssa Bustos, Nazario Delgado, Zachary Bisaillon, Florareli Cortez-Gonzalez, Bryson Queen, Evan Phillips, Arelli Jimenez, Aneesa Ramdass, Diego Jimenez, Leslie Brown, Kimberly Lupian Esquivel, Ryan Kieft, Emily Spears, Austin Bowling, Toryana Dyson, Makayla Franklin, Jehson Pena, Carlos Samaniego, Juan Arenas, Nick Garcia Irizarry, Felix Flores, Zaiden Ramirez, Daniela Ramirez, Emily Morales, Oseas Otero, Dalton Thomas, Stetsen Terry, Michelle Camara, Keyvarion Krull, Donovan Maynard, Rileigh McCue, Carlos Sanchez. Also pictured are Kiwanians Mr. Wallace and Dr. Soyini Ayan, and Principal Wayne Cockcroft. Not pictured: Eliseo Gonzales and Sergio Garcia. MASCOTTE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TERRIFIC KIDS

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C6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 26, 2014 Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) Serena Morizio, a ninth grader at Montverde Academy and member of the 2012-13 MVA Equestrian Team, appears as a horse trainer in the independent lm NOZOMI. The 10-minute short lm won the 2014 Enzian Theatre Film Slam held at the Enzian Theatre on Feb. 9 in Orlando, and the International Florida Faves Love Your Shorts Film Festival, Feb. 1417 in Sanford. Renee Morizio, Serenas mother, is the lms producer. SUBMITTED PHOTO MVA EQUESTRIAN IN SHORT FILM

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Wednesday, March 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D1 rfntbrr rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrff nrrrrrrrrrrff ttbrrrrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rfntbbt rfrntn nnnftbnbn brfbnrb bnbtn brnnrtnftbn tbrbttb nnnrfrbtb nbb n fbfn t brbnbbbtn nnnntnbbtr bbbfrf rtfnbtr rrbrfnnnrfnt t rf r fntb rr ftfnnffn f b rbfbn f nnfb t rf ffftt tntnftfntntt nntnfnttf nfnntnn tttbtnf frnffttnnfft tttnntntnf ntttfn nttfnttff fnnbfnnnfftf tfnnntnnfttt nnnnftf ftnfbfntnfn bbtnttf fnfnfnbttt ntnftnfnt ftftnntfn nttnnntnnnt fftntnfnnnfn tnnfnfnnnnff ttnnnnfnntfb tfbb ntnt n nn tb f r r r ttntfrnrtfn tnfrtfntfnf tnfftftnf ntnfnttnffn nftnnffnnnb fttt tt tnfnfttftnt nftbntt tnttffbb nfnntntnnf fftntftnftt tfrfnrfnbrfnfr bntfnnbt ffnnbnfnfttfnf b tb f r fntb rr ftfnnffn f b rnf nnfb t rrf r ffftt tntnftfntntt nntnfnttf nfnntnn tttbtnf frnffttnnfft tttnntntnf ntttfn nttfnttff fnnbfnnnfftf tfnnntnnfttt nnnnftf ftnfbfntnfn bbtnt fnfnfnbttt ntnftnfnt ftftnntfn nttnnntnnnt fftntnfnnnfn tnnfnfnnnnff ttnnnnfnntfb tfbb ntnt n nn tb f r fntb rr ftfnnffn f b rnf nnfb t r ffftt tntnftfntntt nntnfnttf nfnntnn tttbtn rnnttftt nnffttttnnt ntnfnttt fnnttfnt tfffnnbfnnnff tftfnnntnnftt tnnnnftf ftnfbfntnfn bbtnttf fnfnfnbtttntn ftnfnt ftftnntfn nttnnntnnnt fftntnfnnnfn tnnfnfnnnnff ttnnnnfnntfb tfbb ntnt n nn tb f r fntb rr ftfnnffn f b rrrf rrnf nnfb t rr rfr ffftt tntnftfntntt nntnfnttf nfnntnn tttbtrnf fnnttfttn nnfnfnnfftt ttnntntnf ntttfn nttfnttff fnnbfnnnfftft fnnntnnftttn nnnftfftnf bfntnfnbbt nttf fnfnfnbtttntn ftnfnt ftftnntfn nttnnntnnnt fftntnfnnnfn tnnfnfnnnnff ttnnnnfnntfb tfbb ntnt n nn tb f r fntb rr ftfnnffn f b rrrf rrnf nnfb t rfr ffftt tntnftfntntt nntnfnttf nfnntnn tttbtrnf fnnttfttn nffttttnntntn fntttfn nttfnttff fnnbfnnnfftft fnnntnnftttn nnnftfftnf bfntnfnbbt nttf fnfnfnbtttntn ftnfnt ftftnntfn nttnnntnnnt fftntnfnnnfn tnnfnfnnnnff ttnnnnfnntfb tfbb ntnt n nn tb f r fntb rr ftfnnffn f b rbnf nnfb ffftt tntnftfntntt nntnfnttf nfnntnn tttbtrn fntttfttn nffttttnntntn fntttfn nttfnttff fnnbfnnnfftf tfnnntnnfttt nnnnftf ftnfbfntnfn bbtnt fnfnfnbttt ntnftnfnt ftftnntfn nttnnntnnnt fftntnfnnnfn tnnfnfnnnnff ttnnnnfnntfb tfbb ntnt n nn tb f r r r nnfnttnftnt ntntntnfnt ttfnftf fntnfntf fnttfttf tnfnfbffnfn nfnfnnttn rfntff ftfnbttn fnfntfntfttnb nfntfnffn tnnt rtntfnttf fnt nnfnffn nnn tnttntnb nnfnnnnn ffnttnfnnt tfffnnfnn ntbfbtntf rfnntnnnfntf ntbntnntnttf nffnntntb nttnffnnfn fnnnnfnttn nntfnttf ffntnnnfn ntbfbtntf rfnbnnttfn tftntntfnn nnnnnnntnnf tntnnfnf ttnftnffrft fffnntfb ntnfftftn fnnntnn tnnftnntntnb ntnfnttnf tnnntntnnnt btntfrfnn ntnnftfttn tnttnnftnnt nntnnntb nntbtntf rfntnnfnttf fnnnfnttntfn ftfnfnttnnf tnnttnnfntn fntftbnntnff fttnnttnfffn fnfnftnfnntb nfntfnttnfnt nftfnnntf tnffntfntt nnfffnnnft nfnntbf btntfrfnb nnnntftnn fnftnfntfn nttnntntn tftttfnn btntffntnb ntfnnfnfft nnfnftfn tfntttft fnfnfnfnntnn tnfntnnfnfnf nntnntnntn nnnfnfnnfnn nftnfnt nnfntftfn fnnttfnnf ntnnnntntnnfn ft fnnttnfntn ffnnfnfnnn nfnft fnntfnnt fnffbnnfntnnnt tfn nfnntffnntn tnffnnfttftt nnfnft tnfnntnfnf fnnfnfnnffn nnnntntnnf fnntnnntn ntnfnnnftf nntnfnnfntfnb ntftntnnfnf ftnnfnft fnffnftffn nftnnftfnfn tftfntftnfnn nbb nfnnffnnftn nnttfnffnft ntfntnffn nfnfftfnnn tnttfntnb nttnffnnn fnnffnttn nfnfnntntt ntnfftntnn ftfnnnnnnt ftnb nftnntbtn tfrfntfffnt tnnb nfftfffnt nttfnt fbbtbbtft fnnnftffnnf ntnnfnt tnftntfn tnfrnftb tb f rf r fnn ttbnftntt nb nt r r r r r r r r r r r b r r b r r r r r r r r r b r r r r b r r r r r r r brn r r t f r f n f n f n n f t t f n t t t n t f t t n f n t f n t t n f n f f f f n t n t f n n t t n n n n f n n n f f n b t f r f n f n t n t f f n n f f n f t f n n n n f n t t f f n n n n t f b n f n f n t f t n t n f n f n n t n b n t t f n f n n f r n f t t t n t n n b n b f rfnn

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D2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 26, 2014 rfntbf rf r f n t b b b t t t b f t b nt rrb fbt ttbnt b r r b t b f f b b t b t t b f t n r b t b b t f b t b f b t t f f b t b b n t b f t b t t t b b t f f f f t n b r r n t n b t t t t t t n t n t f t t n t f n t t b b b t t b t b t f t n f t b t t t b t t b t t f t b b f f b f b f b t n b t f t b t b b b n n b t t t f t t f n b t b b t b t t n t t t b t n b n n t b b b t t b b b b b b f b b t r t f b n n t t b t b t t b f b t b t n t b f t b b t b n b b f b n b t b t n b t r t b t t t b t t f b t t t b b b b t t t b t b f t b b b t f n t b t t f r f b t t t b b t b n t f b t b f t t n t b t b r r t n n t b n t f t t f f n t b t r r r t b t f f t b f f t f t btntfb ntbn t b t n f r n t b nr bftf f f t b t n b t b t b b b t b f r b t b t b b r r t t b f f b t b f r n b t b t t t b n t n n t f f n n b b b t r r ftbnn tbttnt tbffbtbnb b r r tb btbnt ftbt ttfbt ttftfnff nt ffbtbnbt tb b r r t b b b t n r bft bfbtfftbtn bbtt f f f t f b fb tt r t b f f r r b t t t f f t f r b b t nf nttn tb r r ftbttttb tnbttt r t b f f r r b r r n f b b t t t f n b t b f f t f b n f f f t f b t t t f n b t b f f t f b tb bt fb tb r r r b b t f b t f f t b t f f t f b r t b t t b n r r b t b r f f b t b r r tf rfb b f f t f b r t b t b b b r t t f t b f b b t r r f f t n t t f t b f b b t r r f f t n f t t t t f f t t b b b t b r r r t t b f t b t t f f b b b f f t t r t r f b b t b t t b n f f t t t t b t t t t f t t t b b t b f b b t t t b t t f f f t f b r r tttbrbtt tnbt ftbtttt bttbbtnb ntb btt b t n t b n t f f t b t t f t r f f f t b t b b n n t b t f f b b t b b r r r b n f f b t n n b b t t t r t t n b b b t t b t b t b f b b b n t b b f t f f r r r r t t b t t t b b n n f t b n n b b b b b n f t t b t b b t t t b f b f f t b t t b t t t b b f n n t b r t r b r t t t b b t t t n f t t b b b t f f b t b n r r ntbtbtf tnttbbtb btbtnb tttb tfftbn tttbb btnbb tbbnn fbtbtfntbtb ffbtbnb b b t b f f r t b t f f b t b f f r btt tt f f b t b b b t b n f r f f n r r b r r t b t nfbtbt btftbttb bfntbft fnbttbbtbfb ttttb t b t t b r r n rt ftt bbt tn rr b n b r r t tt rr br br n bt rr t rr bttt tbr t brr tbt brr tb tr f t t t t r r n rr nbfrr rr b b r r r r r r n b b f b t b b b t t b r t t b rr tbttb nrr bbft bn t rr fbft bftbrtbb rr rr t r r tb nrr b rr b rr ttbnt rr bt rr tbfb trr ttb ttb rr nbt rr rr rr fb rr r r r btr rr rr r r bn rr r r r r n rr tb bbtbbr r bb rr ftfnbt trr t rr t rr btb rr nt rr nfbb trr tbb rr btb rr nnb rr f b r r r r tb rr n rr tb trr tb trr r r f t r r t b f t b b b t b t t r r btb frr tf rr ftbnb rr ftbnb rr ftbttt rr nb nbfnbr nb rr nbt rr bt rr tn rr nb rr nb b tftt tb tbnb btrr tbt rr tfb nbr r btb tbntr rr r tb rr b ttr t trr tt rr b ftbrr tbnt btr f b t b b b rr f b t b b b rr ttt br r tt rr t br tb btrr ft r ft rr bbb rr r tbr fb t r r nbt nbn fftr ftbbb rr ft rr ft nbbt btttb rr b t n b b b f r ff fr ffnt rr fbt bbr fft tbrr rr b brr tb rr rr fb tb rr r r ft tt rr rr r t fbrr bbt rr bb tr b rrrr

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Wednesday, March 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D3 rfntbrr rf nf n n nn t ntr nn t n rr nr rfrr frrfrr rfn trbnn n rfnb b b rf n r rfrn nrfnr bn nbrfb rn fnr n rfr tr ffr n b f r b n b tfn rb b rfnn b t rrfn b b b b nrtrfr nnn b b rfnr tn rfnrnn fnnb b r r f n r n n tfn b rfnrnn r trfrb tbf fr t n n r r f n r b tr rfb b tr rfnnr b rr fnnfrnn b br nrr fnnr rrbr frb rr f r n b r rfnnbn nrftr n t trr rfb b r trfnr rfnnnn rfrnnb b fnb t f n r n b rr fnrb r rrfnrnn b r brfr rfrn rff b b rtr rrfnnr rt trr fnntrnn r fntrn bbnn trfb bnr fnnrbn rt trfrn rn rrfnnt b n tbb f b b r rrfnnrn ntbb f b b t r f n r b t trfrnn f b fn bt ntrrfrnn b rfnr b b b b r f n r b b b r f n r b b b r fnnrb b b b r fnnrb b b r f r n r ftr t trfnnrn f trfnr b b br fb b b nt rfbn b b nntr rfnbn b b t rfnnrn b b r rfr b b fn bn b b t r r f n r n trfnr b r f n n r b r f n n r b trfn nnn fnrtrn f r rfntrn tr rr fb nfrb n rr fnrbn f r rrfnr nnrnrr fnntrb r r r f n r ftrb n rr tfnr br fnnrbn b nntrr fnnbn nn f n fbfb r n t b n tt fnn f f n f f r t f f f b nr b rfnr rbnn r fnnrb nnn n fbf r rrrb n rb rrfnr rfnnnnr r b r b n r nf fbfb r n t b n tt fnn f f n f f r t f f f b rbr rb rfnnrrnnn n r b b r r r f n b n nf fbf r r r r r b n n n b r r nf f rtr rr rfnnrfnr b r r r r t r f n n r r f n n r r f n n r f r r n r

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D4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 26, 2014 A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services 352-431-9481Residential / Commercial rfnfftbrftb f Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Concrete Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Handyman Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. Insurance Services Irrigation Services Landscaping Services r fntbb Lawn Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Painting Services Airport Transportation Enclosure Screening Fencing Services Bathroom Remodeling Handyman Services BOYDSYou call it, We haul it!352 460-7186 Marine Services HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314 HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314 Cleaning Services Land Clearing Services Lawn Services Electrical Services

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Wednesday, March 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D5 Psychic Services Pressure Cleaning Restaurants JAMAICAN GEORGECARRIBBEAN & SOUL FOOD RESTAURANT (352) 455-18982502 W. Main St. Leesburg, FL 34748Goat Soup Curry Chicken Curry Goat Ox Tail & More Tile Service Shower Doors Service Tree Service Veterinarian Services Window Services All About Appliances repairs and installs all brands of major appliances. We are a small husband/wife company. Eric has over 15 years experience repairing appliances and Lavinia (Vinnie) has over 20 years in business management experience. Together, we strive to offer you prompt, professional, courteous and personal services far beyond your expectations, both by phone and in your home. We respect you and your time and make every effort to be in and out of your home as quickly as possible yet provide a thorough diagnosis and timely repair. We genuinely appreciate all your business. Pals Gals Services, Inc. has been owned and operated by Patti Kauffman and Kellie Kennedy since 1986. They are a multifaceted business offering a wide a variety of services, which include interior and exterior painting, faux painting, wallpaper removal and installation, tile and grout cleaning, tile and grout removal and installation, and grout staining. They also install wood floors and can refinished your old wood floors, to make them look brand new. They can help you with color choices and give advice on what is practical or not! They can help resolve your honeydo list such as minor plumbing, electrical, drywall, cabinets, counter tops for your home or office. They pride themselves on quality womanship, dependability and trust. They know how difficult it is to find someone you trust and actually show up on time. They are a referral based business relying on previous clients to spread the word. They are two very talented ladies that take extreme pride in their work and take each job personally. They know how important making choices about your home or office can be and are more than willing to help with each decision.GIVE THE GALS A CALL, THEY CAN DO IT ALL!!! 352-787-4089 Veterinary Care in the Convenience of your own home! and for you Services include Wellness exams, including vaccines and parasite screening, Blood work, Skin and ear issues, Digestive or Urinary tract issues, Health certificates, Kathie L. Robinson, DVMDr. Robinson has over 16 years experience as a veterinarian.VISITING VETERINARIAN, LLC 352-408-3666 FAX: 352-253-2443VISITINGVETERINARIAN@AOL.COM To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact Michelle in the Classified Department at (352) 365-8233 or by email michelle.fuller@dailycommercial.com Plumbing Services Tree Service Roofing Services Window Services

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D6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 26, 2014 rfntbf rffrntb rtrrfbt f b b t t rtfb frr r t r n b t b b b t ffr r rfrffbtrt btt bfrrtrrfr frbtt btrtbrr frtrrfrrtbtbfbtt bttr rfn rn b f t t b b t r t b t b f b t t t r r r r f tbf fnbfrrbbf rffrff rfrbtfffbtt f n b f b r r t r r r t r r f ff n trbfbt tbbfrb bfbbfrbfb bfrrbrfbfrr frt bfbfbbbtt rrtb ff trbfbt tbbfrb ffbf trbrfbtbb rrfbttfrrfrttrrf trbrfr tbfbfb rtbffbttr bfr bfbrrftb tfrttrrfrfrb rbbfbfrr bfrrt rbfrrfrf rrbbfrntb bfrtft rtbttrffrntbrfbbfbtr ff n b f r f r b f b r r f r r r n bfrn rffrntb rtrrfbt f b b t t rtfb frr r t r n b t b b b t ffr r rfrffbtrt btt bf rffrr btt rr r r f f n f b f f r f r f r rn r f f n f b f f r f r f r rnn tbf btb frfbrfb bttrfbt bfr rr b b t f r b f t t f r n b b t t b t f b b t r ff rnn frbrfbt rffrbrff br n bf bf ftb tbbtrrf brr rffrntb rtrrfbt f b b t t rtfb frr r t r n b t b b b t ffr r rfrffbtrt btt bf rffrr btt ttt btbfrfbf rrbtt b f f f r t t r t r f t b b bff ttbfbttf rtrfb fnfrf rbt brbfrf ttfr trf frbfrt bfbtt r f f n f b f f r f r f r bfrt bffftbff bfrfrfb btt bf rn n br rrffbtffrttrrf btt t r nfrt btt r bbbfrttbr ffrfbr tbfrtftb rrbrfrtfb rffbtft rf fbtf trrbrbt rtbfbt ftb fffrfbtf rr bttrbtt rrr f fbfbtt t frrfbtt nft brrrfrtbtt r f tnf bnbtt ttbf tbfrbbt bfrbbft btt frtt rt tr r f brf rrfrtr btt rfb rfb fbt bt bbrfrt frtbr btrrfrrfrrf bfrr nn n b t t bfrrr tbrr bfrf rbtt rrftbtbf rtrf t brrrf brt btbfbbtrf bfrnffbrrf tbrfbt fnf bffbtt rfr tr btt rrf fbr frrbttrf tbftfrf bttrf rnft rrr n ttbf rrb tfb tbrbf tr rf b f r f b t nn tt rrfttr rf brrr rffbtfr fbtt fnbt brrbtt fbrbt rtbf n n t b b t t rf btt rfbfrfft r rf tbt rbbbtt ffbf fbr n trb bfbtt tbf rrbff frr t r r f b f b b n b f t fbfbbftt trfbfrrnf tt ffb fbrnfbfft bttrf bfbrtbn bff bfbrtbn bff



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SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | C1SPORTS:Bulldogs sponsor shing tourney WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWST AND INSIDECLASSIFIED D1 CROSSWORDS C2 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN C1 SPORTS B1 VOICES A4WORD ON THE STREE T A2SOUTH LAKE PRESSV OLUME 99, NO. 13 5 SECTIOn N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reservedwww. southlakepress.com PRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID In Wellness Way Sector Plan, landowners and county hope to avoid headaches of massive developmentTaming the beast BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL John Arnold, owner of Showcase Citrus, checks on his oranges in Clermont on Thursday. Arnold, one of the landowners in the Wellness Way Sector Plan, believes the highly planned concept should have enough exibility to respond to changes in the housing market. We have one shot at this, he said. Once it is approved and development starts coming in, if we make any mistakes, we are going to have to live with that for eternity. LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comAs Lake County ofcials creep toward approv al of the massive Wellness Way Sector Plan near Clermont, supporters say it is carefully designed to prevent the kinds of headaches communities ex perience from scattershot, low-density development. At the same time, several landowners in the sector plan area say exibility and the mar ket should dictate the plans direction. While county ofcials agree parts of the plan should include exibility, there are aspects of the plan that are ironclad, they say. The plan will allow for mar ket exibility but there are key planning principles that cant be compromised such as the protection of water resources and topography and the jobs to housing ratio, Commissioner Sean Parks said. Jobs is one of them. The plan allows for 16,000 residential units and requires 1.5 jobs per house hold. And ofcials do not want potable water used for irrigating landscaping. The sector plan area, which has multiple landowners, has been called the last big chunk of undeveloped land in the county. The area is bounded by State Road 50 to the north, U.S. Highway 192 to the south, U.S. Highway 27 to the west and the Orange County line to the east). Surrounded by major throughways and within close proximity to the city of Orlando and the theme parks, it is the prime spot to bring jobs to the ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comCity ofcials who reviewed more than about 3,000 citations written for turning right on red have re jected 2,373 of them, or about 70 percent of all the tickets written since the citys contro versial red light camer as went live in January. Some 52 of these violations were already paid and $8,216 in nes will be refunded. The review, called for by City Manager Darren Gray near ly a month ago, cov ered all right-on-red violations recorded by the cameras between Jan. 3, when they rst became operational, through Feb. 11, when city ofcials responded to complaints by ticketed drivers. Beginning Feb. 12, Clermont police said they would use more discretion when re viewing violations forwarded to them by the camera compa ny, American Trafc Solutions. Now that the pro cess is complete, we believe we have a sound public-safety program that is better understood by the public, because we now have very few complaints, Gray said. Arnold Ceballos of Clermont was one of those drivers who be lieves he was wrong fully ticketed at the intersection of State Road 50 and Hancock Road, where the majority of right-on-red violations were re corded. He said he stopped at the red light, couldnt see ve hicles coming from his left because of a car next to him, and inched forward to get a better look before turning right. Thats when the camera snapped his picture, Ceballos said. They dismissed my case and so many others because we shouldnt have gotten them since the begin ning, he said. But its not only Clermont where this is happening, its all over Florida. Ofcials previously said they would dismiss tickets if drivers made right-on-red turns in a careful and prudent manner at CLERMONTAbout 70 percent of citys red-light tickets dismissed Staff ReportTwenty-four years ago, facing a possible four-year prison term, Robert Eugene Hendrix killed his cousin and the mans wife in Sorrento to prevent him from testifying in court. The murders landed the now 47-year-old Hendrix on death row where, after 23 years, he has been given an April 23 exe cution date. Hendrix and his cousin, Elmer Scott, were arrested for breaking into a house in 1990. Scott accepted a plea deal that would keep him out of prison if he tes tied against Hendrix, who was offered a plea agreement of four years in prison and ve years probation. Hendrix did not want to accept a plea and told several friends prior to his court date that he was going to kill Scott to keep him from testifying, court doc uments state. Hendrix didnt want to go back to prison, where he had spent 15 months beginning in 1986 after being convicted of burglary, grand theft and dealing in stolen property in Orange County, the documents state. On Aug. 27, 1990, the day be fore his court date, Hendrix went to Scotts home in Sorrento and shot him in the head. His wife, Michelle, tried to intervene and Hendrix slashed her throat. The deaths or phaned the couples 5-month-old daughter. Several witnesses, including (Hendrixs girlfriend) Denise (Turbyville), testied that Hen drix admitted committing the murders to silence Scott, the documents state. He was con victed of two counts of premed itated rst-degree murder, two counts of conspiracy to com mit murder, and one count of armed burglary.SORRENTORobert Hendrix faces April 23 execution date HENDRIX Beginning Feb. 12, Clermont police said they would use more discretion when reviewing violations forwarded to them by the camera company, American Traffic Solutions.SEE WELLNESS | A2SEE TICKETS | A5

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 26, 2014 CLERMONT South Lake Recreation celebrates 20 yearsSouth Lake Recreation, Inc. is celebrating its 20th year of providing community athletics through LC Hoops in Lake County, which has become a second home for over 10,000 kids through the years, fostered by a group of strong volunteers and community support. Stressing the importance of physical education, academics, respect and teamwork, the South Lake Recreation group is currently raising money so it can continue to offer kids scholarships and build a new state of the art com munity center, Arena on the Ridge. To support South Lake Recreation and its community scholarship pro gram, go to www.gofundme.com/ southlakerec, or for information about Arena on the Ridge, go to www.arenaontheridge.org or call 321-236-0240.CLERMONT Informational Meeting for South Lake Dragon Boat FestAn informational meeting for par ticipation in the Dragon Boat Festival in Clermont will be from 5:30 to 6:30 / p.m. April 1 at the Highlander Hut in Clermont. Attendees will learn about forming a team, individual par ticipation, sponsorship and vendor opportunities. The South Lake Dragon Boat event is May 2-3 on Lake Minneola in Clermont. For information, call 352-617-8788.CLERMONT Guns-N-Hoses Chili Cook Off set for April 6The inaugural Guns-N-Hoses Chili Cook-Off will be April 6 with festivities beginning at 9 / a.m. A $5 wristband pro vides guests access to taste chili entries and vote to determine the winner, with proceeds beneting charities of the Clermont re and police departments. Additional activities include a tug of war between the departments. For information or to purchase a wristband, call 352-874-9535 or go to www.cler montdowntownpartnership.com.CLERMONT Public Works will discuss Oswalt Road at meetingThe Lake County Public Works Department is hosting an open house forum regarding upcoming improvements to Oswalt Road from 5 to 7 / p.m. on April 3 at Pine Ridge Elementary School, 10245 County Road 561, Clermont. The road will remain two lanes but will have safety improvements. Road work is expected to begin in August and be completed by May 2015. There will be no formal presentation during the open house forum, but Public Works engineers will be on hand to discuss the improvement plans and accept public comment. For information, call 352-483-9053.CLERMONT Angels of Mercy Thrift Store seeks donationsProceeds from the sale of community donations help support the onsite emergency food pantry at Angels of Mercy, serving Clermont, Ferndale, Minneola and Montverde families in need for over 14 years. The store has many items, including clothing, home decor items and toys. The store is open from 9:30 / a.m. to 3 / p.m., Mon.Fri., 1330 Millholland Dr., Clermont. For information call 352394-4094.MASCOTTE Mascotte Charter pre-k registration is April 3Kindergarten registration will take place on April 3 to enroll students at Mascotte Elementary Charter School, from 9 / a.m. to 6 / p.m. Parents/guard ians will need to bring all health information, identication and proof of physical address. If a child is currently in a 2013-14 pre-k program, attendance is not required. Children must be ve years of age by September 1, 2014 to enroll. For information, call 352-429-2294, ext. 5812. Area Briefs What South Lake residents are saying about ...THE AQUIFERWho owns the aquifer?The State of Florida owns it, as far as I know. This is a subject that has come up here. A while back the county came here and told me Id have to cap down my 6-inch to a four-inch well, at my expense. So I built another house. Otherwise I would have had to cap the well. JOSEPH STEED MONTVERDE I really dont know very much about mineral rights, but I would think it would be like a nation al park a public asset to be protected in some way. TONY HILL CLERMONT The State, I think. It controls the people who are in charge of the aqui fer, keeping it clean and controlling how much water is used. NICK ANDREWS CLERMONT The state of Florida the natural state of Flor ida, the landscape -be cause its so shallow. Nature owns the aquifer, in short. KYLE STONE CLERMONT Word on theStreet Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 region, Parks said We have one shot at this, said John Arnold, one of the landowners who owns Showcase of Citrus, which grows 60 varieties of citrus. Once it is approved and development starts coming in, if we make any mistakes we are going to have to live with that for eternity. Arnold agreed with county ofcials that the area should include both housing and commercial. But he wants county ofcials heading the charge to be exible enough to adapt to the changing market, allowing apartments, for instance, if the need arises years from now. Parks said the plan is exible. Developers will submit proposals for developing pieces of the 16,000-acre tract. Each proposal will be a planned development that will have to adhere to the concepts overarching principles but can differ in many other ways. You have to plan out for commercial space, open space and the infrastructure, he said, but within each PUD, a developer can decide the type of development. The exibility lies entirely within the de tailed specic area plan process. With each plan, density will be determined based on a number of factors, primarily the open space requirements and jobs-to-housing ratio. Scott Bollens, professor of ur ban planning at the University of California, Irvine, said if housing is clustered and development includes both a mixture of homes and businesses, it would prevent urban sprawl, a planning term that describes scattershot, low-density development. In particular, Bollens said the open space requirements are going to encourage builders to build at pretty high densities because half the area is going to be open space. That would lead to a denser and clustered development pattern, he said. Sprawl is low density and unclustered, characterless development. Wellness Way requires 50 per cent open space in each development. The jobs-to-housing ratio is important as well, said Bollens, who has taught urban planning for 26 years and has read a previous article on the sector plan. They are trying to prevent it from being built out as a bunch of homes, he said. That is an attempt to create a balanced, integrated community out there where there are homes and also jobs. Bollens said having the jobs closer to housing will minimize commutes for residents. People will live closer to their jobs sites and stores they shop in, he said. They are creating a balanced community of multiple uses. Jim Karr, another landowner in the sector plan area, said he wanted to make sure there are more single-family homes than multi-family homes. We dont want to see multi-story family housing dominate the housing down there, he said. The real estate values for residential portions is dramatically affected by having all multi-family units. Rex Clonts, a landowner who owns Clonts Groves Inc., expressed concerns about the jobsto-housing ratio. We want to make sure that it is not overly restrictive for what the market wants, he said. This, however, will not be changed in the plan, ofcials have noted. Commissioner Leslie Campione said she preferred lower densities for housing. I am not a proponent of high densities in the majority of the sector plan, she said. I would think there are particular areas that it might be appropriate. Campione said staff is making sure there is exibility within the plan. When people on one hand say they want exibility and on the other hand there are people concerned about sprawl and overdevelopment (that think) exibility means that anything goes, she said. That is the delicate balance you have to strike between any thing goes and having exibility. Robert Chandler, Lakes Economic Development Director of Tourism, said health and life sciences, warehouse and distribution, business services and nance and light manufacturing are the target industries for the area. If the maximum number of residential units are built, the minimum number of jobs created would be 24,300, county ofcials said. Parks said if the plan was not in place you would have 100-acre to 500-acre subdivisions being built haphazardly over the next 25 years. This plan will prohibit the lowest common denominator growth patterns we have, he said. It will encourage visionary leadership for growth into the next generation.WHITNEY WILLARD /STAFF GRAPHIC ON THE WAYThe Wellness Way Sector Plan has to clear several hurdles before it breaks ground. %  enOn April 22, the Lake County Commission meets with the City of Clermont to discuss the plan. %  enIn June, the commission votes on the plan. %  enIf approved, the plan goes to the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity for review and comments. %  enA branding and marketing campaign will then take place to advertise the plan, inviting developers to submit proposals. 91 19 44 19 27 441 33 50 27 LEESBURG TAVARES MOUNT DORA UMATILLA GROVELAND CLERMONT N Wellness Way Sector Plan WELLNESSFROM PAGE A1 Staff ReportA Lake County Tax Col lectors Ofce ofcial is calling the use of new software, which streamlines the tourist tax re turn process for local businesses, a win-win for those taxpayers. Instead of submitting Tourist Development Tax payments and paper returns by mail, they are now processed online via a secure web portal called TouristExpress, ofce Chief Deputy David Jordan said in a press re lease. The system saves both the Tax Collectors Ofce, and the business es in Lake County, time and money, Jordan said. In fact, local businesses and users can save up to $30 each time they use the program, Jordan noted. The program incor porates a system that is as efcient as it is easy to use, he said. Jordan said the Tax Collectors Ofce worked with its tax system soft ware vendor, Grant Street Group, in order to streamline the tourist tax return process at no cost to the residents of Lake County. The program is available 24 hours a day for businesses to report and remit Tourist Development Taxes. For more information, businesses can register by going to www.lake.coun ty-taxes.com/tourist or contact the Lake Coun ty Tax Collectors Ofce at 352-253-2117TAVARESTourist tax return process streamlined

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Wednesday, March 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3 PHOTOS BY ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Boy Scout/Cub Scout Pack 957 of Clermont, led by Mark Heyl and Ann Sheridan, held its 2014 Pinewood Derby races at Lowes of Clermont. Lowes sponsored a new digital track to clock the speed of each car to the 100th of a second. The pack, in its fourth year, started out with 12 boys and now has over 50 members. More than 30 cars competed in the race, with Logan Justynski coming in rst, Jimmy Pecorilli placing second and Cameron Cladwell nishing third. Best in Show was awarded to Nicolas Ferdico. The pack meets Thursdays at 6:30 / p.m. at Sawgrass Elementary School. PINEWOOD DERBY LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comThe Florida Department of Education will not ne Lake County schools for class-size violations because the dis trict conducted a self-audit and corrected its numbers on its own. The district determined, based on the audit, that they needed to submit updat ed data, said Cheryl Etters, spokeswoman for the FLDOE, in an email. They did so within the appeal win dow. They were never out of compliance. During a press conference in February, Superintendent Susan Moxley called for an independent review of all schools in the district to de termine whether any classsize violations were know ingly made. This follows the determination that six school principals broke the law by inaccurately reporting their class sizes to the state. During the appeals process, the district submitted data revisions that resulted in 64.45 full-time equivalent students out of compliance and a reduction of $191,174 in the class size operating categor ical allocation, wrote Lin da Champion, deputy commissioner for the FDOE, in a letter to the superintendent. Subsequent to the data revisions, the unexpected growth adjustments resulted in no nancial adjustment to the districts class size categorical operating allocation. Moxley said in an email the school had an increase of 401.42 full-time equiv alent (FTE) over what the state projected. School Board members voted 3-1 recently to ap prove a $20,000 contract with Carr, Riggs and Ingram LLC to review the school districts class-size compliance policies and procedures. Board members Debbie Stivender, Rosanne Brande burg and Tod Howard vot ed to approve the contract. Kyleen Fischer dissented and Mathias was absent. Several School Board members previously said while the costs of the in dependent review are necessary to address whether principals knowingly co erced teachers to falsify their class rosters during FTE week, when schools are required to provide an accu rate count of student enroll ment to the state. By Florida law, public schools are not permit ted to exceed certain classsize limits: 18 students per class in grades prekindergar ten through grade 3, 22 per class in grades 4 through 8 and 25 in grades 9 through 12. Schools that violate the class-size limits are subject to nes. Simone Maduro-Ferguson, a teacher at Lake Minneola High School, recently tipped off the state about the classsize violations. In her complaint, she claims she was asked to re move kids from her class roster during FTE counting week. School district ofcials subsequently launched an investigation and found additional reporting problems in ve other schools.TAVARESState will not fine Lake County over class-size violations

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 26, 2014The recent news that Florida schools will mandate instruction in cursive writing next school year was a head scratcher, principally because many of us werent aware schools arent teaching this most basic skill. In reality, schools havent quit teaching cur sive completely. The state Board of Education currently requires that students begin learning cursive writing in the third grade, but the policy isnt explicit. Individual school districts determine how much to emphasize cursive. But some school administrators admit there has been a signicant shift away from it to accommodate anti-drug and anti-bullying instruction now required by the state. One par ent told Daily Commercial Staff Writer Millard Ives last week that her fth grader didnt start learning cursive until she pulled her out of public school, and another said her child couldnt sign his name. It might seem progressive at some level to de-emphasize handwriting in favor of more contemporary skills. This generation is growing up in the technology age, after all, and so much of their communication occurs through keyboards. And yet the entire business world still requires this skill. You cant apply for a mortgage, get a drivers license or ll out a basic job application without signing your name. We have to wonder about an education system that skimps on instruction for such a fundamental skill. That, and the recent revelation that most schools in Lake County wont give any child a grade less than 50 in hopes of improving students chances of passing, gives us reason to pause and reect on the direction of public education. Schools exist to pass knowledge to children, to teach them critical thinking skills and to help them learn to socialize. But they also exist to prepare students for the adult world, where they will need basic skills to compete in the job market and where merit is rewarded. When we fail to provide adequate instruction in something as basic as cursive writing, and when we give students signicant handicaps that enable them to pass without putting forth strong effort, we impede their growth and diminish their chances of success later. That is not to say that the public education system is failing. It continues to produce some of the brightest minds in the world. But at a time when educators are forced to adapt to changing cultural and social norms, they would be wise to carefully assess what skills and values remain relevant in todays world and continue to teach those aggressively. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . ........................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTOPINION WHATS YOUR OPINION?The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be origi nal, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to: Letters to the Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711By fax to: 352-394-8001EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed.GUEST COLUMNSIf you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@dailycommercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OURVIEW SOUTH LAKE PRESSYour community newspaper for more than 100 years.732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Florida 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region.All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Keeping education relevant and challengingProgress has a priceI wanted to say what a good article it was on Wildwood being a boom town and that many people do not realize that The Villages isnt the only growing area. Progress is going faster and faster. The concern is the added drain on the aquifer, not only from many thousands of new homes in Central Florida but from the granting of per mits to bottlers of water. We are going to be begging other states for water in time. Not in my time because Im 82 years old, but it will come sooner than later. BROOKY PETERS | Wildwood LETTER of the WEEK BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL New buildings are being added to Brownwood Paddock Square in Wildwood.OTHERVOICESFlorida has a proud recent history of strong open gov ernment laws, and so it is appropriate as the nation cele brates Sunshine Week to raise awareness about the impor tance of government in the sunshine, that the Sunshine State remains a leader in ensur ing public access to the deal ings and decision-making of its elected and appointed ofcials. It is also appropriate that last week the Florida Senate moved along Senate bill 1648 that would strengthen Floridas Sunshine Law. A nal vote is expected next week. While our states Sunshine Law and Open Government laws provide broad access to both public records and meetings, there are always efforts afoot in the Legislature to weaken them, as there are this year. But SB 1648 has been praised by open government advocates as one of the more meaningful advances in Floridas Sunshine Law since the 1990s. Among other things, it would limit fees for record searches so government ofcials could not intimidate people through overpricing. It also would dene more clearly what records are exempt, based on court rulings. And, an element of SB 1648 that is maybe its most important one, is that it would require training on public records laws for all public employees. We urge the Senate, then the House, to approve SB 1648 and its House counterpart, HB 1151, to further the cause of providing relatively easy and affordable access to city, county and state public records. It is important for not only the news media but everyday citizens to have access to information about how their government is doing the peoples business and why. Simply, without an informed citizenry, government cannot be held accountable or responsive. James Madison, the father of the Constitution whose birthday on Sunday marked the beginning of Sunshine Week, put it this way: A popular government without popular information or the means of acquiring it, is but a prologue to a farce, or a tragedy, or perhaps both. Knowledge will forever govern ignorance, and a people who mean to be their own governors must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives. Madison would undoubtedly be amazed at not only the amount of government that exists today but the amount of information about our government that is available. The abundance and relative access to public information is a tribute to, rst, technology, and, second, the ideals of the Sunshine Law and the vigilance of its supporters. Awareness and support for open government, of course, should not be limited to a single week a year. How government regulates our daily lives, protects our community and spends our money affects our daily life. Making sure such decisions are made in the open and not in back rooms is the only way we the people can be sure to have a say in them.From Ocala.com.Celebrating the Sunshine How government regulates our daily lives, protects our community and spends our money affects our daily life. Making sure such decisions are made in the open and not in back rooms is the only way we the people can be sure to have a say in them.

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Wednesday, March 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5 Tour and educate yourself on options available in Clermont when your loved ones are no longer able to live and provide care for themselves. This tour is led by Dr. Marholin D.O., Dr. Sam M.D. and C.O.R.E. Florida Licensed trained administrator to give you objective guidance & direction in a non-threatening and no sale pressure environment. per person TOUR INCLUDES:Breakfast, Lunch and Snack Dr. MarholinWE WILL COVER continuing care based on different needs. from independent living, Assisted Nursing & Hospice. Utilizing resources to maintain your best quality of life and provide in the home. rfntbrrrt 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 less than 12 mph or if they stopped behind the white line at an intersection. This (installing the cameras) is the biggest mistake and the city never educated the public properly before doing it, Ceballos said. Since the camer as became operational on Jan. 3, roughly 90 percent of the citations have been for right-onred turns. At the City Council meeting in February, some 59 drivers complained about their right-on-red tickets and Gray asked Police Chief Charles Broadway to review those citations. Broadway later rescinded 51 of those, causing Gray to call for all citations to be reviewed. The city recently in stalled signs at inter sections to warn driv ers about turning right on red with cameras present. Broadway said ofcers are seeing fewer violations, so something is working. We believe more drivers are now obey ing the law, he said. We continue to em phasize that driv ers should stop before turning right on red. Ceballos said he sim ply avoids the camer as by taking alternative routes and suspects other drivers are doing that, too. TICKETS FROM PAGE A1 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillard.ives@dailycommercial.comIt is a dying art that will be resuscitated next school year. The emphasis on cursive writing has diminished over the years but will be making a comeback in Florida elementary schools in 2014-15 after suggestions from a number of teachers and parents convinced the states Board of Education to support this. Kristi Patterson said her 5th-grade daughter didnt start learning cursive writing until she pulled her out of public schools and enrolled her into Lake Montessori in Leesburg this school season a private school that starts to teach cursive to students in the rst grade. I couldnt believe she couldnt write in cur sive, said Patterson, looking at her daugh ter, Ryann Price, study slabs of cursive letters during an after-school lesson last week. Tiffany Cowie, a spokeswoman with the states Department of Education, said cur rently the Board of Education dictates that students should began learning cursive writing in the third grade, but the policy isnt explicit. Individual school districts deter mine how much to emphasize cursive. Like typewriters and cassette tapes, cur sive has fallen by the wayside in the digital era and focus has increased on how well students can use a key board. Experts on cur sive handwriting say the written form has been hit hard because its viewed as formal. Cheryl Bloom, owner of Blooms Baking House & Restaurant in down town Leesburg, said the bulk of cakes she dec orates are in print, es pecially for children. A cake for a wedding an niversary is one of the rare orders she has re cently decorated with cursive writing etched in the frosting. Print is just easier to read, said the 53-yearold Bloom, who learned how to write in cursive in the rst grade. The lack of cur sive taught in schools was brought in to liv ing rooms last year during the murder trial of George Zimmer man, who shot and killed Sanford teen Trayvon Martin. Many in the courtroom were shocked when Martins 19-year-old friend, Rachel Jeantel, admitted on the stand that she could not read a docu ment a lawyer handed to her because it was written in cursive. Although it is debatable which is the fast est, writing in print or cursive, it does take more time to learn cur sive. At Beacon College, a small private school in Leesburg that is exclusively for students with dyslexia, ADHD or other specic learning disabilities students arent required to write in cursive, even when signing their name. It can be difcult for them, said Dr. Shelly Chandler, the schools vice-president of aca demic affairs. Cowie said cursive writing did not appear in the Common Core standards for schools the state adopted in 2010. It was left up to individual school dis tricts to determine how much of an emphasis to put on the writing art form in their curric ulum. Debbie Moftt, director of K-12 curriculum for Sumter County Schools, said the time devoted to school pro grams such as drug and bullying education, has decreased the teaching of cursive writing in her schools. At a Sumter Coun ty Chamber of Commerce meeting last week, where Moftt discussed the need of cursive writing lessons in schools, one parent complained about his child not being able to sign his name in cur sive. Moftt said the lack of cursive writ ing also prevents chil dren from being able to read important historical documents written in cursive. Its important that our students know what they are looking at and reading when shown one of these documents written in cursive, Moftt said. Researchers say cur sive also appears to improve reading and other learning skills. Cowie added it helps children to read cherished cards and letters from grandma and grand pa. Hugo Hormazabal, headmaster at Lake Montessori, said cur sive writing helps de velop motor skills and hand-eye coordination. It helps students develop more condence in their writing, he said. Apparently, par ents statewide share the same concerns. In a 2013 online poll by Harris Interactive, 79 percent of adults and 68 percent of children said cursive should still be taught. Keyboarding skills, not cursive writing, are part of the Common Core academic standards adopted last year by more than 40 states, including Florida. But as Florida tweaks its Com mon Core, parents and educators asked at pub lic forums and through email that cursive still be taught, and state ed ucation leaders listened. The request for more instructions on cursive comprised a big bulk of the 19,000 comments on the Common Core. As a result, Cowie said the states Board of Education has adopted cursive writing standards for fourthand fth-grade classrooms in 2014-15, with the ex pectation that students should be able to write legibly and uently in cursive upon gradua tion from elementary school. Sitting in a Lake Mon tessori classroom, Lau ren Newman, cur riculum director for the school, displayed similar looking cur sive letters dotted on slabs in front of Price. Then Newman turned around and had the stu dent practice drawing the letters with her ngers on her back before writing them on paper. Price seemed eager to learn the writing form. This is fun, Price said.Source: parentingsquad.com and education.cu-portland.eduCursive writing will return next school year MILLARD K. IVES / DAILY COMMERCIAL Lauren Newman, curriculum director for Lake Montessori, uses slabs of cursive letters with 5th-grader Ryann Price during an after-school lesson.

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10% OFFAll options with this couponrffnntb B1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 26, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTSSPORTS EDITOR . ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE . .............................. 365-8268 FAX . .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL . ......... sports@dailycommercial.comSPORTSandLEISURE FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comThe second annual Tava res High School football shing tournament will be held April 19 at Buzzard Beach in Tavares. Registration is $50 per boat with a maximum of two anglers per boat. Additional anglers can be added for $35. Deadline for registration is April 16 and there will be a $10 fee for late registration. Fishing hours for the tour nament will be from 7 / a.m. until 3 / p.m. Weigh-in will be gin at 3 / p.m. at Lakeside Bait and Tackle, 1000 W. Burleigh Blvd. in Tavares. A $300 cash prize will go to the winning team, with second place getting $150. The third-place team will receive shing gear. The prize for landing the tourna ments Big Fish will be a $100 gift card. Checks should be made out to the Tava res High School Athletic Boosters. Anglers can register at Tavares High School or at Lakeside Bait and Tackle. The tournament is one of many fundraising activities by the booster club to raise money for the schools athletic programs. For information, email Ta vares football coach Chris Gauntlett at gauntlettc@ lake.k12..us.Bulldogs football team sponsors fishing tournament TAVARES FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comMontverde Academys Cruyff Court has become a popular fa cility for area youngsters. Since opening in January, the miniature soccer eld has pro vided students at the school and various groups with a place to rene their soccer skills or get some exercise. It also has become a place for youth groups to come togeth er and develop a love for the sport. The Soccer Institute of Mont verde Academy (SIMA) recently helped elementary school members of the Boys and Girls Clubs of Central Floridas Walt Disney World Clubhouse to the Cruyff Court and led them through a variety of drills. For many of the youngsters, it marked their introduction to soccer under the tutelage of Montverde Academy Athletic Director and boys soccer coach Mike Potempa. In addition, SIMA welcomed a group from the Boys and Girls Club of Clermont recently, which included children with Down syndrome. Potempa said he already has noticed how word has spread about the Cruyff Court and how it is helping local youth build an interest in soccer. Its great for us to come out with children of the community and provide an exercise and play the game we have a pas sion for, Potempa said. Most importantly, its great to see so many youngsters having fun and spend an hour or hourand-a-half with smiles on their faces. (The Cruyff Court) has allowed Montverde Academy to give back something to the community and children from surrounding regions of Central Florida learn more about the game of soccer. Its really great to see them having fun. The visit by the Boys and Girls Clubs of Central Flori da actually served a number of functions, according to Yesenia Maysonet, program director for the organization. She said it allowed many of the youngsters an opportunity to travel away from their homes for the rst time, and a chance to learn Montverde Academys Cruyff Court proving to be popular PHOTO COURTESY OF MONTVERDE ACADEMY Montverde Academy Athletic Director and boys soccer coach Mike Potempa speaks with and instructs area youth using the schools Cruyff Court facility. Since opening in January, the miniature soccer eld has become a popular addition to the school.Its great for us to come out with children of the community and provide an exercise and play the game we have a passion for. Most importantly, its great to see so many youngsters having fun and spend an hour or hour-anda-half with smiles on their faces. (The Cruyff Court) has allowed Montverde Academy to give back something to the community and children from surrounding regions of Central Florida learn more about the game of soccer.Mike PotempaMontverde Academy Athletic Director and boys soccer coach FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comThe future of the Eu stis High School girls basketball program appears to be bright, considering the recent success of the middle school team. Eustis Middle Schools girls team completed the 2013-14 season with an undefeated record and powered through the postseason, claim ing the county championship with a 53-30 win against Gray Middle School. Honestly, I was told we werent going to be good this season, said Eustis coach Mandy Mapp. I was shocked when I was told that. I always thought our girls had potential. Mapp, a former stand out at Tavares High School, said she spent a lot time in the presea son teaching her players how to play the game, since many had never played before. She also concentrated on conditioning and teaching them how to react in game situations. They were nervous, and it took some time to get used to playing against other teams, Mapp said. Mapp said she made certain every player on the team had a role. Some were called on to shoot 3-pointers and others cleaned up in the paint. She also counted on her players to grow into a cohesive unit. They all worked so hard to help us succeed, Mapp said. They showed up to Middle school girls basketball finishes unbeaten, county champions EUSTIS FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comProfessional golf comes to Lake County next week. The Lake County Classic, a stop on the National Golf Association Professional Golf Tour will be played at Harbor Hills Country Club in Lady Lake this week, the highlight event of a week chock full of golf-related activities. A 72-hole event, the Lake County Classic, is set to begin at 7:30 / a.m. on Thursday and will conclude on Sunday. In addition, an open qual ier, a free clinic and a pro-am is scheduled for the week. As is the case with all NGA tour stops, admission for the Lake Coun ty class is free and open to the public. The main purpose LADY LAKENGA Tour coming to Harbor Hills Country Club SEE CRUYFF | B2SEE EUSTIS | B3SEE TOUR | B3

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B2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 26, 2014OutdoorsFishing352-365-8268 sports@dailycommercial.com www.dailycommercial.com %  %  SANDYS BAIT AND TACKLE | TAVARESCrappie are being caught by spider-rigging rods baited with pink or chartreuse jigs tipped with minnows. Lake Dora has been particularly good. Bass are biting well, they have moved into deeper water. They are being caught on RatL-Traps and soft plastics in June bug or green pumpkin colors. Shell cracker are starting to bite on red worms and crickets. Bill Brooker and Mike Strauss won the open bass tournament sponsored by Sandys Bait& Tackle last Saturday with 19.49 pounds. Vern Kemp and Randy Hamrick took second place with 15.25 pounds. Dick Fonda and Matt Gee claimed dual honors with third place at 14.04 pounds and big sh at 7.59 pounds. Sandys bass tour nament, open to all, is held on the 3rd Saturday monthly at the buzzard beach ramp. Sandys next regular bass tournament will be an open tournament held April 19 with the weigh-in at Buzzard Beach at 2:30pm. Any questions about the tournament call the shop at 352742-0036. %  %  PINE ISLAND CAMP | FRUITLAND PARKSeveral patrons are catching bass on minnows, shrimp and worms. Pine Island has a full supply of live baits, including grass shrimp, as well as a variety of articial baits. RV sites, campsites, boats and slips are available for rental. Check out the restaurant before going out or coming off the lake. %  %  PALM GARDENS | TAVARESSpecks are still being caught on mostly minnows and some jigs. They have moved outside of the grass and shorelines and are back in the deeper water, but could still go to the beds one more time if nice weather prevails. Bass and striper action has fallen off. Palm Gardens has pontoon boats available to rent. %  %  NELSONS FISH CAMP | WEIRSD ALESpeck activity has been very good; they are biting on minnows and jigs. Bass have been slow with the most recent weather change. The bass bedding appears to have subsided and they have moved back out into open water. Come check out the next generation bass in pond by Nelsons. %  %  BLACK BASS RESORT-FISH CAMP Guests are catching bass and crappie. Several large bass have been caught in Haynes Creek at the locks. The bass are hitting on articial baits primarily, while the crappie are biting on minnows and jigs. Fish are starting to bite in Lake Yale. Minnows and worm sales have been very good. Small boats can launch from Black Bass boat ramps. %  %  SORRENTO BAIT AND TACKLECrappie shing has been good, weather permitting. Lake Dora and the Apopka-Beauclaire canal have been noteworthy. So good in fact, limits caught on jigs tipped minnows are being reported. Good jig colors have been chartreuse, or ange and hot pink. Quite a few crappie are being caught in Lake Monroe, Lake Dora, Lake Beauclaire and Lake Carlton. Fish are on the beds and biting on jigs, lizards, crawdads, small worms and small baits in general. Remember to practice catch/ release with bedding bass. Colors of baits for bass are crawdad colors, black/blue or watermelon red. It is beautiful weather to get out on the lake and catch a few. Stop in and get the latest daily report. LAKES REPORT a weekly update fromCHERYL STALEY-ARCHER rfntn b nn b n ttn rfnntnt bnn n bt tt ttt ntnnt rffrff tnt rfttt btt ttn bttn ttt tt tttt SUBMITTED PHOTO Leesburg High School girls soccer players Chelsea Mudd (left) and Sarah McKinney signed national letters of intent recently with Polk State College in Winter Haven. AREA STUDENT-ATHLETES SIGN SUBMITTED PHOTOSouth Lake bowler Katie Stark (third from left) the 2012 state champion, signed with Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn. more about a game that is considered the most popular sport in the world. Maysonet also said it in troduced the children to the concept of an international private school. We serve elementary, middle school and high school youth in Orange, Os ceola, Seminole and Brevard counties, said Maysonet. We have 13 tradition al clubs and 13 middle school-specic clubs, with programs that range in inter ests in the arts, technology, sports, tness and healthy habits. This trip exposed our youth to nearly all of those interests. The Cruyff Court at Mont verde Academy is the only one of its kind in the Unit ed States and is one of only 180 scattered throughout the world, according to the Johan Cruyff Foundation (JCF). The court is, essentially, a miniature soccer eld designed to help children learn the game and improve their physical tness. While it is used predomi nantly as a soccer facility at Montverde Academy, Cruyff Courts have been used to help disadvantaged youth and youngsters with disabilities by providing an area for others sports, such as wheel chair hockey. All Cruyff Court facilities promote healthy living and provide opportunities for youngsters to improve their physical health and personal development to increase activity and combat childhood obesity, Potempa said. Started in 1997, the JCF was started by Cruyff, a Eu ropean soccer legend and standout in the 1970s and 1980s in the now-defunct North American Soccer League. The idea for the JCF, Cruyff said, began when he was playing in the NASL. A neighbor had a child with Down syndrome who was always alone, watching other kids playing and having fun. Over time, Cruyff said he befriended the boy and taught him basic soccer skills to help him become more active. As time passed, Cruyff said, he began playing soc cer with the rest of the kids in the neighborhood. Through the JCF, Cruyff said he has realized his dream of giving more children, including those with disabilities, the opportunity to play together through sport while making a contribution to healthy living, quality of life and values. The JCF also supports sports projects for children with disabilities and organizes unique sporting events for youth, according to the JCF website. Potempa said SIMA oper ates independently from the Montverde Academy boys soccer team and is accessible to all the academys students. SIMA was established as an elite-level soccer-specic training experience for any one who possesses the pas sion to challenge themselves at the highest level academ ically and athletically, Po tempa said. It also provides a profes sional training environment for any passionate athlete with the desire to work hard and improve. CRUYFF FROM PAGE B1

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Wednesday, March 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B3 HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. practices at 6 / a.m. and for practices that were held during holiday breaks. Our girls put forth the ef fort to become the best they could be. By the time the postseason rolled around, Mapp said her team was ring on all cylinders. All the work they put in early in the season, she said, paid off with an impressive run to the championship game. No other team had the talent or played with the de termination that our girls had, Mapp said. They did a great job all season from start to nish and earned the right to call themselves an unde feated team. They showed the kind of effort and work ethic that will win on the basketball court and in the classroom. EUSTIS FROM PAGE B1 of the NGA Tour is to prepare our players to move on to the Web.com and PGA Tours, said Robin L. Waters, NGA Tour president. By adding another top-notch course like Harbor Hills Country Club, our players will have yet an other opportunity to prepare them selves for the next level. The weeklong presence of the NGA begins Monday with a qualier round for players who arent previ ously entered. On Tuesday, a free golf clinic will by offered and a one-day pro-am tournament on Wednesday will cap off the list of activities head ing into the Lake County Classic. Like most pro-ams, the Lake County Classic Pro-Am will consist of teams made up of three amateurs and one NGA professional competing in a scramble format that often produces an array of exciting shots and clutch putts. The NGA Tour is the No. 3 Mens pro fessional tour in the U.S. after the PGA and Web.com Tours, and has proven to be the top developmental tour by PGA and Web.com Tour Professionals. The NGA Tour has helped hun dreds of professionals acquire their cards for the PGA TOUR, European, Web.com, and Champions Tour. On average, more than 40 percent of every PGA Tour eld and more than 60 percent of every Web.com Tour eld have played on the NGA Tour. In fact, NGA alumni have won an incredible 15 Major championships. NGA Tour alumni include: 2012 Masters champion Bubba Watson; 2011 PGA Championship winner Keegan Bradley; 2010 PGA TOUR Player of the Year and 2003 US Open champion Jim Furyk; 2009 British Open champion Stewart Cink; 2009 U.S. Open champion Lucas Glover; 2007 Masters champion Zach John son; 2003 PGA champion Shaun Micheel; 2003 British Open champi on Ben Curtis; two-time U.S. Open champion Lee Janzen; British Open and PGA champion John Daly. Founded in 1988, the NGA Tour predates the Web.com Tour as the longest running developmental tour in golf. In 2013, the NGA Tour was awarded ve Web.com Tour event exemptions and two PGA Tour event exemptions Reno-Tahoe Open and the Sanderson Farms Championship the most of any tour in the history of developmental golf. Harbor Hills Country Club is a par72 championship layout designed by Lloyd Clifton. The course has a 72.5 rating and carries a 126 slope rating. Area ofcials welcome the NGA to Lake County and hope the tournament becomes an annual affair. Lake County is a golfers paradise and we are thrilled to welcome the NGA to Harbor Hills, one of the coun tys premier golf course, said Robert Chandler, director of Lake Countys Economic Development and Tourism Department. TOURFROM PAGE B1Just like it led them to winning the champi onship. For Mapp, the season also represented a pe riod of growth, as well. In addition to teaching her players, Mapp learned the nuances of coaching in her rst season on the bench. It proved to be an op portunity that could make Mapp a xture on the sidelines for years to come. These girls were a joy to coach. The entire experience of working with them as a coach was a great learning ex perience for me, and I enjoyed it very much. Members of the Eus tis Middle School girls basketball team were: Iberia Smith, Nylah Brown, Nijah Brown, Destiny Spikes, Brian na Hall, Madison Toft, Kianna Lester, Kadaria Walker, Amaya Tay lor, Rashe Morris and Ajjaria Washington.

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B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 26, 2014 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 725344767 1318315974 921FREE SPACE5372 216424863 529395268ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N IB O G BINGO B I N G O SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Ellen Rochat WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! N 39 FREE N 42 N 31 N 34

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Wednesday, March 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B5

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B6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 26, 2014 CHAMBER AWARDS & NEWS www.southlakechamber-fl.com Julia Buddendorff, a senior at Montverde Academy was named the February 2014 Chamber Student of the Month. The sponsor of the award, Wesley Reed from Ameriprise Financial, recognizes South Lake students for their outstanding academic and volunteer endeavors. Ms. Buddendorff is involved in many activities at Montverde Academy such as the STEM Club, the MVA swim varsity team (captain), Key Club, and more. She has a 4.30 GPA in honors courses and has been accepted at UNC Chapel Hill, Florida Atlantic University, Florida State University, University of Miami, and William & Mary College. Congratulations and well-deserved for this honor! Surrounding Julia, pictured from L to R: Montverde Academy Headmaster Kasey Kesselring, parents Kristine & Dr. Kenneth Buddendorff, Wesley Reed from Ameriprise Financial. Dr. Kasey Kesselring was awarded the Chamber GEM of the Hills Award for February 2014. Since he became the Headmaster for Montverde Academy in 1999, the school has grown from 103 students to well over 1000 and has become a one of the top college preparatory schools in the country and world. He has served the South Lake Community in many different ways such as the 2012 Chairman of the South Lake Chamber, the Chairman of the South Lake Hospital District Board of Trustees, Chairman of the American Cancer Societys Lake-Sumter Cattle Barons Ball, and Cochair for the Boy Scouts of America Golden Eagles Dinner for Lake County. Dr. Kesselring is pictured with 2014 South Lake Chamber Chair Wendy Terry.The 20th Annual Chamber Ambassadors Breakfast was recently held at the First United Methodist Church in downtown Clermont. The event is held each year to celebrate the volunteer efforts of the Chamber Ambassador Committee in welcoming new businesses to the South Lake Community. Kathy Scherer from Centennial Bank is the Ambassador Chair for 2014 and was welcomed in by the 2013 Chair Cuqui Whitehead. There is also a festive atmosphere for the event as sponsors compete in a themed table-decorating contest this years winner was the Greater Clermont Cancer Foundation. The Chamber Ambassadors along with many guests & fellow members welcomed Store Manager Brad Montgomery and his team from Advance Auto Parts to their newly built store location located at 2655 East Hwy 50 in Clermont (SE corner of Hwy 50 & Hancock Rd.) The Chamber Ambassadors welcomed Dr. Lorna Bennett & her great staff from Bennett Pediatrics to their new location at 365 Citrus Tower Blvd in Clermont. Feel free to stop by and welcome Dr. Bennett or you can also see her at www.bennettpediatrics.com. The Chamber Ambassadors welcomed Pastor Juan Rivera with Better Life Worship Center along with his Associate Pastors, staff, and members of their congregation to their new location at 332 Mohawk Road in Clermont. Feel free to stop by and welcome them or you can also see them online at www.betterlifeworship.com. Despite the ironic weather conditions at the time, a large gathering of Chamber Ambassadors, visiting girls lacrosse players, elected officials, and community leaders celebrated Florida Tourism Day and the opening of the beautiful NTC/LiveWell multipurpose fields located on Legends Way in Clermont. The celebration also served to highlight and spread awareness of the many positive economic impacts which the Sports and Tourism sector brings to our South Lake Community. Bridgette Bennett and her staff from Bennett Law Center were welcomed to the Chamber at their offices located at 302 W. Orange St. in Groveland. Immediately following the ribbon cutting, Bennett also hosted the March Chamber Business After Hours where fellow members enjoyed a wonderful evening of food, drink, music, and networking outside of their offices on the shore of Lake David. You can see them at www.bennettlawcenter.com. The Chamber Ambassadors were a part of the Grand Opening festivities held at the newly constructed Benton House assisted living and memory care facility located at 16401 Good Hearth Blvd. Clermont FL 34711. Benton House corporate officials were also on hand to welcome the dozens of people who attended to take guided tours of the facility. A buffet brunch was also served. You can see their beautiful facility online and you can also set up your own tour at www.bentonhouse.com.

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Ann DupeeREMEMBER WHENA weekly column that reprints some of the more interesting news stories that have appeared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press.C1SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 26, 2014 www.southlakepress.comCOMMUNITYProudly servingCLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWSSTAFF WRITER . ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE . .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 EMAIL..... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com %  en HOMETOWN: Winter Garden %  en OCCUPATION: Cosmetologist %  en FAMILY: Lisa Rhoades and William Ray What do you enjoy most about south Lake County? The laid back country atmosphere, meeting new people at the wine walk, festivals and working at Totally Unique Organic Day Spa. 1) If you had to summarize your philosophy of life in one sentence, what would it be? A forever-changing festival of loving, learning and growing as a stylist and esthetician. 2) Name a person or incident youve come across recently thats touched you in some way. Why did this person or incident impress you so much? Seeing my aunt Norma make it through breast cancer has made me realize you should never take life for granted. 3) How does what you do contribute to the welfare of the area? Working at Totally Unique helps me bring business and new people to the community. 4) Name one of your greatest accomplishments so far. Buying a house and getting a job at Totally Unique Organic Day Spa, where I work with amazing coworkers. 5) Whats something youve always wanted to do but havent yet? Go on a European cruise. 6) What advice would you give to people who want to help out in the community? Whatever you give in life, you get back tenfold. FROM THE FILES | 25 YEARS AGO 1989Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press Meet YourNEIGHBORJAMIE RHOADES Kyle Promotions, Clermonts spe cialty advertising and printing company, has moved from West gate Ofce Plaza near City Hall to 748 West Ave. Additional seating and better stadium access will greet fans as the Kansas City Roy als open their second spring training season at Boardwalk and Baseball, just south of I-4 on U.S. Highway 27. Myth About Beef from Gatorland Meats at 627 8th St., in Clermont. Myth: Beef will not t into a low-calorie diet. Fact: Three ounces of cooked, lean beef contains only 189 calories. In comparison, three ounces of roasted chick en without skin contains 162 calories, three ounces of fried chicken with skin contains 246 calories and three ounces of pork contains 198 calories. Bay Lake Beef and Swine 4-H Clubs new ofcers are: Jerry Osteen, president; Mandy Carter, treasurer; Deann Carlton, secretary; Joe Symmes, reporter. Other club members are Clay Burns, Missy Carter, Jamie and Julie Eley, Matthew and Ryan Godwin, Jeremy and Kristy Newman, Steven Park, Andy Tomlinson, Jayson Tootle. Sponsors are Linda and Ter rell Newman. Where citrus was once king, grapes might just be heir apparent, especially if the new Lakeridge Winery and Vineyards on US 27 is as successful as owners plan it to be. Community leaders from south Lake County enjoyed a pre-opening tour and wine tasting in late January as the winery played host to the Clermont Chamber of Commerce and South Lake and Cler mont Kiwanis Clubs. Once completed, the winery will feature a 50-foot wooden horseshoe bar inside its main foyer. The second oor foyer will double as a museum, featur ing artifacts and photographs from Lake Countys history. Twenty-one acres of vines are planted to date. Jo Fleming, a native of Miami Beach, provides the Friends of Cooper Memorial Library display. Shown are items on which pressed owers have been attached, including cards, pictures, tallies, bookmarks and candles. The owers are dried and arranged on the desired surface, covered with sheer rice paper and then brushed with diluted clear glue. Groveland City Council approved a $2 fee hike for monthly residential refuse ser vice, from $6.25 per ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comAs their business has grown, Jack and Dianne Stellhorns ties to the community and the people in it, have as well. Thats because the Stellhorns own ers of Ritters Frozen Custard are cel ebrating 10 years serving south Lake residents the frozen concoction many in the area have gotten to know well from visiting the store and sampling various avors at events and gather ings theyve worked throughout the years. We started back in 2004 and think ing back, there was dirt everywhere you looked. We were the rst store in Hancock Village and there was no through-road on Hancock going north. Weve seen it grow from that, Jack Stellhorn said. Diane Stellhorn said she loves the feel of Clermont. I grew up in a small town in Indi ana and being in Clermont reminds so much of it, she said. Ritters is located at 2560 E. State Road 50, Suite 114. The custard has an ice-cream quality to it, but Jack said its different because of the much lower air quantity in it. The custard ends up with less than 10 percent air quantity because the process we use allows us to control it compared to making soft serve, which usually contains close to 100 percent air, Jack said previously. It makes a difference and you can instantly taste it in the custard because it is so creamy, rich and smooth. Jack Stellhorn also said the custard is much lower in calories than ice cream because the butter fat in the Ritters brand is less than 10 percent. A small 6-ounce has under 200 calories, and a kiddie cup only 100. The store features staples like vanil la, chocolate, strawberry and light vanilla among the 150 avors of custard, sherbets and Italian ices that rotate in depending upon the availability of in-season ingredients like fruit. Whatever they are doing is working because their store has been the high est selling in-line store in the entire Ritters/Tru Foods system for the last two years. Greg Ochiogrosso, interim president and chief development ofcer of TRUFOODS, LLC the parent com pany of Ritters said he is pleased that the Stellhorns continue. We love Jack and Diane, Ochio grosso said. We have 24 operating units in the U.S. and four more in the pipeline, and of those, Jack and Diane have the number one in-line shop. SEE HISTORY | C3CLERMONTRitters Frozen Custard celebrating 10 years serving south Lake County LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL/ ABOVE, RIGHT: Jack and Dianne Stellhorn have owned and operated Ritters Frozen Custard on State Road 50 in Clermont for 10 years.SEE RITTERS | C3We love Jack and Diane. We have 24 operating units in the U.S. and four more in the pipeline, and of those, Jack and Diane have the number one in-line shop. They are great people and their success underscores their passion and commitment for the Ritters brand, it reinforces the quality and longevity statement we are trying to promote as a company and we appreciate it.Greg OchiogrossoInterim president and chief development ofcer of TRUFOODS, LLC

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C2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 26, 2014 ITS BETTER THIS WAY By JEREMY NEWTON / Edited by Will ShortzNo. 0316RELEASE DATE: 3/23/2014 ACROSS1 So over 7 Touching words? 14 Gently floats 19 Seinfeld cohort 20 1965 R&B #1 song with the repeated lyric Cant you see that Im lonely? 22 Too rich for me 23 *He bested Leonidas at Thermopylae 25 Nick of Lorenzos Oil 26 Medicinal qty. 27 Dashed ID 28 Monitor setting, for short 29 Balloon 31 *Off-roader, often 35 What an iPod plays in 36 Stuff in sacks 39 Flying fisher 40 Roughhousing 41 Jokester 44 Glassfuls in restaurantes 45 Country buggy 47 Places for studs 48 Air 49 *Annual draw for snocross fans 52 Union leader? 53 Close up 54 Like Advil or Aleve: Abbr. 55 That may be true, but 57 Its low for gas guzzlers: Abbr. 60 Home to King Harald V 62 ___ good cheer! 64 Doesnt bring up 65 *Iconic feature of comedy 69 Line at the Louvre 70 Bomb shelter? 71 Sub side, maybe 72 D.D.E. challenger 73 Revenge R Us author 75 Suffix with peace 76 Bent beam 78 Biting remark? 79 *Founder of Marvels School for Gifted Youngsters87 Of two minds 88 TALK LIKE THIS! 89 Teen headache 90 Got back to, in a way 91 Prefix with cycle 92 Give ones O.K. 93 Google datum 94 Robed performer 95 Nothing seems to go my way 97 *Frequent problem faced by algebra students 100 Pump up 102 Chichi getaway 103 A street drug, briefly 104 Rural call 107 Stoop 108 *Horror flick starring Humphrey Bogart as a mad scientist, with The 114 Something LOL-worthy 115 Water, wryly 116 Canadian coin named for a bird 117 The ___ Project (Fox comedy) 118 In hot water? 119 Thrive DOWN1 Something dirty kept in a cell? 2 ___ de la Socit 3 Complain, complain, complain 4 Kid-tested breakfast cereal 5 50/50 6 Admit it! 7 J.Los birthplace 8 Shot caller 9 Danger for Indiana Jones 10 Spring river breakup 11 Siren, say 12 Not so great 13 Member of the music industrys former Big Four 14 Part of a Napa Valley tour 15 Whack-___ 16 With 58-Down, a patient process? or a hint to two consecutive letters in the answer to each of the seven starred clues 17 What one might go for a spin in? 18 Any cha in the cha-cha-cha 21 How lines of latitude run 24 Mount Zions land: Abbr. 30 Couples 31 Scratch, say 32 Rest stop 33 The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind per H. P. Lovecraft 34 Cousin of a gazelle35 Drink with two lizards in its logo 36 Club 37 Bleah! 38 Have second thoughts about 40 Clueless and Bridget Joness Diary 42 Sponsorships 43 Serengeti prey 45 Put away for safekeeping 46 Hugs and kisses, at times 47 Paint variety 48 Type-A friend from Friends 50 One turning to the right 51 Lose everything 52 Certain bean 56 Hair-razing stuff? 57 Loud beast heard in theaters 58 See 16-Down 59 Bamboozled 61 Like gathering storm clouds 63 No-holds-barred 66 ___ and Thummim (sacred Judaic objects) 67 Need ___? (query to hitchhikers) 68 Barons blade 73 Theyre 18 to 21 74 Things for here and now 77 More pink, perhaps 80 It can be prickly 81 Jib, e.g. 82 John Candys old comedy program 83 Motor with some muscle 84 You might get stuck with them 85 Book after Galatians: Abbr. 86 Nutritional info 88 Photogs choices 92 It may help catch a fugitive 93 Like Brandos Don Corleone 94 Disappear, as a trail 96 Good heavens! 97 Eject, as froth 98 Retired govt. agent 99 Co. making arrangements 100 Dutch wheels 101 Member of the old Chero-Cola product line 102 Chop-chop! 104 Radius, e.g. 105 Seed casing 106 Jump on ice 109 Jet crew, briefly 110 Quick time-out 111 Scream at a ring 112 Bit of love talk 113 Drag 123456 78910111213 1415161718 19 20 2122 23 24 25 26 27 28 2930 3132 3334 35 363738 39 40 414243 44 4546 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 5556 57585960 6162 6364 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 7475 76 77 78 7980 8182 83848586 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 9596 97 9899 100101 102 103 104105106 107 108109 110111 112113 114 115 116 117 118 119 Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Solution on D3 Staff ReportChristian Brothers Au tomotive, a fast-growing automotive service and repair franchise sys tem, opened a new lo cation this week at 2659 E. Highway 50 in Cler mont. Located just east of the Clermont Water Tower, directly across from Super Target, the nearly 5,000-squarefoot location includes nine service bays, as well as an upscale lobby with artwork, hardwood oors and Wi-Fi. We are excited to serve the Clermont community with integrity and excellence, and provide the Nice Difference that Christian Brothers is known for, Bryce Merideth, who co-owns the new shop with his wife Shannon, said in a press release. Never again will you have to worry about being taken advantage of in the automotive in dustry. Christian Brothers Automotive provides full-service automotive diagnostic testing and evaluation, maintenance programs and re pair work for all domes tic and foreign vehicles at each of their loca tions nationwide. All Christian Brothers Automotive facilities are staffed with technicians certied in automotive service excellence. The Merideths were both born and raised in Central Florida. Bryce worked for the largest rubber manufacturer in the world and was the customer service representative for their Florida commercial ac counts. Shannon cur rently works part time in a dental ofce near downtown Orlando. Opening the new Christian Brothers shop is the culmination of Bryces lifelong dream to own an auto motive service facility, he said. Christian Brothers Automotive features more than 120 locations and an additional 25 under development in 18 states, including Alabama, Arizona, Ar kansas, Colorado, Flor ida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Mis sissippi, Missouri, Nebraska, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Texas. Christian Brothers Automotive began selling franchises in 1996 and continues to grow at a pace of 15 to 20 stores annually, the company says. For information about Christian Broth ers Automotive in Cler mont, go to www.cbac. com/store/clermontor nd them on Face book at www.facebook. com/CBAClermont.CLERMONTNew auto repair shop opening SUBMITTED PHOTO Bryce Merideth co-owns Christian Brothers Automotive in Clermont with his wife Shannon. The Merideths have a 6-month-old daughter named Aubrey. Staff ReportA fundraiser will be held Saturday in Groveland to help Henrietta, the ema ciated beagle/walker hound who gave birth to her puppies via Caesarean section at the Lake County Animal Services shelter last month. The 6-year-old dog was located by Animal Services ofcers in Umatilla, already in labor, and rushed into the shelter where veterinarian Dr. Ju lie-Anne Corda per formed the emer gency surgery to save Henrietta and her tiny puppies, Elisha Pappacoda, county pub lic information ofcer, said in a press release. Animal Services volunteer and pho tographer Whitney Luckhart has been fostering Henrietta ever since, and re ports Henrietta is gaining weight and perking up on her special high fat, high protein diet. Henrietta, who is being treated for heart worms, and her pup pies, will all be put up for adoption through the South Lake Animal League (SLAL) when they are healthy. I think she will make some family very hap py, Luckhart said. In the meantime, Luckhart has or ganized a pet pho to shoot fundraiser to benet Henrietta and her puppies. The event will be Satur day 29 at the SLAL, 4648 Baptist Island Road, Groveland. For a $10 donation, pet owners will receive a mini-photo session with their animals.TAVARESFundraiser planned for dog found in labor PHOTO COURTESY OF LAKE COUNTY ANIMAL SERVICES Six-year-old Henrietta was located by Lake County Animal Services ofcers in Umatilla, already in labor and rushed to the shelter. SUBMITTED PHOTO February Terric Kids at Groveland Elementary School were: Madelyn Dykes, Faith Richardson, Payton Branner, Allyson Vidal, Santiago Rodriguez, Sadie Fountain, Akari Durham West, Jamarkis Harvey, Caleb Sells, Barbara Frazier, Anthony Iorio, Emilie Taylor, Malachi Akrong, Skylar Tarquine, Avalee Lane, KaMora Dorsey, Rionn Roy, Brianna Milner, Nayeli Jaimes, Kendall Brackey, Joannie Rodriguez, Sophia Carrier, Haleigh Lewis, Chelsie Hubbard, Kasey Tyson, Datcha Charles, Jaipaul Singh, Jessica Jordan, Reynaldo Morado, Adrian Gutierrez, Chandani Narain, Santos Aguilar, Denise Martinez, Carla Armas, Shayla Jenkins, Reginal Boyd, Olimey Arroyo, Andres Acosta, Sebasitan Gonell, Thomas Hopper. Principal, Kimberly Sneed-Jarvis. Kiwanians of the Club in Clermont: Fred Fallman, Dave Lofgren and Alan Garcia.GROVELAND ELEMENTARY TERRIFIC KIDS

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Wednesday, March 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C3 residence to $8.25. Clermont High School senior Stacy Spradlin won the the Victorian Pageant at the Ramada Inn in Altamonte Springs. Imagine This was the January bulletin board theme created by Mrs. Sandra Reaves rstgrade class at Groveland Elementary. Integrating disciplines of social studies, language, creative writing, science, math, reading and art, students imagined what it would be like if it snowed in Florida in the winter. Ed Fleming and Green Valley Country Clubs Tournament Committee had a new tournament. Members played the front nine twice, with handicap, to gure the low net for just one, the best nine. Reporter Betty Mohan said it was great; you played your own game and tried to better your score, but it didnt keep you from encouraging your partner. Clermonts Ricardo Lewis set the Flagler College scoring record with a 40-point perfor mance against Edward Waters at the Saints gymnasium in St. Augustine. Honors keep rolling in for Clermont athlete Cedric Jones, son of Mary Jones, as he closes out his career at Western Kentucky University. The most recent award was the Most Outstanding Special Team plaque for the 1988 season. Cedric participated in the NCAA 1988 Division 1-AA quarternals and was Offensive Player of the Week in the Austin Peay game for his kicking efforts. Jeff Ladd, cur rent president of South Lake (Breakfast) Kiwanis, presented 1987-88 president Steve Grimm with a handsome plaque. Ladd also presented a plaque to 1986-87 president Mike Conley. Clermont Junior High Schools student publication, The Iron Feather, asked students, What is the most needed facility for teens in Cler mont? Shawn Tier ney: movie theater and park for skaters. Melissa McGibbon: ice skating palace. Angie Costly: a mall (with at least a Belk-Lindsay included). Brett Green: water park and movie theater. Christi Vance: larger, better schools. In 1929 Harry Stokes and Leonard Fields started Stokes and Fields Insurance Agency upstairs in the Roe Building. Fred B. Kreider bought it in January 1946, and Axel Olivenbaum was employed as an agent, and bought the company in October 1950. During the years Ol ivenbaum served on active duty with the U.S. Air Force in the Korean War, his sister, Mrs. Anna Braddock, operated the agency. In February 1966, it was purchased by the Millican and Beseke Agency. Olivenbaums son, Glenn, joined the agency in 1971, after being discharged after ve years in the U.S. Air Force. The agency was incorporated in 1978 as Olivenbaum Insurance, Inc. with Axel as president, Glenn as vice president and Ruth Harrison as secretary/treasurer. Another of Olivenbaums sons, Donald, joined the agency in 1979 as an agent and became vice president in 1980. Glenn moved up to president and Axel became secretary/ treasurer. In 1980, the rm moved next door from 776 Montrose St. (now home to South Lake Art League) to 892 Montrose St. On September 1, 1981, the rm purchased Don Meeker Insurance. In 1989, Donald had just completed 20 years service in the 20th Special Services Army National Guard. Glenn and Don, who were active members of the Cler mont-Minneola Lions Club, sold the agency and are retired. HISTORYFROM PAGE C1 They are great people and their success underscores their pas sion and commitment for the Ritters brand, it reinforces the quali ty and longevity state ment we are trying to promote as a compa ny and we appreciate it. In early March, the Stellhorns took the mobile Ritters truck to various events, in cluding Pig on the Pond for the Kids, a signature community event. Since then, they have been work ing with the Nation al Training Centers softball tournament, where they have been offering free custard to team members. The Stellhorns are planning a celebra tion for later this spring in honor of their 10-year anniver sary in Clermont. Ritters Frozen Cus tard was founded by John and Bonnie Rit ter in 1989 in Franklin, Ind., after perfecting their own frozen custard recipe. RITTERS FROM PAGE C1 SUBMITTED PHOTO Clermont Toastmasters would like to congratulate, left to right, Greg Antill, Best Speaker and Most Improved; Gordie Allen, Best Evaluator and Best Table Topics and Dr. Thomas Spencer, Club President, at the March 3 meeting. Clermont Toastmasters meets Mondays at 6:30 / p.m. at the SDA Church at 100 Minnehaha Ave. in Clermont. Call 352-234-6495. TOASTMASTERS WINNERS

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C4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 26, 2014 CLERMONT BLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSAMILYELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time! IRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONTL Many Other Activities each week Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.org LIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLCHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm SOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary); 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.org ST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am (Rite I) 10:00 am (Rite II) 5:00 pm (Praise & Worship) Sunday School Youth Group Nursery Adult Bible Study Womens Bible Study Mens Prayer Breakfast WOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH GODINCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALE ERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for Children Groveland IRSTBAPTISTCHURCH GROVELAND Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pm MT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! MINNEOLA CONGREGATIONSMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club NEWLPRESBYTERIANCHURCH18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am TLIVINGGOD Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce Rowland MONTVERDE WOODLANDSLUTHERAN15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 am OAKLAND PRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforSouth Lake South LakeGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOMErfn tbt352-394-7121806 W. Minneola Ave.,Clermont,FL Cremation ChoicesDirect Cremation$675Plus Container Ron Becker,Director352-394-8228921 S.US Hwy 27,Minneola,FL SUBMITTED PHOTO The men and women of Kings Ridge in Clermont call themselves the Friends of Mike Conley Hospice House and recently raised $25,933 at a gala beneting the Cornerstone Mike Conley Hospice House, surpassing last years amount. Pictured from left to right are Friends of Mike Conley Hospice House President Carol Diesl, Cornerstone Hospice Foundation Regional Development Director Carol Felder and Cornerstone Hospice Foundation Executive Director Nick Buchholz.KINGS RIDGE CHECK PRESENTATION SUBMITTED PHOTO Pictured is Bill Weckerly, president of the Rotary Club of South Lake County, presenting a childrens book to be given to a local elementary school in honor of guest Jennifer Tierna, pharmacy manager at Walgreens in Clermont. Tierna spoke at the meeting on the importance of pharmacist/consumer relations in taking medications. The Rotary meets at noon every Tuesday at the Golden Corral restaurant at State Road 50 in Clermont.TIERNA GUEST AT SOUTH LAKE ROTARY

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Wednesday, March 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C5 TODAYMINNEOLA CHARTER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ONGOING REGISTRATION FOR PRE-K FOR 20142015: Call the school, 320 E. Pearl St., at 352-394-2600 and ask for Marilyn Hampton for information and new registration procedures.THURSDAYSOUTH LAKE 912 PROJ -ECT HOSTS KRAIG MC LANE: At 7 p.m., Cl ermont Community Center in downtown Cl-ermont. McLane from the St. Johns River Wa -ter Management Dis -trict will address water issues in Lake County and Central Florida. SATURDAYCLERMONT KIWANIS ANNUAL CHICKEN BARBE -CUE AT CLERMONT COM -MUNITY CENTER: From 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. at 620 W. Montrose St., in Cl -ermont. $7 per person. Proceeds provide funds for Kiwanis youth pro -grams in the schools of south Lake County. For ticket information, call 352-394 6098. TUESDAYSOUTH LAKE ART LEAGUE JEWELRY WORK -SHOP: Learn to make your own earrings and necklaces from 2 to 4:30 p.m., at the Cagan Art-ists Boutique Studio, 16640 Cagan Cross -ings Blvd., in Clermont. Class fee is $20 with a $5 materials fee. Pre-regis -tration required at the studio or by calling 352-638-3736. APRIL 5 EAT THE WEEDS HEALTHY AND EDIBLE NATIVE PLANTS WITH THE LAKE BEAUTYBERRY CHAPTER OF THE FLORIDA NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY: At 10 a.m., Cooper Memo-rial Library, 2525 Oakley Seaver Dr., in Clermont. Free event.To place an item on the calendar, send an email to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...Totally UniqueTotally Unique is proud to be Clermonts first ORGANIC hair salon. We care about your beauty, your wellness, the environment and our community, so we use organic and sustainably harvested products whenever possible. We specialize in organic hair color, hair care products, nail and skin care lines. Our salon is one of the oldest salons in Clermont and is located at 786 W Montrose Street in Historic Downtown Clermont. Our stylists are experienced in all phases of hair care including color, straighteners, cuts, texture and styles. Hair stylists are Marjorie Morphet, Tina Foote, Sherie Wolkens and Jamie Rhoades. Our nail techs, Jennifer Vandergrift and Jamie Rhoades, perform pedicures and manicures using Zoya nail products (which are Big 5 free). Shellac manicures, lasting up to three weeks, are also available by Jennifer and Jamie. We have two pedicure chairs in a private room for your relaxation and enjoyment. Relaxing and therapeutic facials are available by Jennifer in our private upstairs facial room. Massage services include chair massage, Swedish and Deep Tissue. Massage services are also done in a private room in our upstairs area. We utilize several massage therapists and provide massage by appointment only. We also offer a small boutique with handcrafted jewelry and hair accessories, Art by Tina Foote and Jamie Rhoades, and other unique items. Salon hours are 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Saturday and open Sundays by appointment only. Evening hours are also available by appointment. We pride ourselves in providing a friendly, relaxing environment for our clients and friends. Stop by and visit or call 352-394-5005 for more information. We are also on Facebook and www.TotallyUniqueSalon.com. LOOKING FOR PARTS? SEE JULIE (352) 394-6111 Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! COMMUNITY CALENDAR SUBMITTED PHOTO Mascotte Elementary School Terric Kids for February are: Isabella Campbell, Kylie Kieft, Shamariyah Peterson, Itzel Reyna, Ian Moua, Carson Van Den Bogaert, Noah Vargas, Adan Cabrera, David Silva, Alyssa Bustos, Nazario Delgado, Zachary Bisaillon, Florareli Cortez-Gonzalez, Bryson Queen, Evan Phillips, Arelli Jimenez, Aneesa Ramdass, Diego Jimenez, Leslie Brown, Kimberly Lupian Esquivel, Ryan Kieft, Emily Spears, Austin Bowling, Toryana Dyson, Makayla Franklin, Jehson Pena, Carlos Samaniego, Juan Arenas, Nick Garcia Irizarry, Felix Flores, Zaiden Ramirez, Daniela Ramirez, Emily Morales, Oseas Otero, Dalton Thomas, Stetsen Terry, Michelle Camara, Keyvarion Krull, Donovan Maynard, Rileigh McCue, Carlos Sanchez. Also pictured are Kiwanians Mr. Wallace and Dr. Soyini Ayan, and Principal Wayne Cockcroft. Not pictured: Eliseo Gonzales and Sergio Garcia.MASCOTTE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TERRIFIC KIDS

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C6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 26, 2014 Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) Serena Morizio, a ninth grader at Montverde Academy and member of the 2012-13 MVA Equestrian Team, appears as a horse trainer in the independent lm NOZOMI. The 10-minute short lm won the 2014 Enzian Theatre Film Slam held at the Enzian Theatre on Feb. 9 in Orlando, and the International Florida Faves Love Your Shorts Film Festival, Feb. 1417 in Sanford. Renee Morizio, Serenas mother, is the lms producer.SUBMITTED PHOTOMVA EQUESTRIAN IN SHORT FILM

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Wednesday, March 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D1 rfntbrr rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrff nrrrrrrrrrrff ttbrrrrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rfntbbt rfrntn nnnftbnbn brfbnrb bnbtn brnnrtnftbn tbrbttb nnnrfrbtb nbb n fbfn t brbnbbbtn nnnntnbbtr bbbfrf rtfnbtr rrbrfnnnrfnt t rf r fntb rr ftfnnffn f b rbfbn f nnfb t rf ffftt tntnftfntntt nntnfnttf nfnntnn tttbtnf frnffttnnfft tttnntntnf ntttfn nttfnttff fnnbfnnnfftf tfnnntnnfttt nnnnftf ftnfbfntnfn bbtnttf fnfnfnbttt ntnftnfnt ftftnntfn nttnnntnnnt fftntnfnnnfn tnnfnfnnnnff ttnnnnfnntfb tfbb ntnt n nn tb f r r r ttntfrnrtfn tnfrtfntfnf tnfftftnf ntnfnttnffn nftnnffnnnb fttt tt tnfnfttftnt nftbntt tnttffbb nfnntntnnf fftntftnftt tfrfnrfnbrfnfr bntfnnbt ffnnbnfnfttfnf b tb f r fntb rr ftfnnffn f b rnf nnfb t rrf r ffftt tntnftfntntt nntnfnttf nfnntnn tttbtnf frnffttnnfft tttnntntnf ntttfn nttfnttff fnnbfnnnfftf tfnnntnnfttt nnnnftf ftnfbfntnfn bbtnt fnfnfnbttt ntnftnfnt ftftnntfn nttnnntnnnt fftntnfnnnfn tnnfnfnnnnff ttnnnnfnntfb tfbb ntnt n nn tb f r fntb rr ftfnnffn f b rnf nnfb t r ffftt tntnftfntntt nntnfnttf nfnntnn tttbtn rnnttftt nnffttttnnt ntnfnttt fnnttfnt tfffnnbfnnnff tftfnnntnnftt tnnnnftf ftnfbfntnfn bbtnttf fnfnfnbtttntn ftnfnt ftftnntfn nttnnntnnnt fftntnfnnnfn tnnfnfnnnnff ttnnnnfnntfb tfbb ntnt n nn tb f r fntb rr ftfnnffn f b rrrf rrnf nnfb t rr rfr ffftt tntnftfntntt nntnfnttf nfnntnn tttbtrnf fnnttfttn nnfnfnnfftt ttnntntnf ntttfn nttfnttff fnnbfnnnfftft fnnntnnftttn nnnftfftnf bfntnfnbbt nttf fnfnfnbtttntn ftnfnt ftftnntfn nttnnntnnnt fftntnfnnnfn tnnfnfnnnnff ttnnnnfnntfb tfbb ntnt n nn tb f r fntb rr ftfnnffn f b rrrf rrnf nnfb t rfr ffftt tntnftfntntt nntnfnttf nfnntnn tttbtrnf fnnttfttn nffttttnntntn fntttfn nttfnttff fnnbfnnnfftft fnnntnnftttn nnnftfftnf bfntnfnbbt nttf fnfnfnbtttntn ftnfnt ftftnntfn nttnnntnnnt fftntnfnnnfn tnnfnfnnnnff ttnnnnfnntfb tfbb ntnt n nn tb f r fntb rr ftfnnffn f b rbnf nnfb ffftt tntnftfntntt nntnfnttf nfnntnn tttbtrn fntttfttn nffttttnntntn fntttfn nttfnttff fnnbfnnnfftf tfnnntnnfttt nnnnftf ftnfbfntnfn bbtnt fnfnfnbttt ntnftnfnt ftftnntfn nttnnntnnnt fftntnfnnnfn tnnfnfnnnnff ttnnnnfnntfb tfbb ntnt n nn tb f r r r nnfnttnftnt ntntntnfnt ttfnftf fntnfntf fnttfttf tnfnfbffnfn nfnfnnttn rfntff ftfnbttn fnfntfntfttnb nfntfnffn tnnt rtntfnttf fnt nnfnffn nnn tnttntnb nnfnnnnn ffnttnfnnt tfffnnfnn ntbfbtntf rfnntnnnfntf ntbntnntnttf nffnntntb nttnffnnfn fnnnnfnttn nntfnttf ffntnnnfn ntbfbtntf rfnbnnttfn tftntntfnn nnnnnnntnnf tntnnfnf ttnftnffrft fffnntfb ntnfftftn fnnntnn tnnftnntntnb ntnfnttnf tnnntntnnnt btntfrfnn ntnnftfttn tnttnnftnnt nntnnntb nntbtntf rfntnnfnttf fnnnfnttntfn ftfnfnttnnf tnnttnnfntn fntftbnntnff fttnnttnfffn fnfnftnfnntb nfntfnttnfnt nftfnnntf tnffntfntt nnfffnnnft nfnntbf btntfrfnb nnnntftnn fnftnfntfn nttnntntn tftttfnn btntffntnb ntfnnfnfft nnfnftfn tfntttft fnfnfnfnntnn tnfntnnfnfnf nntnntnntn nnnfnfnnfnn nftnfnt nnfntftfn fnnttfnnf ntnnnntntnnfn ft fnnttnfntn ffnnfnfnnn nfnft fnntfnnt fnffbnnfntnnnt tfn nfnntffnntn tnffnnfttftt nnfnft tnfnntnfnf fnnfnfnnffn nnnntntnnf fnntnnntn ntnfnnnftf nntnfnnfntfnb ntftntnnfnf ftnnfnft fnffnftffn nftnnftfnfn tftfntftnfnn nbb nfnnffnnftn nnttfnffnft ntfntnffn nfnfftfnnn tnttfntnb nttnffnnn fnnffnttn nfnfnntntt ntnfftntnn ftfnnnnnnt ftnb nftnntbtn tfrfntfffnt tnnb nfftfffnt nttfnt fbbtbbtft fnnnftffnnf ntnnfnt tnftntfn tnfrnftb tb f rf r fnn ttbnftntt nb nt r r r r r r r r r r r b r r b r r r r r r r r r b r r r r b r r r r r r r brn r r t f r f n f n f n n f t t f n t t t n t f t t n f n t f n t t n f n f f f f n t n t f n n t t n n n n f n n n f f n b t f r f n f n t n t f f n n f f n f t f n n n n f n t t f f n n n n t f b n f n f n t f t n t n f n f n n t n b n t t f n f n n f r n f t t t n t n n b n b f rfnn

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D2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 26, 2014 rfntbf rf r f n t b b b t t t b f t b nt rrb fbt ttbnt b r r b t b f f b b t b t t b f t n r b t b b t f b t b f b t t f f b t b b n t b f t b t t t b b t f f f f t n b r r n t n b t t t t t t n t n t f t t n t f n t t b b b t t b t b t f t n f t b t t t b t t b t t f t b b f f b f b f b t n b t f t b t b b b n n b t t t f t t f n b t b b t b t t n t t t b t n b n n t b b b t t b b b b b b f b b t r t f b n n t t b t b t t b f b t b t n t b f t b b t b n b b f b n b t b t n b t r t b t t t b t t f b t t t b b b b t t t b t b f t b b b t f n t b t t f r f b t t t b b t b n t f b t b f t t n t b t b r r t n n t b n t f t t f f n t b t r r r t b t f f t b f f t f t btntfb ntbn t b t n f r n t b nr bftf f f t b t n b t b t b b b t b f r b t b t b b r r t t b f f b t b f r n b t b t t t b n t n n t f f n n b b b t r r ftbnn tbttnt tbffbtbnb b r r tb btbnt ftbt ttfbt ttftfnff nt ffbtbnbt tb b r r t b b b t n r bft bfbtfftbtn bbtt f f f t f b fb tt r t b f f r r b t t t f f t f r b b t nf nttn tb r r ftbttttb tnbttt r t b f f r r b r r n f b b t t t f n b t b f f t f b n f f f t f b t t t f n b t b f f t f b tb bt fb tb r r r b b t f b t f f t b t f f t f b r t b t t b n r r b t b r f f b t b r r tf rfb b f f t f b r t b t b b b r t t f t b f b b t r r f f t n t t f t b f b b t r r f f t n f t t t t f f t t b b b t b r r r t t b f t b t t f f b b b f f t t r t r f b b t b t t b n f f t t t t b t t t t f t t t b b t b f b b t t t b t t f f f t f b r r tttbrbtt tnbt ftbtttt bttbbtnb ntb btt b t n t b n t f f t b t t f t r f f f t b t b b n n t b t f f b b t b b r r r b n f f b t n n b b t t t r t t n b b b t t b t b t b f b b b n t b b f t f f r r r r t t b t t t b b n n f t b n n b b b b b n f t t b t b b t t t b f b f f t b t t b t t t b b f n n t b r t r b r t t t b b t t t n f t t b b b t f f b t b n r r ntbtbtf tnttbbtb btbtnb tttb tfftbn tttbb btnbb tbbnn fbtbtfntbtb ffbtbnb b b t b f f r t b t f f b t b f f r btt tt f f b t b b b t b n f r f f n r r b r r t b t nfbtbt btftbttb bfntbft fnbttbbtbfb ttttb t b t t b r r n rt ftt bbt tn rr b n b r r t tt rr br br n bt rr t rr bttt tbr t brr tbt brr tb tr f t t t t r r n rr nbfrr rr b b r r r r r r n b b f b t b b b t t b r t t b rr tbttb nrr bbft bn t rr fbft bftbrtbb rr rr t r r tb nrr b rr b rr ttbnt rr bt rr tbfb trr ttb ttb rr nbt rr rr rr fb rr r r r btr rr rr r r bn rr r r r r n rr tb bbtbbr r bb rr ftfnbt trr t rr t rr btb rr nt rr nfbb trr tbb rr btb rr nnb rr f b r r r r tb rr n rr tb trr tb trr r r f t r r t b f t b b b t b t t r r btb frr tf rr ftbnb rr ftbnb rr ftbttt rr nb nbfnbr nb rr nbt rr bt rr tn rr nb rr nb b tftt tb tbnb btrr tbt rr tfb nbr r btb tbntr rr r tb rr b ttr t trr tt rr b ftbrr tbnt btr f b t b b b rr f b t b b b rr ttt br r tt rr t br tb btrr ft r ft rr bbb rr r tbr fb t r r nbt nbn fftr ftbbb rr ft rr ft nbbt btttb rr b t n b b b f r ff fr ffnt rr fbt bbr fft tbrr rr b brr tb rr rr fb tb rr r r ft tt rr rr r t fbrr bbt rr bb tr b rrrr

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Wednesday, March 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D3 rfntbrr rf nf n n nn t ntr nn t n rr nr rfrr frrfrr rfn trbnn n rfnb b b rf n r rfrn nrfnr bn nbrfb rn fnr n rfr tr ffr n b f r b n b tfn rb b rfnn b t rrfn b b b b nrtrfr nnn b b rfnr tn rfnrnn fnnb b r r f n r n n tfn b rfnrnn r trfrb tbf fr t n n r r f n r b tr rfb b tr rfnnr b rr fnnfrnn b br nrr fnnr rrbr frb rr f r n b r rfnnbn nrftr n t trr rfb b r trfnr rfnnnn rfrnnb b fnb t f n r n b rr fnrb r rrfnrnn b r brfr rfrn rff b b rtr rrfnnr rt trr fnntrnn r fntrn bbnn trfb bnr fnnrbn rt trfrn rn rrfnnt b ntbb f b b r rrfnnrn ntbb f b b t r f n r b t trfrnn f b fn bt ntrrfrnn b rfnr b b b b r f n r b b b r f n r b b b r fnnrb b b b r fnnrb b b r f r n r ftr t trfnnrn f trfnr b b br fb b b nt rfbn b b nntr rfnbn b b t rfnnrn b b r rfr b b fn bn b b t r r f n r n trfnr b r f n n r b r f n n r b trfn nnn fnrtrn f r rfntrn tr rr fb nfrb n rr fnrbn f r rrfnr nnrnrr fnntrb r r r f n r ftrb n rr tfnr br fnnrbn b nntrr fnnbn nn f n fbfb r n t b n tt fnn f f n f f r t f f f b nr b rfnr rbnn r fnnrb nnn n fbf r rrrb n rb rrfnr rfnnnnr r b r b n r nf fbfb r n t b n tt fnn f f n f f r t f f f b rbr rb rfnnrrnnn n r b b r r r f n b n nf fbf r r r r r b n n n b r r nf f rtr rr rfnnrfnr b r r r r t r f n n r r f n n r r f n n r f r r n r

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D4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 26, 2014 A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services 352-431-9481Residential / Commercial rfnfftbrftb f Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Concrete Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Handyman Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. Insurance Services Irrigation Services Landscaping Services r fntbb Lawn Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Painting Services Airport Transportation Enclosure Screening Fencing Services Bathroom Remodeling Handyman Services BOYDSYou call it, We haul it!352 460-7186 Marine Services HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314 HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314 Cleaning Services Land Clearing Services Lawn Services Electrical Services

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Wednesday, March 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D5 Psychic Services Pressure Cleaning Restaurants JAMAICAN GEORGECARRIBBEAN & SOUL FOOD RESTAURANT (352) 455-18982502 W. Main St. Leesburg, FL 34748Goat Soup Curry Chicken Curry Goat Ox Tail & More Tile Service Shower Doors Service Tree Service Veterinarian Services Window Services All About Appliances repairs and installs all brands of major appliances. We are a small husband/wife company. Eric has over 15 years experience repairing appliances and Lavinia (Vinnie) has over 20 years in business management experience. Together, we strive to offer you prompt, professional, courteous and personal services far beyond your expectations, both by phone and in your home. We respect you and your time and make every effort to be in and out of your home as quickly as possible yet provide a thorough diagnosis and timely repair. We genuinely appreciate all your business. Pals Gals Services, Inc. has been owned and operated by Patti Kauffman and Kellie Kennedy since 1986. They are a multifaceted business offering a wide a variety of services, which include interior and exterior painting, faux painting, wallpaper removal and installation, tile and grout cleaning, tile and grout removal and installation, and grout staining. They also install wood floors and can refinished your old wood floors, to make them look brand new. They can help you with color choices and give advice on what is practical or not! They can help resolve your honeydo list such as minor plumbing, electrical, drywall, cabinets, counter tops for your home or office. They pride themselves on quality womanship, dependability and trust. They know how difficult it is to find someone you trust and actually show up on time. They are a referral based business relying on previous clients to spread the word. They are two very talented ladies that take extreme pride in their work and take each job personally. They know how important making choices about your home or office can be and are more than willing to help with each decision.GIVE THE GALS A CALL, THEY CAN DO IT ALL!!! 352-787-4089 Veterinary Care in the Convenience of your own home! and for you Services include Wellness exams, including vaccines and parasite screening, Blood work, Skin and ear issues, Digestive or Urinary tract issues, Health certificates, Kathie L. Robinson, DVMDr. Robinson has over 16 years experience as a veterinarian.VISITING VETERINARIAN, LLC 352-408-3666 FAX: 352-253-2443VISITINGVETERINARIAN@AOL.COM To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact Michelle in the Classified Department at (352) 365-8233 or by email michelle.fuller@dailycommercial.com Plumbing Services Tree Service Roofing Services Window Services

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D6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 26, 2014 rfntbf rffrntb rtrrfbt f b b t t rtfb frr r t r n b t b b b t ffr r rfrffbtrt btt bfrrtrrfr frbtt btrtbrr frtrrfrrtbtbfbtt bttr rfn rn b f t t b b t r t b t b f b t t t r r r r f tbf fnbfrrbbf rffrff rfrbtfffbtt f n b f b r r t r r r t r r f ff n trbfbt tbbfrb bfbbfrbfb bfrrbrfbfrr frt bfbfbbbtt rrtb ff trbfbt tbbfrb ffbf trbrfbtbb rrfbttfrrfrttrrf trbrfr tbfbfb rtbffbttr bfr bfbrrftb tfrttrrfrfrb rbbfbfrr bfrrt rbfrrfrf rrbbfrntb bfrtft rtbttrffrntbrfbbfbtr ff n b f r f r b f b r r f r r r n bfrn rffrntb rtrrfbt f b b t t rtfb frr r t r n b t b b b t ffr r rfrffbtrt btt bf rffrr btt rr r r f f n f b f f r f r f r rn r f f n f b f f r f r f r rnn tbf btb frfbrfb bttrfbt bfr rr b b t f r b f t t f r n b b t t b t f b b t r ff rnn frbrfbt rffrbrff br n bf bf ftb tbbtrrf brr rffrntb rtrrfbt f b b t t rtfb frr r t r n b t b b b t ffr r rfrffbtrt btt bf rffrr btt ttt btbfrfbf rrbtt b f f f r t t r t r f t b b bff ttbfbttf rtrfb fnfrf rbt brbfrf ttfr trf frbfrt bfbtt r f f n f b f f r f r f r bfrt bffftbff bfrfrfb btt bf rn n br rrffbtffrttrrf btt t r nfrt btt r bbbfrttbr ffrfbr tbfrtftb rrbrfrtfb rffbtft rf fbtf trrbrbt rtbfbt ftb fffrfbtf rr bttrbtt rrr f fbfbtt t frrfbtt nft brrrfrtbtt r f tnf bnbtt ttbf tbfrbbt bfrbbft btt frtt rt tr r f brf rrfrtr btt rfb rfb fbt bt bbrfrt frtbr btrrfrrfrrf bfrr nn n b t t bfrrr tbrr bfrf rbtt rrftbtbf rtrf t brrrf brt btbfbbtrf bfrnffbrrf tbrfbt fnf bffbtt rfr tr btt rrf fbr frrbttrf tbftfrf bttrf rnft rrr n ttbf rrb tfb tbrbf tr rf b f r f b t nn tt rrfttr rf brrr rffbtfr fbtt fnbt brrbtt fbrbt rtbf n n t b b t t rf btt rfbfrfft r rf tbt rbbbtt ffbf fbr n trb bfbtt tbf rrbff frr t r r f b f b b n b f t fbfbbftt trfbfrrnf tt ffb fbrnfbfft bttrf bfbrtbn bff bfbrtbn bff