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SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | C1 WEIGHTLIFTING: SSHS wins LakeSumter Invitational WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWSTAND INSIDE CLASSIFIED D1 CROSSWORDS C2 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN C1 SPORTS B1 VOICES A3 WORD ON THE STREE T A2 SO UTH LAKE PRE SS V OLUME 99, NO. 11 5 SECTIO N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reserved www. southlakepress.com PRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Workers with the RJ Corman Railroad Group replace ties for the railroad in Eustis on Feb. 27. 4 4 91 500 500 429 408 414 414 436 46 44 44 44 46 19 19 50 50 27 441 441 441 17 92 UMATILLA TAVARES WINTER GARDEN ALTAMONTE SPRINGS CLERMONT ORLANDOLAKE COUNTYLAKE COUNTYSEMINOLE COUNTYVOLUSIA COUNTYORANGE COUNTY N TORONTO MOUNT DORA PLYMOUTH EUSTIS 19 RAIL IMPROVEMENTS INITIATIVE The project to improve the Florida Central Railroad line through Orange and Lake counties is a massive undertaking that will require replacing 23,100 crossties, rehabilitating 25 road crossings and repairing various bridges and rights of way. The total cost of the effort is expected to be $11.4 million. WHITNEY WILLARD / STAFF GRAPHIC SOURCE: Lake-Sumter Metropolitan Planning Organization EUSTIS TO UMATILLAReplace crossties, do surfacing and right-of-way improvements. $772,633 (If funding is available) TAVARES TO MOUNT DORAInstall 6,000 crossties, do surfacing, make bridge repairs and right-of-way improvements. $960,831 LAKE COUNTY LINE TO EUSTISInstall continuous welded rail, replace crossties and do surfacing. $7.07 million PLYMOUTH TO LAKE COUNTY LINEInstall continuous welded rail, replace crossties and do surfacing. $4.3 million PLYMOUTH TO ORLANDOImprove 16 major road crossings, cut brush and do surfacing. $637,460 TORONTO TO WINTER GARDENInstall crossties, do surfacing, cut brush, improve 15 road crossings. $534,545 DORA CANAL BRIDGE REPLACEMENT$1.3 million SILVER STAR INDUSTRIAL TRACKInstall continuous welded rail and crossties, do surfacing, improve 10 road crossings. $2.78 million Light at the end of the tunnel AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com T h e massive over haul of Flori da Central Rail road through Lake and Orange coun ties could open new opportunities here to businesses that crave rail access, economic develop ment ofcials say. The $18.4 million project involves re placing rail from Apopka to Eustis, through Tavares, ac cording to the rail roads vice president BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Erik Olesen, 30, left, and John Meerleveld, 54, right, put pieces of wood into the re bags at Green Light Fire Bag in Montverde. LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com The task seemed daunting at rst. Ray and Karen Levy had been in the real es tate business for more than seven years but wanted to make a bold career move: they want ed to acquire Coldwell Banker Camelot Realty by the end of 2013. But navigating the ins and outs of the bank ing industry to secure a loan had its challenges, they said. They turned to the Lake County Business Opportunity Centers, which offers support to businesses through centers in Leesburg, Eustis and Groveland. The countys Econom ic Development and Tourism ofce has part nered with Lake-Sum ter State College and the Florida Small Business Development Center at UCF to offer training, seminars, one-on-one consultations and a comprehensive incuba tor program. The incu bator program provides ofce space, training and tools for start-up companies in the area. At the end of Decem ber 2013, the Levys were able to secure a loan and purchase the real estate company. In 2013, the Busi ness Opportunity Cen ters had 534 clients like the Levys, and 216 took part in one-on-one consultations, accord ing to Stan Austin, area manager for the Lake County Small Business Development Center. On average we serve 200 clients at a time, he said. County ofcials say the economic impact of the Business Centers on the community is not clear yet, however, be cause clients may work with the centers nine months or longer before showing results. Fur ther, because entrepre Business center to give entrepreneurs a fighting chance MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millardives@dailycommercial.com A kindergarten teacher on her way to work faces sever al charges, includ ing DUI, after al legedly driving into incoming trafc, pass ing a stopped school bus and ramming a sheriffs patrol car that was involved in the pursuit. A sheriffs depu ty said he was nal ly able to stop Moni ca Leigh Jenkins after she became penned in by other vehicles at a construction site in Eustis. Jenkins, 46, who teaches at Sorren to Elementary School, was charged with ag gravated battery on a law enforcement of cer, eeing and elud ing and DUI. According to an ar rest afdavit, sher iffs deputies received several calls early the Monday morning, March 3, about a black SUV weaving across the road in the Royal Trails area in Eu stis. A deputy re sponding to the area and driving west on State Road 44, spotted the vehicle coming at him in the wrong direction. The deputy said he turned on the lights and sirens in his marked vehicle, which caused the SUV to veer back into the prop er lane. But when the deputy turned around to pur sue the vehicle, it wouldnt stop. According to the afdavit, the driver passed a stopped school bus, and when the deputy sped in front of the SUV to stop it, the vehicle started to ram his squad car. The driver of the SUV nally stopped after she was penned EUSTIS School-bound teacher charged with DUI JENKINS SEE TEACHER | A4 SEE RAIL | A2 Completion of rail project in April could spur business development in Lake County SEE CENTER | A2

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 12, 2014 LAKE COUNTY Health Department offers immunizations at school The Department of Health ofce in Lake County will offer immunizations at local Lake County Schools begin ning on Tuesday for students who will enter the seventh grade during the 2014-15 school year. March immunizations will be held on Tuesday at Oak Park Middle School in Leesburg, and on March 20 at Windy Hill Middle School in Clermont. For information, call the Department of Health in Lake County at 352-771-5500 or go to www.lake chd.com. GROVELAND Animal League to host annual Pet Connect Carnival Join the South Lake Animal League for the 2nd Annual Pet Connect Carnival from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., on March 22, at the Petco store park ing lot, at State Road 50 and Hancock Road in Clermont. Several local animal rescue organi zations will be participating and show casing their adoptable animals. The celebration will include family-friendly entertainment throughout the day. A $10 donation registers your pet in two fashion shows at the event. For information, or to register go to www.slal.org/petconnect. CLERMONT GED exam assistance available at the library For those who need help prepar ing for the GED exam and live in the Cagan Crossings area, Lake Technical Center in partnership with the Lake County Library System is offering GED classes at the Cagan Crossings Community Library. Classes meet Monday, Tuesday and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon at the li brary, 16729 Cagan Oaks. For information, call the Lake Technical Center at 352-589-2250, ext. 1870. CLERMONT Kids needed for KidFest at Belks Boys and girls from infants to age 12 years are sought for the KidFest event at the Belk Store in Clermont, 270 Citrus Tower Blvd., from noon to 3 p.m., on March 29. Events will include music, fun, games, prizes and a fashion show. To be part of this event, call 352243-2227, ext. 210. CLERMONT Lakeridge Winery hosts wine and seafood festival Lakeridge Winery and Vineyards will host the 6th Annual Wine and Seafood Festival on March 21-23. The three-day outdoor event will feature seafood dishes, live music, an arts and crafts show and award-win ning Lakeridge Wines, on Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. A $2 donation will be accepted at the gate to benet The Autism Society of Greater Orlando, and parking is free for all guests. Guests are also invited to attend a complimentary tour and wine tasting at the event. For information, go to www.laker idgewinery.com. CLERMONT Bras for the Cause event scheduled for April Real men do wear bras when they are reghters supporting the Greater Clermont Cancer Foundations 7th annual Bras for the Cause and Boxers Too event coming on April 26, at the clubhouse at Heritage Hills. Igniting Hope is the theme for this years event. Doors open at 6 p.m. and the show will start at 7 p.m., with a memory luminary as guests exit down the walkway. Ticket are $30 in advance and $35 at the door. For information, call 352435-3202, or go to www.brasforthe causeandboxerstoo.com. Area Briefs What South Lake residents are saying about ... MARIJUANA Do you think that medical marijuana should be legalized in the state of Florida, and if so, under what guidelines? Word on the Street Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 It should be for medical purposes only. Some peo ple, just because its legal ized, theyll want to be ill. There are question that should be worked out. If youve got an illness and youre smoking this legal marijuana, can you drive? DELL GRAY CLERMONT Yes. I think so. I have heard really good stuff about it. Everything I hear is more than what it has bad. Take it for the right thing and in the right form. LENA HALL CLERMONT I think it should be le galized across the country, but no self-medicating and no self-diagnosing. Thats stupid. NICK HOFFMAN ORLANDO I believe that it should be legalized in the state of Florida, but it should be closely monitored so that people cant say they have a medical condition just to abuse the system. SHEILA GRAY CLERMONT and general manager, Pete Petree. Were taking out small (33-footlong) 1920s vintage rail an d install ing new continuous welded rail that is larger, and it comes in piec es 1,600 feet long, Petree said. You can transport heavier cars, larger trains, larger locomotives. It really provides a good infrastructure for more freight movements, heavi er freight movements, Petree said. In addition to the rail replace ments to Eustis, additional work will allow for the reopening of outof-service lines from Tavares to Mount Dora and from Eustis to Umatilla, according to Petree. The wooden ties on the rail way will be replaced between Eu stis and Umatilla, and Tavares and Mount Dora, Petree said. Road crossings are also being resurfaced during the project, most of which should be completed by April. Well be able to provide them service. We wont quite be able to provide them what we would be able to from Eustis to Apopka, Pe tree said. We can get the larger, heavier rail cars in there, but just in smaller quantities. The line from Mount Dora to Ta vares has been out of service for more than four years, while the line from Eustis to Umatilla has been out since the late 1990s, ac cording to Petree. The line from Mount Dora to Sorrento will remain out of service as the local governments saw no need for it and will try with a sep arate project to turn it into a trail, according to Petree. Robert Chandler, director of eco nomic development and tourism for Lake County, said as proper ty with rail access becomes scarce across the state, the work could be a major boon to business here. For us to now be adding back some supply, the demand is there, Chandler said. On the other side, youve got demand going up for rail-oriented freight, and the sup ply is going down in Florida. So, thats kind of a sweet spot for us. Chandler said his ofce is get ting leads from businesses inter ested in nding properties with rail access in Lake County. Its a straight economic de velopment play. Theres times when youve got to invest mon ey to get money back, Chandler said. What we have to do in Lake County is seek out ways that we can have a competitive advantage over other areas. He added on a certain scale, shipping by train is cheaper than shipping by road. According to Chandler, of Lake Countys main industrial parks, only the Eustis Commerce Park and the Southridge Industrial Park south of Tavares have rail access. But with vacant acreage along the line, new developments could come in. For the industrial parks, its cer tainly a huge advantage because theyve got either buildings that are sitting vacant in some cas es or land that hasnt been devel oped, and this just gives them one more amenity to offer to a poten tial business, Chandler said. U.S. Rep. Daniel Webster also said infrastructure is important for business. Everybodys got these ideas about whats the rst thing a busi ness looks at, Webster said. Its (going to) be infrastructure. You have to have transportation infra structure unless the business is some sort of isolated business that doesnt need to move any product, and thats pretty rare. Petree added the rail could also help reduce trafc. If you can get 300 trucks on one train, thats 300 trucks that are not traveling up and down 441, Pe tree said. Of the $18.4 million cost for the project, $13.8 million came from a state grant, $2.2 million came from a federal grant and the re mainder came from Florida Cen tral Railroad and local govern ments, including Lake and Orange counties, Tavares, Eustis, Mount Dora, Apopka, Orlando, Winter Garden and Ocoee, according to T.J. Fish, the executive director for the Lake-Sumter Metropolitan Planning Organization. neurs do not often report back after starting their businesses, there are no statistics on whether those businesses have succeed ed. Austin said the county is surveying them to gauge the success of the busi nesses that went through the program. One of the things that happens is we help them and they get their busi ness started and we dont hear from them again, Austin said. Small Business Devel opment Center programs have been instrumen tal in saving or retain ing 47,845 jobs across the state and increasing the overall size of Floridas economy by $3.9 billion in 2011-12, according to the Florida SBDC. Lake County Commis sioner Leslie Campione said, the key obstacle for start-up businesses and business expansion is ac cess to capital. It is impossible to ob tain capital and ultimate ly succeed as a business without a solid business plan, she said. Often times people have great ideas about a new busi ness plan they want to start but they have lit tle real experience in the business world. The BOCs provide practical training in skills needed to operate a business In addition to consul tations, there are train ing courses in a variety of subjects, including start up basics, business plan writing made easy, mar keting basics, nance ba sics, bookkeeping and tax basics. When the BOCs were put in place, county of cials found there were tweaks that needed to be made in certain areas, said Robert Chandler, Lake County Economic Development and Tour ism director. What we found is you cant take the blanket small business develop ment center approach and plop it into Lake County, he said. At rst, the program had mixed results, Chan dler said, because ofcials found they could not use the typical incubator pro gram in the county. With the incubator, 50 percent of our business es over the last two years are service-oriented, he said. They dont need an ofce. As a result, Chandler said they are diversifying the program, so someone does not need to use the ofce on a full-time basis. Ray Levy said the lend ing environment was not friendly when he was try ing to buy the real estate rm. We went to sever al lending institutions in that area and we heard No a lot, Levy said. He said the Business Op portunity Center helped. It helped us learn the language of communi cating with the banks about what is important to them. You are able to explain the protability of the business. Levy said Austin pro vided ways they could tweak their proposal to make it more appealing to a lender. Since acquir ing Coleman, the compa ny has achieved $10 mil lion in sales, Levy said. The Business Opportu nity Centers also educate clients about the busi ness world, Austin said. Some who take the classes decide not to open a business, he add ed. Everybody thinks it is easy to start a business, he said. RAIL FROM PAGE A1 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Shannon Hidalgo, 35, helps pack boxes at Green Light Fire Bag. The Business Opportunity Center really helped us to identify and align our current and long-term needs with our realistic capabilities, Hidalgo said. CENTER FROM PAGE A1

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Wednesday, March 12, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3 Unfulfilled promises by the governor This letter is intended for ev ery voter in the State of Flori da taking part in the upcoming Governors race. Weigh carefully all of the cam paign rhetoric spewed by the candidates. Remember all of the broken promises from the past. We have been promised the moon, the stars, a land of milk and honey and on and on. Remember those candidates who have delivered after they were elected to the ofce? They are few and far between. However, our current sitting governor, Rick Scott takes the cake as far as I can determine. He has promised us a lot. What has he delivered? Rick Scott has vowed to cut government waste by $100 mil lion by cutting money in 2014 for new roads and school build ings. Waste? Rick Scott plans to take his ght to randomly drug test state employees to the Supreme Court. He has zero chance of winning, but the people of Flor ida will have to pay for the legal fees. Waste? Despite 100 percent support in the Legislature, Scott vetoes the bill that establishes a $25 fee people voluntarily pay for the Florida Wildowers license plate, which is used to plant wildowers. Lets pink slip Rick! MICHAEL J. HARRIS | Webster Support the Bill of Rights There is a reason we still exist as a nation most people want to live in. There is a reason we must be willing to kill and die to keep The Bill of Rights: B Because we believe in freedom I I will never change my mind L Lets have liberty or death L Lets try pure Democra cy, now O One Nation F Fight and kill all tyrants now R Right means might, walk tall I In our hands lays the fu ture G Give patriots a hand in ghting H Honor, life, fortune needed to win T Take control of your fu ture now S Surrender to no tyrants. We will win. Amen. VERNON HALL | Umatilla Youth need discipline, not understanding While I agree with letter writ er Celestine Wright that no one should lose their life over loud music, I disagree at her casual take on breaking the law from time to time. Yes, we were all teen-agers but the big difference between now and then was our level of respect for adults. These are core values that are drastically absent in todays society. Wrights Kumbaya approach with peace, love and tolerance has yielded a generation of dis respectful, rude, selsh, entitled and Daddys lawyer will get me out of this youth. Again, this is no excuse to take a life. But in our time, if an adult told us to turn down the music, the reply was yes sir. Much of this loud music, pants below the waist and trash talk is for attention and to get a re action. When the reaction is achieved, the disrespect starts. Many parents have failed to instill core values and accept able behavior in their children and this results in many un fortunate outcomes. The walk away and let them be kids ap proach has fueled this series of situations. We cannot walk away from a generation of youth that are headed for trouble. Maybe parents being a lit tle more involved in their chil drens lives, stricter rules and keeping better tabs on their ac tivities would help. With regard to the incident at the core of this story, call law enforcement and let them han dle it. Its possible that the po lice ofcer bringing your child to the front door may save a few more lives and may send a wake-up call for better parent ing. This is a problem we can not simply walk away from. DAVID J. MERRILL | Eustis L ake County is fertile ground for athletics. Its why the National Training Center is lo cated in Clermont. Its why local business and government leaders are trying so hard to brand south Lake County as a destination for those interested in living active, healthy lives. And its why the area sends so many young people on to the collegiate and professional ranks in a number of sports. The Lake Minneola boys basketball team gave the region another reason to boast re cently with its courageous and inspiring run deep into the Class 6A playoffs. That the Hawks made it to the champion ship game at The Lakeland Center last Satur day was impressive enough. This, after all, is a school that has been playing varsity basketball a mere three years. But how they got there was frankly astound ing. You see, throughout the 2013-2014 season, Lake Minneola had to play the role of giant kill ers. With no starter taller than 6 feet 3 inches, the Hawks often found themselves at a decided size disadvantage in a sport where height matters. But like any good leader, Coach Freddie Cole assessed his strengths and exploited his oppo nents weaknesses to overwhelm larger teams with speed, smothering defense and superior game planning. He also threw his team against tough com petition early in the season in hopes of testing and rening them because the goal, he said, was always a state championship. Daily Commercial Sports Editor Frank Jol ley perfectly captured the essence of Hawks basketball in a column he penned right before Lake Minneolas seminal win against Ruskin Lennard. They have all the tools. On defense, they chase the basketball with the same ferocity as a lion circling its prey. On the offensive end, Lake Minneola is re lentless. The Hawks force the issue with its speed and long-range shooting. They do so many things right on the bas ketball court. In fact, if they had a little more height, Lake Minneola would be eerily close to basketball perfection. Alas, the Hawks did not achieve basketball perfection, at least as it is measured by cham pionships. They fell in the nal game to peren nial powerhouse Miami Norland 60-44. But while perfection may have eluded this group, greatness has not. Lake Minneola played inspired, heady ball, conducted itself with class and dignity and rightly earned the praise and admiration of a grateful community. No, the Hawks did not achieve perfection this year, as if that were even possible. They didnt have to. They made us proud. We take inspiration from how they played the game as much as what they accomplished. Perfection will have to wait until next year. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD ........................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST O PINION WHATS YOUR OPINION? The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the ed itor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be origi nal, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Letters to the Editor 732 W. Montrose St. Clermont, FL 34711 By fax to: 352-394-8001 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. GUEST COLUMNS If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@daily commercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. If you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veter ans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to to www.lake vet erans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANS S OUTH LAKE PRESS Your community newspaper for more than 100 years. 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001 The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Flori da 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region. All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. YOUR OPINIONS LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Hawks run was inspiring Dark history repeats itself in Ukraine Who was it that said those who do not learn from history are destined to repeat it? Many people today are too young to remember or were not taught in our dumb ed-down school system about another country with a large ethnic population who lived on the border of another pow erful dictators country saying, I only want the Sudetenland. The gutless world hoping to maintain peace allowed this rst step to take place, and we all know what happened after that. It was called World War II, and somewhere between 50 to 70 million people died. I believe that the Ukraine of today is a test of wills and the worlds resolve to oppose bul lying. You can see in old You Tube movies the smiling faces of the happy ethnic Germans as the Nazis drove across Czechoslovakias borders. I am sure many ethnic Rus sians will also smile when Ukraine splits in two or re joins Russia. One can only wonder what President Putin will want next. Let us hope this time it really does stop with just the Sude tenland, but sadly, I doubt it. ROBERT THRASHER | Fruitland Park LETTER of the WEEK DAVID AZIA / AP A man arranges candles at a memorial to victims of late Februarys clashes in Kievs Independence Square, Ukraine on March 5. OUR VIEW

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 12, 2014 DEATH NOTICES Delbert Ray Bauknight Delbert Ray Bauknight, 87, of Grov eland, FL, died Sat urday, February 22, 2014. Coleman Funer al Home. Beverly Venn Britting Beverly Venn Britting, 87, of Eustis, died Tues day, March 4, 2014. Hamlin & Hilbish Fu neral Directors. Robert E. Carr Robert E. Carr, 86, of Eustis, died Tuesday, March 4, 2014. Hamlin & Hilbish Funeral Di rectors. Irving N. Crissman Jr. Irving N. Crissman, Jr., 75, of Leesburg, died on February 28, 2014. Ronald Gauthier Ronald Gauthier, 75, of Wildwood, died Tuesday, March 5, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations. Edward Anthony Hill Edward Anthony Hill, 69, of Leesburg, died Friday, March 7, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations. Henry Littles Henry Littles, 62, of Coleman, died Sat urday, March 1, 2014. Rocker-Cusack Mortu ary, Leesburg. Robert E. Olmstead Robert E. Olmstead, 82, of Mount Dora, died Sunday, March 2, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations. Amy Ruth Schaller Amy Ruth Schaller, 63, of Fruitland Park, died Friday, March 7, 2014. Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations. Stephen Hopkin Sniffen Stephen Hopkin Sniffen, 79, of Astor, died Tuesday, March 4, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home. Harry Mason Tombleson Harry Mason Tombleson, 87, of Eus tis, died Sunday, March 1, 2014. Central Florida Cremations. IN MEMORY in by other vehicles on the road. She was penned in because trafc was at a stop for the construc tion area, as in there was nowhere else to go, said Sgt. James Vachon, sheriffs spokesman. Jenkins told deputies she had just dropped off her children at a Eustis school and was headed to Sorrento El ementary, where she teaches kindergarten, and didnt remember any of the pursuit or ramming the deputys vehicle. The afdavit adds Jenkins told depu ties that earlier in the morning she had taken hydrocodone, an opi oid derived from co deine used to treat pain and coughs. It is not clear how she performed on a subse quent DUI test, but she was arrested on DUI charges and released from the Lake County jail after posting bail. TEACHER FROM PAGE A1

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10% OFFAll options with this couponrffnntb B1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 12, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTS SPORTS EDITOR ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE .............................. 365-8268 FAX .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL ......... sports@dailycommercial.com S PORTS and LEISURE FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com P.J. Fosters senior season is becoming more magical with virtually every game he plays. The former Leesburg High School basketball stand out was named First Team All-Conference earlier in the week and then backed up the honor by helping to lead Limestone College to the Conference Carolinas tour nament championship on Thursday, earning tourna ment Most Valuable Player honors along the way. Foster scored 16 points for the Saints, an NCAA Di vision-II school in Gaffney, S.C., in Limestones 69-54 win against King University. Lime stone entered the tourna ment as the No. 4 seed in Con ference Carolinas and King was the third-seeded team. The win ensured Lime stone (21-8 overall) a berth in the upcoming NCAA Di vison-II tournament. It will mark the Saints third tour nament berth ever all coming in the past four years. In the title tilt, Foster drained four 3-pointers and handed out three assists. Fos ter scored 18 points on March 5 in the Saints Conference Carolinas seminal match up against Mount Olive, the leagues top seed a game the Saints won easily, 75-57. Foster will head into the NCAA tournament with a team-best 20.1 points per game scoring aver age. He is shooting 45 percent from the eld and 43 percent (152 of 356) behind the arc. Hes currently on a streak with at least one 3-pointer in 37 straight games. Foster is 16 triples away from breaking the NCAA Division II single-sea son record set in 1988. Fosters long-range shoot ing attracted enough atten tion this season to earn his spot on the All-Conference team, which was announced March 4. He has be come, arguably, one of the most danger ous long-range shoot ers in the nation, regardless of classication. His totals for 3-point shots attempted, made and average number of triples per game (5.3) lead all NCAA Division II players. Foster leads Limestone to league title, earns NCAA berth FOSTER FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Francisco Lindor was expect ed to have a brief run with the Cleveland Indians this spring. The former Montverde Acad emy standout was invited again this year to spring train ing in Goodyear, Ariz., but the Indians top draft pick in 2011 is playing like he plans to stick around with the big club. Lindor may have sped up the learning curve in his rst week of spring training with a .333 batting average and an OPS (On-Base percentage plus Slugging average) of 1.167. He blasted a three-run home run on March 2 against Seattle to lift the Indians to a 6-3 win. This is Lindors second spring training with the Indians. He had 24 at bats in 2013 and bat ted .292 with one RBI. After hitting .303 in the minor leagues last year and a .279 aver age in 231 games in the minors, Lindor has proven he can hit for a decent average, but the power stroke he displayed on Sunday caught many by surprise. I dont think hes going to be a power hitter, said Cleve land manager Terry Franco na. But can the guy hit the ball out of the ballpark? Hes proved he can do that. Thats part of whats fun. These guys grow into stuff. You dont know what theyre going to grow into. Lindor is considered by many baseball publications to be the Indians top minor-league pros pect. He started the 2013 season with the Class A Carolina Mud cats before earning a promo tion to Double-A Akron in July. He also played in the MLB Futures Game for the sec ond-straight year. Thats pretty heady stuff for someone who grew up in Puer to Rico and played high school baseball in southern Lake County. Lindor was named to the USA Today All-USA team while at Montverde Academy and was selected by the Indi ans with the eighth pick, mak ing him one of the highest draft picks ever from Lake County. As a professional, Lindor quickly established himself as a young player with exception al instincts for the game and one of the top defensive short stops in the minor leagues. In 1,040 elding opportunities, he has committed only 41 errors and has helped turn 145 dou ble plays. Many baseball pundits be lieve Lindor likely will spend the upcoming season in the minor leagues and make his debut with Cleveland in 2015, replacing Asdrubal Cabrera. Still, Francona wont complete ly discount the possibility that Lindor could get called up this season, although he insists Lin dor will not be rushed. Kid does everything ... Hes one of the special prospects in all of baseball, Francona said in 2013 after watching Lindor. Nonetheless, you dont want to rush a kid too much. Francisco Lindor making a splash in spring training COURTESY PHOTO Cleveland Indians shortstop Francisco Lindor throws during spring training baseball practice in Goodyear, Ariz., on Feb. 21. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com The Lake-Sumter In vitational weightlifting meet has always been one of the areas top at tractions for schools. It mayve reached a whole new level this year. A total of 11 teams competed in this years event, which was held March 5 in the South Sumter High School gymnasium. South Sumter, a long time area weightlifting power, won the team title with 58 points, fol lowed by Tavares with 37 points and South Lake with 25. Other n ishers included Uma tilla (20 points), Eustis (19), Mount Dora (17), East Ridge (14), Lees burg (13), Lake Minne ola (11) and The Villag es (6). Wildwood failed to record a score. Lifters competed in 10 weight classica tions, ranging from 119 pounds to Heavy weight (more than 238 pounds). South Sumter won six weight classications and Tavares took the top spot in two clas sications. Eustis and Leesburg won one clas sication apiece. At 119 pounds, South Sumters Valen tino Avant won with a combined weight of 355 pounds. Avant lift ed 195 pounds in the Bench Press and 160 pounds in the Clean and Jerk. He outlasted team mate Alan Macias, who lifted 350 pounds. Cody Maddux was the top lifter at 129 pounds. Maddux hoist ed a combined weight of 360 pounds to easi ly outdistance Tavares Trevor Lamm, who n ished with 330 pounds. Maddux hit 190 pounds in the Bench Press and 170 pounds in the Clean and Jerk. At 139 pounds, Eu stis Corey Davis won with 475 pounds. His closest competitor was Umatillas Brett Bush, who lifted 470 pounds. Davis had a top lift of 220 pounds in the Bench Press and 255 pounds in the Clean and Jerk. He improved his weight on each of his three lifts in both disciplines. SSHS wins Lake-Sumter Invitational BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Logan Payne of Tavares High School performs the bench press at a weightlifting tournament at South Sumter High School in Bushnell, on March 5. SEE LIFTERS | B4

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B2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 12, 2014 A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services Cleaning Services Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Concrete Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. Insurance Services Irrigation Services Land Clearing Services Landscaping Services r fntbb Lawn Services Legal Services Moving Services Painting Services Airport Transportation Enclosure Screening Flooring Services Fencing Services Bathroom Remodeling Handyman Services Lawn Services BOYDSYou call it, We haul it!352 460-7186 Marine Services

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Wednesday, March 12, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B3 Psychic Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Pressure Cleaning Restaurants Roofing Services Tile Service Shower Doors Service Tree Service Veterinarian Services Window Services Steve and Brenda Rizer have owned Blinds 4 Less since 2000. The business is still in its original location in Lady Lake. The company focuses on strong customer service and also selling the best brand names in the industry at very competitive prices. Chris Carnes Landscape has been in business since 2005 along with over 30 yrs experience in everything from hardscapes such as patios, retaining walls, to sod repair and installations, to ripout of old landscapes and design. We also can provide maintainence to your newly installed landscape or even mowing maintainence services to even sprinkler repairs. We serve all projects big or small create landscapes one lawn at a time". Mention this bio ad and receive 15 percent off when you call for your estimate on any of our services. Emerson Street Automotive has been family owned and operated for nearly 30 years. Lori and Michael Farfaglia purchased the business from Loris family in 2010. Loris father, Terrill Davis stayed as the onsite manager. Emerson Street is located at 1406 Emerson Street, right next to the Post Office in Leesburg, Florida. We are opened Monday-Friday 7:30-5:30 and Saturday 7:30-3:00. Phone: 352-326-2400. We do all kinds of automotive repair including light body work. We have state of the art diagnostic equipment that takes the guess out of repairing your car. We service all makes and models including SUVs, ATVs, and RVs. To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact Michelle in the Classified Department at (352) 365-8233 or by email michelle.fuller@dailycommercial.com Plumbing Services Roofing Services Restoration

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B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 12, 2014 SAVE MONEY! IMPROVE YOUR CREDIT!All outstanding loans, bills, credit cards One easy monthly payment. Quick! Get help, Bad credit Ok. Personal loans, Business debt consolidation Home improvement loan and othersSignature Finance & Investment ServicesCall: 1-866-284-9779Signaturemgt@nancier.com HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. Leesburgs lone win ner was Bryant Benton at 154 pounds. Ben ton totaled 470 pounds to top South Lakes Chucky Hutchinson, who lifted 435 pounds. Benton had 255 pounds in the Bench Press and 215 in the Clean and Jerk. At 169 pounds, Jose Barajas from Tava res took the top spot with 600 pounds. Bara jas winning weight was the third-high est total recorded in the meet and was the only 600-pound total by a lifter weighing less than 200 pounds. Barajas hit 315 pounds in the Bench Press and 285 pounds in the Clean and Jerk. His closest competitor was Lake Minneolas Calvin Alardo, who lift ed a combined weight of 470 pounds. Bara jas margin of victory 130 pounds was the largest in the meet. In the 183-pound classication, Estevan Barajas from Tavares picked up the victo ry with 545 pounds. He outlasted East Ridges Vinnie Martins, who had 530 pounds. Barajas secured the victory by lifting 280 pounds in the Bench Press and 165 pounds in the Clean and Jerk. At 199 pounds, South Sumters Joey Mohler walked away with the win with 575 pounds, besting East Ridges Zach Honnold, who n ished with 535 pounds. Five lifters in the classi cation totaled at least 500 pounds, includ ing Eustis Marc Wilson (510 pounds) and Nick Morey from South Lake and Jonathan Pickett from Lake Minneola at 500 pounds each. Morey was awarded fourth place because he was lighter at 196 pounds than Pickett (197.2 pounds). Mohlers winning total came from a 295-pound lift in the Bench Press and a 280-pound hoist in the Clean and Jerk. At 219 pounds, South Sumters Caleb Sim mons won with 575 pounds, followed by South Lakes Rhys Ar matti at 540 pounds. East Ridges Scott Starr was third at 535 pounds. Simmons had 330 pounds in the Bench Press and 245 pounds in the Clean and Jerk. He hit on his rst lift in the Clean and Jerk, but failed in subsequent at tempts at 265 and 270 pounds. Anthony Yurich from South Sumter won 238 pounds with a total weight of 585 pounds. Leesburgs Christian Williams was second at 550 pounds and Eus tis Tyric Reid was third with 530 pounds. Yurich hit at 300 pounds in the Bench Press and 285 pounds on the Clean and Jerk. In the Heavyweight classication, Mon tel Presley from South Sumter won with 650 pounds, outdistanc ing Mount Doras Rich ar Marinacci (620 pounds) and T.J. Mc Coy (585) from South Lake. Presley hit at 375 pounds in the Bench Press and 275 in the Clean and Jerk. LIFTERS FROM PAGE B1

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Ann Dupee REMEMBER WHEN A weekly column that reprints some of the more interest ing news stories that have ap peared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press. C1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 12 2014 www.southlakepress.com C OMMUNITY Proudly serving CLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWS STAFF WRITER ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 E-MAIL .... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com HOMETOWN: Ft. Walton Beach OCCUPATION: Senior depu ty supervisor, Orange County Elec tions Ofce FAMILY: We have three chil dren, all born and raised in Cen tral Florida. Sean Tanko (wife, Christine) is a mechanical engi neer working in Jesup, Ga.; Sarah Tanko-Vicens (husband, Alex) lives in Orlando with our granddaughter, Natalee. Sarah works for Walt Dis ney World and helps with various Kona Ice projects; Sydney Tanko is a hospitality major at UCF and also helps with Kona projects. What do you enjoy most about south Lake County? Weve always enjoyed Lake County the people, the landscape, the activities. As weve launched this business, weve been touched by how supportive people have been when we tell them were starting a new business. It seems like ev eryone knows somebody they can refer us to or an event we should check out as a possible Kona Ice location. Its heartwarming. 1) If you had to summarize your philosophy of life in one sen tence, what would it be? Make a positive impact on every body you meet. 2) Name a person or incident youve come across recently thats touched you in some way. Why did this person or incident impress you so much? Ive been pleasantly surprised at how enthusiastic our kids have been as we launch this franchise. Our daughter, Sarah, is deaf, but shes the rst one to volunteer to help with a Kona Day at a school or with working a Little League game. Our youngest daughter, FROM THE FILES | 26 YEARS AGO 1988 Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press Meet Your NEIGHBOR LINDA TANKO SEE NEIGHBOR | C2 The city of Clermont welcomes aboard its new code enforcement ofcer, Jim McFatter. He and his wife, Belle, have a 17-year-old daughter, Lynn, who is a junior at Clermont High School. Following his retire ment from Palm Beach County ambulance ser vice, the family now owns a home in Hazel wood. They found out about Clermont from former resident Shel ley Judy Stosheim, who now lives in Delray Beach. Shelley and her parents, Max and Carole Judy, showed the Mc Fatters around town. Tuesday, May 10 of this year, there will be a special referendum on a $110 million bond is sue for construction of schools in Lake County. A new consolidated Cl ermont and Groveland high school is one of the projects to be included. Mascotte City Coun cil discussed the traf c situation at Sunset and Highway 50. Police Chief Don Page stated the department has re corded an increase in tickets issued at the in tersection and said, in his opinion, the solu tion to the problem is installation of a trafc signal or ashing light. Members of local Brownie troops and Girl Scout Troop 564 were busy from 7 to 3 p.m. helping at the annual Rotary Pancake Day. Helpers pictured were Julie Stout, Tra cy White, Keisha Foun taine, Cassidy Bryan, Jamie Grant, Melony Horton, Kelly Hateld and Shauna Holt. Prices at Publix: Maxwell House Cof fee, 1lb. bag, $1.99; Kraft Squeeze Parkay Margarine, 1b. plas tic bottle, $.79; GE Soft White Light Bulbs, 4 pack, $1.88; Banquet Frozen Pot Pies, three 7-oz. packages, $.80; Green Giant Vegeta bles, 12-ounce cans, 3/$1.19. City ofcials and members of Clermont Kiwanis Club held a dedication Feb.15 at the new Kiwanis Park at the intersection of Minnehaha Avenue and 4th Street. CLEANUP OF TOWER CHEMICAL SITE Former Tower Chem ical President Ralph Roane will not pay any of the cost involved in the more than $2 mil lion cleanup of the contaminated 5-acre site on County Road 455 because of pro tection received under 1984 bankruptcy laws. Instead, the sev en-member trust that purchased the prop erty from Roane will pay a $110,000 ne, which will be applied to the cleanup in a set tlement reached re cently with the fed eral government. The LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com M ontverde Academy (MVA) has formed a new academic-arts partnership with the Flori da Film Academy in Winter Garden, which lm acade my ofcials hope will help prepare students for a ca reer in the lm industry while encouraging creative thinking. Beginning in the fall 2014 school year, 40 students from MVA will be able to enter the program for about $7,000, said Kay Hill, executive producer at the Florida Film Academy. Monday through Thurs day after school, those stu dents will be transferred to the academy, where they will receive instruction in script writing, visual sto rytelling and lm history, among other study areas. For lmmakers, it is the perfect lm academy, Hill said. By the time they graduate high school they would have entered lms into lm festivals. Hill said the academy also serves students who are not majoring in lm. It is really a platform to encourage creative think ing, she said. It is a cre ative thinking academy but is focused around a lm curriculum the visual storytelling in lm. George Karos, director of communications for MVA, said the partnership arose from the schools wish to further expand our vid eo arts programming and principal mission of in spiring students to become knowledgeable leaders with a global vision that instills a passion for learning, and that nurtures character de velopment in a disciplined and diverse community. The lm academys in structors have more than 50 years combined expe rience in broadcast and media industries, and still actively work as writers, producers, directors, cin ematographers and pho tographers for some of the worlds top networks. MVA is an internation al, coeducational, indepen dent college preparatory school for grades PK-12. For information about the Florida Film Academy or to book a tour, call 407 654-8400. MONTVERDE MVA working with Florida Film Academy PHOTO COURTESY OF FLORIDA FILM ACADEMY A Florida Film Academy student works on some editing equipment in Winter Garden. Montverde Academy has formed a new academic-arts partnership with the lm academy. SEE HISTORY | C2 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Rooms to Go was planning to open a store in Clermont six years ago but backed off because of a shaky economy. Still interested in south Lake, the com pany took another look at Clermont two years ago and pulled the trigger when of cials found the same property still on the market. The store ofcial ly opened Saturday at 13642 East State Road 50. Rooms to Go Presi dent Jeffrey Seamen, one of the companys original co-found ers, said he is excit ed to be coming to CLERMONT New Rooms to Go store display showcases every sale item SEE STORE | C4

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C2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 12, 2014 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 12thAnnualTHEGENERALFEDERATIONOFWOMENSCLUBS SPONSOREDBY THECLERMONT WOMANSCLUB DOOR PRIZESThroughout the day!ENTER TO WIN:Fabulous Prizesand much more...ADMISSIONFREE! HERESJUSTAFEWOFTHEPRODUCTS& SERVICES: HERESJUSTAFEWOFOURVENDORS: Saturday, March 22, 201410:00am 2:00pm Your First ChoiceIn-Print & On-Line OSCAR DOUBLE FEATURES By ALAN ARBESFELD / Edited by Will ShortzNo. 0302 RELEASE DATE: 3/9/2014 ACROSS1 Compadre6 Director of Carrie and Scarface13 Muss19 They put up walls21 Does some farriers work on22 Berate23 Nelson Mandela? [1995, 1985]26 She, in Lisbon27 Strike the ground in a golf swing28 On the line29 Fraternal group30 One giving unreliable testimony? [1976, 1985*]34 Blood-related36 Gang girl37 Paradigms40 Bread holder?43 Magnate46 Alternatively48 Like yaks and mynas50 Muckraker Tarbell51 Flips over53 Reason for missing a flight? [1970*, 2000*]57 Message from one whos all thumbs?58 60 With the jawbone of ___ ... (declaration of Samson)61 Purposely misinform62 First name in tyranny63 Real enthusiast65 Ending for acroor homo-66 Look-alike68 Part of a line at OHare? [2002, 1976*]73 From the top74 Hide-hair connector75 ___ cologne76 Put away79 Leader of the pack82 Insurance giant84 Part of a jazz duo?85 Noted provider of pictorial instructions86 Cheesy pickup line? [1944, 1995*]90 Bears, but not Cubs92 Novelist Patchett93 Forfeits94 Degrees for attys.96 Hound Dog or Whats New Pussycat?97 Baseballs Iron Man99 Snowmobile brand102 River to the Rhine104 V-shaped fortification106 Reason why all the computers are down? [1976*, 2005]111 Gallic girlfriend113 Surgically remove116 Pulitzer winner James117 Locale in Grays Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard118 Seaside outing? [1955*, 1954]123 Former Gracie Mansion resident124 Repeat125 Lying face up126 ___ Channel (Hannah Montana airer)127 Successfully impersonate128 Early Apple computers DOWN1 Yellow shade2 Thomas of TV3 Caravaggios The Sacrifice of ___4 End of some URLs5 Individually6 Annual N.B.A. event7 Auction ending?8 The Oscars are awarded on it: Abbr.9 When repeated, a plea of Richard III10 Daughter in The Sound of Music11 1986 World Series champs12 Dilbert intern13 Reciprocal raising of tariffs, e.g.14 Lummox15 Amazing!16 Many a hanging17 Deficiency18 Some P.A. announcements20 Knitted wrap24 TurboTax option25 Yuk!31 Target competitor32 Not yet final, legally33 Linda of Broadways Jekyll & Hyde35 Holy cow!38 Historic fort on the Oregon Trail39 Bygone boomers41 Mince words?42 Tijuana treat43 Star of Mr. Hulots Holiday44 Put the finger on45 Poisonous47 The Divided Self author R. D. ___49 Im not kidding!52 Enliven, with up54 Like Gamal Abdel Nassers movement55 Jet black56 Numismatic condition59 Ocean routes63 Achieved through trickery64 Rough day? response67 Expand69 Chemistry Nobelist Otto70 Award won 21 times by Harold Prince71 In a stupor72 Like fall leaves77 Hatcher or Polo78 Allay79 Food thickener80 Actress Anderson81 Small irritations83 Meadow mamas85 No ones ___ than me (Eminem lyric)87 Belgium or Denmark88 Tons89 Diddle away91 Emphatic95 Beetle Bailey figure98 Excited about100 Moves slowly101 Scares off103 Astronaut Thomas on four space shuttle flights105 Prefix with natal107 Western108 Dr. Alzheimer109 Medicinal plant110 Cant stand111 Mimicked112 Skirt style114 Short cut115 James portrayed by Beyonc119 Clinch120 Post-W.W. II female service member121 From ___ Z122 The Engineers of the N.C.A.A., for short 12345 6789101112131415161718 19 2021 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 3233 3435 36 37 383940 4142 434445 4647 4849 50 51 5253 5455 56 57 5859 60 61 62 63 6465 6667 6869 70 71 72 73 74 75 767778 798081 8283 84 85 86 87 8889 9091 92 93 94 9596 97 98 99100101 102103 104 105 106 107 108109110 111112 113114115 116 117 118 119 120121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Solution on D3 Sydney, is willing to drive from UCFs main campus to work a Kona event with us. We didnt start this as a family business, but its turned out to be a great family project. 3) How does what you do contribute to the welfare of the area? Fun and fundraising! Fundraising is a core part of the Kona Ice mission. Were in the business of helping groups fundraise with our outstand ing shaved ice. The Kona Ice truck, with its patent ed Flavorwave for syrup, strobe lights and tropical steel drum music, is irre sistible and just plain fun. 4) Name one of your greatest accomplishments so far. We are about to celebrate 31 years of marriage and are proud of the kids weve raised. 5) Whats something youve always wanted to do but havent yet? My husband and I enjoy traveling and hope to visit all 50 states. Toms made it to 48 so far; I have vis ited 41. A highlight of 2013 was traveling to Alaska. NEIGHBOR FROM PAGE C1 remainder of the cost will be paid from the federal Superfund set up by Congress. TIMBER VILLAGES OLYMPIC GAMES The opening events of the Olympic Winter Games reminded Tim ber Village residents of their own Olym pic games. The horse shoe competition has progressed to the nal round. In the pre liminaries, Lu Burkett out-pitched Dick Mill er, Ed Peterson defeated Wayne Wood and Ray Gulick won over Gene Checots. Lu sidelined Ed and soon Lu and Ray will have a pitch-off for the championship. One match has been played in ladies shufeboard. Mildred McColley and Alice Jenkins downed Vickie Horton and Ale thea Knauss. Timber Villagers among the Clermont Travel Service contin gent attending a mat inee performance of Nunsense at the Mark II Dinner Theater in Orlando were Freida Maxwell, Jeane Peav ler, Vickie Horton, Ju lie Williams, Alethea Knauss, Alice Jenkins, Eva Currie, Pat Kelly, Frances and Doug Kent and Margaret and Os car Robb. HISTORY FROM PAGE C1 SUBMITTED PHOTO Kathie Camara, left, of Buttery Kisses Studio in Clermont, was recently awarded the International Seascape Certication by completing a three-week intensive oil painting workshop with award-winning seascape artist Joyce Ortner. For information about classes and workshops, go to www.butterykissesstudio.com. CAMARA EARNS PAINTING SEASCAPE CERTIFICATION CLERMONT Junior Womans Club to award scholarships The South Lake Ju nior Womans Club will be giving away two $500 scholarships this year with one award ed to a high school student that resides in south Lake Coun ty and will be attend ing college this fall, and another awarded to a woman 21 years of age or older who would like to continue her educa tion. For details on qual ications, application and deadline, go to www.slwjc.webs.com. For information, email rhonda_sl jwc2011@yahoo.com, aimeeoptimaone@ gmail.com or go to facebook.com/sljwc.

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Wednesday, March 12, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C3 CLERMONT BLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSAMILYELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time! IRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONTL Many Other Activities each week Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.org LIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLCHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm SOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary); 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.org ST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am (Rite I) 10:00 am (Rite II) 5:00 pm (Praise & Worship) Sunday School Youth Group Nursery Adult Bible Study Womens Bible Study Mens Prayer Breakfast WOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH GODINCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALE ERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for Children Groveland IRSTBAPTISTCHURCH GROVELAND Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pm MT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! MINNEOLA CONGREGATIONSMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club NEWLPRESBYTERIANCHURCH18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am TLIVINGGOD Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce Rowland MONTVERDE WOODLANDSLUTHERAN15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 am OAKLAND PRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforSouth Lake South LakeGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOMErfn tbt352-394-7121806 W. Minneola Ave.,Clermont,FL Cremation ChoicesDirect Cremation$675Plus Container Ron Becker,Director352-394-8228921 S.US Hwy 27,Minneola,FL SUBMITTED PHOTO The Leadership Lake County Class of 2013 has donated $8,500 to New Beginnings, a south Lake County nonprot organization that provides life and job skills training to area homeless. The funds will be used to construct a playground at the New Beginnings Learning and Development Center and contribute to the new Clermont facilitys telephone system. Pictured, left to right, are Leadership Lake Class of 2013 members David Pelton; Rebecca Sargent; Steve Smith, New Beginnings president; Carolyn Scott; Tessa Hibbard; Kalena Meyers; Betsy Trinder and Layna France. LEADERSHIP LAKE GRADUATES PRESENT DONATION SUBMITTED PHOTO Mascotte Elementary fourth graders counted down to FCAT Writes recently as teachers prepared them for the test. Pictured, left to right, are Wayne Cockcroft, Rebecca Gomez, Barbara Pake, Giana Delgado, Cesar Jimenez Ibarra, Janet Mata Torres, Cristophe Lopez Matias, Jacob Townsend, Laura Robbins-Ryan, Rachel Hernandez and Kimberly Harac. SUPPORTING FCAT WRITES IN MASCOTTE CLERMONT Annual Womens Expo approaches The 12th annual South Lake Womens Expo event will be held March 22 at the Wesley Center at First United Methodist Church, at 950 7th St., north of State Road 50, Clermont. Admission is free for the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For information email BSsportzfan@aol.com.

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C4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 12, 2014 Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...Totally UniqueTotally Unique is proud to be Clermonts first ORGANIC hair salon. We care about your beauty, your wellness, the environment and our community, so we use organic and sustainably harvested products whenever possible. We specialize in organic hair color, hair care products, nail and skin care lines. Our salon is one of the oldest salons in Clermont and is located at 786 W Montrose Street in Historic Downtown Clermont. Our stylists are experienced in all phases of hair care including color, straighteners, cuts, texture and styles. Hair stylists are Marjorie Morphet, Tina Foote, Sherie Wolkens and Jamie Rhoades. Our nail techs, Jennifer Vandergrift and Jamie Rhoades, perform pedicures and manicures using Zoya nail products (which are Big 5 free). Shellac manicures, lasting up to three weeks, are also available by Jennifer and Jamie. We have two pedicure chairs in a private room for your relaxation and enjoyment. Relaxing and therapeutic facials are available by Jennifer in our private upstairs facial room. Massage services include chair massage, Swedish and Deep Tissue. Massage services are also done in a private room in our upstairs area. We utilize several massage therapists and provide massage by appointment only. We also offer a small boutique with handcrafted jewelry and hair accessories, Art by Tina Foote and Jamie Rhoades, and other unique items. Salon hours are 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Saturday and open Sundays by appointment only. Evening hours are also available by appointment. We pride ourselves in providing a friendly, relaxing environment for our clients and friends. Stop by and visit or call 352-394-5005 for more information. We are also on Facebook and www.TotallyUniqueSalon.com. LOOKING FOR PARTS? SEE JULIE (352) 394-6111 Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! Clermont after years of waiting for the right opportunity. Seaman said the 35,000-square-foot Cl ermont store is the rst of its kind in Florida: a combined Rooms to Go and Rooms to Go Kids & Teens store. There are only two other com bo stores in the nation, one in Georgia and one in Texas. People who have vis ited other Rooms to Go stores will see the Cler mont store is different, Seaman said. Sometimes in our showrooms, we cant show everything, but this store has every thing we sell on display for people to see in per son everything, he said. We want people to come check us out be cause we cant wait to see peoples reactions. To make way for the new Clermont store, an older Rooms to Go store in the Highland Lake shopping cen ter, just 16 miles away on State Road 50 and Hiawassee Road in Orlando, closed last week. Some staff ers at the older store have moved to the new store. We are glad to be here and would love to have people come in and see us, compa ny Regional Vice Pres ident Alan Salmi said. We are completely full service with sales asso ciates who are knowl edgeable about what they are selling and who can answer any questions about home furnishings that people might have. Regional Adminis trative Assistant Becky Bauer said the kids section is hands-on. The kids section is designed for kids to play in it just as if they were at home, she said. We want them to lie in the beds, test out the chairs, walk around and look at everything. John and Lorraine Simmons, Clermont residents at the store recently for a soft opening, agreed Cler mont was in need of a Rooms to Go store. Im glad were get ting this kind of stuff (business wise) in Cler mont, John said. The stores hours are 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mon days through Saturdays and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sundays. For informa tion, call 352-432-2958. STORE FROM PAGE C1 ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Rooms to Go is set for the grand opening of a new store in Clermont. The 35,000-squarefoot facility combines Rooms to Go and Rooms to Go Kids.

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Wednesday, March 12, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D1 rfntb r f n t bb b bb b b n b f b n n n f b f f b b b bb bb bbb b b n b b b bb b b n bb bbbb b bb bbnb bb bbb b b n r t b b n bbnb bbb b n b b b b b b n b b b b n n n b b b b b b b b b b n n b b b b n n bbb b b b n b b b b b b b b b b b f b b n b b bbb b b b b n nbn bnb b b b b b b b b b b b r b b b b b b b b b b fnt n b b b b f b b b b b b b b n b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b n f b b n b b n b b bt b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b fnr bn fn n n n n n n n n f n n n n n b n fb bn f b b b b fn b nn b rt b n n bb bbbbbb bbb brt bbbb bbb bbbbb bbb bbbb bb bbbb bb nbb bb bbbb rtbb bbb bbbb bb b bbb bn bb n b n t t rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrff nrrrrrrrrrrff ttbrrrrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rfntbbt rfrntn nnnftbnbn brfbnrb bnbtn brnnrtnftbn tbrbttb nnnrfrbtb nbb n fbfn t brbnbbbtn nnnntnbbtr bbbfrf rtfnbtr rrbrfnnnrfnt t rf

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D2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 12, 2014 rfntbf rfntbnrttnr rbtbr btbntnr r bb btbb t t b bb b n b t r t b b n bbnnb r bb btbb t t b bb b n b t r t b b n bbnnb r r r b n b t b n r b r f b rbbnr brr r bb btbb t t b bb b n b t r t b b n bbnnb r bb btbb t t b bb b n b t r t b b n bbnnb fn r tb nt ttn rbr bn rr ntrr br f ntrr bn tnnnbrrr fnnb rbr r f br t b ntrr bbnbr brbbr rbbr btbbtb r t rbr t n r n n r r t n r n n r r fn tn bbbr ntbb br nb nr bb r bbr fn tn tbtn rr tbtn rr r bbnr b t n n r r bbr r f t n t t r t r f t n t t r t r b bn f bt bbrr f t r r f nr rbrr ff b r f f bbrbbbr bbr tbb br tbrbb bbr fb bntbb tnbrr ttnnr rbrr rbrt r rbrt r trbn br bnbb ntrr bn nr nbn r f r tnnrr f ftnrb nrr f tbrr r rbbr bnbtntbrt r t brr t bnrr tbtnrr bnbr nbb brr n ntrbr b n n n r r r bttr br nbtr r t nrr fb nb f t b t n r r r f fbb ntnbb nntnrr t n r r r t n r r r t n t r r f t r b r nb r tb ttnr rnr tnrt nttr bnbtt tbnnrr ntbnbr br bnbnr ttn nrr ntb bnttrr nb brbbr f fbbr f b nb n b bnnt bbbrr f n r tn r b rtnrrbrr tbbr f nrr tbbr n t n t b b r r n r r nrr frb r rftntrt rr f nntbt tntntntbrr br nt bntrr r n r n n b b r t b r t t b r bb trr f r r bnbnt trrnr r bnbr f n bntnnbb br brt tnr tr nnbtbbr bbb rrr br brr n r n n b t r r fr rt r rt r tnnnb rr n r ntr brr fr rnb brr nrtr tnrnnbbb bnrr ff bnbbr bbbrr f nb nbbrrr n rr b b b n r t n r n t r r tnbbb ntrr nr fbr b b ttbr bb fbr n bbbrtnbbbr f bbrbt ntnrr bbrbt ntnrr bn tnbbr bbbbr r b b n r ttr rbb bb f br tbnb ffbn r r tbbtrn nbtnbb trb bbbr tn r t r btnrnr rbrr btnrnr rbrr tbb rbrr f f t t b n t f f n b n b n t n b t t b fb nbbn tr tnr trbbbr bnbbntb trr f btr tnrbbbrr t n b t r t b n r r ntnrt bnnbrrr f b t r t t n n b t r r f ntnrbb brr f tbbbr r f nbnb ntt nrrtr brbr nrr bntnrnr r tr bnrr tr b b r r f r b nbrtr b br btbr r r r r tbbtb nbb brr bbbr ntbbbbbr tbtnbrt rr tbtnbrt rr nbr btt rr btt rr bnbnnbrr ftrbr tn nbr tn nbr n rr n b n n b n b n t b n b b n b n t b b b b t n t t r f rr n ftfr r b t t t t b r r bbftnr trr fnbbb r t ntrr tnbrbbn f fr f br tr r trtr f b brbn bbr b r t r n f t rnnnrb brr nb b nbbttbtntb trnbtbn rnntntt brnb r r t r r bbbrbntbn tttnbtn nbrnbb nttnnnbt nnntbnbntr f fnnttnr brr t b t n f r b r b b t n t n r t t n r b n t t t r b f b n n t n b n t b t b t r r b b t t b r b b b b n n n t r t n t n t n b r n n b n t n b n r t r b b r f b n n t r r r t t n b f r t b f b t b t r t n r b t t t b t r b b t t r t n n t n b n n t b t t r f r tnnbnntb rntbbbnnb ttbbrftb brfr t n b b t r b t t b t r b n b b b n n t b b b t r r r r b t b t f b n b f f t n t r r r t nbb bbttntbbr nbntn f brtr t b n b r n f r t b b f f n t b tnntn btntnttr ftntnbbtb nttr n b b t r b f b b r r t b n r b r

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Wednesday, March 12, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D3 rfntb r ff rfn n r t n rrt n bf n ff nfr r rrn fr rrb rfntb bfn b n nnb tn nrrf tn nbn n nr rrnr rnn n n rrf fnnr f rn r ntf nrnnrn bn ntf n r n r n rrrnbn brrf f btt r nrnn nrn tnrn rnn rnn rtn fnn rnn r r f n b b bb nt rr n nnn rtn ntbb b f rrf n fr n btf t tf nn f n b bb frft bb f f n nn rn brnrrb n nfnrrrn b fnnnbrn rfrnrnr rnnrnn bbf f nntn rnnn n r n r nnn t r b n r nnb nntn rnnn n r n r nnn t r b n r nnb rfrnrnr rnnrnn bbf f bbbrf f n r r n n r t n n n b r r n t r n f n r t n n n f f n f n n b bf f r n r b r f n r n r f n r n r f n r n n n f n n n n r n r b n bf f bbff f r n r b r f n r n r f n r n r f n r n n n f n n n n r n r b n fn rnrr nrf rnb nn r n r b r f n r n r f n r n r f n r n n n f n n n n r n r b n nntn rnnn n r n r nnn t r b n r nnb nntn rnnn n r n r nnn t r b n r nnb rf ff n n r n r r r n b rfnr n r f n bnnnnn nnnb nrtnrnnb n t r n r n r n nnrrb rnrnbrn rfnnrnn nnn nnnnb n trr nnnfn rr frt f n r f n n n f n n r r r n n r n n f n bnbrnb rnfrnn nrbn n r n n r f r r n n r n b nf nntn rnnn n r n r nnn t r b n r nnb nntn rnnn n r n r nnn t r b n r nnb bff nnnn f n nnnr n n n n n bf f f n r r r n b r r n r nrnr bnf nnnnb bf tf r b n n n t n n r n n r n r r n n n b n t n n f b r r n n r r r n r n b b r t n r n r n n n r n n t n n r n n n r b b b r n bf tf rfnn

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D4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 12, 2014 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 7 25 34 47 67 13 18 31 59 74 9 21FREE SPACE53 72 2 16 42 48 63 5 29 39 52 68ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N I B O G BINGO B I N G O SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Amos Duncan WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! B 13 I 18 G 59 O 74 N 31



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Sponsored by Fran Haasch lawfran.com Phone: 352-326-2623LEARN TO RIDE! WE ARE EXCITED ABOUT THE"NEW SUPER LOW 1200 T "EXPERIENCE & TEST RIDE ONE TODAY!WEDNESDAY BIKE NIGHT AT BEEF O BRADYS Dont Miss It! RENTALS LATEST MODELS AVAILABLE! CALL US SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | C1 SPORTS: Russell selected for McDonalds All American Game WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWSTAND INSIDE CLASSIFIED D1 CROSSWORDS C2 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN C1 SPORTS B1 VOICES A4 WORD ON THE STREE T A2 SO UTH LAKE PRE SS V OLUME 99, NO. 12 5 SECTIO N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reserved www. southlakepress.com PRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Lacrosse teams from Ithaca College and Stevenson warm up for a game on one of the new elds at the National Training Center in Clermont on Friday. CLERMONT ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com T wo $400,000 multipur pose/World Cup soc cer elds were unveiled to the public last week at the National Training Center in Clermont. NTC spokesperson Kim Couch said the elds can be used for soccer, lacrosse, ag football and other sports. Paul Johns, NTCs chief op erating ofcer, said he be lieves the elds will bene t Lake County because they will attract even more teams along with sports fans and players families and friends who will spend money on food, lodging and other things. This certainly will be a big impact to south Lake County, he said. The NTC already has ve multipurpose elds, but more were needed because local groups and organizations use them, too. Thats why county ofcials contributed $400,000 from their county-wide parks and recreation budget to build them. We, along with the county, wanted to take care of com munity leagues and clubs, and were excited that we were able to provide them with what they needed, Johns said. Couch said the two World Cup soccer elds can also serve as four modied elds. Information provided by the chamber said the NTC wel comes more than 250,000 vis iting athletes to its facilities each year, which South Lake Chamber of Commerce Presi dent Ray San Fratello said en ergizes the local economy. South Lake County has a niche in sports tourism, ec otourism, adventure tour ism and heritage tourism, he said. It is a true econom ic development driver in that it provides jobs and creates new wealth in the communi ty through visitors spending at our hotels, dining in our restaurants and buying goods and services typical of tourists from our stores. NTC adds World Cup fields South Lake County has a niche in sports tourism, ecotourism, adventure tourism and heritage tourism. It is a true economic development driver in that it provides jobs and creates new wealth in the community.... Ray San Fratello South Lake Chamber of Commerce President Staff Report The South Lake Chamber of Commerce, which in Decem ber earned the Runner Friend ly designation for south Lake County through the Road Run ners Club of America, is now seeking a Bike Friendly des ignation from the League of American Bicyclists. Besides bringing transpor tation and recreational oppor tunities for health and tness to south Lake, chamber of cials believe these designations serve as opportunities for eco nomic development. Biking means busi ness. There are quan tiable benets that bicycling infrastruc ture is a cost-effec tive way to enhance communities, gener ate tourism and sup port local business, South Lake Chamber of Commerce Sports and Tourism chairwom an Shannon Hidalgo said. Hidalgo was joined by Bike Friendly Committee Co-chair man Ryan Donovan recent ly at a workshop hosted by the League of American Bicyclists, Florida Bicycle Association and MetroPlan Orlando. League of Ameri can Bicyclists Presi dent Bill Nesper also attended and now plans to visit south Lake in April to dis cuss the chambers bike-friendly initiative. These initiatives are al ready attracting attention in the health and wellness life style sectors in our communi ty, Donovan said. We are ex cited for what this will mean, not only for the residents, but how it will showcase all that south Lake has to offer. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Clermont City Man ager Darren Gray said a series of visioning sessions he led last year to gather ideas about the citys future yielded some strong suggestions. One such idea, Gray said, was residents wishes to maintain and grow the historic downtown area, which includes Waterfront Park. The idea is to at tract more peop le to its shops, restaurants, at tractions and events. The downtown and waterfront areas are important from a historic and econom ic development per spective. I think that any great city has to have a thriving down town. We wanted to make sure as we grow and serve new neigh borhoods and busi ness districts that we continue to make the downtown and water front area a priority. We want to enhance its reputation as a des tination, Gray said. Gray said he has been working on a plan to make it hap pen. Last week, Gray an nounced that hed formed a task force to assess the condition of certain downtown areas and make rec ommendations based on observations and feedback it receives from local residents and business owners there. The objective is to make any im provements needed to boost Clermonts downtown and Water front Parks image as an attractive destina tion, he said. To do that, the Cl ermont Police De partment is assigning two ofcers Ofcer James Rooney and Of cer Brenda Teets to patrol those areas. Gray said the pur pose has little to do with crime rates but rather security. We have a low crime rate in Cler mont overall, includ ing our downtown business and Water front area, and we want to keep it that way. Our ofcers will be mostly on their bikes or walking the district, Gray said. Its not only a proven way to prevent crime, it also gives the pub lic a sense of security when they are enjoy ing visiting the area or coming to downtown Clermont for events. Parents can feel safe bringing their kids to the beach or jogging on the trail. Its just a smart use of our resources. CLERMONT City focusing efforts toward downtown area CLERMONT South Lake seeks bike-friendly tag SEE DOWNTOWN | A2

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 19, 2014 CLERMONT Box car racing scheduled for March 28 The Clermont/Minneola Box Car Racing company, 363 Sky Valley St., will host an open house at the Clermont Community Center from 7 to 8:30 p.m. on March 28. Box cars will be on dis play and guests can ask questions. The sanctioning body for the group is National Derby Rallies (NDR). The local group hosts special events for kids, the Wounded Warrior Project, breast cancer awareness and others through NDR. For information, call 352-708-4207, email cmboxcarracing@gmail.com or go to www.cmboxcarracing.com. MINNEOLA City receives award for public policy The city of Minneola recently re ceived the distinguished Horizon Award from the Lake-Sumter Metropolitan Planning Organization for Exemplary Public Policy. The city was honored with this award for its forward thinking by creating the Minneola Mountain Community Redevelopment Area to propel the Florida Turnpike Interchange project forward. Over a decade in the making, the project is expected to inject nearly $1 billion into the areas economy over the next 30 years. The state of Florida has commit ted $30 million toward the construc tion of the interchange in Minneola. Construction on the project is expected to begin within the next 12 months. CLERMONT Lakeridge Winery hosts wine and seafood festival Lakeridge Winery and Vineyards will host the 6th annual Wine and Seafood Festival Friday through Sunday. The three-day outdoor event will feature seafood dishes, live music, an arts and crafts show and award-win ning Lakeridge Wines, on Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. A $2 donation will be accepted at the gate to benet The Autism Society of Greater Orlando, and parking is free for all guests. For information, go to www.laker idgewinery.com. CLERMONT Annual South Lake Womens Expo approaches The 12th annual South Lake Womens Expo event sponsored by the Clermont Womens Club will be held Saturday at the Wesley Center at First United Methodist Church, at 950 7th St., north of State Road 50. Admission is free for the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For information or a vendor ap plication, email Basha Schlazer at BSsportzfan@aol.com. CLERMONT Annual Teen Battle of the Bands is April 5 The Cooper Memorial Librarys 3rd annual Teen Battle of the Bands will take place from 2 to 5:30 p.m. on April 5. This years battle will be on the out door stage at Lake-Sumter State College and includes a rst-place cash prize of $250. Second place will win $125 and third place will take home $75. For information, call 352-536-2275, or email lpiper@lakeline.lib..us. CLERMONT Animal League to host annual Pet Connect Carnival Join the South Lake Animal League for the 2nd annual Pet Connect Carnival from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, at the Petco store park ing lot, at State Road 50 and Hancock Road in Clermont. Several local animal rescue orga nizations will be participating and showcasing their adoptable animals. A $10 donation registers your pet in two fashion shows at the event. For information, or to register go to www.slal.org/petconnect. Area Briefs What South Lake residents are saying about ... TRANSPORTATION What kind of public transportation would you like to see in south Lake County? More. Theres only the Lake Express and the Lynx that goes to Orlan do. I grew up in Orlando, and Im used to bus stops every few miles. My little brother lived with me for a while in Minneola and he needed public trans portation to get to work and there wasnt any. He had no other choice but to walk or ride a bike. JEREMY PECK CLERMONT They need a mono rail; so many people com ing here to Orlando, back and forth. It could go from here all the way down 50. Too many people mov ing to Florida. Its an over populated stat, for sure. DELL GRAY CLERMONT Not Lynx. Instead of stopping in the middle of the road, they need to make bus stops so they can actually pull in and out and a runway for en tering trafc. Its not safe. You see a Lynx bus in front of you, automatical ly go over to the left. KATHY BRINKS FOUR CORNERS I dont know that Id like to see any, actually. Im not so sure the need would justify the expense. GARY PERRIGO SORRENTO Word on the Street Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 Gray said there is not a separate budget for the initiative. The city is using existing resources, he said, adding that he is moving money around in the citys budget to make it work. If we need to ex pand or add additional funding, I will request it through our budget pro cess. This will allow us a few months to see how the program is working, Gray said. Gray has also handpicked a group of city of cials and staff to help with the effort. Gray said there were several things he con sidered when choosing the task force. I looked for people who were enthusiastic about the task force. A number of city workers, including almost a dozen police ofcers, asked to be part of this initiative. I asked myself, Does the employees department or specic job play a role in the mission of the task force, which was improv ing and beautifying the downtown waterfront area as well as boosting our events? Gray said. Members of the task force are: Clermont Eco nomic Development Di rector Jim Hitt, chair man; Carle Bishop, Aaron Nickerson and Joe Silves tris from the re depart ment; Charles Broadway, Rooney and Teets from the police department; Public Information Of cer Doris Bloodsworth; Stoney Brunson from Public Works; Barbara Hollerand from Planning and Zoning; James Kinzler from Environmental Ser vices; Suzanne OShea from Code Enforcement; Dave Teske from Recre ation and Chris Dudeck from Events. Some projects are al ready under way, Gray said, including the new historic downtown direc tional signage and build ing locator signs. There also will be a fo cus on the signature events, including Light Up Clermont, the Down town Music Festival and Pig on the Pond. Those will be augmented by new events, such as the Sports Field Day at Wa terfront Park in April. The effort will focus on an area that is bound ed by 5th Street on the east and 12th Street on the west, and from State Road 50 on the south to the entire waterfront area, including the new Lake Hiawatha Preserve, a passive park set to break ground on the north. Hitt said he has talked to several business own ers about the goals of the task force since its imple mentation and is excited about the responses hes received. The (business owners) Ive talked to are very ex cited. They like that were focusing some attention on the downtown area in stead of just talking about it here and there, Hitt said. Were going to be doing what we can to bring busi ness back and help get the attention of the residents, and I think we are well on our way. Our thought process is that a healthy, vibrant downtown usually means that you have a healthy, vibrant city. DOWNTOWN FROM PAGE A1 Staff Report Clermont city ofcials are invit ing the public to name their new est facility, the $6.3-million build ing and surrounding property formerly known as the Celebration of Praise Church. The city purchased the property in December and has been refer ring to the 69,000-square-foot fa cility as the Celebration Center, but that was never intended to be the permanent name, ofcials said. The complex, located at 3700 S. U.S. Highway 27 in Clermont, in cludes the largest auditorium in Lake County, a small theater and a gymnasium, in addition to adult and childrens swimming pools. About 10,000 square feet of the building will be incorporated into a new police station. Some of the city ofces will be moved to the new complex, and some space may be leased to other government agen cies. City Manager Darren Gray said the public may suggest names by sending suggestions by email, fax or mail through the end of March. Gray will choose the top 10 names and then ask the public to choose the top three by voting online, in person, by fax or by mail. The Cler mont City Council will make the nal decision. How to send a suggestion: ONLINE: Use the feedback form on the citys website home page: www. cityofclermont.com. FAX: 352-394-4087 MAIL: Darren Gray, City Hall, 685 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711 If you wish to be notied when the poll opens, send your email ad dress or other contact information to the citys Public Information Of cer Doris Bloodsworth at dblood sworth@clermont.org. CLERMONT City invites public to rename Celebration Center PHOTO COURTESY CITY OF CLERMONT Clermont city ofcials are looking for a name for the Celebration of Praise building purchased last year.

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tural interests and develop ers to the Wekiva River Basin Coordinating Committee. Constantine, who chaired the committee, said the committee was responsible for recommending how to complete the beltway while protecting the river and the resources. It is the largest and most important springshed we have in Central Florida, he said of the Wekiva Riv er. This was a nely crafted agreement, which we had 28 members of this commission give near unanimous agree ment to the 17 recommen dations drafted into the bill. Fish said:We are not ask ing anything but to study fu ture conditions. If it looks like marginally there are too many cars on CR 435, we are going to talk about potential solutions and one of those solutions might be a par tial interchange at the east bound ramps. He added there are no plans to widen CR 435. The partial interchange would allow motorists to ac cess CR 435 and head toward Sanford while also enabling them to get off the parkway coming from Sanford, Fish said. But, he emphasized there would only be eastbound ramps available if this option is considered. There are two permanent interchanges planned for the Wekiva Parkway, SR 429 with County Road 46A, just east of Camp Challenge; and in northwest Orange County at Kelly Park Road. There is also a new spur that will be built off SR 429 that will go into Lake Coun ty and intersect with existing SR 46 1500 feet east of Round Lake Road in Mount Dora. Thirty years ago, the FDOT, the Orlando-Orange Coun ty Expressway Authority and Floridas Turnpike Enter prise determined the belt way needed to be complet ed, Brooks said. The $1.7 billion proj ect funded in partnership with the FDOT, the express way authority and the enter prise is going to make it eas ier to get to the parkway and to travel between Seminole, Lake and Orange counties, according to Brooks. As a result of the project, there will be more than 3,400 acres of land set aside for conservation. Brooks said the project is on schedule. We are proceeding to de sign on the other sections, she said. In 2015, work will begin on the Expressway Au thority where SR 429 ends to U.S. Highway 441 north to Kelly Park Road. Trendy Per TuttiFashion Jewelry & Accessories Elina Baade Altamonte Springs, FL 32701 Cell 407-619-2284 elinabaade@gmail.com rrffrfnnftb Pain, Hormonal imbalances, Thyroid imbalance, PMS, Menopause, Fatigue, Insomnia, High Cholesterol, Depression, Allergies, Migraines, Heartburn & more... ffrrb rntrrnftfrffftfr b nf235 Citrus Tower Blvd., Ste. 105, Clermont www.docvisconti.com or our Facebook Page rfntbb nr We all have to eat! 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Once opened, a temporary ramp will provide access from CR 435 to the Wekiva Parkway until the Expressway Authori ty and Florida Department of Transportation sections of the project are built sometime between 2017-19. However, Lake Coun ty commissioners and the Lake-Sumter Metropoli tan Organization have each passed resolutions request ing the Florida Department of Transportation study the pro jected trafc patterns at the temporary interchange after the Wekiva Parkway opens. County and transporta tion ofcials said there is concern that once the inter change is closed in 2019 traf c could increase substan tially in Mount Plymouth. It is a very large burden on CR 435 and Mount Plym outh, Commissioner Les lie Campione said. Once you close it you are going to force all the trafc into those winding streets in the Mount Plymouth area. T.J. Fish, executive director of the Lake-Sumter Metro politan Planning Organiza tion, said if the interchange is closed, it will force motorists to use the other two inter changes, which could affect trafc conditions on CR 435. The parkway is a planned 25-mile state toll road begin ning at State Road 429 and ending near Mount Dora. It is designed to complete the beltway around northwest central Florida and reduce congestion on U.S. Highway 441, SR. 46 and other area roads. The Wekiva Parkway and Protection Act limits the number of interchanges to curb potential development in the environmentally sen sitive area, according to Mary Brooks, vice president of Turnpike and Expressway Services and public involve ment coordinator for the Wekiva Parkway. Efforts to include a per manent interchange at the location would require leg islative approval per the Wekiva Parkway and Protec tion Act, said Steve Olson, spokesma n for the FDOT. Lee Constantine, chairman of the Wekiva River Basin Commission, said if a study is conducted, other factors need to also be included. If they wish to change that, not only should there be studies on trafc patterns but on development pat terns, the effects on the riv er and the beltway, said the former state senator who sponsored the Wekiva Park way and Protection Act. When drafting legislation for the act, Gov. Jeb Bush ap pointed 28 members from numerous state agencies, environmentalists, agricul Parkway could spur traffic deluge WHITNEY WILLARD / STAFF GRAPHICWEKIVA PARKWAY The first phase of the Wekiva Parkway, from Mount Plymouth Road to State Road 46, is expected to open later this year. WEKIVA PARKWAY MOUNT DORA APOPKA 441 441 437 429 437 46A 414ORANGE COUNTY LAKE COUNTYWEKIVA TRAIL 46 N WHITNEY WILLARD / STAFF GRAPHIC BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Cranes drive bridge posts into the ground at the Wekiva Parkway in Mount Plymouth on Monday.

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A6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 19, 2014 O ne of the more controversial bills winding its way through the Florida Legislature would allow designated school employees or volunteers to carry concealed weapons. Under the bill, which is being sponsored in the Senate by Alan Ha ys, schools could autho rize certain employees to carry weapons as the last line of defense against the kinds of armed intruders who wreaked havoc at Columbine and Newton, Conn. Those employees would have to have a law enforcement of military background and com plete rearms and school safety training. The law would not be mandatory, so school dis tricts in Florida could opt out if they choose. This is a bad bill for so many reasons. Introducing more rearms into school environ ments that can be fragile and sometimes tense is a recipe for disaster. Schools are places where parents sometimes conict with faculty, faculty with students and students with students. Putting deadly weapons in proximity to heated con frontations exponentially increases the chanc es for serious injury or death, intentional or un intentional. Of course, many schools already have guns on campus in Florida. Those guns, however, are carried by law enforcement ofcers, who re ceive signicantly more training than teachers would be required to get under the bill. It is noteworthy that parents, school lob byists and administrators have opposed this bill. Florida lawmakers should take that into consideration: If the people who spend their days in the halls and classrooms of our public schools dont believe the measure will protect them and might even jeopardize their safety why force it upon them. Supporters of the bill in the Legislature say school safety is a signicant problem. If it is, then the problem deserves a serious solution. But as usual, the Legislature is trying to solve a problem with an ill-conceived and cheap approach. If our children, teachers and adm inistra tors are truly imperiled at school, then there is a realistic and safe solution: Provide the mon ey to put school resource ofcers active-du ty police in each school in the state. Many schools do it now, but at a time when school budgets are incredibly lean, it is becoming less common. State funding would certainly help ensure that the safety of our children was en trusted to highly trained and skilled ofcers whose full-time job is keeping the peace. Instead, legislators want to do what they so often do offer a solution that does not obli gate them to do anything. No, Hays bill is a bad one. Mixing guns and kids is a toxic brew. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD ........................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST O PINION WHATS YOUR OPINION? The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the ed itor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be origi nal, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Letters to the Editor 732 W. Montrose St. Clermont, FL 34711 By fax to: 352-394-8001 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. GUEST COLUMNS If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@daily commercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OUR VIEW If you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veter ans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to to www.lake vet erans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANS S OUTH LAKE PRESS Your community newspaper for more than 100 years. 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001 The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Flori da 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region. All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Allowing guns in schools is a bad idea Dont give away scarce water I totally agree with the two ladies who were bold enough to speak up about water use. I am surprised and shocked that there are not more concerned citizens in Central Florida speaking up about the St. Johns River Water Management District having the authority to make decisions requesting that we conserve water, yet they are giving away thousands of gal lons daily. What does the St. Johns charge for water? I live outside The Villages, and have for 65 years and have a private well, but I still am supposed to limit my water use. This bothers me tremendously that thousands of gallons of extra water are daily drawn from the aquifer and will soon cause Floridians serious problems with water supply. Every citizen should voice their concern. JOHNNIE MAE SMITH | Oxford Support the president As we experience another challenge in our foreign policy, some members of Congress re fuse to follow our presidents di rection and even enhance the positions of those working to destroy this effort. When senators and congress men support military interven tion over the diplomatic efforts preferred by our president, that logic is not only harmful to re solving the matter but creates even greater problems by mak ing our nation appear divided. It is the presidents decision as to what form of response our country takes and thats the rea son we elected him to lead. To claim his reaction is incor rect weakens that logic and re duces the chance for peace ful settlement. To continue to claim his action is a sign of weakness is disrespectful to his efforts and harmful to our nation. Also, to express negativi ty while calming to be a sup porter of our military is not only wrong but un-American. Providing comfort to those who oppose our nations ef forts doesnt help that effort and therefore should be avoided at all costs. United We Stand isnt just a slogan. WILLIAM CAMPBELL | Leesburg Not so friendly to outsiders The friendly Villagers have shown their colors again. They built a beautiful build ing devoted to veterans groups to have their meetings in, The Eisenhower Center. It seems that I and several other members of a U.S. char tered veteran organization were asked to leave because too many of us are not residents of The Villages. Yet we are legiti mate members of a national or ganization and have been for many years. As a veteran, I served the peo ple of the United States, not The Villages. The Villages has no uniform except locked gates to keep people in? I spend money at businesses in The Villages. I am not a sec ond-class citizen. Residents of Fruitland Park and Wildwood beware! Dont become another Lady Lake. You see a lot of veterans wearing hats that tell others of service to our nation. I wear one myself and Im sure other veterans do it also for sever al reasons. For one, it reects service to our country. For instance, I served 25 years in the Air Force, and I am very proud of that. Part of that service was during a time when our coun try was divided over our in volvement in Vietnam. Those of us that served during that time did so to the best of our ability. Unfortunately our tal ents and dedication were throttled by politicians and anti-war activists. Wearing the hat also lets veterans recognize each oth er and strike up conversations about their service experienc es. In some cases it helps pro vide closure to experiences that may have not been pleas ant, and it also strengthens the common bond we have with each other. When people come up and thank me for my service it is a good feeling. Young and old alike take time to do this. Im sure other veterans feel the same way. I hope when others see vet erans wearing hats and oth er items that reect service to our country that they will real ize the mission is not over. Our freedoms are constantly chal lenged, both within and out side the borders of the United States. All citizens need to stay vig ilant, know what decisions are being made in government and not only exercise their right to vote but know who they are voting for. Stay active in the de cision-making of those they place in ofce. You see, it is not enough to reect on our ac complishments, we must all strive to be successful in the challenges ahead. We all are on a mission to preserve our na tion for those who follow. That mission will never end. WILLIAM F. EADS | Leesburg LETTER of the WEEK YOUR VOICES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO Duke Snyder, 75, a Vietnam-era United States Marine Corps veteran, salutes as the colors are raised during the dedication ceremony for the new Veterans Memorial at Good Life RV Resort in Bartow. Honor our veterans sacrifice

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Wednesday, March 19, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A7 DEATH NOTICES Dorothy Barth Dorothy Barth, 86, of Webster, died Tuesday, March 11, 2014. Banks/ Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations. Doris E. Biggers Doris E. Biggers, 80, of the Villages, died Sat urday, March 8, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Eddie L. Bob Sr. Eddie L. Bob Sr., 88, of Eustis, died Thurs day, March 13, 2014. Marvin C. Zanders Inc. Ruth K. Carroll Ruth K. Carroll, 80, of the Villages, died Fri day, March 14, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood. David Cifuni David Cifuni, 95, of Leesburg, died Friday, March 14, 2014. PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, Leesburg James Fahnestock James William Fahne stock, 86, of Leesburg, died Saturday, March 15, 2014. Beyers Funer al Home Leesburg John Edward Freer John Edward Fre er, 94, of Eustis, died Wednesday, March 12, 2014. Harden/Pauli Fu neral Home. Ruth Anna Howard Ruth Anna Howard, 103, of Mount Dora, died Tuesday, March 11, 2014. Beyers Funer al Home. Willard J. Kissinger Willard J. Kissing er, 85, of Winter Park, died Tuesday, March 11, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations. Charles R. Major Charles R. Major, 71, of The Villages, died Friday, March 7, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood Harold R. Martin Harold R. Martin, 84, of Fruitland Park, FL died Monday, March 10, 2014. Beyers Funer al Home and Cremato ry, Leesburg, FL. Edgar Molina Edgar Molina, 6, of Bushnell, died Wednes day, March 12, 2014. Rocker-Cusack Mortu ary, Leesburg Richard Poirier Richard Poirier, 69, of the Villages, died on Saturday, March 15, 2014. Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Leesburg. Buel Junior Rodgers Buel Junior Rodg ers, 77, of Tavares, FL passed away on Tues day, March 11, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares, FL Neil Stephenson Neil Stephenson, 67, of Riley Park (Mount Dora) passed away on Wednesday, March 12, 2014. Steverson, Ham lin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tava res, FL Madeleine Stock Madeleine Stock, 101, of Mount Dora, died Monday, March 10, 2014. Hamlin & Hil bish Funeral Directors. Chaplain Philip Symonds Chaplain Philip Tony Symonds, 71,of Tavares died Saturday, March 15, 2014. Ham lin & Hilbish Funeral Directors, Eustis. William A. Bill Tidmore William A. Bill Tid more, 94, of Tavares, died Monday, March 10, 2014. Harden/Pauli Funeral Home, Eustis. Barbara VanBuren Barbara VanBuren, 78, of Umatilla, died Wednesday, March 12, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home. Hazel Alice White Hazel Alice White, 88 of Wildwood, died Sat urday, March 8, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Robert Davis White Robert Davis White, 72, of Eustis, died We nesday, March 12, 2014. Hamlin & Hilbish Funeral Directors. Steven Leman Williams Steven Leman Wil liams, 42, of Eustis, died Sunday, March 9, 2014. Marvin C. Zanders Fu neral Home, Inc. Clarence Wilson Clarence Wilson, 83, of Eustis, died Thurs day, March 6, 2014. Hamlin & Hilbish Fu neral Directors. Paul Young Paul Young, 66, of Leesburg, died on Fri day, March 14, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares. Richard Ziegler Richard Ziegler, 76, of The Villages, died Sunday, March 9, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations, Leesburg IN MEMORY Staff Report Wilesmith Advertis ing & Design of West Palm Beach has been tapped to create place branding for Clermont, City Manager Darren Gray said Thursday. Place branding in cludes capturing a communitys core attri butes to create a brand promise, logos, taglines and other expressions that promote a city and drive economic devel opment. Gray said the brand ing initiative is anoth er step in developing the citys future, fol lowing a series of high ly successful vision ing forums last year. The branding will help drive the citys master planning for the com ing years, he said. Gray and a team of city ofcials reviewed 10 rms interested in the branding project. He said t he Wilesmith team was chosen for its talent, experience and successful plac e brand ing for other locations, such as Australias Gold Coast, Amelia Island Plantation and Tavares, among other destina tions. All of the nalists had impressive creden tials, Gray said. Wile smith stood out be cause of their grasp of our community and enthusiasm for the project. Wilesmith was founded in 1999 by president and creative director Margaret Wile smith, whose 32 years of experience includes expertise in brand ing and strategic com munications. The cre ative team working on the Clermont branding project includes a de sign director, research er, strategic planner, public-relations spe cialist and graphic de signers. We believe in collab oration and listening, Wilesmith said. Cl ermont is an amazing city. The challenge is to capture the citys many attributes in a single, powerful promise that differentiates it from other cities in Florida and beyond. Gray said he and his directors, as well as city council members, will meet the Wilesmith team for the rst proj ect meeting today CLERMONT City chooses branding firm MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millard.ives@dailycommercial.com An accused jaywalker scufed with Clermont police and, despite being pepper-sprayed, briey es caped before ofcers tracked him down. Gordon Lee Hosler, 34, was charged with battery on a law enforcement ofcer and resisting arrest. He was re leased from the Lake Coun ty jail after posting a $5,500 bond. According to an arrest afdavit, a police ofcer was driving on U.S. Highway 27 on Sunday when he spotted a man carrying bags and walking across the road outside the crosswalk. The ofcer said he had to slam on his brakes and swerve to avoid hitting the man. The ofcer said the man, later identied as Hosler, looked like he had been involved in a ght. The of cer said he asked Hosler if he was OK and said the man cursed him. The afdavit states Hosler would not provide his name, could not provide identication and refused to stop texting someone on his cell phone. The ofcer said that when he called for backup, Hosler stood up and assumed a ghting stance. Hosler then alleged ly punched the ofcer, who doused him with pepper spray. While the ofcer was waiting for the spray to take effect and backup to arrive, Hosler reportedly cursed him again and ran through a 12-foot-deep ditch before disappearing into the woods. Police dogs were unable to nd Hosler, but information in the bags he left behind led ofcers to a girl, who told them Hosler was hiding and waiting for a man to pick him up. Law enforcement found Hosler on March 10 outside of Clermont and arrested him. CLERMONT Situation escalates for alleged jaywalker HOSLER Staff Report Lake County high school stu dents currently taking Advanced Placement courses are encouraged to sign up for district-wide AP sem inars scheduled on April 5 and 26 from 8 to 11 a.m. and 12 to 3 p.m. The April 5 seminars will be held at Leesburg High School and Lake Minneola High School, according to a press release. The April 26 semi nars will be held at Mount Dora High School and East Ridge High School. Students can receive more in formation from their AP teachers. There are 30 seats available per ses sion, awarded on a rst-come, rstserved basis. Registration for the April 5 sem inars runs through March 31 at www.surveymonkey.com/s/ap_ seminar_april5. Registration for the April 26 sem inars runs through April 21 at www. surveymonkey.com/s/ap_seminar_ april26. Lake students urged to attend AP seminars

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10% OFFAll options with this couponrffnntb B1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 19, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTS SPORTS EDITOR ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE .............................. 365-8268 FAX .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL ......... sports@dailycommercial.com S PORTS and LEISURE FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Lake Countys girls senior soccer players got together at Leesburgs H.O. Dabney Stadi um on Friday for the annual Se nior All-Star Game. Five players for the Red Team scored in a 5-0 win against the Blue Team in a game that marked the nal high school soccer game of the year in Lake County. Eustis Karina Chico opened the score early in the game and was followed into the scoring column by Lauren Gibson of East Ridge, Alexandra Emeli anchik from South Lake, Lees burgs Sarah McKinney and Eu stis Kristi Vidler. The Red Team powered 18 shots on goal, while the Blue Team managed nine. At halftime, the Daily All-Ar ea First Team, Second Team and Honorable Mentions were honored, as were Leesburgs Chelsea Mudd as Player of the Year, Chico as Sportsman of the Year and Leesburgs Israel Ra mos as Coach of the Year. The Red Team wore jerseys donated by area athletic boost ers, and the Blue Teams jerseys were supplied by Blount Honda. Senior girls shine on soccer field BRETT LEBLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Tavares Ashley Myer, left, and South Lakes Carina Borajas ght for the ball during the 2014 Lake County girls Senior All Star Classic at Leesburg High School in Leesburg on Friday. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com DAngelo Russell has reached the pinnacle of high school basketball. The Montverde Acad emy senior was select ed recently to play in the 37th annual Mc Donalds All American Game on April 2 at the United Center in Chi cago. Russell, who has committed to Ohio State, will be the third Montverde Acade my player in the last two years to play in the game, arguably the most respected of all high school All Ameri can games. Kasey Hill, now at the University of Florida, and Dakari Johnson, a freshman at Kentucky, represented the Eagles in last years game. Despite missing a large portion of the season due to knee sur gery, Russell helped Montverde Acade my to a 24-0 record the Eagles lone loss to Chicago Curie on Jan. 16 at the Tourna ment of Champions FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com The Leesburg Light ning will open the 2014 season on June 4 against the DeLand Suns at Pat Thomas Stadium-Buddy Lowe Field. The Florida Colle giate Summer League released the schedules for each of six teams on Thursday in antic ipation of the leagues 11th season. Leesburg has 22 games scheduled for the upcoming season and will play 45 games in total. The season will culminate on Aug. 3 with the FCSL Cham pionship Game at Tropicana Field, which will follow the Tam pa Bay Rays-Los Ange les Angels game which begins at 1:40 p.m. Leesburg has played in ve FCSL champi onship games in its seven-year history, winning the league ti tle in 2007 and 2009. Lightning to open 2014 season at home FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Aurora Davis has already had a college career that would be the envy of many student-athletes. However, the former South Lake High School multi-sport standouts big gest accomplishments may be yet to come. Davis has started her third season as one of Flor ida State Universitys top players and, along with playing partner Jace Par don, has led the Seminoles to a No. 4 national ranking. The Seminoles got their stiffest test of the season on March 12 when they faced defending national cham pions Long Beach State in Long Beach, Calif. The Seminoles went into Wednesdays match look ing to avenge last seasons 3-2 loss to the 49ers at the 2013 American Volleyball Coaches Association Na tional Championships. They got what they were looking for. A pair of critical kills by Davis in the second game lifted her and Pardon to a two-set victory against Long Beach States top team of Delainey Aign er-Swesey and Bojana Todorovic. Scores were 2117 and 21-13. Florida State topped the 49ers 3-2. It marked the Seminoles rst win ever against Long Beach State in dual play. Any time you beat the defending national cham pions its a huge win, FSU head coach Danalee Cor so said. We played well, but we still have a lot we can improve on. Jace and Aurora were fantastic on Court 1, as they have been all year. Im very proud of this team, but we still have plenty of work to do this season. After Long Beach State, the Seminoles (4-0 entering Wednesdays match) will play No. 2 USC, Loyola Ma rymount and No. 6 UCLA MONTVERDE Russell selected for McDonalds All American Game BRETT LEBLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Montverde senior DAngelo Russell dribbles the ball down the court during the rst half of the Montverde AcademyPhiladelphia Math, Civics & Sciences Charter School game in Montverde. Ex-SLHS standout Davis leads FSU to cusp of greatness PHOTO COURTESY OF FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY Former South Lake High School standout Aurora Davis competes for the Florida State University sand volleyball team. Any time you beat the defending national champions its a huge win. ... Im very proud of this team, but we still have plenty of work to do this season. Danalee Corso FSU head coach SEE RUSSELL | B3 SEE AURORA | B4 SEE FCSL | B3

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B2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 19, 2014

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Wednesday, March 19, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B3 HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Eustis High Schools Kiron Williams scored 28 points Thursday to lead the home team to a 125121 win at the annual Corey Rolle Lake-Sum ter Senior All-Star game at Mount Dora High School. Troy Willis from Lees burg added 17 for the home squad. For the away team, Mount Doras Jefferson Vea scored 14 to lead a furious comeback, and Antwon Clayton from Eustis had 17. Mount Dora Bibles Zach Brock won the 3-point contest with 20 points, and First Acad emy of Leesburgs Luke Lea won the slam dunk contest. The annual game be gan in 1994 and was lat er renamed in honor of Rolle, a former Eustis coach who died in 2010 from complications of diabetes. Last night in the limelight BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Eustis Antwon Clayton dunks the ball during the Corey Rolle Lake-Sumter All-Star basketball game on Thursday. Clayton scored 17 in the contest. in Springeld, Mo., was taken down after it was determined that Chicago Curie had used ineligible players. Russell was named the Most Valuable Player at the Mont verde Academy Invitational Tournament in January and helped the Eagles to a No. 1 na tional ranking by Max Preps. Russell also was the MVP for the South team at the Nike Global Challenge last summer and was featured in Sports Il lustrateds Faces in the Crowd in August. Before his knee in jury, Russell was ranked No. 21 in the Top 150 Recruits for Class of 2014 by Rivals.com. According to Bleacher Re port columnist Scott Henry, Russell is ranked among the nations top ve prospects at his position by nearly every recruiting service available. He boasts a complete combo guards game, with the abili ty to handle, pass and score in the lane. However, its Rus sells rst-three-rows range that produces the most excite ment. Russell is one of three play ers with Florida connections who has committed to play in the game. Orlando Lake High land Preps Joel Berry and Jack sonville Providence Schools Grayson Allen also are expect ed to play. Berry, a North Carolina com mit, and Allen, a Duke com mit, will play for the West. Rus sell will play for the East. The McDonalds All Amer ican Game often features the nations top recruits and this years contest will have the Top 13 picks and 17 of the top 20 prospects. The rst McDonalds All American Game was played in 1978 in Philadelphia, one year after McDonalds selected its rst All American team. Over the years, some of the great est basketball players in his tory have played in the game, including Mark Aguirre, Isiah Thomas, James Worthy, Ralph Sampson, Dominique Wilkins, LeBron James, Shaquille ONe al, Carmelo Anthony and Mi chael Jordan. RUSSELL FROM PAGE B1 The Lightning will play two home games in their open ing week DeLand on June 4 and San ford on June 6. Lees burg will welcome the leagues new est franchise Win ter Garden with a three-game series beginning June 10 at Pat Thomas Sta dium-Buddy Lowe Field. Nicknamed the Squeeze, Lees burg will travel to Winter Gardens West Orange High School to play Winter Gar den the following night and will close out the series on June 12 in Leesburg. Games at Pat Thomas Stadi um-Buddy Lowe Field are free ad mission. At all oth er FCSL ballparks, admission is $5 for adults and $3 for children and seniors. The Lightning is the only team in the FCSL that has never charged admission for its home games. Leesburgs lon gest homestead of the season will be a three-game set from July 3-5, which in cludes the teams an nual Independence Day celebration. The Lightning will host defending league champion Winter Park at 6 p.m. on July 4. After the game, fans are invited on the eld to watch the citys reworks show at approximately 9 p.m. Leesburgs lon gest road trip is ve games, June 25 to 29, when the Lightning play at Sanford (June 25-26) and Winter Garden (June 27-29). The FCSL All-Star Game is scheduled FCSL FROM PAGE B1 for 7 p.m. July 8 at San ford Memorial Stadi um. Leesburg will wrap up its regular season on July 26-27 with a pair of home games against Winter Park. The only Monday game of the season for the Light ning is scheduled for July 14 at Winter Gar den. All games, except for Sunday and the Light nings games on July14 and July 19, are sched uled for a 7 p.m. start. On Sundays, game time is 5 p.m., except for June 29, July 6 and July 19, which are 1 p.m. starts.

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B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 19, 2014 CLERMONT BLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSAMILYELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time! IRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONTL Many Other Activities each week Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.org LIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLCHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm SOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary); 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.org ST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am (Rite I) 10:00 am (Rite II) 5:00 pm (Praise & Worship) Sunday School Youth Group Nursery Adult Bible Study Womens Bible Study Mens Prayer Breakfast WOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH GODINCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALE ERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for Children Groveland IRSTBAPTISTCHURCH GROVELAND Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pm MT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! MINNEOLA CONGREGATIONSMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club NEWLPRESBYTERIANCHURCH18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am TLIVINGGOD Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce Rowland MONTVERDE WOODLANDSLUTHERAN15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 am OAKLAND PRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforSouth Lake South LakeGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOMErfn tbt352-394-7121806 W. Minneola Ave.,Clermont,FL Cremation ChoicesDirect Cremation$675Plus Container Ron Becker,Director352-394-8228921 S.US Hwy 27,Minneola,FL on Friday in dual-match play be fore playing the same teams on Saturday in bracket competition. Davis has helped the Seminoles get out of the gates quickly this sea son with wins against Jacksonville, North Florida, Louisiana-Monroe and No. 9 Florida International. Pardon and Davis have proven to be a dynamic pairing this season and have yet to lose a set. For Davis, this season her senior year will be her nal chance to climb the last steps to ward immortality in the relative ly new sport of college sand vol leyball. She was a member of the Seminoles charter team in 2012 and was named to the sports rst All-America team. Davis recorded a 50-7-1 record during that inaugural season and reached the quarternals of the National Championships with playing partner Brittany Tiegs. She didnt start the season as a mem ber of the Seminoles No. 1 team, but once she was paired with Tiegs, Davis became even more dominant, achieving a 22-2-1 re cord and earning three tourna ment titles. As a junior, Davis recorded a 22-9 overall record. She was 5-3 at No. 1, 3-1 at No. 2 and 6-1 at No. 3. At Nationals, Davis went 3-1 at No. 3, reaching the seminals be fore losing to Peppperdine. Florida State nished third in each of its rst two appearances at Nationals. Davis began establishing her athletic prowess at South Lake, where she competed in basket ball, volleyball and track. Her in door volleyball talents earned her a scholarship as an outside hitter at State College of Florida in Sara sota. With the Manatees, she ranked number one in the nation in total kills and was a National Junior Col lege Athletic Association All-Amer ica Honorable Mention. Davis also led the Manatees to a Suncoast Conference title. Even though she was one of the countrys top players in the gym, Davis rst love was the beach. She has competed for years in a variety of tournaments and quickly estab lished herself as a formidable foe on beaches around the country. Davis rst taste of success on a national stage came in 2008 when she won the USA Beach Volleyball Tour title in Huntington Beach, Calif. She also appeared in the 2010 Dig the Beach Top 10 Wom ens Open Division and won the Fi esta and Siesta Collegiate Beach Championship in 2010. Despite her many successes in the sand, Davis returned to the gym in 2013 and played with the Seminoles indoor volleyball team. In Florida States nal home match of the season, she was recognized along with three senior team mates. Although she has had a highly successful collegiate career, Davis likely would give it all back for the chance to lead the Seminoles to a national title in her nal season with the school. AURORA FROM PAGE B1 FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Montverde Acade mys boys basketball team gets a chance to defend its national championship. As expected, the Ea gles were invited re cently to play in the High School Nation al Invitational tourna ment in April in New York City where they will vie for a second straight national cham pionship against a eld of nationally recog nized programs. The sixth annual tour nament will begin play on April 3 with quar ternal games at Christ the King High School. The national champi onship game on April 5 will be played in New York Citys iconic Madi son Square Garden. High school basket ball has a long and rich tradition at Madison Square Garden. ... We are excited to host the boys and girls nals of the High School Nation al Invitational tourna ment, the premier high school basketball tour nament in the country. Every basketball player dreams of playing in the Garden, and were real ly happy to provide that opportunity with these kids, said Joel Fisher, executive vice president of MSG Sports. This opportuni ty gives these kids a chance to play here with memories theyll never forget. Some of the top prep programs in the coun try have been invit ed, such as Charlotte (N.C.) Northside Chris tian Academy, Mouth of Wilson (Va.) Oak Hill Academy, Seattle Rani er Beach High School, Huntington (W. Va.) Prep, LaPorte (Ind.) La Lumiere School and Weston Sagemont the second boys team from Florida in the tournament. In the girls tourna ment a four-team eld Orlando Edge water will represent central Florida. Montverde Acade my enters the tourna ment with a 25-0 re cord. The Eagles only loss against Chicago Curie on Jan. 16 was taken down after it was determined that Chica go Curie had used sev en academically ineligi ble players. Montverde Academy will wrap up the rst day of the HSNI at 6 p.m. with a nationally tele vised contest against Weston Sagemont (330), winner of the Flori da High School Athlet ic Association Class 3A state title. All four games on April 3 will be shown live on ESPNU. Montverde Academy to defend national title

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Ann Dupee REMEMBER WHEN A weekly column that reprints some of the more interest ing news stories that have ap peared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press. C1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 19, 2014 www.southlakepress.com C OMMUNITY Proudly serving CLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWS STAFF WRITER ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 E-MAIL .... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com FROM THE FILES | 25 YEARS AGO 1989 Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press COMMISSIONERS APPROVE NEW DESIGN FOR COUNTY JAIL Lake County Commission ers voted for a two-building design for the proposed Crim inal Justice Complex to be built in Tavares, with the jail being built on the south side of Main Street. Budget is $34.5 million. The temporary jail under construction will open shortly to ease overcrowding at the existing facility. Sheriff George Knupp told commissioners that when he took ofce January 3 the total jail population was 250. The current population is 278. In an effort to cut costs, Knupp plans to eliminate catered meals to prisoners, reducing food costs from $6.84 per in mate per day to $2.76, saving $119,000 per year. SEWER FOR MASCOTTE? Mascotte council mem bers and assembled resi dents were told a city sewer system was a matter of how and when and not a matter of choice by consultant Bud Clark of Clark, Roumelis and Associates. He said that once the citys comprehensive plan is passed next July, state reg ulations requiring sewer sys tems for metropolitan areas go into effect. Council will ex plore the matter. NAMES IN THE NEWS Jim Stivender has been hired as Lake Countys Public Works Director. Amid the last minute ur ry of activity, sunny skies and many onlookers, the South Lake Animal League Thrift Shop opened. Dr. William Brannon joined League Presi dent Beth McCabe in the of cial ribbon-cutting ceremony. South Lake Countys Teach er of the Year selections: Rena Clark, Clermont Elementa ry; Audrey McGriff Irvin, Cl ermont Junior High School; Jeff Richard Odom, Clermont High School; Sandra Reaves, Groveland Elementary; Pa mela Joy Catrett Worley, Grov eland High School; Sheryl Yvonne Williams, Groveland Middle School; Mary Jattu so Olson, Mascotte Elemen tary; Debra Phipps, Minneo la Elementary Gerald William Buell, South Lake Education Center. Pastor William N. McKin ney announced his retire ment at New Jacobs Chapel Baptist Church. Minneola Elementary School fth grader Franklin Davis won the schools spell ing bee. Clermont Womans Club held its annual Arts and Craft Show. Winners were Hel en Gallagher, Ruby Abel, Mil lie Warren, Mary White, Jo anne Apel and Lois Tucker. SEE HISTORY | C2 Staff Report Heroes Landing com ic book store in Cler mont will host com ic legend Neal Adams from 4-7 p.m. on Thursday. Adams is a tower ing gure in the world of comic books, known for help ing create some of the denitive modern imag ery of DC Com ics most iconic characters, store owner Todd Mer rick said. Neal has had leg endary runs on Bat man, X-Men, Green Lantern-Green Arrow and Deadman, Mer rick said in a press re lease. Adams res cued Batman from the campy nostalgia of the television show and re tted him in his pres ent incarnation as an Avenger of the Night. When people say modern Batman, they mean Neal Adams Bat man. His run on Bat man led direct ly to the new, more realistic in carnation in the Batman Begins movie, which fea tured the charac ter he created, Ras Al Ghul. Adams recently com pleted an eight-page story called Batman Black & White #1, Mer rick said. Copies will be available at the store for Adams to sign. Each persons rst autograph CLERMONT Comic book legend coming to local store PHOTO COURTESY OF NEAL ADAMS Comic book artist Neal Adams rescued Batman from the campy nostalgia of the television show and retted him in his present incarnation as an Avenger of the Night, said Todd Merrick, owner of Heroes Landing comic book store in Clermont. ADAMS SEE COMICS | C4 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com T he rst time Don Wasness ew in a glider, it was be cause a friend in Mary land prodd ed him to come along. That ight took place in 1965 and Wasness became hooked. He has been ying ever since, logging more than 5,900 miles over the years. We (pilots) see the world like no one else sees it. Were sitting in a bubble looking out and we can see so much all around, above and under us. Its a feeling like no other, and its just beautiful, Wasness said. Those were Wasness senti ments Saturday after complet ing the nal task of the 24th annual Seniors Soaring Cham pionship, a national competi tion sanctioned by the Soaring Society of America that takes place each year at the Lake Seminole Gliderport in Cler mont. Wasness, now 81, is the only pilot of the 55 competing this year that has own and com peted all 24 years. His daughter, Marlene Was ness, who has been part of his ground crew since she was in high school, said her dad placed rst in the inaugural competition, second the next year and third place the year after that. E is the number he got as signed for his rst competi tion, and hes kept it. It stands for One-Echo but hes been nicknamed One-Easy because he makes ying look so easy, she said. Marlenes brother, James Wasness, also helps out with the crew duties for their dad, and before their mother, Do lores, passed away in 2010, she happily did as well. She used to come to this competition with my dad every year. She knew he loves ying and she loved watching him y. She died about 3 years ago and its been tough, but were still hanging in there, Marlene Wasness said. Don Wasness said his inten tion is to compete in the na tional competition for as long as he is able. Im 81 now, working on 82, and if I feel as good next year Ill be here, and every year af ter that for as long as I have, he said. The competition, which started with a practice day on March 8, ended Saturday. Was ness nished 13th out of 55 competing seniors. Among the 55 were world champions and members of the world team, including Karl Striedieck, 77, a world re cord-setting glider pilot from Pennsylvania and a member of the U.S. Soaring Hall of Fame, and Rich Owen, an Orlando top yer and co-coordinator of Seniors take to the air over Clermont in glider championships ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Young glider pilot J.P. Stewart from Virginia, ying a borrowed glider with identier X8 landed at the Lake Seminole Gliderport late Saturday afternoon, the nal day of the 24th annual Senior Soaring National Competition in Clermont. Stewart, who was too young to be scored in the competition, ew as one of ve guests invited each year to y among the sports best pilots. We (pilots) see the world like no one else sees it. Were sitting in a bubble looking out and we can see so much all around, above and under us. Its a feeling like no other, and its just beautiful. Don Wasness SEE GLIDER | C2

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C2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 19, 2014 NOSY NONSENSE By BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY / Edited by Will ShortzNo. 0309RELEASE DATE: 3/16/2014 ACROSS1 Top off, as someones drink 8 Isolated hill surrounded by lava15 Shine 20 Lubrication point 21 Snapping things 22 Avoiding the rush, say 23 She speaks things in doubt, / That carry but half sense 24 Theyre not accented in music 25 Unimaginative 26 One unsatisfied with a She loves me, she loves me not result? 28 Picky little dog? 30 Faint trace 31 A lot 33 Neglect 34 Detests 38 Game equipment 40 Haitian couple 41 Bandleaders cry 42 Called off 43 Lay atop 47 LArlsienne composer 48 Its not much 49 Lake ___ (Australias lowest point) 50 Audition winners part, maybe 51 Peep 52 Business transactions free from government regulation? 57 Spanish bear 58 Vanquish 61 Narrow land projections into the sea 62 Floors 64 Billet-doux recipient 66 Hands, informally67 Orbit rival 69 Coat style 70 Bank run 71 Change structurally 72 Its nothing at all 73 Carefree dairy product? 77 Really! 80 Radiohead head Yorke 82 Modest response to a compliment 83 French 101 pronoun 84 It covers Hectors death 86 Continental free trade group 88 Block, as a stream 91 Likes lots 92 F.S.U. player, for short 93 Bright red 94 One spinning ones wheels? 95 Optimally 98 Its often heard at a ballpark 99 Reconstructionera cartoonist 101 Optimistic theater audience? 103 Marvel from Idahos largest city? 109 Soot 110 Kind of seat 112 Straightshooting 113 Its bigger than a family 114 Slalom, for one115 Winstons home in 116 Snapchat demographic 117 Nuts 118 In words DOWN1 Kind of pyramid 2 TVs Kelly 3 Educ. book category 4 ___ Like the Wind (song from Dirty Dancing) 5 Sunday reading 6 Supporter of the 1%, say 7 Advances on 8 Missile name 9 Got to the point? 10 Eagerly adopt 11 Polish leader? 12 Developers expanses 13 Profanities 14 Canadian business often connected to a Tim Hortons 15 Makes bail, e.g. 16 Talking points? 17 Un Ballo in Maschera aria 18 Some chorus members 19 Like hell! 27 Mollify 29 Hold your horses32 Boosted, as an ego 34 Heat alerts, for short? 35 Tiny indicator 36 Barely remembered seaman? 37 Listen up, Lucia!39 Hoosier capital, informally 40 Detective writer Earl ___ Biggers 43 Some loaves 44 Sports score most likely to be on the highlight reel? 45 Actress Elizabeth with older twins 46 Fagins end 48 Pulled tight 49 Defib team 52 Post office workers, for short? 53 CBS series that, oddly, was filmed in L.A. 54 Lens 55 Sen. McConnell 56 Downton Abbey maid 59 Museum decoration 60 Sherlock channel, affectionately, with the 63 Bread box? 64 De Monarchia writer 65 He discusses divine providence in Job 66 Labyrinthine 67 An Arnaz 68 Busy travel day, maybe 70 Cheeky 71 Goes back into business 74 Venices oldest bridge 75 Fmes is a form of it 76 Birds with inflatable neck sacs78 I ___ Hamlet (Paul Rudnick play) 79 Fumes may produce one 81 Financiers 84 Brand of gloves and slippers85 Blitzed 87 Concertgoers who are into the hits? 88 Rice paper?: Abbr. 89 Desert steed 90 One of the Balearic Islands 91 County seat of Suffolk, England 93 Stupid sort 95 Specialized talk 96 2014 Baseball Hall of Fame inductee 97 The Beatles P.S. I Love You, e.g. 98 Honshu port 100 The Two Pots storyteller 102 College up the coast from L.A. 104 March time 105 Certain tourney overseer 106 TV spots 107 City near Presque Isle State Park 108 Like some tea leaves 111 Sports ___ 1234567 8910111213141516171819 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 3132 33 34353637 3839 40 41 42 43 444546 47 48 49 50 51 52 535455 5657 585960 61 6263 6465 66 6768 69 70 71 72 737475 76 777879 80 8182 83 8485 86 87 888990 91 92 93 94 959697 98 99100 101 102 103104 105106107108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Solution on D3 They all won ribbons at dis trict competition. The clubs main project this year is the YMCA pool. For the rst time since Cl ermont Garden Club be gan the Home of the Month award, it has been given to Florida Natives Don and Nancy Pederson of 1641 2nd Street. Groveland na tive Don owns and operates the Don Pederson Insurance Agency, while Clermont na tive Nancy is secretary-trea surer. They are parents of 7-year-old Amanda. Nancy is chairing the clubs ower show for the second consec utive year, assisted by Marge Battersby. While many in the citrus business packed it in after the back-to-back freezes in 1983 and 1985, B.G. Harmon stood strong and just kept on packing. Located be tween Clermont and Grov eland on State Road 50, it is one of the top ve of more than 100 registered citrus packing houses in Florida. Management team is Bin G. Harmon, president; Dennis Broadway, packing house manager; Steve Wil liams, fruit procurement; Robin Harmon Crawford, sales manager; David Gur ney, general manager and Tom Resler, juice opera tions. CLERMONT JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL BECOMES MIDDLE SCHOOL Clermont Junior High School Principal Bill Cock croft reported to the Lake County School Board that faculty, parents, local civ ic organizations and the schools citizens advisory committee recommended changing the schools name to Clermont Middle School. Many of Clermonts black residents were present and gave the board a peti tion requesting the school be named after William N. McKinney. Former teacher Sallie Benson explained why the group felt it would be appropriate. Before integra tion, the junior high school was a black elementary/ high school known as Lin coln Park. McKinney was principal of this school for many years, dating from when it was a three-room wooden build ing accommodating stu dents in grades 1 through 9. He also taught grades 7, 8 and 9 and was the coach. Mrs. Benson said the group felt the school should be named for him because of the many children he touched in a positive way and because of his dedica tion to education as well as mankind. HISTORY FROM PAGE C1 the competition. On Sunday, Canadas Vir ginia Thompson, a co-co ordinator, conrmed that Striedieck was this years winner, followed by Owen, who came in second, and Henry Retting, who was third. Thompson said the week has been a good one. Pi lots had ve ying days and, except for a bout of bad weather, they would have had more. The competition is the rst of the year for the se nior pilots and is always open to the public. Ground crews, made up this year of volunteers from the civilian patrol and stu dents at Embry Riddle, help secure the gliders to six dif ferent tow planes, which take the gliders aloft. Once in the air, howev er, the ight and task given to the pilots on each day of the competition is between them and the GPS locat ed in their gliders that track specied GPS waypoints and award pilots points for speed, distance and their ability to stay in the air for the entire task. The pilots race high per formance, berglass gliders over distances of 100 to 200 miles by studying the skies for thermals, or patches of rising hot air, keeping them aloft. The presence of uffy white cumulus clouds in dicates a higher likelihood that thermals are present. Greg Delp, a spectator, was too young to compete in the senior competition, but along with piloting pri vate ights from Connecti cut to Florida each week end, he ies gliders as well. Watching the planes go up is a thrill, he says, because he knows what goes into it. He tried to attend the launch at least one day of the Senior Nationals because, Its prob ably the most gliders you can see in one place, just about anywhere. Its a lot of stuff happen ing at the launch. Then, once they are up and re leased, youre constant ly thinking ahead, trying to look for a lift, climbing as fast as you can and get ting to the different check points, Delp said. Its very challenging. For information about competitions, classes or ights available year round at the Lake Seminole Glider port, call 352-394-5450. GLIDER FROM PAGE C1 ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Glider pilot Don Wasness from Maryland, ying under the competition identier 1E, landed his ASW-24B glider after a 230-mile, three-hour route, late Saturday at the Lake Seminole Gliderport on the nal day of the 24th annual Senior Soaring National Competition in Clermont.

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Wednesday, March 19, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C3 Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...Totally UniqueTotally Unique is proud to be Clermonts first ORGANIC hair salon. We care about your beauty, your wellness, the environment and our community, so we use organic and sustainably harvested products whenever possible. We specialize in organic hair color, hair care products, nail and skin care lines. Our salon is one of the oldest salons in Clermont and is located at 786 W Montrose Street in Historic Downtown Clermont. Our stylists are experienced in all phases of hair care including color, straighteners, cuts, texture and styles. Hair stylists are Marjorie Morphet, Tina Foote, Sherie Wolkens and Jamie Rhoades. Our nail techs, Jennifer Vandergrift and Jamie Rhoades, perform pedicures and manicures using Zoya nail products (which are Big 5 free). Shellac manicures, lasting up to three weeks, are also available by Jennifer and Jamie. We have two pedicure chairs in a private room for your relaxation and enjoyment. Relaxing and therapeutic facials are available by Jennifer in our private upstairs facial room. Massage services include chair massage, Swedish and Deep Tissue. Massage services are also done in a private room in our upstairs area. We utilize several massage therapists and provide massage by appointment only. We also offer a small boutique with handcrafted jewelry and hair accessories, Art by Tina Foote and Jamie Rhoades, and other unique items. Salon hours are 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Saturday and open Sundays by appointment only. Evening hours are also available by appointment. We pride ourselves in providing a friendly, relaxing environment for our clients and friends. Stop by and visit or call 352-394-5005 for more information. We are also on Facebook and WWW.TotallyUniqueSalon.com.. LOOKING FOR PARTS? SEE JULIE (352) 394-6111 Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com High-paying jobs are land ing at Leesburg Internation al Airport with Leesburg of cials coming to terms this week on a lease agreement for Wipaire Inc. to provide 60 full-time jobs related to air craft maintenance, avionics repair and more. A vote for this lease is a vote for jobs, high-paying jobs, Lee Webb, vice presi dent of aircraft services for Wipaire, said Monday night as he addressed the city commission. I was a little surprised when I recently read that the average hour ly wage in Lake County is $14.96 an hour, and the cur rent staff that we have here now, and that we are bring ing and recruiting, the aver age hourly rate is little over $32 an hour, so its a signi cant difference. Webb said Wipaire has been around for 54 years in St. Paul, Minn., before the company chose to expand to Leesburg as its southeast ern service center, where the big draw for Wipaire was the citys proximity to Lake Har ris and the Tavares seaplane base, as well as the num ber of oatplanes and sea plane-rated pilots in the re gion. The company services air craft ranging in size from small single-engine aircraft such as the Piper Super Cub up to single-engine turbo props like the Quest Kodiak and Cessna Caravan series. Wipaire began opera tions at the Leesburg airport in January 2013, although terms of its lease have been under negotiations this past year. This is our rst venture outside of our home base, Webb said of the business that is now attracting pi lots who do not want to y to Minnesota in the winter to have work done on their aircraft. Wipaire is currently working on six planes at its Leesburg service site and is making improvements at its hangar facility. It also plans to expand the building by an additional 5,000 square feet for more than 15,000 square feet of space. Leesburg Airport Manager Leo Triggi said the airport is soaring to new heights with Wipaire providing aircraft service, and he predicts it will be the start of more eco nomic development. We expect a lot of other business to come and exist ing businesses at the airport to expand. There are two or three others that are in line to come to Leesburg, Trig gi said Wednesday, although he did not reveal the compa nies by name. Triggi also predicts that Leesburg will expand its sea plane activity after a sea plane ramp is built into Lake Harris. Commissioner Elise Den nison said Wednesday she is thrilled the contract with Wipaire has been signed and she joins her fellow com missioners in wanting to see m ore airplane-related com panies based at the airport. The $32 an hour is one of the highest paying lev els in Leesburg, she said. Wipaire is willing to train there (at its facility), but as this company grows, they would like to see more train ing come to this area. What Im trying to do along with this, is to meet with some of the educators in the area (Lake-Sumter State College and Lake Tech) to see about setting up an airplane me chanical-type school, so that we can go ahead and actu ally train individuals in this type of work and work handin-hand with Wipaire. Dennison envisions oth er businesses at the airport in the future, such as restau rants where people can come down and have lunch and watch the planes y in and take off. There is a lot that we can do with Leesburg airport, she said, calling it one of the citys jewels. The air port is absolutely one of my top projects, and Im go ing to work them as long as I can and keep that moving along. We have a good advi sory board over there to help with what is going on and now that Leo i s on board, were starting to get every thing right in place. Wipaire brings high-paying jobs to Leesburg PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Aircraft Mechanic Pete Nunez, 52, installs wingtip fuel tanks on a Cessna 206 at the Wipaire Inc.s hangar at Leesburg International Airport in Leesburg. Aircraft Mechanic Butch Barnette, 51, works on the wiring of a Cessna 206 at Wipaire Inc.s hangar. There is a lot that we can do with Leesburg airport. The airport is absolutely one of my top projects, and Im going to work them as long as I can and keep that moving along. Commissioner Elise Dennison

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C4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 19, 2014 is free, with additional autographs costing $10 each. This is a very awe some and rare oppor tunity to meet this cre ator in a smaller and personal setting, Mer rick said of Adamss vis it. Heroes Landing is lo cated off of U.S. High way 27 in the shopping plaza in front of Kohls Department Store. It sells the latest comics, graphic novels, trade paperbacks, Manga, role-playing and trad ing card games, toys and collectibles. Heroes Landing also offers a free com ic book subscription pull service so that cus tomers do not miss an issue of their favor ite comic. Additionally, Heroes Landing ships discounted comics to military personnel and has sent over 3,000 comics since 2009, Merrick said. COMICS FROM PAGE C1 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com Oksana Hagerty never lost sleep over Ukraines relationship with Russia until Rus sian President Vladi mir Putin rolled troops across the border re cently. We were sure we were an indepen dent country, said the Ukrainian, who re cently moved to Ox ford with her husband, George, the new presi dent of Beacon College. We never imagined he could do something like this. Russian troops re portedly poured into Crimea on Feb. 28 after three months of pro tests in Kiev, Ukraine re sulted in the Ukrainian Parliament removing President Viktor Yanu kovych. Critics say the pro tests stemmed from corruption in the pres idency and Yanu kovychs decision not to join the European Union. The president ed the country, prompting Russias show of force on behalf of its ally. Pu tin reportedly has de fended the effort as a way to protect Russians in the Crimea region who are in danger. Hagerty said she could not understand Putins reasoning. She described how she spent many summers in Crimea, and found that Russians and Ukrainians have gotten along well there. We all spoke Rus sian and we just did not think about it, she said. This is the worst part of this conict. People start thinking about the things that did not really matter but now create a lot of tension. Ethnic Russians in Crimea, a pen insula in south ern Ukraine, make up two thirds of the population. On Sun day, Crimean residents will vote whether to se cede from Ukraine. The area has remained an autonomous republic within Ukraine since 1954. Putins argument for potentially annexing Crimea does not make sense, Hagerty ex plained. She said the earli est residents of Crimea were Persians, Greeks and Tatars. About 300,000 Tatars were displaced during World War II by Joseph Stalin. Who do we give Crimea to? she asked You say it is Russian. Tomorrow, Iran will say it is Iranian. Without question, a dangerous precedent is being set for the for mer Soviet zone, where national borders do not correspond perfect ly to where people live, said Stephen Bittner, a professor of history at Sonoma State Universi ty and short-term schol ar for the Wilson Center. Bittner said that hun dreds of thousands of ethnic Russians live outside of Russia in places such as the Bal tic republics, Kazakh stan and Belarus. Does Russia pre serve the right to inter vene on their behalf? Bittner asked. Hagerty, who was born in Lugansk, Ukraine, near the Rus sian border, said the country has not expe rienced such turmoil since World War II. Her dark eyes convey anguish as she shares how she feels betrayed by Russia. In Crimea, she said, propaganda has been spread about the Ukrai nians not doing enough for the Russians in the region. She compared Crimeas actions to a wife leaving a husband for a better deal where she later nds out she ended up with a mar ried man who is bank rupt. Putin comes to Crimea and says I can bring you a better life, she said. Why doesnt he bring a better life for the thousands of peo ple who live below pov erty line and drink be cause they have no hope in Russia? Eugene Huskey, a professor of political science and Russian studies at Stetson Uni versity, said, The Rus sian government un der Putin is whipping up a kind of hysteria to make it more likely that people will vote to join Russia. Hagertys family, who are still living in Lu gansk, are waiting anx iously in anticipation of Putins next move. What they are tell ing me is that it is very unstable, she said. We should have never thought that after ght ing the same war more than 60 years ago we would be back ght ing against each oth er. It polarizes the soci ety. People that used to be friends are now en emies, not only with in Ukraine but within families in Russia. Hagertys biggest con cern is that Putin will go further into the coun try. This has kept her up at night, she said. I could not sleep, she said. It was a sense of abuse. When your territory is invaded, it is a deep, unpleasant feeling. To think the Russians can do that and we have to ask the Germans to protect us against Russians is just crazy. If Putin advanc es further into eastern Ukraine, Huskey said, it could lead to a larg er conict between Ukrainian and Russian forces. If you move into other parts of eastern Ukraine, all bets are off, he said. Hagerty says her mother, who is Russian, feels a strong sense of betrayal. It is a betrayal to people who we thought were our proud est friends, she said. They never respected our independence. Russias incursion has changed Hagertys views of the two na tions relationship. We thought we were the same people, she said of Russians and Ukrainians. After Pu tin explained to us that we were not the same people, I thought to myself of switching to Ukrainian language out of protest. I never cared about that. I spoke Rus sian freely. Now because of Pu tin I feel uncomfortable reading Russian books or Russian music, she said. It is no longer part of my culture. Woman reflects on conflict in her native Ukraine BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Oksana Hagerty poses at her home in Oxford.

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Wednesday, March 19, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C5

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C6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 19, 2014 A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services 352-431-9481Residential / Commercial rfnfftbrftb f Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Concrete Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Handyman Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. Insurance Services Irrigation Services Land Clearing Services Landscaping Services r fntbb Lawn Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Moving Services Painting Services Enclosure Screening Fencing Services Bathroom Remodeling Handyman Services BOYDSYou call it, We haul it!352 460-7186 Marine Services HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314 HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314 Cleaning Services Land Clearing Services

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Wednesday, March 19, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C7 Psychic Services Pressure Cleaning Restaurants Roofing Services Tile Service Shower Doors Service Tree Service Veterinarian Services Window Services All About Appliances repairs and installs all brands of major appliances. We are a small husband/wife company. Eric has over 15 years experience repairing appliances and Lavinia (Vinnie) has over 20 years in business management experience. Together, we strive to offer you prompt, professional, courteous and personal services far beyond your expectations, both by phone and in your home. We respect you and your time and make every effort to be in and out of your home as quickly as possible yet provide a thorough diagnosis and timely repair. We genuinely appreciate all your business. Pals Gals Services, Inc. has been owned and operated by Patti Kauffman and Kellie Kennedy since 1986. They are a multifaceted business offering a wide a variety of services, which include interior and exterior painting, faux painting, wallpaper removal and installation, tile and grout cleaning, tile and grout removal and installation, and grout staining. They also install wood floors and can refinished your old wood floors, to make them look brand new. They can help you with color choices and give advice on what is practical or not! They can help resolve your honeydo list such as minor plumbing, electrical, drywall, cabinets, counter tops for your home or office. They pride themselves on quality womanship, dependability and trust. They know how difficult it is to find someone you trust and actually show up on time. They are a referral based business relying on previous clients to spread the word. They are two very talented ladies that take extreme pride in their work and take each job personally. They know how important making choices about your home or office can be and are more than willing to help with each decision.GIVE THE GALS A CALL, THEY CAN DO IT ALL!!! 352-787-4089 Veterinary Care in the Convenience of your own home! and for you Services include Wellness exams, including vaccines and parasite screening, Blood work, Skin and ear issues, Digestive or Urinary tract issues, Health certificates, Kathie L. Robinson, DVMDr. Robinson has over 16 years experience as a veterinarian.VISITING VETERINARIAN, LLC 352-408-3666 FAX: 352-253-2443VISITINGVETERINARIAN@AOL.COM To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact Michelle in the Classified Department at (352) 365-8233 or by email michelle.fuller@dailycommercial.com Plumbing Services Tree Service Roofing Services Window Services

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C8 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 19, 2014 Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) COMMUNITY CALENDAR TODAY MINNEOLA ELEMEN TARY SCHOOL CHARTER BOARD MEETING: At 7 p.m., at media center at the school, 320 E. Pearl St. Call 352-394-2600 for details. MASCOTTE ELEMEN TARY CHARTER SCHOOL VPK SIGN-UP: At 8:30 a.m. Children need to be in attendance on the day of registration for testing. Applications are available at the school or online at www.lake. k12..us. Children must be 4 years old by Sept. 1, 2014 to apply. Call Carol A. Mayer at 352429-2294, ext. 5812. Ap plications will not be ac cepted before this date. FRIDAY LOTTERY APPLICATIONS ACCEPTED AT CYPRESS RIDGE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL: Lottery enroll ment applications are being accepted through Friday for students who will be entering kindergarten through fth grades during the 2014-15 school year. Applications are avail able at the school from 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. in the front ofce. For in formation, call 352-3947651. MARCH 24-28 SPRING BREAK CRAFT HOUR AT THE MARIANNE BECK MEMORIAL LI BRARY: At 3 p.m., Mon day through Friday. Ages 6-14 welcome. Call 352324-0254 for details. MARCH 24 OPERA AT THE LIBRARY: At 1:45 p.m., featuring Francesco Cileas Adri ana Lecouvreur at the Cooper Memorial Li brary, Room 108B, 2525 Oakley Seaver Dr., Cler mont. Call Dennis Smo larek at 352-536-2275. MARCH 27 SOUTH LAKE 912 PROJ ECT HOSTS KRAIG MC LANE: At 7 p.m., at the Clermont Community Center in downtown Cl ermont. Kraig McLane from the St. Johns River Water Management Dis trict will address water issues in Lake County and Central Florida. APRIL 1 SOUTH LAKE ART LEAGUE JEWELRY WORK SHOP: Learn to make your own earrings and necklaces from 2 to 4:30 p.m., April 15 and 29, at the Cagan Artists Bou tique Studio, 16640 Ca gan Crossings Blvd., in Clermont. Class fee is $20 with a $5 materials fee. Preregistration re quired at the studio or by calling 352-638-3736. APRIL 5 EAT THE WEEDS HEALTHY AND EDIBLE NA TIVE PLANTS WITH THE LAKE BEAUTYBERRY CHAPTER OF THE FLORIDA NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY: At 10 a.m., at the Cooper Memorial Library, 2525 Oakley Seaver Dr., in Clermont. APRIL 7 MASCOTTE ELEMEN TARY CHARTER BOARD SAC MEETING: At 5 p.m., in the media center. Call 352-429-2294. To place an item on the calen dar, send an email to pam.fen nimore@dailycommercial.com. LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com In the middle of the night, Bob Schmeltz of ten would wake to the disturbing sound of semi-trucks barreling down County Road 44A at 65 mph. The semi-trucks would use the coun ty road, also known as Burlington Avenue, as a shortcut to State Road 19 in Eustis, he said. It just kept getting increasingly louder and louder, he said. Enough was enough. For two years, Schmeltz and other neighbors have been affected by the noise and trafc on the road. As a result, Schmeltz, Lisa Cox and John Try bulec came together and rallied neighbors to sign a petition to send to the Lake Coun ty Commission to ad dress the issue. Specically, they con tacted their district com missioner, Leslie Campi one about the problem. This week, coun ty commissioners ap proved a resolution to designate the 44A corridor from Coun ty Road 437 east to State Road 44 as a nothrough truck zone, ap plying to Class 8-sized semi-trucks or larger. The Class 8 gross ve hicle weight rating is anything above 33,000 pounds, mainly tractor trailers. What I am trying to do is address the high way situation, Cam pione said at Tuesdays board of county com mission meeting. It is through trafc as op posed to local trafc. Referring to the num ber of companies in the area, Commissioner Welton Cadwell asked if the commission would consider putting restrictions for Class 8 size trucks just in the evenings. If we are going to go for the semi-trucks, I think that would be too complicated, Campio ne said. Commission Chair man Jimmy Conner agreed. We want to give the people out there some relief, he said. Campione added the noise was creating a nuisance for the resi dents. It is interfering with the use and enjoyment of the area as a quiet, rural residential area. Schmeltz said there have been many acci dents on the road be cause of semi-truck trafc. He remembered a major accident that occurred right in front of his home. Coming before the commission Tuesday, Trybulec had with him a petition with 80 sig natures. Commerce and trucking have to take place for America to keep moving, he said in a follow-up phone interview. Trucks are an essential part of the nations economy. But at the same time, he said, society has rules. Everybody has a le gal right to do busi ness, but it is important that everything is done within reason, he said. I work at home and I would hear the trucks at all different hours. You hear it in the morn ing, in the middle of the night when you are sleeping. It was not just a little bit. Jim Stivender, pub lic works director, said the truck volume on the road was between 5 and 10 percent, which is typ ical compared with oth er roads in the county. The issue is there has been a lot of com plaints about excessive noise in the nighttime hours, he said. Campione proposed also reducing the speed limit on the road, but commissioners decid ed to not enforce it at this time. Semi-trucks no longer welcome on Eustis Road NO TRUCKS The Lake County Commission banned truck traffic from a stretch of 44A because of complaints from area residents. WHITNEY WILLARD / STAFF GRAPHIC BLACK BEAR GOLF CLUBLake Norris Rd. 44A 437 44 N

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Wednesday, March 19, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D1 rfntbrr rfrrntbrrbf rrntrrfbttrr rbrtbrftrtb btttrbrt tntbbt r t r f f r b b t r r t r f f b t t t b t f r t b n t b r f r t t b b t t r b t r r t b t f t r t b t b r f b t t r b b n t b n t r f r t t b r b t b t b r f r b f b b t r t b f t b t b r t t r b t b t b t f r t b r r t t r t r r t b f r b r b r t n t t t r b r t r b f f r r rttbfrr bfbt tbrfbttrb ntbfrrntb btrbb b f r t t b t r r r b fn tnbn rr f t b t b t f t t t t b r n r f b r r r b t r b t f t t r b t r r n t b b r r r t t f n r f b b r t f t t b r r b r b t f n b r t b r t b b t r b r r r r r t r t r f t b r t r f t t b t b t t t r t f r r b t t t t t r f t b f t b t t b f t b r r b t b b f r f t t f t r b r b t r b f b t t b t r r trb tb n b r r r t r n b n t b f b r f r r r n r f b f f b r b f t b r b t b b t t r b t t r b f t b r b t t t b t r t r t b t f t r b r r b t b n b b n r b t t r b b r t r b t b b r t n r b n f t r t b t r b f t r b t t b b t f r r r br r b n t b t r r nntrbrtbtfrtbr trbrrbrtbtfrr tbttrrrn ftrrnrfbrt bbttbrfbrf ftrrrrftb btbrtbtrbf rtr rbrt brrbrr trtr fttrbbrtrttbt nrtrftrtrb tbtrbrtt rtftbtb rfrtbtbrtb rb nrrf tn fn r r r rtbbt tbt b bb r f b b btrbr rrrrbrrtb trtbnrfbrt ttrntb rbrtbtfbtrrf r rtbbt tbt b bb r f b b btrbr rrrrbrrtb trtbnrfbrt ttrntb rbrtbtfbtrrf ntrbrtbtfrtbr bbtrbr rbrtbtfrrtbtt rrrnft rrnrfbrt bbttbrfbrf ftrrrrftb btbrtbtrbf rtr rbrt brrbrr trtr fttrbbrtrttbt nrtrftrtrb tbtrbrtt rtftbtb rfrtbtbrtb rb nrrf tn fn r brrbrr trtr fttrbbrtrttbt nrtrftrtrb tbtrbrtt rtftbtb rfrtbtbrtb rb nrrf tn fn r r r rtbbt tbt bb r f b btrbr rrrrbrrtb trtbnrfbrt ttrntb rbrtbtfbtrr frbrtbtfrtbr trbrrbrtbtfr rtbttrrrn ftrrnrfb rtbbttb rfbrfftrrr rftbbtbrtbt rbfrt rrbrt r rtbbt tbt bb r f b b btrbr rrrrbrrtb trtbnrfbrt ttrntb rbrtbtfbtrrt frtbrtrb rrbrtbtfrrtbtt rrrnft rrnrfbrt bbttbrfbrf ftrrrrftb btbrtbtrbf rtr rbrt brrbrr trtr fttrbbrtrttbt nrtrftrtrb tbtrbrtt rtftbtb rfrtbtbrtb rb nrrf tn fn r r r rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrff nrrrrrrrrrrff ttbrrrrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rfntbbt rfrntn nnnftbnbn brfbnrb bnbtn brnnrtnftbn tbrbttb nnnrfrbtb nbb n fbfn t brbnbbbtn nnnntnbbtr bbbfrf rtfnbtr rrbrfnnnrfnt t rf

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D2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 19, 2014 rfntbf r f n t b nrr trb t r f b rrb nr rnb nrnt rrnb nrnt rrnb nr rtrb rffr tnb b rfn rb nrn b b rrf rb n b nnb n b rrnn rnb rfnt rr rb nb b nn n nf nrb r rntnfb n rb ntr nrnfn b n nt ntr rb rr nb b rrn rrrnb rn trrrrb nr nfb b rrrrb rrrrb n nt bnr n b nnf nb nrrnr fb rrtn b rnr rbnb fnrf nb rf rtnnb b r b trtrnrrnfr b f rb nnb trrn nb n n b nr b f rr rntb b tnb n b b ttn nttn b n rrrnrrtr rbfb nb r tb r tb frr bfnb rrn b rnrrr b rrrr rb nrrn nrb nf nfrb frn rb nrrb nt nb f tb rf fnfb n tnb btn fn nb trt fb fnn trrb rn b n frb rnn b tt b r ntrb bn rtrt nb n b nrb r nb r b n rnrrrn tb tb tb rnrb rn b r n r b rnr b rn ntnn nrrrnnn nnrb b rttrn b rnr ntnb rn tb rnfn nb nnn tnr n r n r r r n f b rr t rb t nt rn nb rrn b b nn nrtrrb nnf b nr b trrrn b n n nn b t rnr b bff tnt b rn b n r r r r r n n b n r r r r r n n b rtrntr trb t n r r f n t b nn rrrb n nrfb fn b b b frtb rn b n b nfn b rnrr ntb n b nb r r r b r r n r r r r n t n r r r r n n t r f n r b t b rf b r b ntrrtn rb rrrb n nb n nb nn nb tnb bnn b tnb rb n b tn b f b nf nb tb b n rtrfntb rf b rf b b ftn b nrnf b rtnnt nb r tnb rn b ntb tn b b trr rb tntn trrb nn b rrrntr b ntrnn nb n rrb n r r t n r r f n r r r n t r n n r r n r r r r r n f bnn b b nrnb n n n n n n b rntr rb n rtnb b nb b n b n rfntb nb bn bb nr b rfntbtr b n fn frrrrnt rrrb b f tnnrfnt b b f bb t f n r r r f n n n n n t f n r n n t f n t n n n n n n n rnnrfr nrn rfnr nntntrnfnr nn nrrn nnn nfn nnrn nt n r n r r n n r n r n t f rnntrrn tnnnt n r r n n t n n n r t t n t r r f r n r n n n r n t r n r t r b b n n r r n n r n r f r r r n t r n r r n t r n r n n f r n r r n n r n n r t r n n n n r r n n t n r r n r n r n r n r n r n t n n t n t n r r r n n r n r n n n r r n r t b tntn r r n r n r trrtn ntr fnr rn r b n r r n r n r n r n n t n r n r r n r b rr ntr nf nt nrnnrtr rrr n n n b n r f n r n nnntr n r n nr rnrnt r n r n n n f r t nt fntn nrrrfr rn rrrnn nrnnt nrnnn nn r r r n t n n f r r n n r r n n n n n r r t n n t n n n t n t n n t r n n n n f t n r n f f r t r f r t r r n f n r n n n n r r r r n t n n t r t n r r r r n r n r

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Wednesday, March 19, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D3 rfntbrr rr f r rrr nr rrn rr t n r r fr r rb r frrfrr rfrntb fr rt tr rr rffr rft rf r rfr ntb t tff tff r r t t rrf rrf t ntf tt rrfr rfr rfrrrrf rnbtf ntf rfr frr r r f r f r r r f rft rft bnr t r f r r t rt b r frr tt brrf f r r f r f r n b r r r r r f r r r r r t t brrf f btt frtr tffr rrtt t t t r rfr t ffrr rft b bb nt fr rrrr ttt fr rfrr rfrr rtfr rfrt rrr tt r r b f ntbff rt r tt ffr fr frr rt btf t tf r f r r f r f r t t fr rfrrf frr t trffff trf rf rrfr fff rrrfr ttt ffr rr b bb frft bb f f f rt f t r r r f r f frff nrfb rrfr tt ffr frft tt rfrr frfr rftfr rfrr t rr frfr rt bbf f frf r r bbf f bbbrf f f f r f r r r t t r r f tfrr r f frrrr rfr frrt bf f bbff f f t r r r f r fn frf rff r rrt f t r r r f r frrfr rrffr r t rf ff r r r f t r t t t frt f f r r r r r r r r f r r f f t r r r f r r f f r f f r f t t b f tf f r r r r f r r r r f r r f r r f r f r r f f r f r r f t f r f r r r r t t f f f r r f r r f r f r r f r t bf tf t f r r r f frrfr rrfr frr rr frrf rt frf f r t frr rf t bf tf bbff f trrr rfr r r f r f r rrr frffrfr frfrfr rrfr t rfr rr r t t n rtf rfrrf t nb frr rfrrrrf rrrrf t f ttt rrf frt frft

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D4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 19, 2014 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 7 25 34 47 67 13 18 31 59 74 9 21FREE SPACE53 72 2 16 42 48 63 5 29 39 52 68ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N I B O G BINGO B I N G O S OUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Tom Lanzarone WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! B 9 I 21 G 53 O 72 FREE



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Sponsored by Fran Haasch lawfran.com Phone: 352-326-2623LEARN TO RIDE! WE ARE EXCITED ABOUT THE"NEW SUPER LOW 1200 T "EXPERIENCE & TEST RIDE ONE TODAY!WEDNESDAY BIKE NIGHT AT BEEF O BRADYS Dont Miss It! RENTALS LATEST MODELS AVAILABLE! CALL US SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | C1SPORTS: Russell selected for McDonalds All American Game WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWST AND INSIDECLASSIFIED D1 CROSSWORDS C2 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN C1 SPORTS B1 VOICES A4WORD ON THE STREE T A2SOUTH LAKE PRESSV OLUME 99, NO. 12 5 SECTIOn N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reservedwww. southlakepress.com PRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Lacrosse teams from Ithaca College and Stevenson warm up for a game on one of the new elds at the National Training Center in Clermont on Friday.CLERMONT ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comTwo $400,000 multipur pose/World Cup soc cer elds were unveiled to the public last week at the National Training Center in Clermont. NTC spokesperson Kim Couch said the elds can be used for soccer, lacrosse, ag football and other sports. Paul Johns, NTCs chief operating ofcer, said he believes the elds will benet Lake County because they will attract even more teams along with sports fans and players families and friends who will spend money on food, lodging and other things. This certainly will be a big impact to south Lake County, he said. The NTC already has ve multipurpose elds, but more were needed because local groups and organizations use them, too. Thats why county ofcials contributed $400,000 from their county-wide parks and recreation budget to build them. We, along with the county, wanted to take care of community leagues and clubs, and were excited that we were able to provide them with what they needed, Johns said. Couch said the two World Cup soccer elds can also serve as four modied elds. Information provided by the chamber said the NTC welcomes more than 250,000 visiting athletes to its facilities each year, which South Lake Chamber of Commerce President Ray San Fratello said energizes the local economy. South Lake County has a niche in sports tourism, ecotourism, adventure tour ism and heritage tourism, he said. It is a true economic development driver in that it provides jobs and creates new wealth in the community through visitors spending at our hotels, dining in our restaurants and buying goods and services typical of tourists from our stores.NTC adds World Cup fieldsSouth Lake County has a niche in sports tourism, ecotourism, adventure tourism and heritage tourism. It is a true economic development driver in that it provides jobs and creates new wealth in the community....Ray San FratelloSouth Lake Chamber of Commerce President Staff ReportThe South Lake Chamber of Commerce, which in December earned the Runner Friend ly designation for south Lake County through the Road Run ners Club of America, is now seeking a Bike Friendly des ignation from the League of American Bicyclists. Besides bringing transpor tation and recreational oppor tunities for health and tness to south Lake, chamber of cials believe these designations serve as opportunities for eco nomic development. Biking means busi ness. There are quan tiable benets that bicycling infrastructure is a cost-effec tive way to enhance communities, gener ate tourism and support local business, South Lake Chamber of Commerce Sports and Tourism chairwoman Shannon Hidalgo said. Hidalgo was joined by Bike Friendly Committee Co-chair man Ryan Donovan recently at a workshop hosted by the League of American Bicyclists, Florida Bicycle Association and MetroPlan Orlando. League of American Bicyclists Presi dent Bill Nesper also attended and now plans to visit south Lake in April to discuss the chambers bike-friendly initiative. These initiatives are al ready attracting attention in the health and wellness life style sectors in our community, Donovan said. We are ex cited for what this will mean, not only for the residents, but how it will showcase all that south Lake has to offer. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comClermont City Manager Darren Gray said a series of visioning sessions he led last year to gather ideas about the citys future yielded some strong suggestions. One such idea, Gray said, was residents wishes to maintain and grow the historic downtown area, which includes Waterfront Park. The idea is to at tract more people to its shops, restaurants, at tractions and events. The downtown and waterfront areas are important from a historic and economic development per spective. I think that any great city has to have a thriving downtown. We wanted to make sure as we grow and serve new neigh borhoods and business districts that we continue to make the downtown and water front area a priority. We want to enhance its reputation as a destination, Gray said. Gray said he has been working on a plan to make it happen. Last week, Gray an nounced that hed formed a task force to assess the condition of certain downtown areas and make rec ommendations based on observations and feedback it receives from local residents and business owners there. The objective is to make any im provements needed to boost Clermonts downtown and Water front Parks image as an attractive destination, he said. To do that, the Cl ermont Police Department is assigning two ofcers Ofcer James Rooney and Ofcer Brenda Teets to patrol those areas. Gray said the pur pose has little to do with crime rates but rather security. We have a low crime rate in Cler mont overall, including our downtown business and Water front area, and we want to keep it that way. Our ofcers will be mostly on their bikes or walking the district, Gray said. Its not only a proven way to prevent crime, it also gives the public a sense of security when they are enjoy ing visiting the area or coming to downtown Clermont for events. Parents can feel safe bringing their kids to the beach or jogging on the trail. Its just a smart use of our resources.CLERMONTCity focusing efforts toward downtown areaCLERMONTSouth Lake seeks bike-friendly tag SEE DOWNTOWN | A2

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 19, 2014 CLERMONT Box car racing scheduled for March 28The Clermont/Minneola Box Car Racing company, 363 Sky Valley St., will host an open house at the Clermont Community Center from 7 to 8:30 / p.m. on March 28. Box cars will be on dis play and guests can ask questions. The sanctioning body for the group is National Derby Rallies (NDR). The local group hosts special events for kids, the Wounded Warrior Project, breast cancer awareness and others through NDR. For information, call 352-708-4207, email cmboxcarracing@gmail.com or go to www.cmboxcarracing.com.MINNEOLA City receives award for public policyThe city of Minneola recently received the distinguished Horizon Award from the Lake-Sumter Metropolitan Planning Organization for Exemplary Public Policy. The city was honored with this award for its forward thinking by creating the Minneola Mountain Community Redevelopment Area to propel the Florida Turnpike Interchange project forward. Over a decade in the making, the project is expected to inject nearly $1 billion into the areas economy over the next 30 years. The state of Florida has committed $30 million toward the construction of the interchange in Minneola. Construction on the project is expected to begin within the next 12 months.CLERMONT Lakeridge Winery hosts wine and seafood festivalLakeridge Winery and Vineyards will host the 6th annual Wine and Seafood Festival Friday through Sunday. The three-day outdoor event will feature seafood dishes, live music, an arts and crafts show and award-winning Lakeridge Wines, on Friday and Saturday from 10 / a.m. to 5 / p.m. and Sunday from 11 / a.m. to 5 / p.m. A $2 donation will be accepted at the gate to benet The Autism Society of Greater Orlando, and parking is free for all guests. For information, go to www.laker idgewinery.com.CLERMONT Annual South Lake Womens Expo approachesThe 12th annual South Lake Womens Expo event sponsored by the Clermont Womens Club will be held Saturday at the Wesley Center at First United Methodist Church, at 950 7th St., north of State Road 50. Admission is free for the public from 10 / a.m. to 2 / p.m. For information or a vendor application, email Basha Schlazer at BSsportzfan@aol.com.CLERMONT Annual Teen Battle of the Bands is April 5The Cooper Memorial Librarys 3rd annual Teen Battle of the Bands will take place from 2 to 5:30 / p.m. on April 5. This years battle will be on the outdoor stage at Lake-Sumter State College and includes a rst-place cash prize of $250. Second place will win $125 and third place will take home $75. For information, call 352-536-2275, or email lpiper@lakeline.lib..us.CLERMONT Animal League to host annual Pet Connect CarnivalJoin the South Lake Animal League for the 2nd annual Pet Connect Carnival from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, at the Petco store parking lot, at State Road 50 and Hancock Road in Clermont. Several local animal rescue organizations will be participating and showcasing their adoptable animals. A $10 donation registers your pet in two fashion shows at the event. For information, or to register go to www.slal.org/petconnect. Area Briefs What South Lake residents are saying about ...TRANSPORTATIONWhat kind of public transportation would you like to see in south Lake County?More. Theres only the Lake Express and the Lynx that goes to Orlando. I grew up in Orlando, and Im used to bus stops every few miles. My little brother lived with me for a while in Minneola and he needed public trans portation to get to work and there wasnt any. He had no other choice but to walk or ride a bike. JEREMY PECK CLERMONT They need a mono rail; so many people coming here to Orlando, back and forth. It could go from here all the way down 50. Too many people moving to Florida. Its an over populated stat, for sure. DELL GRAY CLERMONT Not Lynx. Instead of stopping in the middle of the road, they need to make bus stops so they can actually pull in and out and a runway for en tering trafc. Its not safe. You see a Lynx bus in front of you, automatical ly go over to the left. KATHY BRINKS FOUR CORNERS I dont know that Id like to see any, actually. Im not so sure the need would justify the expense. GARY PERRIGO SORRENTO Word on theStreet Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 Gray said there is not a separate budget for the initiative. The city is using existing resources, he said, adding that he is moving money around in the citys budget to make it work. If we need to ex pand or add additional funding, I will request it through our budget process. This will allow us a few months to see how the program is working, Gray said. Gray has also handpicked a group of city of cials and staff to help with the effort. Gray said there were several things he con sidered when choosing the task force. I looked for people who were enthusiastic about the task force. A number of city workers, including almost a dozen police ofcers, asked to be part of this initiative. I asked myself, Does the employees department or specic job play a role in the mission of the task force, which was improv ing and beautifying the downtown waterfront area as well as boosting our events? Gray said. Members of the task force are: Clermont Economic Development Di rector Jim Hitt, chair man; Carle Bishop, Aaron Nickerson and Joe Silvestris from the re department; Charles Broadway, Rooney and Teets from the police department; Public Information Ofcer Doris Bloodsworth; Stoney Brunson from Public Works; Barbara Hollerand from Planning and Zoning; James Kinzler from Environmental Ser vices; Suzanne OShea from Code Enforcement; Dave Teske from Recreation and Chris Dudeck from Events. Some projects are al ready under way, Gray said, including the new historic downtown direc tional signage and building locator signs. There also will be a focus on the signature events, including Light Up Clermont, the Down town Music Festival and Pig on the Pond. Those will be augmented by new events, such as the Sports Field Day at Wa terfront Park in April. The effort will focus on an area that is bound ed by 5th Street on the east and 12th Street on the west, and from State Road 50 on the south to the entire waterfront area, including the new Lake Hiawatha Preserve, a passive park set to break ground on the north. Hitt said he has talked to several business owners about the goals of the task force since its imple mentation and is excited about the responses hes received. The (business owners) Ive talked to are very ex cited. They like that were focusing some attention on the downtown area in stead of just talking about it here and there, Hitt said. Were going to be doing what we can to bring busi ness back and help get the attention of the residents, and I think we are well on our way. Our thought process is that a healthy, vibrant downtown usually means that you have a healthy, vibrant city. DOWNTOWN FROM PAGE A1 Staff ReportClermont city ofcials are invit ing the public to name their new est facility, the $6.3-million building and surrounding property formerly known as the Celebration of Praise Church. The city purchased the property in December and has been refer ring to the 69,000-square-foot fa cility as the Celebration Center, but that was never intended to be the permanent name, ofcials said. The complex, located at 3700 S. U.S. Highway 27 in Clermont, in cludes the largest auditorium in Lake County, a small theater and a gymnasium, in addition to adult and childrens swimming pools. About 10,000 square feet of the building will be incorporated into a new police station. Some of the city ofces will be moved to the new complex, and some space may be leased to other government agen cies. City Manager Darren Gray said the public may suggest names by sending suggestions by email, fax or mail through the end of March. Gray will choose the top 10 names and then ask the public to choose the top three by voting online, in person, by fax or by mail. The Cler mont City Council will make the nal decision. How to send a suggestion: ONLINE: Use the feedback form on the citys website home page: www. cityofclermont.com. FAX: 352-394-4087 MAIL: Darren Gray, City Hall, 685 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711 If you wish to be notied when the poll opens, send your email address or other contact information to the citys Public Information Of cer Doris Bloodsworth at dblood sworth@clermont.org.CLERMONTCity invites public to rename Celebration Center PHOTO COURTESY CITY OF CLERMONT Clermont city ofcials are looking for a name for the Celebration of Praise building purchased last year.

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tural interests and developers to the Wekiva River Basin Coordinating Committee. Constantine, who chaired the committee, said the committee was responsible for recommending how to complete the beltway while protecting the river and the resources. It is the largest and most important springshed we have in Central Florida, he said of the Wekiva Riv er. This was a nely crafted agreement, which we had 28 members of this commission give near unanimous agree ment to the 17 recommendations drafted into the bill. Fish said:We are not ask ing anything but to study fu ture conditions. If it looks like marginally there are too many cars on CR 435, we are going to talk about potential solutions and one of those solutions might be a par tial interchange at the east bound ramps. He added there are no plans to widen CR 435. The partial interchange would allow motorists to access CR 435 and head toward Sanford while also enabling them to get off the parkway coming from Sanford, Fish said. But, he emphasized there would only be eastbound ramps available if this option is considered. There are two permanent interchanges planned for the Wekiva Parkway, SR 429 with County Road 46A, just east of Camp Challenge; and in northwest Orange County at Kelly Park Road. There is also a new spur that will be built off SR 429 that will go into Lake Coun ty and intersect with existing SR 46 1500 feet east of Round Lake Road in Mount Dora. Thirty years ago, the FDOT, the Orlando-Orange County Expressway Authority and Floridas Turnpike Enter prise determined the beltway needed to be complet ed, Brooks said. The $1.7 billion proj ect funded in partnership with the FDOT, the express way authority and the enter prise is going to make it easier to get to the parkway and to travel between Seminole, Lake and Orange counties, according to Brooks. As a result of the project, there will be more than 3,400 acres of land set aside for conservation. Brooks said the project is on schedule. We are proceeding to de sign on the other sections, she said. In 2015, work will begin on the Expressway Au thority where SR 429 ends to U.S. Highway 441 north to Kelly Park Road. Trendy Per TuttiFashion Jewelry & Accessories Elina Baade Altamonte Springs, FL 32701 Cell 407-619-2284 elinabaade@gmail.com rrffrfnnftb Pain, Hormonal imbalances, Thyroid imbalance, PMS, Menopause, Fatigue, Insomnia, High Cholesterol, Depression, Allergies, Migraines, Heartburn & more... ffrrb rntrrnftfrffftfr b nf235 Citrus Tower Blvd., Ste. 105, Clermont www.docvisconti.com or our Facebook Page rfntbb nr We all have to eat! 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Once opened, a temporary ramp will provide access from CR 435 to the Wekiva Parkway until the Expressway Authority and Florida Department of Transportation sections of the project are built sometime between 2017-19. However, Lake County commissioners and the Lake-Sumter Metropolitan Organization have each passed resolutions requesting the Florida Department of Transportation study the pro jected trafc patterns at the temporary interchange after the Wekiva Parkway opens. County and transporta tion ofcials said there is concern that once the inter change is closed in 2019 trafc could increase substantially in Mount Plymouth. It is a very large burden on CR 435 and Mount Plymouth, Commissioner Les lie Campione said. Once you close it you are going to force all the trafc into those winding streets in the Mount Plymouth area. T.J. Fish, executive director of the Lake-Sumter Metropolitan Planning Organiza tion, said if the interchange is closed, it will force motorists to use the other two inter changes, which could affect trafc conditions on CR 435. The parkway is a planned 25-mile state toll road begin ning at State Road 429 and ending near Mount Dora. It is designed to complete the beltway around northwest central Florida and reduce congestion on U.S. Highway 441, SR. 46 and other area roads. The Wekiva Parkway and Protection Act limits the number of interchanges to curb potential development in the environmentally sensitive area, according to Mary Brooks, vice president of Turnpike and Expressway Services and public involve ment coordinator for the Wekiva Parkway. Efforts to include a per manent interchange at the location would require leg islative approval per the Wekiva Parkway and Protec tion Act, said Steve Olson, spokesman for the FDOT. Lee Constantine, chairman of the Wekiva River Basin Commission, said if a study is conducted, other factors need to also be included. If they wish to change that, not only should there be studies on trafc patterns but on development patterns, the effects on the riv er and the beltway, said the former state senator who sponsored the Wekiva Park way and Protection Act. When drafting legislation for the act, Gov. Jeb Bush appointed 28 members from numerous state agencies, environmentalists, agricul-Parkway could spur traffic deluge WHITNEY WILLARD / STAFF GRAPHICWEKIVA PARKWAY The first phase of the Wekiva Parkway, from Mount Plymouth Road to State Road 46, is expected to open later this year. WEKIVA PARKWAY MOUNT DORA APOPKA 441 441 437 429 437 46A 414ORANGE COUNTY LAKE COUNTYWEKIVA TRAIL 46 N WHITNEY WILLARD / STAFF GRAPHIC BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Cranes drive bridge posts into the ground at the Wekiva Parkway in Mount Plymouth on Monday.

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A6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 19, 2014One of the more controversial bills winding its way through the Florida Legislature would allow designated school employees or volunteers to carry concealed weapons. Under the bill, which is being sponsored in the Senate by Alan Hays, schools could authorize certain employees to carry weapons as the last line of defense against the kinds of armed intruders who wreaked havoc at Columbine and Newton, Conn. Those employees would have to have a law enforcement of military background and com plete rearms and school safety training. The law would not be mandatory, so school districts in Florida could opt out if they choose. This is a bad bill for so many reasons. Introducing more rearms into school environ ments that can be fragile and sometimes tense is a recipe for disaster. Schools are places where parents sometimes conict with faculty, faculty with students and students with students. Putting deadly weapons in proximity to heated confrontations exponentially increases the chanc es for serious injury or death, intentional or un intentional. Of course, many schools already have guns on campus in Florida. Those guns, however, are carried by law enforcement ofcers, who receive signicantly more training than teachers would be required to get under the bill. It is noteworthy that parents, school lobbyists and administrators have opposed this bill. Florida lawmakers should take that into consideration: If the people who spend their days in the halls and classrooms of our public schools dont believe the measure will protect them and might even jeopardize their safety why force it upon them. Supporters of the bill in the Legislature say school safety is a signicant problem. If it is, then the problem deserves a serious solution. But as usual, the Legislature is trying to solve a problem with an ill-conceived and cheap approach. If our children, teachers and administrators are truly imperiled at school, then there is a realistic and safe solution: Provide the mon ey to put school resource ofcers active-du ty police in each school in the state. Many schools do it now, but at a time when school budgets are incredibly lean, it is becoming less common. State funding would certainly help ensure that the safety of our children was en trusted to highly trained and skilled ofcers whose full-time job is keeping the peace. Instead, legislators want to do what they so often do offer a solution that does not obli gate them to do anything. No, Hays bill is a bad one. Mixing guns and kids is a toxic brew. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDTOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD ........................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTOPINION WHATS YOUR OPINION?The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be origi nal, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Letters to the Editor 732 W. Montrose St. Clermont, FL 34711By fax to: 352-394-8001EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed.GUEST COLUMNSIf you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@daily commercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OURVIEWIf you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veterans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to to www.lakeveterans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANS SOUTH LAKE PRESSYour community newspaper for more than 100 years.732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Florida 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region.All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Allowing guns in schools is a bad ideaDont give away scarce waterI totally agree with the two ladies who were bold enough to speak up about water use. I am surprised and shocked that there are not more concerned citizens in Central Florida speaking up about the St. Johns River Water Management District having the authority to make decisions requesting that we conserve water, yet they are giving away thousands of gallons daily. What does the St. Johns charge for water? I live outside The Villages, and have for 65 years and have a private well, but I still am supposed to limit my water use. This bothers me tremendously that thousands of gallons of extra water are daily drawn from the aquifer and will soon cause Floridians serious problems with water supply. Every citizen should voice their concern. JOHNNIE MAE SMITH | OxfordSupport the presidentAs we experience another challenge in our foreign policy, some members of Congress refuse to follow our presidents direction and even enhance the positions of those working to destroy this effort. When senators and congressmen support military intervention over the diplomatic efforts preferred by our president, that logic is not only harmful to resolving the matter but creates even greater problems by making our nation appear divided. It is the presidents decision as to what form of response our country takes and thats the reason we elected him to lead. To claim his reaction is incor rect weakens that logic and reduces the chance for peaceful settlement. To continue to claim his action is a sign of weakness is disrespectful to his efforts and harmful to our nation. Also, to express negativity while calming to be a supporter of our military is not only wrong but un-American. Providing comfort to those who oppose our nations efforts doesnt help that effort and therefore should be avoided at all costs. United We Stand isnt just a slogan. WILLIAM CAMPBELL | LeesburgNot so friendly to outsidersThe friendly Villagers have shown their colors again. They built a beautiful building devoted to veterans groups to have their meetings in, The Eisenhower Center. It seems that I and several other members of a U.S. char tered veteran organization were asked to leave because too many of us are not residents of The Villages. Yet we are legitimate members of a national or ganization and have been for many years. As a veteran, I served the people of the United States, not The Villages. The Villages has no uniform except locked gates to keep people in? I spend money at businesses in The Villages. I am not a second-class citizen. Residents of Fruitland Park and Wildwood beware! Dont become another Lady Lake. You see a lot of veterans wearing hats that tell others of service to our nation. I wear one myself and Im sure other veterans do it also for sever al reasons. For one, it reects service to our country. For instance, I served 25 years in the Air Force, and I am very proud of that. Part of that service was during a time when our country was divided over our involvement in Vietnam. Those of us that served during that time did so to the best of our ability. Unfortunately our talents and dedication were throttled by politicians and anti-war activists. Wearing the hat also lets veterans recognize each other and strike up conversations about their service experiences. In some cases it helps provide closure to experiences that may have not been pleasant, and it also strengthens the common bond we have with each other. When people come up and thank me for my service it is a good feeling. Young and old alike take time to do this. Im sure other veterans feel the same way. I hope when others see veterans wearing hats and other items that reect service to our country that they will realize the mission is not over. Our freedoms are constantly challenged, both within and outside the borders of the United States. All citizens need to stay vigilant, know what decisions are being made in government and not only exercise their right to vote but know who they are voting for. Stay active in the decision-making of those they place in ofce. You see, it is not enough to reect on our accomplishments, we must all strive to be successful in the challenges ahead. We all are on a mission to preserve our nation for those who follow. That mission will never end. WILLIAM F. EADS | Leesburg LETTER of the WEEK YOURVOICESLETTERS TO THE EDITOR HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO Duke Snyder, 75, a Vietnam-era United States Marine Corps veteran, salutes as the colors are raised during the dedication ceremony for the new Veterans Memorial at Good Life RV Resort in Bartow.Honor our veterans sacrifice

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Wednesday, March 19, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A7 DEATH NOTICESDorothy BarthDorothy Barth, 86, of Webster, died Tuesday, March 11, 2014. Banks/ Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations.Doris E. BiggersDoris E. Biggers, 80, of the Villages, died Saturday, March 8, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Eddie L. Bob Sr.Eddie L. Bob Sr., 88, of Eustis, died Thursday, March 13, 2014. Marvin C. Zanders Inc.Ruth K. CarrollRuth K. Carroll, 80, of the Villages, died Fri day, March 14, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.David CifuniDavid Cifuni, 95, of Leesburg, died Friday, March 14, 2014. PageTheus Funerals and Cremations, LeesburgJames FahnestockJames William Fahnestock, 86, of Leesburg, died Saturday, March 15, 2014. Beyers Funer al Home LeesburgJohn Edward FreerJohn Edward Fre er, 94, of Eustis, died Wednesday, March 12, 2014. Harden/Pauli Funeral Home.Ruth Anna HowardRuth Anna Howard, 103, of Mount Dora, died Tuesday, March 11, 2014. Beyers Funer al Home.Willard J. KissingerWillard J. Kissinger, 85, of Winter Park, died Tuesday, March 11, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations.Charles R. MajorCharles R. Major, 71, of The Villages, died Friday, March 7, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, WildwoodHarold R. MartinHarold R. Martin, 84, of Fruitland Park, FL died Monday, March 10, 2014. Beyers Funer al Home and Cremato ry, Leesburg, FL.Edgar MolinaEdgar Molina, 6, of Bushnell, died Wednesday, March 12, 2014. Rocker-Cusack Mortuary, LeesburgRichard PoirierRichard Poirier, 69, of the Villages, died on Saturday, March 15, 2014. Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Leesburg.Buel Junior RodgersBuel Junior Rodgers, 77, of Tavares, FL passed away on Tuesday, March 11, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares, FLNeil StephensonNeil Stephenson, 67, of Riley Park (Mount Dora) passed away on Wednesday, March 12, 2014. Steverson, Ham lin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares, FLMadeleine StockMadeleine Stock, 101, of Mount Dora, died Monday, March 10, 2014. Hamlin & Hil bish Funeral Directors.Chaplain Philip SymondsChaplain Philip Tony Symonds, 71,of Tavares died Saturday, March 15, 2014. Ham lin & Hilbish Funeral Directors, Eustis.William A. Bill TidmoreWilliam A. Bill Tidmore, 94, of Tavares, died Monday, March 10, 2014. Harden/Pauli Funeral Home, Eustis.Barbara VanBurenBarbara VanBuren, 78, of Umatilla, died Wednesday, March 12, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home.Hazel Alice WhiteHazel Alice White, 88 of Wildwood, died Sat urday, March 8, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Robert Davis WhiteRobert Davis White, 72, of Eustis, died We nesday, March 12, 2014. Hamlin & Hilbish Funeral Directors.Steven Leman WilliamsSteven Leman Williams, 42, of Eustis, died Sunday, March 9, 2014. Marvin C. Zanders Fu neral Home, Inc.Clarence WilsonClarence Wilson, 83, of Eustis, died Thursday, March 6, 2014. Hamlin & Hilbish Fu neral Directors.Paul YoungPaul Young, 66, of Leesburg, died on Fri day, March 14, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares.Richard ZieglerRichard Ziegler, 76, of The Villages, died Sunday, March 9, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations, LeesburgIN MEMORY Staff ReportWilesmith Advertising & Design of West Palm Beach has been tapped to create place branding for Clermont, City Manager Darren Gray said Thursday. Place branding includes capturing a communitys core attributes to create a brand promise, logos, taglines and other expressions that promote a city and drive economic development. Gray said the brand ing initiative is another step in developing the citys future, fol lowing a series of highly successful visioning forums last year. The branding will help drive the citys master planning for the com ing years, he said. Gray and a team of city ofcials reviewed 10 rms interested in the branding project. He said t he Wilesmith team was chosen for its talent, experience and successful place branding for other locations, such as Australias Gold Coast, Amelia Island Plantation and Tavares, among other destina tions. All of the nalists had impressive credentials, Gray said. Wilesmith stood out because of their grasp of our community and enthusiasm for the project. Wilesmith was founded in 1999 by president and creative director Margaret Wilesmith, whose 32 years of experience includes expertise in brand ing and strategic communications. The creative team working on the Clermont branding project includes a design director, researcher, strategic planner, public-relations specialist and graphic designers. We believe in collaboration and listening, Wilesmith said. Clermont is an amazing city. The challenge is to capture the citys many attributes in a single, powerful promise that differentiates it from other cities in Florida and beyond. Gray said he and his directors, as well as city council members, will meet the Wilesmith team for the rst project meeting today .CLERMONTCity chooses branding firm MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillard.ives@dailycommercial.comAn accused jaywalker scufed with Clermont police and, despite being pepper-sprayed, briey escaped before ofcers tracked him down. Gordon Lee Hosler, 34, was charged with battery on a law enforcement ofcer and resisting arrest. He was re leased from the Lake County jail after posting a $5,500 bond. According to an arrest afdavit, a police ofcer was driving on U.S. Highway 27 on Sunday when he spotted a man carrying bags and walking across the road outside the crosswalk. The ofcer said he had to slam on his brakes and swerve to avoid hitting the man. The ofcer said the man, later identied as Hosler, looked like he had been involved in a ght. The ofcer said he asked Hosler if he was OK and said the man cursed him. The afdavit states Hosler would not provide his name, could not provide identication and refused to stop texting someone on his cell phone. The ofcer said that when he called for backup, Hosler stood up and assumed a ghting stance. Hosler then alleged ly punched the ofcer, who doused him with pepper spray. While the ofcer was waiting for the spray to take effect and backup to arrive, Hosler reportedly cursed him again and ran through a 12-foot-deep ditch before disappearing into the woods. Police dogs were unable to nd Hosler, but information in the bags he left behind led ofcers to a girl, who told them Hosler was hiding and waiting for a man to pick him up. Law enforcement found Hosler on March 10 outside of Clermont and arrested him. CLERMONTSituation escalates for alleged jaywalker HOSLER Staff ReportLake County high school stu dents currently taking Advanced Placement courses are encouraged to sign up for district-wide AP seminars scheduled on April 5 and 26 from 8 to 11 / a.m. and 12 to 3 / p.m. The April 5 seminars will be held at Leesburg High School and Lake Minneola High School, according to a press release. The April 26 seminars will be held at Mount Dora High School and East Ridge High School. Students can receive more information from their AP teachers. There are 30 seats available per ses sion, awarded on a rst-come, rstserved basis. Registration for the April 5 seminars runs through March 31 at www.surveymonkey.com/s/ap_ seminar_april5. Registration for the April 26 sem inars runs through April 21 at www. surveymonkey.com/s/ap_seminar_ april26.Lake students urged to attend AP seminars

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10% OFFAll options with this couponrffnntb B1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 19, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTSSPORTS EDITOR ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE .............................. 365-8268 FAX .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL ......... sports@dailycommercial.comSPORTSandLEISURE FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comLake Countys girls senior soccer players got together at Leesburgs H.O. Dabney Stadium on Friday for the annual Se nior All-Star Game. Five players for the Red Team scored in a 5-0 win against the Blue Team in a game that marked the nal high school soccer game of the year in Lake County. Eustis Karina Chico opened the score early in the game and was followed into the scoring column by Lauren Gibson of East Ridge, Alexandra Emeli anchik from South Lake, Leesburgs Sarah McKinney and Eu stis Kristi Vidler. The Red Team powered 18 shots on goal, while the Blue Team managed nine. At halftime, the Daily All-Ar ea First Team, Second Team and Honorable Mentions were honored, as were Leesburgs Chelsea Mudd as Player of the Year, Chico as Sportsman of the Year and Leesburgs Israel Ra mos as Coach of the Year. The Red Team wore jerseys donated by area athletic boost ers, and the Blue Teams jerseys were supplied by Blount Honda.Senior girls shine on soccer field BRETT LEBLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Tavares Ashley Myer, left, and South Lakes Carina Borajas ght for the ball during the 2014 Lake County girls Senior All Star Classic at Leesburg High School in Leesburg on Friday. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comDAngelo Russell has reached the pinnacle of high school basketball. The Montverde Academy senior was select ed recently to play in the 37th annual McDonalds All American Game on April 2 at the United Center in Chi cago. Russell, who has committed to Ohio State, will be the third Montverde Academy player in the last two years to play in the game, arguably the most respected of all high school All Ameri can games. Kasey Hill, now at the University of Florida, and Dakari Johnson, a freshman at Kentucky, represented the Eagles in last years game. Despite missing a large portion of the season due to knee sur gery, Russell helped Montverde Academy to a 24-0 record the Eagles lone loss to Chicago Curie on Jan. 16 at the Tourna ment of Champions FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comThe Leesburg Lightning will open the 2014 season on June 4 against the DeLand Suns at Pat Thomas Stadium-Buddy Lowe Field. The Florida Colle giate Summer League released the schedules for each of six teams on Thursday in anticipation of the leagues 11th season. Leesburg has 22 games scheduled for the upcoming season and will play 45 games in total. The season will culminate on Aug. 3 with the FCSL Cham pionship Game at Tropicana Field, which will follow the Tampa Bay Rays-Los Ange les Angels game which begins at 1:40 / p.m. Leesburg has played in ve FCSL championship games in its seven-year history, winning the league title in 2007 and 2009.Lightning to open 2014 season at home FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comAurora Davis has already had a college career that would be the envy of many student-athletes. However, the former South Lake High School multi-sport standouts big gest accomplishments may be yet to come. Davis has started her third season as one of Flor ida State Universitys top players and, along with playing partner Jace Par don, has led the Seminoles to a No. 4 national ranking. The Seminoles got their stiffest test of the season on March 12 when they faced defending national cham pions Long Beach State in Long Beach, Calif. The Seminoles went into Wednesdays match looking to avenge last seasons 3-2 loss to the 49ers at the 2013 American Volleyball Coaches Association National Championships. They got what they were looking for. A pair of critical kills by Davis in the second game lifted her and Pardon to a two-set victory against Long Beach States top team of Delainey Aign er-Swesey and Bojana Todorovic. Scores were 2117 and 21-13. Florida State topped the 49ers 3-2. It marked the Seminoles rst win ever against Long Beach State in dual play. Any time you beat the defending national cham pions its a huge win, FSU head coach Danalee Cor so said. We played well, but we still have a lot we can improve on. Jace and Aurora were fantastic on Court 1, as they have been all year. Im very proud of this team, but we still have plenty of work to do this season. After Long Beach State, the Seminoles (4-0 entering Wednesdays match) will play No. 2 USC, Loyola Ma rymount and No. 6 UCLA MONTVERDERussell selected for McDonalds All American Game BRETT LEBLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Montverde senior DAngelo Russell dribbles the ball down the court during the rst half of the Montverde AcademyPhiladelphia Math, Civics & Sciences Charter School game in Montverde.Ex-SLHS standout Davis leads FSU to cusp of greatness PHOTO COURTESY OF FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY Former South Lake High School standout Aurora Davis competes for the Florida State University sand volleyball team. Any time you beat the defending national champions its a huge win. ... Im very proud of this team, but we still have plenty of work to do this season.Danalee CorsoFSU head coachSEE RUSSELL | B3SEE AURORA | B4SEE FCSL | B3

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Wednesday, March 19, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B3 HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comEustis High Schools Kiron Williams scored 28 points Thursday to lead the home team to a 125121 win at the annual Corey Rolle Lake-Sum ter Senior All-Star game at Mount Dora High School. Troy Willis from Leesburg added 17 for the home squad. For the away team, Mount Doras Jefferson Vea scored 14 to lead a furious comeback, and Antwon Clayton from Eustis had 17. Mount Dora Bibles Zach Brock won the 3-point contest with 20 points, and First Acad emy of Leesburgs Luke Lea won the slam dunk contest. The annual game began in 1994 and was lat er renamed in honor of Rolle, a former Eustis coach who died in 2010 from complications of diabetes.Last night in the limelight BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Eustis Antwon Clayton dunks the ball during the Corey Rolle Lake-Sumter All-Star basketball game on Thursday. Clayton scored 17 in the contest.in Springeld, Mo., was taken down after it was determined that Chicago Curie had used ineligible players. Russell was named the Most Valuable Player at the Mont verde Academy Invitational Tournament in January and helped the Eagles to a No. 1 national ranking by Max Preps. Russell also was the MVP for the South team at the Nike Global Challenge last summer and was featured in Sports Il lustrateds Faces in the Crowd in August. Before his knee injury, Russell was ranked No. 21 in the Top 150 Recruits for Class of 2014 by Rivals.com. According to Bleacher Report columnist Scott Henry, Russell is ranked among the nations top ve prospects at his position by nearly every recruiting service available. He boasts a complete combo guards game, with the abili ty to handle, pass and score in the lane. However, its Russells rst-three-rows range that produces the most excite ment. Russell is one of three play ers with Florida connections who has committed to play in the game. Orlando Lake Highland Preps Joel Berry and Jack sonville Providence Schools Grayson Allen also are expected to play. Berry, a North Carolina com mit, and Allen, a Duke com mit, will play for the West. Rus sell will play for the East. The McDonalds All Amer ican Game often features the nations top recruits and this years contest will have the Top 13 picks and 17 of the top 20 prospects. The rst McDonalds All American Game was played in 1978 in Philadelphia, one year after McDonalds selected its rst All American team. Over the years, some of the great est basketball players in history have played in the game, including Mark Aguirre, Isiah Thomas, James Worthy, Ralph Sampson, Dominique Wilkins, LeBron James, Shaquille ONeal, Carmelo Anthony and Michael Jordan. RUSSELL FROM PAGE B1 The Lightning will play two home games in their open ing week DeLand on June 4 and Sanford on June 6. Lees burg will welcome the leagues newest franchise Win ter Garden with a three-game series beginning June 10 at Pat Thomas Stadium-Buddy Lowe Field. Nicknamed the Squeeze, Lees burg will travel to Winter Gardens West Orange High School to play Winter Gar den the following night and will close out the series on June 12 in Leesburg. Games at Pat Thomas Stadium-Buddy Lowe Field are free ad mission. At all oth er FCSL ballparks, admission is $5 for adults and $3 for children and seniors. The Lightning is the only team in the FCSL that has never charged admission for its home games. Leesburgs longest homestead of the season will be a three-game set from July 3-5, which in cludes the teams annual Independence Day celebration. The Lightning will host defending league champion Winter Park at 6 / p.m. on July 4. After the game, fans are invited on the eld to watch the citys reworks show at approximately 9 / p.m. Leesburgs longest road trip is ve games, June 25 to 29, when the Lightning play at Sanford (June 25-26) and Winter Garden (June 27-29). The FCSL All-Star Game is scheduled FCSL FROM PAGE B1 for 7 / p.m. July 8 at San ford Memorial Stadi um. Leesburg will wrap up its regular season on July 26-27 with a pair of home games against Winter Park. The only Monday game of the season for the Light ning is scheduled for July 14 at Winter Gar den. All games, except for Sunday and the Lightnings games on July14 and July 19, are sched uled for a 7 / p .m. start. On Sundays, game time is 5 / p.m., except for June 29, July 6 and July 19, which are 1 / p.m. starts.

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B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 19, 2014 CLERMONT BLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSAMILYELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time! IRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONTL Many Other Activities each week Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.org LIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLCHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm SOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary); 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.org ST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am (Rite I) 10:00 am (Rite II) 5:00 pm (Praise & Worship) Sunday School Youth Group Nursery Adult Bible Study Womens Bible Study Mens Prayer Breakfast WOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH GODINCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALE ERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for Children Groveland IRSTBAPTISTCHURCH GROVELAND Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pm MT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! MINNEOLA CONGREGATIONSMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club NEWLPRESBYTERIANCHURCH18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am TLIVINGGOD Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce Rowland MONTVERDE WOODLANDSLUTHERAN15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 am OAKLAND PRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforSouth Lake South LakeGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOMErfn tbt352-394-7121806 W. Minneola Ave.,Clermont,FL Cremation ChoicesDirect Cremation$675Plus Container Ron Becker,Director352-394-8228921 S.US Hwy 27,Minneola,FL on Friday in dual-match play before playing the same teams on Saturday in bracket competition. Davis has helped the Seminoles get out of the gates quickly this sea son with wins against Jacksonville, North Florida, Louisiana-Monroe and No. 9 Florida International. Pardon and Davis have proven to be a dynamic pairing this season and have yet to lose a set. For Davis, this season her senior year will be her nal chance to climb the last steps to ward immortality in the relatively new sport of college sand vol leyball. She was a member of the Seminoles charter team in 2012 and was named to the sports rst All-America team. Davis recorded a 50-7-1 record during that inaugural season and reached the quarternals of the National Championships with playing partner Brittany Tiegs. She didnt start the season as a mem ber of the Seminoles No. 1 team, but once she was paired with Tiegs, Davis became even more dominant, achieving a 22-2-1 re cord and earning three tourna ment titles. As a junior, Davis recorded a 22-9 overall record. She was 5-3 at No. 1, 3-1 at No. 2 and 6-1 at No. 3. At Nationals, Davis went 3-1 at No. 3, reaching the seminals be fore losing to Peppperdine. Florida State nished third in each of its rst two appearances at Nationals. Davis began establishing her athletic prowess at South Lake, where she competed in basket ball, volleyball and track. Her in door volleyball talents earned her a scholarship as an outside hitter at State College of Florida in Sara sota. With the Manatees, she ranked number one in the nation in total kills and was a National Junior College Athletic Association All-Amer ica Honorable Mention. Davis also led the Manatees to a Suncoast Conference title. Even though she was one of the countrys top players in the gym, Davis rst love was the beach. She has competed for years in a variety of tournaments and quickly established herself as a formidable foe on beaches around the country. Davis rst taste of success on a national stage came in 2008 when she won the USA Beach Volleyball Tour title in Huntington Beach, Calif. She also appeared in the 2010 Dig the Beach Top 10 Wom ens Open Division and won the Fiesta and Siesta Collegiate Beach Championship in 2010. Despite her many successes in the sand, Davis returned to the gym in 2013 and played with the Seminoles indoor volleyball team. In Florida States nal home match of the season, she was recognized along with three senior teammates. Although she has had a highly successful collegiate career, Davis likely would give it all back for the chance to lead the Seminoles to a national title in her nal season with the school. AURORA FROM PAGE B1 FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comMontverde Academys boys basketball team gets a chance to defend its national championship. As expected, the Ea gles were invited re cently to play in the High School National Invitational tournament in April in New York City where they will vie for a second straight national championship against a eld of nationally recog nized programs. The sixth annual tour nament will begin play on April 3 with quar ternal games at Christ the King High School. The national championship game on April 5 will be played in New York Citys iconic Madison Square Garden. High school basket ball has a long and rich tradition at Madison Square Garden. ... We are excited to host the boys and girls nals of the High School Nation al Invitational tournament, the premier high school basketball tour nament in the country. Every basketball player dreams of playing in the Garden, and were real ly happy to provide that opportunity with these kids, said Joel Fisher, executive vice president of MSG Sports. This opportunity gives these kids a chance to play here with memories theyll never forget. Some of the top prep programs in the coun try have been invit ed, such as Charlotte (N.C.) Northside Christian Academy, Mouth of Wilson (Va.) Oak Hill Academy, Seattle Ranier Beach High School, Huntington (W. Va.) Prep, LaPorte (Ind.) La Lumiere School and Weston Sagemont the second boys team from Florida in the tournament. In the girls tourna ment a four-team eld Orlando Edgewater will represent central Florida. Montverde Academy enters the tournament with a 25-0 re cord. The Eagles only loss against Chicago Curie on Jan. 16 was taken down after it was determined that Chica go Curie had used sev en academically ineligible players. Montverde Academy will wrap up the rst day of the HSNI at 6 / p .m. with a nationally televised contest against Weston Sagemont (330), winner of the Florida High School Athlet ic Association Class 3A state title. All four games on April 3 will be shown live on ESPNU.Montverde Academy to defend national title

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Ann DupeeREMEMBER WHENA weekly column that reprints some of the more interesting news stories that have appeared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press.C1SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 19, 2014 www.southlakepress.comCOMMUNITYProudly servingCLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWSSTAFF WRITER ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 E-MAIL .... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com FROM THE FILES | 25 YEARS AGO 1989Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press COMMISSIONERS APPROVE NEW DESIGN FOR COUNTY JAILLake County Commissioners voted for a two-building design for the proposed Criminal Justice Complex to be built in Tavares, with the jail being built on the south side of Main Street. Budget is $34.5 million. The temporary jail under construction will open shortly to ease overcrowding at the existing facility. Sheriff George Knupp told commissioners that when he took ofce January 3 the total jail population was 250. The current population is 278. In an effort to cut costs, Knupp plans to eliminate catered meals to prisoners, reducing food costs from $6.84 per inmate per day to $2.76, saving $119,000 per year.SEWER FOR MASCOTTE?Mascotte council members and assembled residents were told a city sewer system was a matter of how and when and not a matter of choice by consultant Bud Clark of Clark, Roumelis and Associates. He said that once the citys comprehensive plan is passed next July, state regulations requiring sewer systems for metropolitan areas go into effect. Council will explore the matter.NAMES IN THE NEWSJim Stivender has been hired as Lake Countys Public Works Director. Amid the last minute ur ry of activity, sunny skies and many onlookers, the South Lake Animal League Thrift Shop opened. Dr. William Brannon joined League President Beth McCabe in the ofcial ribbon-cutting ceremony. South Lake Countys Teacher of the Year selections: Rena Clark, Clermont Elementary; Audrey McGriff Irvin, Clermont Junior High School; Jeff Richard Odom, Clermont High School; Sandra Reaves, Groveland Elementary; Pamela Joy Catrett Worley, Groveland High School; Sheryl Yvonne Williams, Groveland Middle School; Mary Jattuso Olson, Mascotte Elementary; Debra Phipps, Minneola Elementary Gerald William Buell, South Lake Education Center. Pastor William N. McKinney announced his retirement at New Jacobs Chapel Baptist Church. Minneola Elementary School fth grader Franklin Davis won the schools spelling bee. Clermont Womans Club held its annual Arts and Craft Show. Winners were Helen Gallagher, Ruby Abel, Millie Warren, Mary White, Joanne Apel and Lois Tucker. SEE HISTORY | C2 Staff ReportHeroes Landing comic book store in Cler mont will host comic legend Neal Adams from 4-7 / p .m. on Thursday. Adams is a tower ing gure in the world of comic books, known for help ing create some of the denitive modern imagery of DC Comics most iconic characters, store owner Todd Mer rick said. Neal has had leg endary runs on Batman, X-Men, Green Lantern-Green Arrow and Deadman, Mer rick said in a press re lease. Adams rescued Batman from the campy nostalgia of the television show and retted him in his pres ent incarnation as an Avenger of the Night. When people say modern Batman, they mean Neal Adams Bat man. His run on Bat man led direct ly to the new, more realistic incarnation in the Batman Begins movie, which featured the charac ter he created, Ras Al Ghul. Adams recently completed an eight-page story called Batman Black & White #1, Mer rick said. Copies will be available at the store for Adams to sign. Each persons rst autograph CLERMONTComic book legend coming to local store PHOTO COURTESY OF NEAL ADAMS Comic book artist Neal Adams rescued Batman from the campy nostalgia of the television show and retted him in his present incarnation as an Avenger of the Night, said Todd Merrick, owner of Heroes Landing comic book store in Clermont. ADAMSSEE COMICS | C4 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comThe rst time Don Wasness ew in a glider, it was be cause a friend in Mary land prodd ed him to come along. That ight took place in 1965 and Wasness became hooked. He has been ying ever since, logging more than 5,900 miles over the years. We (pilots) see the world like no one else sees it. Were sitting in a bubble looking out and we can see so much all around, above and under us. Its a feeling like no other, and its just beautiful, Wasness said. Those were Wasness sentiments Saturday after completing the nal task of the 24th annual Seniors Soaring Championship, a national competition sanctioned by the Soaring Society of America that takes place each year at the Lake Seminole Gliderport in Cler mont. Wasness, now 81, is the only pilot of the 55 competing this year that has own and competed all 24 years. His daughter, Marlene Wasness, who has been part of his ground crew since she was in high school, said her dad placed rst in the inaugural competition, second the next year and third place the year after that. E is the number he got assigned for his rst competition, and hes kept it. It stands for One-Echo but hes been nicknamed One-Easy because he makes ying look so easy, she said. Marlenes brother, James Wasness, also helps out with the crew duties for their dad, and before their mother, Dolores, passed away in 2010, she happily did as well. She used to come to this competition with my dad every year. She knew he loves ying and she loved watching him y. She died about 3 years ago and its been tough, but were still hanging in there, Marlene Wasness said. Don Wasness said his intention is to compete in the national competition for as long as he is able. Im 81 now, working on 82, and if I feel as good next year Ill be here, and every year after that for as long as I have, he said. The competition, which started with a practice day on March 8, ended Saturday. Wasness nished 13th out of 55 competing seniors. Among the 55 were world champions and members of the world team, including Karl Striedieck, 77, a world record-setting glider pilot from Pennsylvania and a member of the U.S. Soaring Hall of Fame, and Rich Owen, an Orlando top yer and co-coordinator of Seniors take to the air over Clermont in glider championships ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Young glider pilot J.P. Stewart from Virginia, ying a borrowed glider with identier X8 landed at the Lake Seminole Gliderport late Saturday afternoon, the nal day of the 24th annual Senior Soaring National Competition in Clermont. Stewart, who was too young to be scored in the competition, ew as one of ve guests invited each year to y among the sports best pilots.We (pilots) see the world like no one else sees it. Were sitting in a bubble looking out and we can see so much all around, above and under us. Its a feeling like no other, and its just beautiful.Don WasnessSEE GLIDER | C2

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C2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 19, 2014 NOSY NONSENSE By BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY / Edited by Will ShortzNo. 0309RELEASE DATE: 3/16/2014 ACROSS1 Top off, as someones drink 8 Isolated hill surrounded by lava15 Shine 20 Lubrication point 21 Snapping things 22 Avoiding the rush, say 23 She speaks things in doubt, / That carry but half sense 24 Theyre not accented in music 25 Unimaginative 26 One unsatisfied with a She loves me, she loves me not result? 28 Picky little dog? 30 Faint trace 31 A lot 33 Neglect 34 Detests 38 Game equipment 40 Haitian couple 41 Bandleaders cry 42 Called off 43 Lay atop 47 LArlsienne composer 48 Its not much 49 Lake ___ (Australias lowest point) 50 Audition winners part, maybe 51 Peep 52 Business transactions free from government regulation? 57 Spanish bear 58 Vanquish 61 Narrow land projections into the sea 62 Floors 64 Billet-doux recipient 66 Hands, informally67 Orbit rival 69 Coat style 70 Bank run 71 Change structurally 72 Its nothing at all 73 Carefree dairy product? 77 Really! 80 Radiohead head Yorke 82 Modest response to a compliment 83 French 101 pronoun 84 It covers Hectors death 86 Continental free trade group 88 Block, as a stream 91 Likes lots 92 F.S.U. player, for short 93 Bright red 94 One spinning ones wheels? 95 Optimally 98 Its often heard at a ballpark 99 Reconstructionera cartoonist 101 Optimistic theater audience? 103 Marvel from Idahos largest city? 109 Soot 110 Kind of seat 112 Straightshooting 113 Its bigger than a family 114 Slalom, for one115 Winstons home in 116 Snapchat demographic 117 Nuts 118 In words DOWN1 Kind of pyramid 2 TVs Kelly 3 Educ. book category 4 ___ Like the Wind (song from Dirty Dancing) 5 Sunday reading 6 Supporter of the 1%, say 7 Advances on 8 Missile name 9 Got to the point? 10 Eagerly adopt 11 Polish leader? 12 Developers expanses 13 Profanities 14 Canadian business often connected to a Tim Hortons 15 Makes bail, e.g. 16 Talking points? 17 Un Ballo in Maschera aria 18 Some chorus members 19 Like hell! 27 Mollify 29 Hold your horses32 Boosted, as an ego 34 Heat alerts, for short? 35 Tiny indicator 36 Barely remembered seaman? 37 Listen up, Lucia!39 Hoosier capital, informally 40 Detective writer Earl ___ Biggers 43 Some loaves 44 Sports score most likely to be on the highlight reel? 45 Actress Elizabeth with older twins 46 Fagins end 48 Pulled tight 49 Defib team 52 Post office workers, for short? 53 CBS series that, oddly, was filmed in L.A. 54 Lens 55 Sen. McConnell 56 Downton Abbey maid 59 Museum decoration 60 Sherlock channel, affectionately, with the 63 Bread box? 64 De Monarchia writer 65 He discusses divine providence in Job 66 Labyrinthine 67 An Arnaz 68 Busy travel day, maybe 70 Cheeky 71 Goes back into business 74 Venices oldest bridge 75 Fmes is a form of it 76 Birds with inflatable neck sacs78 I ___ Hamlet (Paul Rudnick play) 79 Fumes may produce one 81 Financiers 84 Brand of gloves and slippers85 Blitzed 87 Concertgoers who are into the hits? 88 Rice paper?: Abbr. 89 Desert steed 90 One of the Balearic Islands 91 County seat of Suffolk, England 93 Stupid sort 95 Specialized talk 96 2014 Baseball Hall of Fame inductee 97 The Beatles P.S. I Love You, e.g. 98 Honshu port 100 The Two Pots storyteller 102 College up the coast from L.A. 104 March time 105 Certain tourney overseer 106 TV spots 107 City near Presque Isle State Park 108 Like some tea leaves 111 Sports ___ 1234567 8910111213141516171819 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 3132 33 34353637 3839 40 41 42 43 444546 47 48 49 50 51 52 535455 5657 585960 61 6263 6465 66 6768 69 70 71 72 737475 76 777879 80 8182 83 8485 86 87 888990 91 92 93 94 959697 98 99100 101 102 103104 105106107108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Solution on D3They all won ribbons at district competition. The clubs main project this year is the YMCA pool. For the rst time since Clermont Garden Club began the Home of the Month award, it has been given to Florida Natives Don and Nancy Pederson of 1641 2nd Street. Groveland native Don owns and operates the Don Pederson Insurance Agency, while Clermont native Nancy is secretary-treasurer. They are parents of 7-year-old Amanda. Nancy is chairing the clubs ower show for the second consecutive year, assisted by Marge Battersby. While many in the citrus business packed it in after the back-to-back freezes in 1983 and 1985, B.G. Harmon stood strong and just kept on packing. Located between Clermont and Groveland on State Road 50, it is one of the top ve of more than 100 registered citrus packing houses in Florida. Management team is Bin G. Harmon, president; Dennis Broadway, packing house manager; Steve Williams, fruit procurement; Robin Harmon Crawford, sales manager; David Gur ney, general manager and Tom Resler, juice operations.CLERMONT JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL BECOMES MIDDLE SCHOOLClermont Junior High School Principal Bill Cockcroft reported to the Lake County School Board that faculty, parents, local civic organizations and the schools citizens advisory committee recommended changing the schools name to Clermont Middle School. Many of Clermonts black residents were present and gave the board a petition requesting the school be named after William N. McKinney. Former teacher Sallie Benson explained why the group felt it would be appropriate. Before integration, the junior high school was a black elementary/ high school known as Lincoln Park. McKinney was principal of this school for many years, dating from when it was a three-room wooden building accommodating students in grades 1 through 9. He also taught grades 7, 8 and 9 and was the coach. Mrs. Benson said the group felt the school should be named for him because of the many children he touched in a positive way and because of his dedication to education as well as mankind. HISTORY FROM PAGE C1 the competition. On Sunday, Canadas Vir ginia Thompson, a co-coordinator, conrmed that Striedieck was this years winner, followed by Owen, who came in second, and Henry Retting, who was third. Thompson said the week has been a good one. Pilots had ve ying days and, except for a bout of bad weather, they would have had more. The competition is the rst of the year for the senior pilots and is always open to the public. Ground crews, made up this year of volunteers from the civilian patrol and students at Embry Riddle, help secure the gliders to six different tow planes, which take the gliders aloft. Once in the air, however, the ight and task given to the pilots on each day of the competition is between them and the GPS located in their gliders that track specied GPS waypoints and award pilots points for speed, distance and their ability to stay in the air for the entire task. The pilots race high per formance, berglass gliders over distances of 100 to 200 miles by studying the skies for thermals, or patches of rising hot air, keeping them aloft. The presence of uffy white cumulus clouds indicates a higher likelihood that thermals are present. Greg Delp, a spectator, was too young to compete in the senior competition, but along with piloting private ights from Connecticut to Florida each weekend, he ies gliders as well. Watching the planes go up is a thrill, he says, because he knows what goes into it. He tried to attend the launch at least one day of the Senior Nationals because, Its probably the most gliders you can see in one place, just about anywhere. Its a lot of stuff happening at the launch. Then, once they are up and released, youre constantly thinking ahead, trying to look for a lift, climbing as fast as you can and getting to the different checkpoints, Delp said. Its very challenging. For information about competitions, classes or ights available year round at the Lake Seminole Glider port, call 352-394-5450. GLIDER FROM PAGE C1 ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Glider pilot Don Wasness from Maryland, ying under the competition identier 1E, landed his ASW-24B glider after a 230-mile, three-hour route, late Saturday at the Lake Seminole Gliderport on the nal day of the 24th annual Senior Soaring National Competition in Clermont.

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Wednesday, March 19, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C3 Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...Totally UniqueTotally Unique is proud to be Clermonts first ORGANIC hair salon. We care about your beauty, your wellness, the environment and our community, so we use organic and sustainably harvested products whenever possible. We specialize in organic hair color, hair care products, nail and skin care lines. Our salon is one of the oldest salons in Clermont and is located at 786 W Montrose Street in Historic Downtown Clermont. Our stylists are experienced in all phases of hair care including color, straighteners, cuts, texture and styles. Hair stylists are Marjorie Morphet, Tina Foote, Sherie Wolkens and Jamie Rhoades. Our nail techs, Jennifer Vandergrift and Jamie Rhoades, perform pedicures and manicures using Zoya nail products (which are Big 5 free). Shellac manicures, lasting up to three weeks, are also available by Jennifer and Jamie. We have two pedicure chairs in a private room for your relaxation and enjoyment. Relaxing and therapeutic facials are available by Jennifer in our private upstairs facial room. Massage services include chair massage, Swedish and Deep Tissue. Massage services are also done in a private room in our upstairs area. We utilize several massage therapists and provide massage by appointment only. We also offer a small boutique with handcrafted jewelry and hair accessories, Art by Tina Foote and Jamie Rhoades, and other unique items. Salon hours are 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Saturday and open Sundays by appointment only. Evening hours are also available by appointment. We pride ourselves in providing a friendly, relaxing environment for our clients and friends. Stop by and visit or call 352-394-5005 for more information. We are also on Facebook and WWW.TotallyUniqueSalon.com.. LOOKING FOR PARTS? SEE JULIE (352) 394-6111 Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comHigh-paying jobs are land ing at Leesburg International Airport with Leesburg of cials coming to terms this week on a lease agreement for Wipaire Inc. to provide 60 full-time jobs related to air craft maintenance, avionics repair and more. A vote for this lease is a vote for jobs, high-paying jobs, Lee Webb, vice presi dent of aircraft services for Wipaire, said Monday night as he addressed the city commission. I was a little surprised when I recently read that the average hour ly wage in Lake County is $14.96 an hour, and the cur rent staff that we have here now, and that we are bring ing and recruiting, the aver age hourly rate is little over $32 an hour, so its a signi cant difference. Webb said Wipaire has been around for 54 years in St. Paul, Minn., before the company chose to expand to Leesburg as its southeast ern service center, where the big draw for Wipaire was the citys proximity to Lake Har ris and the Tavares seaplane base, as well as the number of oatplanes and sea plane-rated pilots in the re gion. The company services air craft ranging in size from small single-engine aircraft such as the Piper Super Cub up to single-engine turboprops like the Quest Kodiak and Cessna Caravan series. Wipaire began operations at the Leesburg airport in January 2013, although terms of its lease have been under negotiations this past year. This is our rst venture outside of our home base, Webb said of the business that is now attracting pi lots who do not want to y to Minnesota in the winter to have work done on their aircraft. Wipaire is currently working on six planes at its Leesburg service site and is making improvements at its hangar facility. It also plans to expand the building by an additional 5,000 square feet for more than 15,000 square feet of space. Leesburg Airport Manager Leo Triggi said the airport is soaring to new heights with Wipaire providing aircraft service, and he predicts it will be the start of more eco nomic development. We expect a lot of other business to come and existing businesses at the airport to expand. There are two or three others that are in line to come to Leesburg, Triggi said Wednesday, although he did not reveal the compa nies by name. Triggi also predicts that Leesburg will expand its sea plane activity after a sea plane ramp is built into Lake Harris. Commissioner Elise Den nison said Wednesday she is thrilled the contract with Wipaire has been signed and she joins her fellow com missioners in wanting to see m ore airplane-related companies based at the airport. The $32 an hour is one of the highest paying lev els in Leesburg, she said. Wipaire is willing to train there (at its facility), but as this company grows, they would like to see more training come to this area. What Im trying to do along with this, is to meet with some of the educators in the area (Lake-Sumter State College and Lake Tech) to see about setting up an airplane me chanical-type school, so that we can go ahead and actu ally train individuals in this type of work and work handin-hand with Wipaire. Dennison envisions oth er businesses at the airport in the future, such as restau rants where people can come down and have lunch and watch the planes y in and take off. There is a lot that we can do with Leesburg airport, she said, calling it one of the citys jewels. The air port is absolutely one of my top projects, and Im going to work them as long as I can and keep that moving along. We have a good advi sory board over there to help with what is going on and now that Leo i s on board, were starting to get every thing right in place.Wipaire brings high-paying jobs to Leesburg PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Aircraft Mechanic Pete Nunez, 52, installs wingtip fuel tanks on a Cessna 206 at the Wipaire Inc.s hangar at Leesburg International Airport in Leesburg. Aircraft Mechanic Butch Barnette, 51, works on the wiring of a Cessna 206 at Wipaire Inc.s hangar. There is a lot that we can do with Leesburg airport. The airport is absolutely one of my top projects, and Im going to work them as long as I can and keep that moving along.Commissioner Elise Dennison

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C4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 19, 2014 is free, with additional autographs costing $10 each. This is a very awesome and rare oppor tunity to meet this creator in a smaller and personal setting, Mer rick said of Adamss vis it. Heroes Landing is lo cated off of U.S. Highway 27 in the shopping plaza in front of Kohls Department Store. It sells the latest comics, graphic novels, trade paperbacks, Manga, role-playing and trading card games, toys and collectibles. Heroes Landing also offers a free com ic book subscription pull service so that customers do not miss an issue of their favor ite comic. Additionally, Heroes Landing ships discounted comics to military personnel and has sent over 3,000 comics since 2009, Merrick said. COMICS FROM PAGE C1 LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comOksana Hagerty never lost sleep over Ukraines relationship with Russia until Russian President Vladi mir Putin rolled troops across the border re cently. We were sure we were an independent country, said the Ukrainian, who recently moved to Ox ford with her husband, George, the new presi dent of Beacon College. We never imagined he could do something like this. Russian troops re portedly poured into Crimea on Feb. 28 after three months of pro tests in Kiev, Ukraine re sulted in the Ukrainian Parliament removing President Viktor Yanu kovych. Critics say the protests stemmed from corruption in the presidency and Yanukovychs decision not to join the European Union. The president ed the country, prompting Russias show of force on behalf of its ally. Pu tin reportedly has defended the effort as a way to protect Russians in the Crimea region who are in danger. Hagerty said she could not understand Putins reasoning. She described how she spent many summers in Crimea, and found that Russians and Ukrainians have gotten along well there. We all spoke Russian and we just did not think about it, she said. This is the worst part of this conict. People start thinking about the things that did not really matter but now create a lot of tension. Ethnic Russians in Crimea, a pen insula in south ern Ukraine, make up two thirds of the population. On Sun day, Crimean residents will vote whether to secede from Ukraine. The area has remained an autonomous republic within Ukraine since 1954. Putins argument for potentially annexing Crimea does not make sense, Hagerty ex plained. She said the earliest residents of Crimea were Persians, Greeks and Tatars. About 300,000 Tatars were displaced during World War II by Joseph Stalin. Who do we give Crimea to? she asked You say it is Russian. Tomorrow, Iran will say it is Iranian. Without question, a dangerous precedent is being set for the for mer Soviet zone, where national borders do not correspond perfectly to where people live, said Stephen Bittner, a professor of history at Sonoma State University and short-term schol ar for the Wilson Center. Bittner said that hundreds of thousands of ethnic Russians live outside of Russia in places such as the Bal tic republics, Kazakhstan and Belarus. Does Russia pre serve the right to inter vene on their behalf? Bittner asked. Hagerty, who was born in Lugansk, Ukraine, near the Rus sian border, said the country has not experienced such turmoil since World War II. Her dark eyes convey anguish as she shares how she feels betrayed by Russia. In Crimea, she said, propaganda has been spread about the Ukrai nians not doing enough for the Russians in the region. She compared Crimeas actions to a wife leaving a husband for a better deal where she later nds out she ended up with a mar ried man who is bank rupt. Putin comes to Crimea and says I can bring you a better life, she said. Why doesnt he bring a better life for the thousands of people who live below pov erty line and drink because they have no hope in Russia? Eugene Huskey, a professor of political science and Russian studies at Stetson University, said, The Russian government under Putin is whipping up a kind of hysteria to make it more likely that people will vote to join Russia. Hagertys family, who are still living in Lu gansk, are waiting anx iously in anticipation of Putins next move. What they are tell ing me is that it is very unstable, she said. We should have never thought that after ght ing the same war more than 60 years ago we would be back ght ing against each oth er. It polarizes the soci ety. People that used to be friends are now en emies, not only with in Ukraine but within families in Russia. Hagertys biggest concern is that Putin will go further into the coun try. This has kept her up at night, she said. I could not sleep, she said. It was a sense of abuse. When your territory is invaded, it is a deep, unpleasant feeling. To think the Russians can do that and we have to ask the Germans to protect us against Russians is just crazy. If Putin advances further into eastern Ukraine, Huskey said, it could lead to a larg er conict between Ukrainian and Russian forces. If you move into other parts of eastern Ukraine, all bets are off, he said. Hagerty says her mother, who is Russian, feels a strong sense of betrayal. It is a betrayal to people who we thought were our proudest friends, she said. They never respected our independence. Russias incursion has changed Hagertys views of the two na tions relationship. We thought we were the same people, she said of Russians and Ukrainians. After Putin explained to us that we were not the same people, I thought to myself of switching to Ukrainian language out of protest. I never cared about that. I spoke Rus sian freely. Now because of Putin I feel uncomfortable reading Russian books or Russian music, she said. It is no longer part of my culture.Woman reflects on conflict in her native Ukraine BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Oksana Hagerty poses at her home in Oxford.

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Wednesday, March 19, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C5

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C6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 19, 2014 A/C Services Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Carpet Repair Services 352-431-9481Residential / Commercial rfnfftbrftb f Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Concrete Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Handyman Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. Insurance Services Irrigation Services Land Clearing Services Landscaping Services r fntbb Lawn Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Legal Services Moving Services Painting Services Enclosure Screening Fencing Services Bathroom Remodeling Handyman Services BOYDSYou call it, We haul it!352 460-7186 Marine Services HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314 HOPKINSCONCRETE CREATIONSLIC. INS.LANDSCAPE CURBING STONE WALLS HARDSCAPECON/PAVERS PATIOS PALMS PLANTS ROCKS & MULCH Email:HOPKINS.CURBING10@YAHOO.COM352-615-1314 Cleaning Services Land Clearing Services

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Wednesday, March 19, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C7 Psychic Services Pressure Cleaning Restaurants Roofing Services Tile Service Shower Doors Service Tree Service Veterinarian Services Window Services All About Appliances repairs and installs all brands of major appliances. We are a small husband/wife company. Eric has over 15 years experience repairing appliances and Lavinia (Vinnie) has over 20 years in business management experience. Together, we strive to offer you prompt, professional, courteous and personal services far beyond your expectations, both by phone and in your home. We respect you and your time and make every effort to be in and out of your home as quickly as possible yet provide a thorough diagnosis and timely repair. We genuinely appreciate all your business. Pals Gals Services, Inc. has been owned and operated by Patti Kauffman and Kellie Kennedy since 1986. They are a multifaceted business offering a wide a variety of services, which include interior and exterior painting, faux painting, wallpaper removal and installation, tile and grout cleaning, tile and grout removal and installation, and grout staining. They also install wood floors and can refinished your old wood floors, to make them look brand new. They can help you with color choices and give advice on what is practical or not! They can help resolve your honeydo list such as minor plumbing, electrical, drywall, cabinets, counter tops for your home or office. They pride themselves on quality womanship, dependability and trust. They know how difficult it is to find someone you trust and actually show up on time. They are a referral based business relying on previous clients to spread the word. They are two very talented ladies that take extreme pride in their work and take each job personally. They know how important making choices about your home or office can be and are more than willing to help with each decision.GIVE THE GALS A CALL, THEY CAN DO IT ALL!!! 352-787-4089 Veterinary Care in the Convenience of your own home! and for you Services include Wellness exams, including vaccines and parasite screening, Blood work, Skin and ear issues, Digestive or Urinary tract issues, Health certificates, Kathie L. Robinson, DVMDr. Robinson has over 16 years experience as a veterinarian.VISITING VETERINARIAN, LLC 352-408-3666 FAX: 352-253-2443VISITINGVETERINARIAN@AOL.COM To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact Michelle in the Classified Department at (352) 365-8233 or by email michelle.fuller@dailycommercial.com Plumbing Services Tree Service Roofing Services Window Services

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C8 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 19, 2014 Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) COMMUNITY CALENDAR TODAYMINNEOLA ELEMEN -TARY SCHOOL CHARTER BOARD MEETING: At 7 p.m., at media center at the school, 320 E. Pearl St. Call 352-394-2600 for details. MASCOTTE ELEMEN -TARY CHARTER SCHOOL VPK SIGN-UP: At 8:30 a.m. Children need to be in attendance on the day of registration for testing. Applications are available at the school or online at www.lake.k12..us. Children must be 4 years old by Sept. 1, 2014 to apply. Call Carol A. Mayer at 352-429-2294, ext. 5812. Ap-plications will not be ac -cepted before this date. FRIDAY LOTTERY APPLICATIONS ACCEPTED AT CYPRESS RIDGE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL: Lottery enroll -ment applications are being accepted through Friday for students who will be entering kindergarten through fth grades during the 2014-15 school year. Applications are avail-able at the school from 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. in the front ofce. For in -formation, call 352-394-7651. MARCH 24-28 SPRING BREAK CRAFT HOUR AT THE MARIANNE BECK MEMORIAL LI -BRARY: At 3 p.m., Mon -day through Friday. Ages 6-14 welcome. Call 352-324-0254 for details. MARCH 24 OPERA AT THE LIBRARY: At 1:45 p.m., featuring Francesco Cileas Adri -ana Lecouvreur at the Cooper Memorial Li -brary, Room 108B, 2525 Oakley Seaver Dr., Cler -mont. Call Dennis Smo -larek at 352-536-2275. MARCH 27 SOUTH LAKE 912 PROJ-ECT HOSTS KRAIG MC LANE: At 7 p.m., at the Clermont Community Center in downtown Cl -ermont. Kraig McLane from the St. Johns River Water Management Dis -trict will address water issues in Lake County and Central Florida. APRIL 1SOUTH LAKE ART LEAGUE JEWELRY WORK -SHOP: Learn to make your own earrings and necklaces from 2 to 4:30 p.m., April 15 and 29, at the Cagan Artists Bou -tique Studio, 16640 Ca -gan Crossings Blvd., in Clermont. Class fee is $20 with a $5 materials fee. Preregistration re -quired at the studio or by calling 352-638-3736.APRIL 5 EAT THE WEEDS HEALTHY AND EDIBLE NA-TIVE PLANTS WITH THE LAKE BEAUTYBERRY CHAPTER OF THE FLORIDA NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY: At 10 a.m., at the Cooper Memorial Library, 2525 Oakley Seaver Dr., in Clermont. APRIL 7 MASCOTTE ELEMEN TARY CHARTER BOARD SAC MEETING: At 5 p.m., in the media center. Call 352-429-2294. To place an item on the calendar, send an email to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comIn the middle of the night, Bob Schmeltz often would wake to the disturbing sound of semi-trucks barreling down County Road 44A at 65 mph. The semi-trucks would use the county road, also known as Burlington Avenue, as a shortcut to State Road 19 in Eustis, he said. It just kept getting increasingly louder and louder, he said. Enough was enough. For two years, Schmeltz and other neighbors have been affected by the noise and trafc on the road. As a result, Schmeltz, Lisa Cox and John Try bulec came together and rallied neighbors to sign a petition to send to the Lake Coun ty Commission to ad dress the issue. Specically, they con tacted their district commissioner, Leslie Campione about the problem. This week, county commissioners approved a resolution to designate the 44A corridor from Coun ty Road 437 east to State Road 44 as a nothrough truck zone, ap plying to Class 8-sized semi-trucks or larger. The Class 8 gross vehicle weight rating is anything above 33,000 pounds, mainly tractor trailers. What I am trying to do is address the highway situation, Campione said at Tuesdays board of county commission meeting. It is through trafc as op posed to local trafc. Referring to the number of companies in the area, Commissioner Welton Cadwell asked if the commission would consider putting restrictions for Class 8 size trucks just in the evenings. If we are going to go for the semi-trucks, I think that would be too complicated, Campione said. Commission Chair man Jimmy Conner agreed. We want to give the people out there some relief, he said. Campione added the noise was creating a nuisance for the residents. It is interfering with the use and enjoyment of the area as a quiet, rural residential area. Schmeltz said there have been many accidents on the road be cause of semi-truck trafc. He remembered a major accident that occurred right in front of his home. Coming before the commission Tuesday, Trybulec had with him a petition with 80 sig natures. Commerce and trucking have to take place for America to keep moving, he said in a follow-up phone interview. Trucks are an essential part of the nations economy. But at the same time, he said, society has rules. Everybody has a le gal right to do busi ness, but it is important that everything is done within reason, he said. I work at home and I would hear the trucks at all different hours. You hear it in the morn ing, in the middle of the night when you are sleeping. It was not just a little bit. Jim Stivender, pub lic works director, said the truck volume on the road was between 5 and 10 percent, which is typ ical compared with other roads in the county. The issue is there has been a lot of com plaints about excessive noise in the nighttime hours, he said. Campione proposed also reducing the speed limit on the road, but commissioners decid ed to not enforce it at this time.Semi-trucks no longer welcome on Eustis Road NO TRUCKS The Lake County Commission banned truck traffic from a stretch of 44A because of complaints from area residents. WHITNEY WILLARD / STAFF GRAPHIC BLACK BEAR GOLF CLUBLake Norris Rd. 44A 437 44 N

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Wednesday, March 19, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D1 rfntbrr rfrrntbrrbf rrntrrfbttrr rbrtbrftrtb btttrbrt tntbbt r t r f f r b b t r r t r f f b t t t b t f r t b n t b r f r t t b b t t r b t r r t b t f t r t b t b r f b t t r b b n t b n t r f r t t b r b t b t b r f r b f b b t r t b f t b t b r t t r b t b t b t f r t b r r t t r t r r t b f r b r b r t n t t t r b r t r b f f r r rttbfrr bfbt tbrfbttrb ntbfrrntb btrbb b f r t t b t r r r b fn tnbn rr f t b t b t f t t t t b r n r f b r r r b t r b t f t t r b t r r n t b b r r r t t f n r f b b r t f t t b r r b r b t f n b r t b r t b b t r b r r r r r t r t r f t b r t r f t t b t b t t t r t f r r b t t t t t r f t b f t b t t b f t b r r b t b b f r f t t f t r b r b t r b f b t t b t r r trb tb n b r r r t r n b n t b f b r f r r r n r f b f f b r b f t b r b t b b t t r b t t r b f t b r b t t t b t r t r t b t f t r b r r b t b n b b n r b t t r b b r t r b t b b r t n r b n f t r t b t r b f t r b t t b b t f r r r br r b n t b t r r nntrbrtbtfrtbr trbrrbrtbtfrr tbttrrrn ftrrnrfbrt bbttbrfbrf ftrrrrftb btbrtbtrbf rtr rbrt brrbrr trtr fttrbbrtrttbt nrtrftrtrb tbtrbrtt rtftbtb rfrtbtbrtb rb nrrf tn fn r r r rtbbt tbt b bb r f b b btrbr rrrrbrrtb trtbnrfbrt ttrntb rbrtbtfbtrrf r rtbbt tbt b bb r f b b btrbr rrrrbrrtb trtbnrfbrt ttrntb rbrtbtfbtrrf ntrbrtbtfrtbr bbtrbr rbrtbtfrrtbtt rrrnft rrnrfbrt bbttbrfbrf ftrrrrftb btbrtbtrbf rtr rbrt brrbrr trtr fttrbbrtrttbt nrtrftrtrb tbtrbrtt rtftbtb rfrtbtbrtb rb nrrf tn fn r brrbrr trtr fttrbbrtrttbt nrtrftrtrb tbtrbrtt rtftbtb rfrtbtbrtb rb nrrf tn fn r r r rtbbt tbt bb r f b btrbr rrrrbrrtb trtbnrfbrt ttrntb rbrtbtfbtrr frbrtbtfrtbr trbrrbrtbtfr rtbttrrrn ftrrnrfb rtbbttb rfbrfftrrr rftbbtbrtbt rbfrt rrbrt r rtbbt tbt bb r f b b btrbr rrrrbrrtb trtbnrfbrt ttrntb rbrtbtfbtrrt frtbrtrb rrbrtbtfrrtbtt rrrnft rrnrfbrt bbttbrfbrf ftrrrrftb btbrtbtrbf rtr rbrt brrbrr trtr fttrbbrtrttbt nrtrftrtrb tbtrbrtt rtftbtb rfrtbtbrtb rb nrrf tn fn r r r rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrff nrrrrrrrrrrff ttbrrrrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rfntbbt rfrntn nnnftbnbn brfbnrb bnbtn brnnrtnftbn tbrbttb nnnrfrbtb nbb n fbfn t brbnbbbtn nnnntnbbtr bbbfrf rtfnbtr rrbrfnnnrfnt t rf

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D2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 19, 2014 rfntbf r f n t b nrr trb t r f b rrb nr rnb nrnt rrnb nrnt rrnb nr rtrb rffr tnb b rfn rb nrn b b rrf rb n b nnb n b rrnn rnb rfnt rr rb nb b nn n nf nrb r rntnfb n rb ntr nrnfn b n nt ntr rb rr nb b rrn rrrnb rn trrrrb nr nfb b rrrrb rrrrb n nt bnr n b nnf nb nrrnr fb rrtn b rnr rbnb fnrf nb rf rtnnb b r b trtrnrrnfr b f rb nnb trrn nb n n b nr b f rr rntb b tnb n b b ttn nttn b n rrrnrrtr rbfb nb r tb r tb frr bfnb rrn b rnrrr b rrrr rb nrrn nrb nf nfrb frn rb nrrb nt nb f tb rf fnfb n tnb btn fn nb trt fb fnn trrb rn b n frb rnn b tt b r ntrb bn rtrt nb n b nrb r nb r b n rnrrrn tb tb tb rnrb rn b r n r b rnr b rn ntnn nrrrnnn nnrb b rttrn b rnr ntnb rn tb rnfn nb nnn tnr n r n r r r n f b rr t rb t nt rn nb rrn b b nn nrtrrb nnf b nr b trrrn b n n nn b t rnr b bff tnt b rn b n r r r r r n n b n r r r r r n n b rtrntr trb t n r r f n t b nn rrrb n nrfb fn b b b frtb rn b n b nfn b rnrr ntb n b nb r r r b r r n r r r r n t n r r r r n n t r f n r b t b rf b r b ntrrtn rb rrrb n nb n nb nn nb tnb bnn b tnb rb n b tn b f b nf nb tb b n rtrfntb rf b rf b b ftn b nrnf b rtnnt nb r tnb rn b ntb tn b b trr rb tntn trrb nn b rrrntr b ntrnn nb n rrb n r r t n r r f n r r r n t r n n r r n r r r r r n f bnn b b nrnb n n n n n n b rntr rb n rtnb b nb b n b n rfntb nb bn bb nr b rfntbtr b n fn frrrrnt rrrb b f tnnrfnt b b f bb t f n r r r f n n n n n t f n r n n t f n t n n n n n n n rnnrfr nrn rfnr nntntrnfnr nn nrrn nnn nfn nnrn nt n r n r r n n r n r n t f rnntrrn tnnnt n r r n n t n n n r t t n t r r f r n r n n n r n t r n r t r b b n n r r n n r n r f r r r n t r n r r n t r n r n n f r n r r n n r n n r t r n n n n r r n n t n r r n r n r n r n r n r n t n n t n t n r r r n n r n r n n n r r n r t b tntn r r n r n r trrtn ntr fnr rn r b n r r n r n r n r n n t n r n r r n r b rr ntr nf nt nrnnrtr rrr n n n b n r f n r n nnntr n r n nr rnrnt r n r n n n f r t nt fntn nrrrfr rn rrrnn nrnnt nrnnn nn r r r n t n n f r r n n r r n n n n n r r t n n t n n n t n t n n t r n n n n f t n r n f f r t r f r t r r n f n r n n n n r r r r n t n n t r t n r r r r n r n r

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Wednesday, March 19, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D3 rfntbrr rr f r rrr nr rrn rr t n r r fr r rb r frrfrr rfrntb fr rt tr rr rffr rft rf r rfr ntb t tff tff r r t t rrf rrf t ntf tt rrfr rfr rfrrrrf rnbtf ntf rfr frr r r f r f r r r f rft rft bnr t r f r r t rt b r frr tt brrf f r r f r f r n b r r r r r f r r r r r t t brrf f btt frtr tffr rrtt t t t r rfr t ffrr rft b bb nt fr rrrr ttt fr rfrr rfrr rtfr rfrt rrr tt r r b f ntbff rt r tt ffr fr frr rt btf t tf r f r r f r f r t t fr rfrrf frr t trffff trf rf rrfr fff rrrfr ttt ffr rr b bb frft bb f f f rt f t r r r f r f frff nrfb rrfr tt ffr frft tt rfrr frfr rftfr rfrr t rr frfr rt bbf f frf r r bbf f bbbrf f f f r f r r r t t r r f tfrr r f frrrr rfr frrt bf f bbff f f t r r r f r fn frf rff r rrt f t r r r f r frrfr rrffr r t rf ff r r r f t r t t t frt f f r r r r r r r r f r r f f t r r r f r r f f r f f r f t t bf tf f r r r r f r r r r f r r f r r f r f r r f f r f r r f t f r f r r r r t t f f f r r f r r f r f r r f r t bf tf t f r r r f frrfr rrfr frr rr frrf rt frf f r t frr rf t bf tf bbff f trrr rfr r r f r f r rrr frffrfr frfrfr rrfr t rfr rr r t t n rtf rfrrf t nb frr rfrrrrf rrrrf t f ttt rrf frt frft

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D4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 19, 2014 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 725344767 1318315974 921FREE SPACE5372 216424863 529395268ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N IB O G BINGO B I N G O S OUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Tom Lanzarone WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! B 9 I 21 G 53 O 72 FREE