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Sponsored by Fran Haasch lawfran.com (drink responsibly some restrictions apply) Phone: 352-326-2623LEARN TO RIDE! GREEN BAG DAY...CELEBRATE WITH US MARCH 1520% OFF ALL LICENSED PRODUCTS YOU CAN STUFF IN OUR GREEN BAGFOOD AVAILABLE & FREE BUD LIGHTWEDNESDAY BIKE NIGHT AT BEEF O BRADYS SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | C1 SPORTS: Lake Minneola loses in state nals WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWSTAND INSIDE CLASSIFIED D1 CROSSWORDS C2 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN C1 SPORTS B1 VOICES A4 WORD ON THE STREE T A2 SO UTH LAKE PRE SS V OLUME 99, NO. 10 5 SECTIO N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reserved www. southlakepress.com PRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com L ake County Animal Ser vices Division ofcials say big changes have occurred at the animal shelter since two critical internal audits cited at least 45 areas for improve ment. In addition, shelter ofcials now agree there is a need for a low-cost spay and neutering program, which would help re duce the number of animals brought to the shelter, in ef fect, preventing the euthaniza tion of dogs and cats. Bob Melton, inspector gener al with the Lake County Clerk of Courts ofce, who conduct ed the audit, said among his most signicant ndings was that the shelter kept poor re cords of animals coming into the facility. We found that animals were unaccounted for and the soft ware was not being used prop erly, he said. There were also signicant issues in how the animals were cared for for example, keeping the lights off in the quarantined area during the day and keeping the ani mals in the dark. Cyndi Nason, the countys new director of animal ser vices, who took the place of Marjorie Boyd after she re signed in April 2013, said the shelter uses a new computer software system to keep better track of animals. The previous system, she said, was antiquated and not used correctly. The audits also indicated the county was missing out on hundreds of thousands of dollars a year because pet li censing laws werent being PERCENTAGE OF DOGS EUTHANIZEDLake County is euthanizing just over 15 percent of the dogs that come into its shelter, a sizable decrease from 2009, when 25 percent of dogs were being put down. WHITNEY WILLARD / STAFF GRAPHIC 26 24 22 20 18 16 14 2009 25.49% 16.44% 17.63% 15.98% 15.03% 15.03% 2010 2011 2012 2013 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Veterinarian Boyd Harrell gives a dog a shot at Lake County Animal Services in Tavares on Monday. Animal Services uses spaying and neutering in conjunction with other initiatives to keep the number of euthanized animals as low as possible. TAVARES Officials: More adoptions, fewer animals put down at animal shelter SEE ANIMALS | A2 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Clermont city of cials say they could be on the hook for up to $28,000 a month if they decide to stop citing drivers for making ille gal right turns using the new red light cameras. At a City Coun cil meeting last week, City Manager Darren Gray said eliminat ing the right-turn-onred violations would reduce the number of tickets so dramatically that there wouldnt be enough revenue to pay for the cameras each month. We would be re sponsible for pay ing ATS, which means $4,750 per camera per month, Gray told council members. ATS is the company that in stalled and runs the red light cameras through a contract with the city. With just six of 24 cameras installed now, that payment could be as high as $28,500 per CLERMONT Cutting out right-turn tickets could cost big bucks DAILY COMMERCIAL FILE PHOTO A red-light camera watches the intersection of U.S. Highway 27 and State Road 50 in Clermont. SEE TICKETS | A2 Its only in its first month, so well have to wait and see how it goes from here, but they (ATS) did express to me that the 80-90 percent (of tickets issued for right turns) was a high amount for a city. City Manager Darren Gray LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com Evening bus service for Link 55 in south Lake will not be re stored anytime soon, accord ing to county ofcials. LYNX and county ofcials were unable to reach a new agreement last week. When the Link 55 route which runs from Cagan Cross ings along U.S. Highway 192 to downtown Kissimmee was reinstated Jan. 12, the service only offered eight round trips instead of the 16 that riders and Lake County ofcials thought would be offered. County ofcials were stumped when they received a response from LYNX in De cember that they could only of fer half the number of trips at an increased cost of $16,000. The cost for the 16 trips was originally $50,685. Furthermore, the bus ser vice only offers four trips in the morning from 6 to 8 and four trips in the evening from 5 to 6:30. The service ended two and a half hours earlier than the agreed upon time, upset ting many shift workers. The change came because the Link 55 route was expand ed into Osceola County, adding three miles to the route, LYNX ofcials said. They do not have the mar ginal capacity in the system to be able to expand the ser vice easily, said David Heath, county manager. At the meeting, LYNX of cials said they could rein state the service for an addi tional $22,000. The costs were raised to accommodate the bus routes expansion. Another option included forming a partnership with Polk County because they run a CLERMONT LYNX, Lake cant make deal on bus route SEE BUS | A3

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 5, 2014 CLERMONT Vendors sought for annual South Lake Womens Expo The 12th annual South Lake Womens Expo is seeking vendors for the event sponsored by the Clermont Womens Club to be held March 22 at the Wesley Center at First United Methodist Church, at 950 7th St., north of State Road 50, Clermont. Applications are now being accept ed for the event offering a bonus for vendors, included in the vendor fee a business card ad to be published in the March 19 edition of the South Lake Press Admission is free for the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For information or an application, email BSsportzfan@aol.com. CLERMONT Annual Scholarship Fair scheduled for March 11-12 Back to School is COOL Lake County, a local nonprot organiza tion, will host the 2014 Scholarship Fair from 4:30 to 7 p.m. March 11-12. The event, open to all Lake County school seniors and their families, will be held at the Clermont Community Center, 620 W. Montrose St., in down town Clermont. Business sponsorships are available for $100 for both days of the event. Registration is required. For information, go to www.backto schooliscool.org, or email Julie Hulley at Julie@backtoschooliscool.org. CLERMONT Police to conduct DUI, traffic safety checkpoint The Clermont Police Department will conduct a DUI and trafc safety checkpoint from 5 to 9 p.m. March 13 on East Avenue, just north of Grand Highway. The goal of the checkpoint is to pro mote safe driving by ensuring that all motorists are wearing seat belts. Ofcers will also check safety equip ment on vehicles, make sure all driv ers are licensed and insured and will apprehend those driving under the inuence. CLERMONT Tax service at Liberty offered Liberty Tax Service in Clermont is offering free tax preparation to new customers and to local communi ty heroes, at their ofce 711 S. U.S. Highway 27, unit B, during March. Teachers and school employees through Sunday, medical providers and staff personnel from March 10-16 and people in the military and veter ans from March 17-23. For information or to schedule an appointment, call 352-536-1829. Area Briefs What South Lake residents are saying about ... NIAGARA BOTTLING The Water Management District approved a permit which allows Groveland-based Niagara Bottling to dou ble its withdrawals from the lower aquifer. What effect do you anticipate these withdrawals will have? The effect of drawing down the lower aquifer, in my opinion, would cause an excessive amount of damage to the upper aquifer because you have to go through the upper to reach the lower. There would be a mixture of material between the two. The effects are in quantity and in quality. DARIAN ARRIAGA CLERMONT Maybe by taking from one and not the other, youre reducing the qual ity of the one not being taken from. Its the ho meostasis of it all main ly the level of balance. FRANKIE GEORGE WINTER GARDEN Im guessing that high er is better than lower in terms of quality of wa ter. It could go either way. Water could be cleaner. It could also contain more bacteria. There will be movement between the aquifers. STEVE AMANN CLERMONT Its not a case of upper aquifer versus lower aqui fer. Does anyone really know what effect one has on the other? Lake County cant continue this devel opment extravaganza. We need a long moratorium on development until we can gure out how to sta bilize our water resources. RICHARD DE FRAN CLERMONT Word on the Street Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 followed. At the same time, the audit found the county was not charging enough for the licenses. We have tightened the way we handle money, Na son said. According to the audit, current kennel operations may not maximize the safe ty or well-being of animals. There also is no air condi tioning in any of the rooms. Mike Brown, president of Harris Air Conditioning Inc., has since volunteered to put in a free air conditioning unit at the shelter. Nason said the lights have been xed in the quaran tined area and she wants to have the whole shelter area brightened. Further, the audit stated, practices and procedures relating to animal socialism and behavior should be im proved. Nason said she makes sure the animals get out at least once every day, and she is working to set up play groups for the animals to get more exercise. Melton said the audit showed during scal year 2012, Animal Services euth anized 4,571 animals, which is reasonable compared to other counties. In the last four months, animal services has not eu thanized any adoptable dogs, according to Brian Sheahan, director of the De partment of Community Safety and Compliance and Nasons boss. The audit recommended a more formal process for de ciding when to euthanize animals, as opposed to the director of animal services solely making the call. That process is already implemented, according to Nason. It is more of a group deci sion, she said. Since the audit was con ducted, Sheahan said, the shelter has improved pro tocols for disease control and standard operating pro cedures for the vetting of animals, whether they are suitable for adoption or not. The continued goal, he added, is to reduce eutha nasia overall. We can always do a bet ter job with adoptions, and improving our relationship and coordination with res cue partners, he said. In 2013, 15 percent of dogs deemed adoptable found new homes. Melton said the Division of Inspector General plans to perform a follow-up au dit of animal services to determine whether the recommendations were im plemented. While the current spay and neutering rebate pro gram has been success ful, according to Nason, the county needs more low-cost spay and neutering pro grams. Funding, however, is a big concern. Lake County Commis sioner Sean Parks voiced the same concern at a recent County Commission meet ing. It is money well spent, he said of the programs. In October 2013, the county implemented a spay and neutering program. Residents can ll out paper work at animal services to receive a $50 rebate if they spay or neuter an animal. Doreen Barker, presi dent of the South Lake An imal League, a no-kill an imal shelter for dogs and cats, said spay and neuter programs are essential to re ducing the pet population and euthanasia. The reason for the num ber of pets in the shelters is because people dont spay and neuter their pets, she said. Barker said the Animal Leagues mission is to get to the root of the problem of the overpopulation of pets and help the community understand the importance of spaying and neutering animals. ANIMALS FROM PAGE A1 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL A stray husky lies down in a kennel at Lake County Animal Services. month, Gray explained. City Attorney Daniel Mantzaris said a contract is a contract. We entered into a con tract agreement, and while stopping the right turns on red is not in breach of the contract, what enables the city to ensure they arent los ing money will go away, Mantzaris said. There may or may not be enough money at the end of the contract to pay for the cameras, so it adds that risk element. The six red light camer as went live in early Jan uary at troublesome in tersections. But almost immediately, motorists began to complain that they were being unfairly ticketed for making right turns on red. City ofcials expressed concerns as well, noting that about 90 percent of the 3,000-plus citations issued have been for right turns. Their concerns only grew when Police Chief Charles Broadway reviewed 59 right-turn vi olations and overturned 51. Gray said he thinks he can convince ATS to delay installing any other cam eras until the city resolves its concerns. He added that ATS representatives agreed that the percent age of tickets being is sued for right-turn viola tions is kind of high. Its only in its rst month, so well have to wait and see how it goes from here, but they (ATS) did express to me that the 80-90 percent (of tick ets issued for right turns) was a high amount for a city, he said. Gray also reiterated that he has asked Broad way to review every rightturn violation approxi mately 3,000 sent out from Jan 3. to Feb. 11. As the city wrestles with implementing the cam eras successfully, the Florida Legislature is ex pected in the upcoming session to consider lim iting or banning red-light cameras statewide. Gray believes a clause in the citys contract would let them out of it. Mantzaris, however, voiced some doubt. Theres concern whether the new legis lature can legally affect existing contracts that would otherwise be legal without the new laws, he said. Councilman Ray Good game said hed talked to Senator Alan Hays and understood that any leg islation would be spe cically directed toward right turns on red. Matthew Modica, a longtime resident of Cler mont, expressed concern that the city is bound to the contract for three years and may even have to install the addition al cameras as originally agreed. I dont know what we can do about this. Im concerned about adding 18 more cameras, and so I dont see a solution for this, Modica said. Suzy Gibson, another local resident and busi nesswoman, told the council she believes the city and citizens were bamboozled by ATS. I understand the city of Clermont needs to make a prot, but I urge you to do your research in the future. Right now, were kind of stuck with it (contract) and we all got bamboozled and left ask ing, What are the conse quences of our actions? Gibson said. TICKETS FROM PAGE A1 I understand the city of Clermont needs to make a profit, but I urge you to do your research in the future. Right now, were kind of stuck with it (contract) and we all got bamboozled and left asking, What are the consequences of our actions? Suzy Gibson, local resident and businesswoman

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Wednesday, March 5, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 route close to the Lake County line. We have looked at these options before but it has been awhile, said Dottie Keedy, director of community services. It hasnt been in the same circumstances. County Commission er Sean Parks, who has fought for the routes reinstatement, said he was unhappy a new agreement could not be reached. I am extremely dis appointed, he said. I am appreciative of the commission sup porting this, but LYNX needs to make this right with their riders. County commission ers approved a motion in January to work with LYNX ofcials to ex tend the evening bus service for Link 55. At the time, riders such as Celeste Clifford were paying about $10 a day for a cab home. In one week, Clifford said she spent $70 on cab fare. Clifford said she was saddened to hear there was no new agreement. It affects you, she said. You cant do the grocery shopping you normally do. You cant save. It is robbing Peter to pay Paul. It also doesnt help that the buses run late, sometimes by hours, she said. Some are waiting an hour and a half for a bus, she said. Bus es are passing passen gers (on the side of the road) because they are behind schedule. Matt Friedman, spokesman for LYNX, said the bus service de lay depends on trafc. BUS FROM PAGE A1 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com As city ofcials develop plans for converting the re cently purchased Cel ebration of Praise Church into a mu nicipal complex, the 69,000-square-foot building already has a temporary name and some new life. A youth basket ball program is set to begin in March and events are being planned for May. A city spokeswom an said the grand opening for the Cele bration Center is be ing planned for some time in June. City Manager Dar ren Gray said the city is focusing its efforts on the maintenance that needs to be com pleted before then. Inoperative locks have been repaired and estimates are being gathered for re-keying the entire building, Gray said. Gray said walls have to be repaired, light ing must be upgrad ed in the gymnasium, blocks will be leveled around the pool to avoid tripping haz ards and restroom fa cilities must be made ADA compliant. In addition, re ex tinguishers and kitch en re-suppression systems must be in spected and certied and the building will be treated against ter mites. Gray also said that the re sprinklers were inspected and deciencies were found, something the city is repairing, along with several air con ditioning units that must be serviced or replaced. Gray said th e roof warranty was just transferred to the city and event planning is underway. Meanwhile, the event schedule is ll ing up quickly. Last week, the city announced that the Pat Burke Hoops Life Basketball and Life Skills Program will vis it the site from March 10 through June 7. On May 8, city em ployees will be treat ed to breakfast at the new facility. On May 9, local children will enjoy a sympho ny jazz fest, with per formances by south Lakes three local high schools. And on May 17, there will be a wa ter safety day for the entire com munity. The ofcial opening of the pool is targeted for June 7. At a council meet ing following the workshop and COP update, ofcials ap proved new positions in the Public Works, Facility Maintenance and Recreation and Events departments to staff the Celebra tion Center in the amount of $125,455 and a budget amend ment in the amount of $125,455. According to Gray, the city plans on hir ing eight life guards on a part-time basis and adding ve posi tions to operate the facility. Some city depart ments will also occu py the building, The Clermont Police De partment will occupy about 10,000 square feet and Lake Coun ty Tax Collector Bob McKee is interested in a long-term lease for about 10,000 square feet as well. Ofcials said they are considering ofcal names for the complex. CLERMONT Celebration Center fills first event slots ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com The Clermont Police Department and Na tional Training Center played host to the inau gural World Police Soc cer 7s World Champi onship last week. Welcoming ofcers across the globe for the tournament was or ganizer Steve Crane, a former British police ofcer and profession al soccer player who now runs Striker Soc cer Academy in Winter Garden. Crane, along with the International Police As sociation Region 39, co-sponsored the event. Its cops helping cops, using service through friendship and no politics, said IPA President John Nabet. This tournament has been wonderful. We have seen some great games and some fan tastic players, but its really more about ca maraderie. Teams comprised of seven to 14 players came from as far away as Sweden, Wales, Chi cago and Belgium and as near as Orlando and Tampa. Each team played at least seven games over three days and, on Fri day, Sweden played Wales for the champi onship. Chief Charles Broad way, who led the Or lando/Central Florida team, said they were impressed with the ath letic skills of the Swed ish team. Groveland Ofcer Robert Mata, the teams goalie and MVP, put it a little more blunt ly, declaring, They de stroyed us. Its been a lot of fun though. Weve gotten to meet a lot of people and its been an honor. Ofcers from all agen cies have come togeth er to play and just have fun, Mata said. Originally from Costa Rica, Mata played soc cer since he was 5 years old. He said he under stands the difference between the mentali ty of the internation al players and why they are sometimes better at soccer than many U.S. players. In Costa Rica, its like people say, Hey baby, welcome to the world, heres your (soc cer) ball, Mata joked. Peter Eriksson, who led the Swedish team to a 3-2 victory against Wales, said everyone on his team has played soc cer professionally. When in uniform, he and his teammates patrol the town of Eskilstvna. In Sweden, soccer is the biggest event. Its the national sport and ev eryone on our team has played at high levels, Eriksson said. Many of the players then seek their way into police work becau se they seek the adrenaline. Eriksson hopes his team will return to de fend its title next year. Policemen from across the globe compete in Clermont PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Clermont Police Chief Charles Broadway, left, scores a goal against the team from Belgium. Broadway was playing as part of the unied Orlando team. A player from Belgium, left, encounters two unied Orlando players.

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 5, 2014 I t recently came to light that a handful of schools in Lake County will not give students scores of less than 50 on class assignments, while several other schools do so only during ofcial grading periods four times a year. Its not a novel idea in education circles. Some school districts, in Florida and else where, have adopted such approaches in hopes of improving the odds that struggling students will pass and, ultimately, graduate from school. The theory goes like this: A student who earns a very low grade early in a marking period may have trouble recovering from it and fail. Those students may become frustrated and consider dropping out. It is not clear how many schools in Lake County have adopted the more lenient grading system, but district administrators conrmed that at least some wont award any grade lower than 50 on class assignments, even if a student earns a zero. Daily Commercial reporter Livi Stanford re ported last week that the practice has caused some debate among Lake County School Board members, some of whom want to elimi nate that option. A board workshop is planned in March to discuss the issue. We agree that the practice should be abol ished district-wide, and soon. This approach, however well-intentioned, is fraught with problems. Principal among these is that it rewards poor academic performance by providing an arti cial safety net that virtually assures every child of passing, no matter how little effort they in vest in their studies. While we recognize that not every child will excel academically, we also recognize that the world is a cruel place for those who dont try, and the no-grade-lower-than-50 approach cer tainly removes some incentive for students to put forth the effort needed to achieve even a minimum level of academic success. You also have to question the basic fairness of this system. One child may try hard and fail a test with a grade of 59, and another may earn a 20 while putting in no effort and still come away with a 50. The message we send to the child who tried is this: Quit trying and you can get virtually the same result. Its a bad ap proach that provides articial results. The fact is, school ofcials have better tools at their disposal for ensuring that struggling students pass. They can offer extra credit to erase bad grades. And why not? Its a legitimate way of re warding a students effort while also offering enrichment. And best of all, the student must earn the grade. School grades, like real-world rewards, should be based on effort and merit, after all. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD ........................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST O PINION WHATS YOUR OPINION? The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the ed itor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be origi nal, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Letters to the Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711 By fax to: 352-394-8001 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. GUEST COLUMNS If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@daily commercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OUR VIEW S OUTH LAKE PRESS Your community newspaper for more than 100 years. 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001 The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Flori da 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region. All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Bad-grade policy should be dumped by Lakes schools Scotts making bad appointments Governor Rick Scotts appoin tees to the St. Johns River Water Management District are giv ing Floridas water away at no cost to the Niagara Water com pany so the company can sell it for huge prots. And his ap pointees to the Expressway Authority name an unqualied politician to run the Authority. Anyone who votes for Gov. Scotts re-election so he can make more appointments as mentioned is a complete idiot. SAMUEL E. LUELLEN | Grand Island Just walk away from trouble There are some activities we possibly engage in from time to time that may be illegal. Does it mean that someone has the right to take our life? When we were 17-years old, and even today, we all broke the law in some manner. It would be a sad state of affairs if a cit izen responded to our trash talking with a gun and ended our life. Many of us have children, and so do our friends. Teenagers like to play their music very loud. I certainly would not want an adult to confront these youth to the point of ensuring an argu ment that ended with a death. Whatever happened to just walking away? In some cases we should give up our right for anothers wrong. Why cant we show love rather than hate? We can engage in peace rather than war and offer compassion rath er than revenge. There are times when things do not go our way. If we would take a step back and ask God for tolerance, apply common sense to the situation and not always have to be right, there would be less need to lament If I could do it all over again... We are blessed to live in the greatest country on earth. In America we have many free doms and of course we misuse some of them. Lets show how thankful we are to be citizens of this great land by treating oth ers as we wish to be treated. With this simple rule our lives would be enriched with joy, peace and happiness. CELESTINE WRIGHT | Leesburg Stop giving away water I agree with Carole Rietzel in her letter from Jan. 12. I also think the St. Johns Water Management District does not have the authority to make decisions requesting that we conserve water, yet they are giving away thousands of gal lons of water daily. I get a water bill every month that I pay. I wonder how much the St. Johns charges for water? The water belongs to the people that pay to use it each month. If this continues for long we will have less water. One of the main causes of sinkholes is the lack of water in the ground. The ground be comes dry with lack of water, at which point the sandy soil gives way and we have a sinkhole. When man takes away from the earth, the earth gets sick and takes away from man. ELMA NELSON | Leesburg Thanks to the businesses that keep their property clean I walk every day with my dog, and, as a Northerner I enjoy the green I see all around. However, the amount of trash that is on the sides of the roads spoils this beautiful area. I want to thank the two women I saw hauling a large trash bag on County Road 452 for collecting other peoples trash. There was a lot of trash on Florida Hospital Watermans property. When I contacted them, they promptly sent main tenance staff to clean the area. I wish people would stop tossing trash from their cars! But until that time, thanks to the individuals and Waterman Hospital for picking up after ir responsible litterers. If more businesses would clean around their proper ties, imagine how much nicer it would be. PENELOPE JOHNSON | Tavares If you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veter ans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to www. lakeveterans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANS YOUR VOICES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Red-light camera program is a farce In response to the current debate over the red light cameras in Clermont, I would like to offer this opin ion. During earlier discussions regard ing the possible use of red-light cameras at the city council meet ing, I presented evi dence from numerous studies across the U.S. that concluded the cameras were margin al at best for providing safety for drivers. Furthermore, these studies also indicated a heightened distrust by the general public for these devices. Un der the assumption that safety and not revenue was the cen tral motivation for the cameras, I provided the council members with several alterna tives. These options included lengthening the duration of yellow caution lights; install ing strobes within the green lights to warn of the forthcoming light change; setting up separate ashing lights at the road side to do the same; or convening a com mittee to recommend other changes. I provided the coun cil evidence that ev ery single referendum taken in the country had turned down red light cameras. Its im portant to recognize that both Mayor Hal Turville and Council man Keith Mullins had the foresight to realize the red light camera program was a farce, which now has turned into a asco. STERLING O. FREY Clermont LETTER of the WEEK HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO

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Wednesday, March 5, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5 and Leon Haw kins during the argument, Mill er pulled out a gun and point ed it at Rus sells face. Rus sell slapped the gun away and ran, at which point Miller red several times at Russell, striking him in the back, the af davit stated. Russell died from multiple gunshot wounds, an autopsy showed. U.S. Marshals ar rested Miller at a rel atives home in Alba ny, N.Y., according to the Lake County Sher iffs Ofce, whose task force agent aid ed in the cap ture. The afda vit adds people from the two ar eas were appar ently feuding because some peo ple in Stuckey believe people from Cler mont are responsible for the disappearance of Xavier Tarrand, a Groveland-area man. Tarrand was last seen in mid-January get ting into a vehicle at a RaceTrac gas station on State Road 50 in Groveland in what the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce still considers a missing-person case. THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com Jane Graham was 22 when she boarded a bus from her former West Virginia home more than 70 years ago and headed to Detroit, Mich., to become one of the Rosie the Riveter gals during World War II. On Feb. 25, the eve of her 92nd birthday, the Leesburg resident sat in her walker seat underneath the wings of a B-29 bomber at the Lees burg International Airport and recalled riveting the wings and tail gunner cabin on the B-29s. I really wanted to see this, Graham said. This is humongous. When we were working in it, it wasnt that big, but it was just the wings that we worked on. Wed go around the holes that the rivets went in and ream it out and make sure it was clean, with no pieces of met al in it. Graham was one of many women who left the rural mountain areas for the big city and lled the temporary industrial labor shortage created by the men serving overseas. She rode a street car to work. It was really cold in the winter time, but I wanted to make a living, Graham said. She recalled that the pay was good at $1.32 an hour, and her work on the B-29 was the job she loved the most throughout her working ca reer. I thought it was great that I got to work on it. Graham beamed as she showed the rivets under neath the wings to her daughters, Rose Stafford and Denise Brewster, and sonin-law Dennis Brewster. Gra ham has outlived two sons who passed away one day apart in 2004. This might have been one of the very planes that you worked on, Mom, Rose said to her mother. Wouldnt that be something? Did you put your initials on any where? Graham chuckled. This is a part of histo ry and it makes us a part of history, Denise said of see ing the B-29 and knowing that her mother had a vital part in the war effort during World War II. They were the greatest generation. LEESBURG BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Jane Graham, 92, center left, and Benjamin Staba, 94, center right, stop to talk. During World War II, Graham helped assemble the tail section of B-29s and Staba served on the aircraft carriers USS Wasp and USS Princeton. Graham is accompanied by her daughter Denise Brewster, 60. With Staba is his son-in-law John Hoban, 70. Woman, 92, was a Rosie who built planes like Fifi I really wanted to see this. This is humongous. When we were working in it, it wasnt that big, but it was just the wings that we worked on. Wed go around the holes that the rivets went in and ream it out and make sure it was clean, with no pieces of metal in it. Jane Graham LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com With lawmakers looking at a surplus in the states budget this year, and Gov. Rick Scott already planning to spend $185 million on water issues in Flor ida, local ofcials hope some money will trick le down from Tallahas see for a study to nd an alternative water supply in south Lake. County ofcials re cently attended an an nual event known as Lake County Days in Tallahassee, where they had the opportunity to meet with the Lake County Legislative Del egation to highlight key issues important to the county. One of those issues is funding a study to nd an alternative wa ter supply to ground water in south Lake, as the projected de mand for water contin ues to grow. Water ex perts predict there will be demand for 300 mil lion gallons of water a day in 2035. The tradi tional source, the Flor idan aquifer, can cur rently meet a demand of only 50 million gal lons, according to wa ter experts. Im very hopeful for funding for the study based on support ex pressed by Rep. Larry Metz, R-Groveland, and Sen. Alan Hays, R-Uma tilla, County Commis sioner Sean Parks said. I am looking forward to getting that (study) project listed as an ap propriation. The South Lake Re gional Water Initia tive consisting of the South Lake Cham ber of Commerce, the county and the munic ipalities of Clermont, Groveland, Minneo la, Mascotte and Mont verde agreed in Jan uary to equally share in the cost of hiring a consultant to help nd an alternative water source for south Lake County. Working in conjunc tion with the Central Florida Water Initia tive, which is develop ing a unied process to address Central Flori das current long-term water supply needs, the South Lake Region al Water Initiative must come up with $300,000 to fund a study to ex plore alternative water sources in the region. Hays said he did not know of any higher pri ority statewide than the protection of water re sources. Water has been an issue in Florida for years, he said. Now, we have more revenue and are able to do more than we previously could. Metz agreed. We are going to be addressing water issues on some level, he said. What you are going to see most of is the abil ity to fund water proj ects that havent been funded previously be cause we were in bud get-cutting mode the last couple of years. I think some of the water projects will be funded this year. Scott already has said he wants to spend $130 million this year for Ev erglades and other wa ter projects, plus an other $55 million for springs protection. CLERMONT Funding eyed for south Lake water supply study MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millardives@dailycommercial.com A teen on the run after being sus pected in a Grove land shooting death, who was captured in New York last week, is now in the Lake County jail after waiv ing extradition. Travis Leomontez Miller, 18, was moved here on Thursday to face second-degree murder charges in the killing of 31-year-old Justin Russell in early February. Miller remained in jail Friday on no bond. The shooting oc curred Feb. 1 in a eld just north of 15720 Stuckey Loop in Grov eland, where a large number of people had gathered. According to a prob able cause afdavit, Miller, who has ties to Clermont but lives in Groveland, showed up with his mother and got into an argument with a man from the Stuckey area of Groveland, ap parently part of an on going feud over a miss ing Groveland man. The afdavit states that when Russell stepped between Miller Shooting suspect now in Lake jail GROVELAND MILLER Staff Report Band students from all over Lake, Sumter and Marion counties recently met at Tava res High School for the Florida Bandmasters Association District 19 Solo & Ensemble Mu sic Performance As sessment. About 1,000 entries from 38 schools participated in the three-county festival. High school perform ers whose solo or en semble met certain dif culty standards, and whose performance was rated Superior, are eligible to repeat the process at the state level in about a month. LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Kadeen Lyttle of East Ridge High School helps tune up the bands woodwind choir prior to its performance. Local bands compete in Tavares

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A6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 5, 2014 rfntfbtnf rfnftnbrbnrfn rfrntfbbr rfrntfbbrrfnt rf rfnfntbnf DEATH NOTICES Laura Lynn Belding Laura Lynn Belding, 44, of Leesburg, died Saturday, February 22, 2014. Page-Theus Fu nerals & Cremations. Brian David Chambliss Brian David Cham bliss, 52, of Tavares, died Wednesday, Feb ruary 26, 2014. Harden/ Pauli Funeral Home. Rosemarie Therese Christ Rosemarie Therese Christ, 75, died Satur day March 1, 2014 in Fruitland Park. Beyers Funeral Home and Cre matory, Leesburg. Maxinia Edwards Maxinia Edwards, 63, of Orlando passed away on February 19, 2014. Anderson-Hence Funeral Home, Wild wood. Robert J. Grayford Robert J. Grayford, 80, of Clermont, died Tuesday, February 25, 2014. Harden/Pauli Fu neral Home. Philip L. Hollenbeck Philip L. Hollenbeck, 86, of Eustis, died Fri day, February 28, 2014. Hamlin & Hilbish Fu neral Directors, Eustis. Jean P. Jaroch Jean P. Jaroch, 85, of Wildwood, died Sun day, February 16, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations. Max E. Love Max E. Love, 79, of Fruitland Park, died Tuesday, February 25, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg, FL. Alvin James Nesbitt Alvin James Nes bitt, 71, of Tavares, FL passed away on Tues day, February 25, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares, FL Mary Ryan Mary Ryan, 70, of Al toona, died Wednes day, February 26, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home. Catherine Santiel Catherine Santiel, 73, of Wildwood, passed away Wednesday,Fe buary 26, 2014 Jacobs Funeral Home Richard Smith Richard Smith, 88, of Leesburg, died Sat urday, March 1, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations. Ryan Addam Smith Ryan Addam Smith, 29, of Welaka, died Thursday, February 27, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Astor. Ernest Mike Tilghman Ernest Mike Tilgh man, 68, of Eustis, died Wednesday, February 26, 2014. Hamlin & Hil bish Funeral Directors. Wylie Torrance Wylie Torrance, 90, of Eustis, died Fri day, February 28, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatilla. Brenda Walburn Brenda Walburn, 59, of Leesburg, died Fri day, February 21, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home. Edna G. Willis Edna G Willis, 86, of Oxford, died Sun day, February 23, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations. IN MEMORY Staff Report Two Lake County reghters and a lieutenant recently were honored for their service in rescuing dozens of people from a resort building that collapsed into a Clermont-area sink hole last year. Lake County reghters Carlos Herrera and Matthew Barton, and Lt. Jeremy Hendrix, received plaques at Eustis Elks Lodge 1578 during its annual banquet recognizing top lo cal law enforcement and re rescue personnel. The three were stationed at Fire Sta tion 112 in Four Corners on Aug. 11 and were rst on the scene helping res idents evacuate a three-story structure at the Summer Bay Resort as it partially collapsed into a large sinkhole. Their actions that evening rose to the highest standards of Lake County reghters, Lake County Public Safe ty Fire Chief John Jolliff said in a press release. I am proud of each of them. About 30 percent of the three-sto ry structure collapsed into the 100foot sinkhole, Lake County Fire Res cue Battalion Chief Tony Cuellar said at the time. The resort is at 17805 U.S. Highway 192, a half-mile east of U.S. Highway 27 and about 10 miles west of Disney World. It was like crack, crack, boom, guest Alma Villa Nueva told report ers on the scene of the building col lapse. Then the building started sinking a little. Then again, a crack, crack, boom and it sinking lower. Firefighters honored for rescues CLERMONT

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10% OFFAll options with this couponrffnntb B1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 5, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTS SPORTS EDITOR ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE .............................. 365-8268 FAX .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL ......... sports@dailycommercial.com S PORTS and LEISURE FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com LAKELAND Unnished business. Thats how Lake Minneo la boys basketball coach Fred die Cole looks at Saturdays 6044 loss to Miami Norland in the Florida High School Athletic As sociation Class 6A state champi onship at The Lakeland Center. Our goal this year, since our rst practice, was to win the state championship, said Cole. We didnt get that done, but that didnt make this an unsuc cessful season. We learned so much about what it takes to win at this level, but were going to approach next season like we left something on the table this time around. Miami Norland put the game away late in the fourth quar ter when its superior size the Vikings had three players tall er than 6-foot-6, while Lake Minneola had no starter taller than 6-foot-2 became a fac tor. On four-straight posses sions midway through the peri od, Miami Norland was able to get to the rim for putback dunks or tip-ins. That enabled the Vikings to break open a tight game after trailing 36-35 heading into the fourth quarter. Until that point, Lake Minne ola was able to stay close with quickness, aggressive defense and ability to beat Miami Nor land to open areas on the oor. The Hawks attacked the bas ket for most of the game and led by as many as seven points but couldnt overcome a scoreless stretch in the fourth when the Vikings found their stride. That dry spell killed us, Cole said. You cant come into a game like this, against a team like Miami Norland, and not score the basketball. A lot of that was Miami Norland playing on-the-ball basketball and you have to give them credit for that, but we also didnt convert some makeable shots. Until the fourth quarter, I was pleased with the way we executed our game plan. Lake Minneola falls to Miami Norland in Class 6A state championship contest HAWKS GROUNDED PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Lake Minneola players sit on the bench after losing the class 6A state nal to Miamis Norland High School 60-44 at the Lakeland Center in Lakeland on March 1. ABOVE: Lake Minneola junior Avery Brown (5) shoots the ball over a Miami Norland defender during the rst quarter. RIGHT: Lake Minneola junior Anthony Brown (3) shoots the ball over Miami Norland senior Zachary Johnson (5) during the second quarter. SEE LMHS | B4 FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Its likely that P.J. Fosters accomplish ments on the basket ball court at Lime stone College wont soon be forgotten. Foster, a former Leesburg High School standout, secured his place in history Satur day when he drained his 131st three point er of the season and established a new school record for long-range shots. The senior sharp shooter netted four three pointers in Sat urdays 80-75 loss against Mount Olive, adding on to his NCAA Division II lead in 3 pointers made and at tempted. Foster en tered Tuesdays game against Lees-McRae with 132 three point ers on the season. Following Satur days game, Foster leads all three NCAA divisions in made 3-point shots. NCAA all-time record hold er, Travis Bader of Oakland Universi ty, an NCAA Divison I school, had two fewer three pointers despite having played in ve more games. Foster established the new mark with 6 minutes, 52 seconds left in the game on a jumper from the left wing. With the bas ket, Foster surpassed Chuckie Scotland, who set the school mark of 130 in the 1989-90 season. Ex-Jacket in record books for three pointers PHOTO COURTESY OF LIMESTONE COLLEGE Former Leesburg High School and current Limestone College standout P.J. Foster drains a three pointer late in the second half of a game on Saturday against Mount Olive College in Gaffney, S.C. The basket gave Foster, a senior, a school single-season record with 131 three pointers. SEE RECORD | B3 FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Many student-athletes at Carver Middle School eventually wind up at Leesburg High School. That being the case, supports of the Yellow Jackets boys basketball team likely are chomp ing at the bit in anticipation of future graduat ing classes at Carver. Especially after Wednesday night, when Carver blasted Clermont Middle School 7541 at the Big House in Tavares to complete an Carver boys wins second straight middle school title LEESBURG SEE TITLE | B3

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B2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 5, 2014 HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. CLERMONT BLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSAMILYELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time! IRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONTL Many Other Activities each week Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.org LIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLCHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm SOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary); 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.org ST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am 10:00 am Beginning Oct. 6, 2013 5:00 pm Service Sunday School Youth Group Nursery Adult Bible Study Womens Bible Study Mens Prayer Breakfast WOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH GODINCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALE ERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for Children Groveland IRSTBAPTISTCHURCH GROVELAND Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pm MT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! MINNEOLA CONGREGATIONSMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club NEWLPRESBYTERIANCHURCH18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am TLIVINGGOD Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce Rowland MONTVERDE WOODLANDSLUTHERAN15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 am OAKLAND PRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforSouth Lake South LakeGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOMErfn tbt352-394-7121806 W. Minneola Ave.,Clermont,FL Cremation ChoicesDirect Cremation$675Plus Container Ron Becker,Director352-394-8228921 S.US Hwy 27,Minneola,FL N EW R EFORMED P LANT C HURCH We meet our God on Sunday at Superior Residence at 10:30 AM. 1600 Hunt Trace Blvd. (Behind Home Depot)Pastor Harm Biehl 407-325-8663 Lake-Sumter State College freshman Walker Sheller pitches during a game between LSSC and the Davenport University junior varsity at the LSSC baseball complex. BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Lake-Sumter State College fell behind early, but rebounded with nine unanswered runs on Feb. 26 in a 9-2 win against Dav enport University junior varsity team at the LSSC baseball com plex. The Lakehawks improved to 9-4 with the win against the NAIA school from Caledonia Township, Mich. Davenport jumped on LSSC starter Michael Hennessey for two runs in third inning, but the Lakehawks offense got cranked up in fourth with two runs. LSSC added two runs in the sixth and seventh innings and put the game on ice with three runs in the eighth. Tanner Barnhard scored two runs for LSSC and Walker Shell er had three hits and four RBIs, including a home run. LSSC to taled 10 hits against four Daven port pitchers. Kyle Schackne picked up the win in relief and improved to 3-1 on the season. LSSC beats Davenport junior varsity

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Wednesday, March 5, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B3 $24.99Full Service Oil Change**Includes up to 5 quarts of Valvoline`s Conventional oil, standard oil filter, lube and maintenance check. Additional charge for premium filter. Offer not valid with any other same service offers or discounts (including fleets). Good at participating Orlando locations.$15 offany Additional Service**Includes Transmission Fluid Exchange, Radiator Service, Entire Fuel System Cleaning, or Serpentine Belt Offer not valid with any other same service offers or discounts (including fleets). Good at participating Orlando locations. Foster nished with 18 points in 38 minutes. He was 7-of-18 from the eld and went 4-for-15 from 3-point range. Limestone College, located in Gaffney, S.C., is a member of Con ference Carolinas. The Saints have a 17-8 over all record and a 9-6 mark in Conference Carolinas, not count ing Tuesdays game. Foster leads the team with a 20.4 scoring av erage on 45 percent shooting. He is shoot ing 43 percent behind the 3-point line. Foster began his col lege career at Brevard Community College in Melbourne in 2009 and scored 20 points in the rst game. He averaged 9.8 points per game and hit 39 three pointers in his only season at BCC. From there, Fos ter transferred to Pas co-Hernando College in New Port Richey in 2010 and raised his scoring average to 15.3 points per game with a career high of 37 points. He was sixth in the National Junior College Athletic Asso ciation in three-point percentage. After being redshirt ed his rst year at Lime stone, Foster stepped up as a redshirt junior to average 11.5 points per game and shot 42 percent from behind the three-point line. RECORD FROM PAGE B1 undefeated season and win the Lake County Middle School Cham pionship for the sec ond-straight season. Carver closed out the 2013-14 campaign with an 11-0 record. Carver led from start to nish, using relent less full-court pressure to build a 42-17 lead at half time. In the second half, Carver went to a zone defense and cruised to the championship. Calvin Hein led Carver with 13 points and 11 assists. Cordray ius Graham also had a double-double with 12 points and 10 assists. In addition, Kenny Jones had 11 points, Trey Johnson added nine and Wayne Wat kins scored eight. After the game, Carv er coach Ben Nash praised his players. I am extremely proud of this group of kids, Nash said. They have worked hard since November and grew to gether as a team. They put themselves in a po sition to win. TITLE FROM PAGE B1 FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Local boys basketball players fared well re cently when the Florida Athletic Coaches Asso ciation announced its postseason awards for District 8. Mount Dora Bibles Zac Ward and Eustis Kiron Williams earned three honors apiece among players, Mount Dora Bible coach Steven Hayes and Eustis Mike Bowe earned Coach of the Year accolades. Ward was named the Distri cts Class 3A Play er of the Year. The se nior averaged 23.5 points per game for the Bulldogs. Williams, one of four seniors in the Panthers starting lineup, aver aged 16.4 points per game en route to be ing named the Class 5A Player of the Year. He also grabbed 3.2 re bounds and led Eustis with 3.8 steals per game. In addition, Ward was the districts Most Valuable Player and Williams was the run ner-up. Ward and Wil liams also earned dis trict nominations for All State. Hayes was the Class 3A coach of the Year. He paced Mount Dora Bi ble to a 21-7 record and won the Class 3A-Dis trict 5 championship. The Bulldogs reached the regional quarter nals. Bowe, whose daugh ter Brittany repre sented Team USA in speedskating at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia, led Eustis to a 22-8 record. He had in the Class 5A Elite Eigh t for the sec ond straight year. In addition to the Class 5A award, Bowe was named the Dis tricts All Classica tion Coach of the Year and was nominated to coach in the District All-Star Game. Other awards hand ed out included East Ridges Isaiah Matthews earning Class 7A Player of the Year. Three local players also earned Ac ademic All-State nomi nations Mount Dora Bibles Daniel Johnson in Class 3A, Eustis Coy Patterson in Class 5A and East Ridges Josh Click in Class 7A. Area players, coaches earn postseason honors

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B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 5, 2014 We just couldnt get the ball t o fall in the fourth quarter. Lake Minneola (28-4) got out to an early lead when Carlyle Hold er scored on a layup on the games opening possession. The Hawks tried to attack the bas ket in the rst quar ter with mixed results but shot only 27 per cent from the eld and trailed 13-8. Even more telling was the Vikings dominance on the backboards. Mi ami Norland out-re bounded Lake Minne ola 8-3 in the opening period and nished with a 41-24 advantage. We had to con trol the tempo against them and we did that by rebounding the bas ketball, said Miami Norland coach Lawton Williams. Our size had to be a factor on the boards. If we let them rebound the ball, they were going to run and that would create big problems for us. Lake Minneola junior Avery Brown helped the Hawks get back into the game in the second quarter. Brown got to the rim with a variety of drives, challenging the Vikings size and clos ing out the rst half with 14 points. In addition, the Hawks stepped up their backcourt pressure. When Brown ignit ed the Lake Minneola faithful with a thunder ous dunk at the 2-min ute mark, the Hawks took a 23-18 lead and seemed in control of the game. Less than a minute after Browns dunk, Lake Minneola suffered a devastating blow when Holder injured his right ankle. The in jury kept Holder on the bench at the start of the second half and even though he played most of the second half, his effectiveness was se verely limited. We lost a lot when Carlyle got hurt, Cole said. We lost a scor er and we lost a lot of quickness on defense. It forced us to make ad justments and get away from our game plan some. In the third quarter, Lake Minneola came out and looked to run away from the Vikings. At the 5:09 mark, the Hawks had built their largest lead, 33-26, but a defensive switch by Miami Norland changed the complex ion of the game. Williams began to look for someone to neutralize Brown and found his stopper in senior Zachary John son. The 6-foot-2 John son, who was named the tournaments Most Valuable Player, shut down the Hawks lead ing scorer, holding him scoreless for the nal 13 minutes. I asked if anyone could stop (Brown), Williams said. We werent going to change anything we were do ing, as far as our game plan, but we need ed someone to step up and stop him. Zach went out and got the job done and still man aged to carry his load of the offense. That was part of our senior leadership. When weve asked someone to raise their game, our seniors have always stepped up. For the game, Lake Minneola shot 31 per cent from the eld and was 2-of-19 from be hind the 3-point line. Brown, who was the Hawks tournament MVP, scored a team high 16 points, but was the only Hawk in dou ble gures. He and An drew Mendoza led the team in rebounds with ve apiece. Miami Norland (275) shot 49 percent from the eld, including a blistering 58 percent in the second half. In the fourth quarter, Lake Minneola man aged to hit only 4-of-17 shots (24 percent). The victory was Mi ami Norlands thirdstraight Class 6A championship. It also marked Williams fth championship in nine years at Miami Nor land. Cole said he and his players, while disap pointed in the loss, are proud of their ac complishments and how far they have tak en the Lake Minneola program in only three years of existence. Some players and coaches never get to play for a state cham pionship, Cole said. Were going to work even harder next year to get back to Lakeland and win it all. We have to get back here and n ish the job we started. Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) LMHS FROM PAGE B1 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Avery Brown (5) dunks the ball over Miami Norland senior Larry McKnight (1) during the second quarter.

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Ann Dupee REMEMBER WHEN A weekly column that reprints some of the more interest ing news stories that have ap peared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press. C1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 5, 2014 www.southlakepress.com C OMMUNITY Proudly serving CLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWS STAFF WRITER ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 E-MAIL .... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com HOMETOWN: Clermont OCCUPATION: Holistic Health and Wellness Coach What do you enjoy most about South Lake County? When I was house hunting and drove to Clermont, I immediately fell in love with the beauty of the rolling hills and the tropical look, with the palm trees and the aro ma of the orange groves. I love the weather and the idea of rid ing my bike on the trails in the middle of winter and then send ing pictures to friends in the Mid west who are in freezing tempera tures, and showing them what I am up to. 1) If you had to summarize your philosophy of life in one sen tence, what would it be? Love God, love and serve others! 2) Name a person or incident youve come across recently thats touched you in some way. Why did this person or incident impress you so much? I have to say one person who comes to mind is Mo Mydlo. She has such a servant heart and a desire to encourage and support single moms. She is truly an inspi ration to me. 3) How does what you do contrib ute to the welfare of the area? I grew up learning about organic gardening, healthy eating, and ex ercising -as a result, having lots of energy and preventing disease. This is my mission, to encourage and support those busy individuals who want to live a healthy life full of energy and preventing disease. I also work with the Life Center in Clermont, and we offer a complete wellness opportunity to those indi viduals who are desiring a change in their lifestyle. I am also a part FROM THE FILES | 25 YEARS AGO 1989 Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press Meet Your NEIGHBOR JOANNE RAFACZ SEE NEIGHBOR | C2 CHAMBER INSTALLS OFFICERS Clermont Chamber of Commerce Past President Mary Ogilvie installed new ofcers at the annual meet ing Friday morning, Feb. 17 at the Citrus Tower Restaurant: Bobby Duncan, Market Bas ket, president; Bruce Yates, Subway Sandwiches and Sal ads, vice president; Jack Sar gent, Harold Roberts Real ty, treasurer; and Amy Walker Wynn, Central Florida Blood Bank, secretary. Board of directors are: Keith Mullins, Lakeridge Win ery; Bridgot Robinson, Dom inos Pizza; Sharon Williams, Meritor Savings; Cecil Smart, Smarts Locksmith and En gravers (immediate past pres ident); Gabby Monroe, Unit ed National Real Estate; Gene Landers, Private Ledger; Paul Lewis, Florida Power; and Bob Patterson, IDS Financial Ser vices. Outgoing board members are Diane James, Peggy Weath erbee, Roger Bornt, David Payne, Jim Hurtak and Michael Floyd. Chamber Executive Di rector Marge Tindal and Exec utive Secretary Carol Schom mer selected Jack Sargent as Board Member of the Year. Susan Craycraft, SunBank; Susan Matthews, Hilltop Sta tionery; Gene Landers, Private Ledger; Joyce Driggers, Meritor Savings; and Dennis Horton, local attorney, won door prizes with a Valentines theme. BUSINESS NEWS Bill Jayne Carpets has opened in Emerald Lakes Plaza. Hugh and Ida Johnson pur chased the shoe repair shop in South Lake Plaza from J.C. and Lois Coble. It has moved to larger quarters in the Pla zas east end next to John York Jewelers, enlarged to include the sale of several nice lines of mens and womens shoes. The name is changed to Cob bler Shoe Repair. A popular eatery in Tavares was Chicagos on Hwy. 441, which on St. Patricks Day served Corned Beef and Cab bage Dinner for $5.99 and Irish Stew for $4.99. SOUTH LAKE DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL ELECTS OFFICERS South Lake Development ofcers are Bob Wade, presi dent; Frank Bergau, vice pres ident, Ed Augustine, treasur er; and Lucie Blake, secretary. Chairing standing commit tees are: Planning and Zoning, Jay Vander Meer and Lawson Wolfe; Government Regula tion and Legislative, Roy Cald well and Ed Augustine; Ed ucation, Bud Ambrose and Richard Bell; Commercial De velopment, John Hughes, Frank Bergau and Don Bailey; SEE HISTORY | C2 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com T he man who founded and built the popular Arabian Nights dinner theater equestrian show in Kissimmee opened his Cl ermont ranch Saturday in hopes of adopting out 16 of the horses that performed at the attraction before it closed. Mark Miller, who was raised around horses and learned all about the Al-Marah Arabian breed from his mother Ruth Bazy McCormick Tankersley, called it a once-in-a-life time opportunity to acquire one of the highly trained show horses. All of the horses are beautiful. They are trained for riding and if you wanted to go to horse shows with them, a lot of them can still compete, Miller said. Al-Marah spokeswom an Eileen Daley said about 80 or 90 people showed up, and six of the horses found new ho mes. The six that sold are Of cer, a grey Arabian gelding; Dark Storm, a black Arabi an stallion; Luckys Queen, a half Grey, half Arabian Irish draft mare; Shift Work, a Grey Anglo Arabian geld ing; Sonny, an 11-year-old Percheron gelding; and Re gency Royal, a 5-year-old Belgian gelding. A couple of sales are still pending A lot of people came to check us out and we were pleased that six of our hors es were able to nd new homes, Daley said. A press release issued by Al-Marah announcing the auction calls the animals the most famous horses in Central Florida. If not the entire coun try, said Miller. The horses have performed for 500,000 to 600,000 people annually at Arabian Nights. Millers ranch is on 80 acres off Lakeshore Drive overlooking Little Lake Nel lie and Lake Nelli. Its name, Al-Marah, a word from the Budeon tribe that means An Oasis, is synonymous with the Tucson, Ariz., CLERMONT Arabian Nights stars sold at auction Mark Miller with Nuncho Primero Whiz (AKA Rocky) a palomino quarter horse gelding and former show horse at Arabian Nights. PHOTOS BY ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Al-Marah Ranch owner Mark Miller with one of the Arabians he was selling Saturday at his Clermont farm. Miller founded the now-closed Arabian Nights dinner show in Orlando and decided to sell many of the show horses. All of the horses are beautiful. They are trained for riding and if you wanted to go to horse shows with them, a lot of them can still compete. Mark Miller SEE HORSES | C2

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C2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 5, 2014 REEL-LIFE ANNIVERSARY By A NAMESAKE OF 119-ACROSS / Edited by Will ShortzNo. 0223RELEASE DATE: 3/2/2014 ACROSS1 Bush judicial appointee8 Quarterbacks, often15 Bush judicial appointee20 Professional tennis since 196821 Rank22 Singer with the album Live at the Polynesian Palace23 Time for the best deals, maybe, in a going-out-ofbusiness sale24 *1939 Judy Garland film26 There was a great one in Genesis27 One-named designer28 Lava comes out of it29 Kind of car or tee32 Appear suddenly36 Slaughter in the 1946 World Series37 *1933 Jean Harlow film40 Nuts!41 Gators tail?43 D-backs, on scoreboards44 Daily riser45 How things may be brought47 Pass51 Restful places53 Each54 *1943 Spencer Tracy/Irene Dunne film56 Is threatening, in a way58 Colorist60 Self-absorbed sort61 Hit63 Some kitchenware66 Call from a curb67 Sprint competitor, once68 *1939 Vivien Leigh/ Clark Gable film73 ___ king76 Sprint77 Word of agreement78 2000s events in North Korea, for short82 Provider of music on the go?85 Court grp.88 Footnote abbr.89 *1942 Spencer Tracy/Hedy Lamarr film92 Odists preposition94 When repeated, a Polynesian capital95 Publish96 Drinkers toasts97 Brother of George W. and Jeb99 Award for Miss Hawaii, in addition to a tiara100 Summer hrs.102 Snow queen in Disneys Frozen103 *1948 Ingrid Bergman film105 Elegance108 eBay user110 Certain newspaper advertisement111 Like Christiane Amanpour, by upbringing113 Pub containers115 Perfect, as a home119 Director of the eight starred films in this puzzle, who was born on 2/23/1889123 Torrey Pines Golf Course locale125 Suffer humiliation, in slang126 Comeback127 Brooks Robinsons team128 Sitcom with a 1974 wedding129 Foreign travelers purchase, maybe130 Source of the line Whats past is prologue, with The DOWN1 Massage therapeutically2 ___-blue3 I should ___ lucky4 Put into a sepulcher5 *1932 Clark Gable/ Jean Harlow film6 La-la lead-in7 Perhaps8 Migratory seabird9 Vier + vier10 What Babe wants to be in Babe11 Finish (up)12 New Haven reuner13 Frasier role14 Major glitch15 Puts together16 Things that should be tied up by the curtain?17 Playfully18 Complete, informally19 Transudes25 Beatles title girl27 Queen of literature30 Send off31 Gave up33 Birthplace of 22-Across34 Hunts, with on35 Lacking variety37 Gives up, in slang38 Then again, I could be wrong39 Adults counterpart42 Obsessed with45 Fortunetelling aids46 1980s-s series based on the fictional firm McKenzie, Brackman, Chaney & Kuzak48 Doing ___ (dancing springily)49 Basis in accounting50 Head to Paris?52 Overly confident55 Recipe instruction57 Wiry-coated terriers59 Lead-in to Pen, commercially62 Genuflect64 Night that Friends aired: Abbr.65 Swashbuckles, say69 Some London lords70 Effected, in a bad way71 ___ ba-aack!72 Ed Wood star73 When the story begins, perhaps74 1960s U.S. bombing target75 Flight board info: Abbr.79 Milans La ___80 Go-getter81 Unemotive83 Means of access to a cafeteria, maybe84 In past centuries86 Joint parts87 Specialties90 Give off coherent light91 Overreacting sort93 Essen article98 *1925 Percy Marmont film101 One way to the top103 Pub measure104 1960s western sitcom105 Chopped ___106 ___ Heep (Dickens character)107 Blade brand109 Red opening?112 Bit114 Render ___ Caesar 116 Shelfmate of Vogue117 Tavern stock118 Place for a topgallant120 Lash holder121 Green monitor, for short?122 Finish (up)123 Fate124 ___ we done? 1234567 8910111213141516171819 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 293031 32333435 36 373839 40 4142 43 44 45 4647484950 51 5253 54 55 56 575859 60 61 62 63646566 67 68 6970 71 72 73747576 77 78 798081 82 83 84 85868788 89 9091 929394 95 96 97 9899 100101102 103 104 105106107 108109 110 111 112 113114 115116117118 119 120121122 123124 125 126 127 128 129 130 Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Solution on D3 Residential Development, Richard Huff, Peggy Weath erbee and Joe Washuta; En vironmental Impact, Dick Stokes; Finance, Ed Augus tine; Public Relations, Law son Wolfe; Program, Lucie Blake; Membership: Rich ard Huff. CLERMONT POLICE WANT PENSION CHANGE A petition signed by all but one member of the Cl ermont Police Department req uesting a change in the retirement age for police ofcers was brought before the Pension Fund Board of Trustees at its quarterly meeting. The request, present ed by police department representative and board member Mitchell Rogers, was to reduce the retire ment age, with full bene ts, from 60 to 55, to bring the plan in line with the re tirement age for city re department employees. Several months ago, po lice ofcers voted to take increased benets with re tirement at age 60 in lieu of the earlier retirement. Of cers have re-evaluated their options and now feel it is in their best interest to be able to obtain full retire ment benets at age 55. All city employees covered by the pension fund are ful ly vested after 10 years em ployment, according to City Manager Wayne Saunders. Saunders stated Clermonts pension p lan benets were compared with those offered by other cities and found to be better than the aver age plan. The request will be considered at the next Pen sion Board meeting. HISTORY FROM PAGE C1 of Real Life Church, and there are so many wonderful outreach op portunities. 4) Name one of your greatest ac complishments so far. I have to say raising my children. I have a daughter and son. They are both adults now, and I am so proud of them. I really did focus on them when they were growing up. Now that they are off on their own, I am focusing on what my passion is and that is to change the world one person at a time re garding health and wellness. 5) Whats something youve al ways wanted to do but havent yet? I have always wanted to do more travel. I would especially love to travel to Europe. My grandparents were from Prague, and I have rela tives there and would love to visit them. That is just one of the plac es out of the many on my list. 6) What advice would you give to people who want to help out in the community? I am a part of Real Life Church and there are so many wonderful out reach opportunities. One in partic ular, which I have been a part of since moving to the area, is called Real Help. We make over a home four times a year, similar to Ex treme Home Makeover, and totally transform the home. We also sup port a single moms home. NEIGHBOR FROM PAGE C1 ranch Millers moth er ran. Miller has about nine national champi on horses in Clermont, in addition to the 16 that came from Arabi an Nights. Miller said while he personally loves the horses, he is keep ing only a couple from the show to use on his ranch as teachers to some of the others. Thee rest are not from the core herd of hors es his family has bred since the 1940s. Breeds available in clude Al-Marah Arabi ans, Percherons, Ap paloosas, Saddlebreds, Belgians, Irish Sport Horses and Quarter Horses. Buyers had an op portunity to dis cuss the horses with Al-Marah Arabians staff, including Miller and head trainer Kassie Barteau. Prices ranged from $2,500 to $20,000. Theyre all like fam ily to me really, and they each have their very own personal ity. They love being around people. Thats what they do, Mill er said. Itll be nice for anyone interested to come out and have a look at them. HORSES FROM PAGE C1 ROXANNE BROWN Staff writer/roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Clermonts rst ever syna gogue Temple LChayim will celebrate its grand open ing Friday with a procession by the families that make up the congregation, board members and city ofcials. During the procession, To rah scrolls will be carried in side and placed into their new home. Temple LChayim board members Nathal Axel, Jay Forman and Andrew Feld man announced that Orlan dos Anne Perry, who accept ed the post as the synagogues rabbi last week, will lead the Sabbath service to follow. This will by a joyous ser vice. We will have our spiri tual leader there with us and we are looking forward to welcoming everyone into our new home and the growth that lies ahead of us, For man said. It has been a long time coming. Temple LChayim is locat ed at 4420 South Highway 27, Suite 4, next to Walgreens in Clermont. The procession will begin at 7 p.m. and be followed by the service. Worshipers and guests will get to meet the new rabbi during a reception at 6:30 p.m. Services will also be followed by Shabbat, a social hour. We are sure that every one will be pleased with Rab bi Anne Perry. We would like everyone to join us in mak ing her feel welcome, board member Nathan Axel said. Forman said he wants vis itors and families to feel at home and wants everyone to know that there is much more in store for the temple. We want to provide the Jewish community with a place to gather for prayer, learning and socializing, but this is just the start, For man said. We have benefac tors made up of many Jew ish organizations, including the Jewish Society of Florida, that have committed to fund ing land and a building so the synagogue will have a perma nent building pretty quickly. For now, however, we feel condent and are very happy, that the place we have cho sen as our temporary home will be a great place for com ing together. Temple leaders say LChay im features members from a broad background, includ ing orthodox, conservative, traditional reform, interfaith families and Jews-by-Choice, made up of families, singles and people of all ages. The synagogue will provide a full range of services, includ ing weekly Sabbath services and the celebration of major Jewish holidays. It will also of fer Barmitzvahs and Batmitz vahs, baby naming services, funeral remembrances, wed ding and yarzit services. LChayim leaders would also like to establish a Hebrew school to provide instruction in coming of age rituals. Forman said those who miss the open house will still have the opportunity to sign up for Charter Membership status, which means no fees, includ ing building fund fees, and a cap on the membership costs so they will never go up in the future, at the service Friday. The deadline for the char ter membership at a cost of $350 per family or $175 per individual, runs through March 31. For information, call 352241-6030. Clermonts first synagogue opens Friday SUBMITTED PHOTO Nathan Axel, Andy Feldman and Jay Forman, board members, stand with Millie Altholz, the oldest congregant of Temple LChayim, during an open house for Temple LChayim, a new temple opening in Clermont this week.

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Wednesday, March 5, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C3 12thAnnualTHEGENERALFEDERATIONOFWOMENSCLUBS SPONSOREDBY THECLERMONT WOMANSCLUB DOOR PRIZESThroughout the day!ENTER TO WIN:Fabulous Prizesand much more...ADMISSIONFREE! HERESJUSTAFEWOFTHEPRODUCTS& SERVICES: HERESJUSTAFEWOFOURVENDORS: Saturday, March 22, 201410:00am 2:00pm Your First ChoiceIn-Print & On-Line To Apply for Scholarships from the Pig on the Pond Education Fund Vist Our Website: www.pigonthepond.org Come and Join our Family of Proud Sponsorsfor the 16th Annual Pig on the Pond For the Kids Pig on the Pond Mission Statement Jordan Anderson11:00 am 12:00 pm Clermonts Country Sweetheart Jordons latest singleYou Aint Ready For Me, shot straight to the Top 40 of the Music Row charts. HayFire Band2:15 pm 3:30 pmHAYFIRE has played all over the great state of Florida. They have been on stage with some of the biggest names in Country Music. The Down Brothers SUNDAY, March 9th a Day of Entertainment12:45 pm 1:45 pmThe Down Brothers perform Classic Rock throughout the Orlando area. The Abby Four4:15 pm 6:00 pmA Beatles tribute band with music and costumes from three different Beatle eras. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com The head of Floridas Dem ocratic Black Caucus told a group gathered in Cler mont for Black History Month on Feb. 22 to embrace their differenc es and to be fearless about ghting against intolerance. Henry Crespo Sr. red up a crowd numbering about 200 when he reminded them that the promise of the civ il rights movement has not been fullled 50 years after its birth. Crespo encouraged guests to throw away the African American title, accept their identities aside from race and to challenge the system by standing up for what they believe. Sometimes we blame our young people for not know ing, but we have to teach them to push back. Some times things dont happen because there was no push back, Crespo said. Dont be scared to challenge the system. The only reason we are here in the masses is be cause people were ghting, people were struggling. Never negate the black ness of who you are or the beauty it represents. The program, at Cler monts Community Center, drew a number of inuen tial speakers, including Pas tor Mervin Morgan, Joan and Paul Johnson, Minister Nial Alvarez and Elder Evadnie Watkis. The event also featured a fashion show highlight ing Afro-centric designs modeled by people from throughout the community. I think this is one of the highlights of the night, said Dr. Soyini Ayan, an herbal ist and doctor of naturopa thy who co-sponsored the event. Police Chief Charles Broadway, Clermonts rst black police chief, reected on his own past as well as the story of baseball great Jackie Robinson, reminding every one that results are achieved through perseverance, even in the toughest of times. His (Robinsons) life and the life of his family were threatened, and because of that, he could have played (in the Negro Leagues) and been done, but he chose not to, Broadway said. He chose to stick it out, he chose to persevere through the tough times and at one time became the highest paid Dodger of that time and was inducted into the Base ball Hall of Fame. Lastly, Dee Lee, a Christian stand-up comedian, took the microphone to deliver a message that was at once humorous and poignant. Racism is not born in you, its raised in you. Its taught to you, Lee said. But youve got to laugh at life. You cant let it get you down. You just have to get up every morn ing and thank your maker for another day to try to get things right. Black Caucus leader: Embrace your identity, battle injustice CLERMONT ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL A Black History Month presentation at Clermonts Community Center featured a fashion show modeled by local community members. CRESPO ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Batteries Plus Bulbs has opened its 34th Central Florida loca tion in Clermont. Owner Joe Kasper said hes been getting good response from people who say they have had a hard time nding special batter ies and bulbs. Ive had trouble nding certain size batteries for items I own and, if that hap pens, you just have to go without them, said shopper Jean Rhubin. Whats especially nice is that this store also has watch batteries. We go through a lot of watch batteries, and let me tell you, they are hard to nd around here. Batteries Plus Bulbs is in a 1,700-squarefoot Clermont location at 1120 State Road 50 in Clermont, next to Fe dex/Kinkos. Kasper is a seasoned Batteries Plus Bulbs franchise owner, mak ing the Clermont store the 11th on his ros ter, including others in Brandon, Gainesville, Jacksonville, Kissim mee, Lakeland, Ocala, Tampa, Winter Haven and two in Orlando. Florida has been wonderful to my busi ness over the years, and I couldnt be hap pier with another op portunity to bring our breadth of products, services, expertise and helpful advice to the Clermont community, Kasper said. Batteries Plus Bulbs stores offer thousands of batteries for devic es including watches, cars, golf carts, digital cameras, laptops and cell phones, as well as hard-to-nd batteries for old toys and nov elty or obscure devic es. The Clermont store also assembles, tests, conditions and de signs custom battery packs for rechargeable household and busi ness-to-business prod ucts. Kasper is working with t he South Lake Chamber of Commerce to set up a date and time for a formal rib bon cutting and grand opening celebration. Batteries Plus Bulbs opens 34th Central Florida location

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Wednesday, March 5, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C5

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C6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 5, 2014 Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...Totally UniqueTotally Unique is proud to be Clermonts first ORGANIC hair salon. We care about your beauty, your wellness, the environment and our community, so we use organic and sustainably harvested products whenever possible. We specialize in organic hair color, hair care products, nail and skin care lines. Our salon is one of the oldest salons in Clermont and is located at 786 W Montrose Street in Historic Downtown Clermont. Our stylists are experienced in all phases of hair care including color, straighteners, cuts, texture and styles. Hair stylists are Marjorie Morphet, Tina Foote, Sherie Wolkens and Jamie Rhoades. Our nail techs, Jennifer Vandergrift and Jamie Rhoades, perform pedicures and manicures using Zoya nail products (which are Big 5 free). Shellac manicures, lasting up to three weeks, are also available by Jennifer and Jamie. We have two pedicure chairs in a private room for your relaxation and enjoyment. Relaxing and therapeutic facials are available by Jennifer in our private upstairs facial room. Massage services include chair massage, Swedish and Deep Tissue. Massage services are also done in a private room in our upstairs area. We utilize several massage therapists and provide massage by appointment only. We also offer a small boutique with handcrafted jewelry and hair accessories, Art by Tina Foote and Jamie Rhoades, and other unique items. Salon hours are 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Saturday and open Sundays by appointment only. Evening hours are also available by appointment. We pride ourselves in providing a friendly, relaxing environment for our clients and friends. Stop by and visit or call 352-394-5005 for more information. We are also on Facebook and www.TotallyUniqueSalon.com. LOOKING FOR PARTS? SEE JULIE (352) 394-6111 Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! COMMUNITY CALENDAR TODAY ASH WEDNESDAY SER VICE AT WINDERMERE UNION CHURCH: 7 p.m., 10710 Park Ridge-Go tha Road, with the Rev. Barton Buchanan ofci ating. Go to www.wind ermereunion.org or call 407-876-2112. PINE RIDGE ELEMEN TARY SAC MEETING: At 7 p.m. in the media center. PLAY CANASTA ON WEDNESDAYS AT THE LI BRARY: From 2 to 5 p.m., at Marianne Beck Memorial Library in Howey-in-the-Hills. For information, call 352324-0254. THURSDAY FREE TRIATHLON CLINIC AT GEAR FOR MULTIS PORT: From 5:45 to 6:30 p.m., Thursdays in March, at the National Training Center in Cler mont. First-come, rstserved. Email Multis portgear@aol.com to reserve a spot, or go to www.gearformultisport. com. FRIDAY TO SUNDAY PIG ON THE POND SANCTIONED BARBECUE COMPETITION AND FES TIVAL: At Waterfront Park in Clermont. Details by email to tandy@church atsouthlake.com or pigonthepond@earth link.net. HOWEY-IN-THE-HILLS GARDEN AND CIVIC CLUB YARD SALE: Through Sunday, 313 W. Cen tral Ave., across from the Howey water tower. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Fri., and Sat.; 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Sunday. Call 352-324-6037 for details. SUNDAY LENTEN SERVICES AND POT LUCK DIN NERS AT WINDERMERE UNION CHURCH, UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST: Spe cial Lenten services ev ery Sunday evening preceded by a potluck dinner beginning at 5:30 p.m. A service on the theme of forgiveness follows at 6:30 p.m., 10710 Park Ridge-Go tha Road. For informa tion, go to www.wind ermereunion.org or call 407-876-2112. MONDAY TODDLER STORY HOUR AT THE LIBRARY: At 10:30 a.m. at the Marianne Beck Memorial Library, Howey-in-the-Hills, for ages to 4 years. Call the library at 352-324-0254 for details. MARCH 14 TOM JONES, NATIONALLY KNOWN WATERCOLORIST, TEACHES WORKSHOP: A three-day watercolor workshop at the South Lake Art Leagues Ca gan Art Studio, 16640 Cagan Crossings Blvd., in Clermont, from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., March 14-16. Non-members $275, members $245. Deposit of $100 is re quired to reserve a seat. Call 352-241-6407 or go to www.ButteryKisses Studio.com. CAGAN CROSSINGS FARMERS MARKET HOSTS MARDI GRAS CELEBRA TION: From 4 to 8 p.m., with a Mardi Gras Mask Contest, Mutti-Gras Pet Parade and Costume Contest. Regular ven dors will be on-site with produce, food, arts and crafts, at Cagan Town Center, Cagan Cross ings Blvd. in Clermont. Email cagancrossings farmersmarket@gmail. com for details. MARCH 18 THE TOPSHELF BOOK CLUB MEETS: At noon, Marianne Beck Memo rial Library in Howeyin-the-Hills. The group will discuss the The Paris Wife by Paula Mc Lain. Call 352-324-0254 for details. MARCH 19 MINNEOLA ELEMEN TARY SCHOOL CHARTER BOARD MEETING: At 7 p.m., media center at the school, 320 E. Pearl St. Call the school at 352-394-2600 for de tails. MASCOTTE ELEMEN TARY CHARTER SCHOOL VPK SIGN-UP: At 8:30 a.m. Children need to attend the day of regis tration for testing. Ap plications are available at the school or on line at www.lake.k12. fl.us. Children must be 4-years old by Sept. 1, 2014 to apply. Call Carol A. Mayer at 352429-2294, ext. 5812. Ap plications will not be ac cepted before this date. MARCH 24-28 SPRING BREAK CRAFT HOUR AT THE MARIANNE BECK MEMORIAL LI BRARY: Every afternoon, Mon.-Fri., at 3 p.m. for a fun time. Ages 6-14 wel come. Call the library at 352-324-0254 for de tails. To place an item on the calen dar, send an email to pam.fen nimore@dailycommercial.com.

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Wednesday, March 5, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D1 rfntbrr rfntbn tbttt ntbffbtbb r b t t t b t t t b fbtrb ntb b b b b r b t b t t t b t r f f b b t n t b t b f t r b b b t bntbtbb fftrf fttttbt r b t b n f t b t t t t f f b b n f f t b n n n b b r b ntbtbbbt btbtftrf tbtt r t t t f f b t bfbbtbttb fbttbtrf tttbnbf nbt ftbbt nbfbtbbt t ntbtrbfbtb bttfnbtr f t b t t b b b t b b b t b r b r f t t b t t r f b t t b t t t b t f t f b b b t b t r f b b b t b f f b b t b t t t t n n b r f t b t b b t n f b t b r f b t t f f b t b b t b f t t t b b t f f b t f f t n r b t t t b b b b t n n t t t t b n t b r f t t f f t b t f n t b t t b t t t t t b t b rf ftbt fbfttb ftttbt t ttbbtbt ttbb tbb ntffb ftbtffbbf bfbb tt ftfb ttt nrftt btbbtf r b t f f t t t t b n t b b n n n b t b b f t ntffn bn f t t b t b t r t nnt t b b b b b b t t f n t n t t b b t b f b b b f b b f b t n t b b t n t b b t b t n t b b f b b n t t f f t t b b b b b f b t t t t b n t b b t t n t b t b t b b b b t t t b b b b f f t b n t b b b t t b t f nr n t n t b b b t b b b t b b t t t b t b t t t t t t f b t t t t t b t b b b f b t f b t b b b b t t t b b b t f b t t f t b t b b ntffn rf tbbb bt ttntb ttftt brb tft fnf r nf nf n nf rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrff nrrrrrrrrrrff ttbrrrrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rfntbbt rfrntn nnnftbnbn brfbnrb bnbtn brnnrtnftbn tbrbttb nnnrfrbtb nbb n fbfn t brbnbbbtn nnnntnbbtr bbbfrf rtfnbtr rrbrfnnnrfnt t rf

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D2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 5, 2014 rfntbf rfntt bb nt b fffntt bbb tnrbbrf bn bb r f trb nnbf tffbbbbb n tnffbb tnt rbrff rf nftb ft nn ntffbbf nn ntbrf b f f b ft t ttt tnnff nfff nttnff b nf nfbbbf n t t b b r n t t b r ntnn nbr r tfb ft nntn rfnttbfr fbn ffnttbff ft n fb nttnt fnttfbfff tffbbb nt rfbf nrfbr bf nbfb b n n t n f t n t n n n n t t b r b r ft nntn nffnttfff nfbbrbrb tn nfbr nttn bbrf nnt nbr bf ntntn ffbbbr nt ffbfrr tn bfbrbr tt fnttbbrrbb tt nttbf tnnfb rff br ttfntt br n f n t t b f r tntn nff nttbffb tttt nttbbbr f f nn ttrffb n rfrb f b f f b f btntt n n ttffr nff nttb btt nttntff ntt bttnt ffbbrb tn fnttbbff tn fnttbbf bnttbrbb ntt nn nttbrf nbbr bf t nnffbb ntb tbbb n f f b f r f n n n n n n n t t n f n n n n t n n t n t ntt bb r nnnfrb f n t t b b b nnn ffnttbbrbb t n n n f b r tbf nbbfr ffft nbrrf tbt tnn fbr ff tffbfbrf ffnttb rf nb tnffnttbbrb t t bfnttbb f bttn nttbbrb t nttfbff nttt tnnn ffbff nft t n n t t n t t b t nf tbft n n n t t b b b nnn nntntnn ntnn rn n n t t b b r f f f b r n nntttnttf tnrnt ttnt nnt t n n f b n f f f n n n t n t n n f t t t t n t n n n n t n t n t n t t r b r b b b n t t t b f r n n n t n t t t b r n n n n n t t t n t n n t t b f r r r n n t n n b r t t t n t f n t t n t n t n t n n t n n t n t t n n n t n n n t n t n n n n t n n b r t t t n t f nnt tnnt ntnt tn tntb nttn n n n tf ttnnt ntnnn ttn nnnnt tnn ttnnnn nnnt t tnntnn nnttn tnntt nnn nnttn tn ttn t t n t n n n t n n t n n t t n n n b f b f n t t t n t n ntnftnn nnnttnnt ntt tnt ttn tntn n nttt nntn n n t t r r r r r f n n n t b f t n t t n ntntn n nntn t n n n t t t n t n n t t f f b b n t t b r t n b b b f f t r f f n n ttt t nnnt tnt nttt ntt ntntfn nn n t n n n t t nnn nnn ntn n t n nnnntt ntnt ttttn nnnnt nn tntn nttnn fnnn nntn n b b f n t t t n rn n t t b b r n t t n t n t n n f

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Wednesday, March 5, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D3 rfntbrr r frr f rfn f rtb r r rt n rb frf fn f frrfrr rfntnrbntbn nn bnbbr b rfrf fr bnn nb brb bb rb nbnnnnbb rrf nf bnr brnfrr n tbf brfn bntnb rn b n t bn fb bf rn nt nbn nr b fn nt nb bnbfn b fnbn bnbntt nn n nrrf f nbbt b rbn r b b n r b bnr n nn tbt tn brb nbr nbbbn n f tn br bn f rbn f n btf b bf b bbfbrbr rfnnf nffn nfnb bn f nfrfbrb r fbrrnn nbrf t n nn frfbt tbr nb nn f t f tbt nft t nb nrnfbn tbnffb fn b n t b b b t b t b f n b b n t b f fbnb rtb fbbbn tbt nnf f nnntrf f bb fb n ff tf t b b b f t n t n b b r r r n r n n b b t f b n n n n nf f nnff f t n t n b b r r r n r n n b ftt t n t n b b r r r n r n n b b n t b b b t b t b f n b b n t b f fbnb b b t b b b n n t n trf fft f n n t n b n n t t f t brbb f r n fbfbnn bnnb n bn bnffbt tfrfnbbb fbn n n fnbn nn r bb frb f b r n r f n n b t n n tbb bt b ft ttn bnn bnnrbbn btf tn b b r t tf b n t b b b t b t b f n b b n t b f fbnb nff t tnnnrb f nf tf r b b b b t t t b t b b b t nft tbf n n b b n n b n n n rtt nbb n nft ttbf b b b r b b b n b n b f b n t t t t t f t t t t f t n b b b f b f b b n f b t n t b nbb nbrb b n t b b b t b t b f n b b n t b f fbnb nft ttbf brf ftbn nfnfbrt n n b b b t t b b n t rttr brfftn tbb nbn rbnt fntn rbfb n b n t b b b t b t b f n b b n t b f fbnb nf ttbf bbrn nfnn tbrff t nf tbf nnff ft n b nbf nbb tnrnb br b n bf bb f nbr t f n nbn bbr trrnbf rbtf nbn b b bnn nrbn frfbt nnbn br f n b fbbn nr fbbn nr fbbn nr nrb nrnn nb rb tnn n brnbn nbr brnnbr n nb n frfbt nbb tbn nnbb nb frbfbft t b t b rb tf tnf nbr tf b nbrf tbf bf n nfb br tft fbrfnf n nbr ntn b n n tnnn nbt rnnnfn b n n r b n n nb rbb ntrfrn b b r f r f b nnnnn f nnnn nbrn tnnb nbr n rnnbt bb b b tnn r t n rbn f bnnbrnb brf f nnbnnfnbn b nb bf nf f n b nnbr b n b r n r b nn nbrt bb tr f b rn nbrn bbn b bbb nn b nb tnn nb n bnnf n brf f bbbnf brf tf r n nf b f tfrnb b fbb fb fr t b b b nr t b b tn tb frrfrfb fbr n nf tbfb rnb n nt nb nbr bb b b nbr b r nb f nrr b nfrrnb ft

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D4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 5, 2014 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 7 25 34 47 67 13 18 31 59 74 9 21FREE SPACE53 72 2 16 42 48 63 5 29 39 52 68ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N I B O G BINGO B I N G O SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Shirley Claypool WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! B 7 I 25 G 47 O 67 N 34



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Sponsored by Fran Haasch lawfran.com (drink responsibly some restrictions apply) Phone: 352-326-2623LEARN TO RIDE! GREEN BAG DAY...CELEBRATE WITH US MARCH 1520% OFF ALL LICENSED PRODUCTS YOU CAN STUFF IN OUR GREEN BAGFOOD AVAILABLE & FREE BUD LIGHTWEDNESDAY BIKE NIGHT AT BEEF O BRADYS SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | C1SPORTS:Lake Minneola loses in state nals WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWST AND INSIDECLASSIFIED D1 CROSSWORDS C2 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN C1 SPORTS B1 VOICES A4WORD ON THE STREE T A2SOUTH LAKE PRESSV OLUME 99, NO. 10 5 SECTIOn N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reservedwww. southlakepress.com PRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comLake County Animal Ser vices Division ofcials say big changes have occurred at the animal shelter since two critical internal audits cited at least 45 areas for improve ment. In addition, shelter ofcials now agree there is a need for a low-cost spay and neutering program, which would help reduce the number of animals brought to the shelter, in effect, preventing the euthanization of dogs and cats. Bob Melton, inspector gener al with the Lake County Clerk of Courts ofce, who conducted the audit, said among his most signicant ndings was that the shelter kept poor records of animals coming into the facility. We found that animals were unaccounted for and the software was not being used properly, he said. There were also signicant issues in how the animals were cared for for example, keeping the lights off in the quarantined area during the day and keeping the animals in the dark. Cyndi Nason, the countys new director of animal ser vices, who took the place of Marjorie Boyd after she resigned in April 2013, said the shelter uses a new computer software system to keep better track of animals. The previous system, she said, was antiquated and not used correctly. The audits also indicated the county was missing out on hundreds of thousands of dollars a year because pet licensing laws werent being PERCENTAGE OF DOGS EUTHANIZEDLake County is euthanizing just over 15 percent of the dogs that come into its shelter, a sizable decrease from 2009, when 25 percent of dogs were being put down. WHITNEY WILLARD / STAFF GRAPHIC 26 24 22 20 18 16 14 2009 25.49% 16.44% 17.63% 15.98% 15.03% 15.03% 2010201120122013 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Veterinarian Boyd Harrell gives a dog a shot at Lake County Animal Services in Tavares on Monday. Animal Services uses spaying and neutering in conjunction with other initiatives to keep the number of euthanized animals as low as possible. TAVARESOfficials: More adoptions, fewer animals put down at animal shelterSEE ANIMALS | A2 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comClermont city ofcials say they could be on the hook for up to $28,000 a month if they decide to stop citing drivers for making illegal right turns using the new red light cameras. At a City Coun cil meeting last week, City Manager Darren Gray said eliminat ing the right-turn-onred violations would reduce the number of tickets so dramatically that there wouldnt be enough revenue to pay for the cameras each month. We would be responsible for pay ing ATS, which means $4,750 per camera per month, Gray told council members. ATS is the company that in stalled and runs the red light cameras through a contract with the city. With just six of 24 cameras installed now, that payment could be as high as $28,500 per CLERMONTCutting out right-turn tickets could cost big bucks DAILY COMMERCIAL FILE PHOTO A red-light camera watches the intersection of U.S. Highway 27 and State Road 50 in Clermont.SEE TICKETS | A2Its only in its first month, so well have to wait and see how it goes from here, but they (ATS) did express to me that the 80-90 percent (of tickets issued for right turns) was a high amount for a city.City Manager Darren Gray LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comEvening bus service for Link 55 in south Lake will not be re stored anytime soon, accord ing to county ofcials. LYNX and county ofcials were unable to reach a new agreement last week. When the Link 55 route which runs from Cagan Cross ings along U.S. Highway 192 to downtown Kissimmee was reinstated Jan. 12, the service only offered eight round trips instead of the 16 that riders and Lake County ofcials thought would be offered. County ofcials were stumped when they received a response from LYNX in December that they could only of fer half the number of trips at an increased cost of $16,000. The cost for the 16 trips was originally $50,685. Furthermore, the bus ser vice only offers four trips in the morning from 6 to 8 and four trips in the evening from 5 to 6:30. The service ended two and a half hours earlier than the agreed upon time, upset ting many shift workers. The change came because the Link 55 route was expand ed into Osceola County, adding three miles to the route, LYNX ofcials said. They do not have the mar ginal capacity in the system to be able to expand the ser vice easily, said David Heath, county manager. At the meeting, LYNX of cials said they could reinstate the service for an addi tional $22,000. The costs were raised to accommodate the bus routes expansion. Another option included forming a partnership with Polk County because they run a CLERMONTLYNX, Lake cant make deal on bus routeSEE BUS | A3

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 5, 2014 CLERMONT Vendors sought for annual South Lake Womens ExpoThe 12th annual South Lake Womens Expo is seeking vendors for the event sponsored by the Clermont Womens Club to be held March 22 at the Wesley Center at First United Methodist Church, at 950 7th St., north of State Road 50, Clermont. Applications are now being accepted for the event offering a bonus for vendors, included in the vendor fee a business card ad to be published in the March 19 edition of the South Lake Press. Admission is free for the public from 10 / a.m. to 2 / p.m. For information or an application, email BSsportzfan@aol.com.CLERMONT Annual Scholarship Fair scheduled for March 11-12Back to School is COOL Lake County, a local nonprot organization, will host the 2014 Scholarship Fair from 4:30 to 7 / p.m. March 11-12. The event, open to all Lake County school seniors and their families, will be held at the Clermont Community Center, 620 W. Montrose St., in downtown Clermont. Business sponsorships are available for $100 for both days of the event. Registration is required. For information, go to www.backtoschooliscool.org, or email Julie Hulley at Julie@backtoschooliscool.org.CLERMONT Police to conduct DUI, traffic safety checkpointThe Clermont Police Department will conduct a DUI and trafc safety checkpoint from 5 to 9 / p.m. March 13 on East Avenue, just north of Grand Highway. The goal of the checkpoint is to promote safe driving by ensuring that all motorists are wearing seat belts. Ofcers will also check safety equipment on vehicles, make sure all drivers are licensed and insured and will apprehend those driving under the inuence.CLERMONT Tax service at Liberty offeredLiberty Tax Service in Clermont is offering free tax preparation to new customers and to local community heroes, at their ofce 711 S. U.S. Highway 27, unit B, during March. Teachers and school employees through Sunday, medical providers and staff personnel from March 10-16 and people in the military and veter ans from March 17-23. For information or to schedule an appointment, call 352-536-1829. Area Briefs What South Lake residents are saying about ...NIAGARA BOTTLINGThe Water Management District approved a permit which allows Groveland-based Niagara Bottling to double its withdrawals from the lower aquifer. What effect do you anticipate these withdrawals will have?The effect of drawing down the lower aquifer, in my opinion, would cause an excessive amount of damage to the upper aquifer because you have to go through the upper to reach the lower. There would be a mixture of material between the two. The effects are in quantity and in quality. DARIAN ARRIAGA CLERMONT Maybe by taking from one and not the other, youre reducing the qual ity of the one not being taken from. Its the homeostasis of it all main ly the level of balance. FRANKIE GEORGE WINTER GARDEN Im guessing that higher is better than lower in terms of quality of wa ter. It could go either way. Water could be cleaner. It could also contain more bacteria. There will be movement between the aquifers. STEVE AMANN CLERMONT Its not a case of upper aquifer versus lower aquifer. Does anyone really know what effect one has on the other? Lake County cant continue this development extravaganza. We need a long moratorium on development until we can gure out how to sta bilize our water resources. RICHARD DE FRAN CLERMONT Word on theStreet Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 followed. At the same time, the audit found the county was not charging enough for the licenses. We have tightened the way we handle money, Nason said. According to the audit, current kennel operations may not maximize the safety or well-being of animals. There also is no air conditioning in any of the rooms. Mike Brown, president of Harris Air Conditioning Inc., has since volunteered to put in a free air conditioning unit at the shelter. Nason said the lights have been xed in the quarantined area and she wants to have the whole shelter area brightened. Further, the audit stated, practices and procedures relating to animal socialism and behavior should be improved. Nason said she makes sure the animals get out at least once every day, and she is working to set up play groups for the animals to get more exercise. Melton said the audit showed during scal year 2012, Animal Services euthanized 4,571 animals, which is reasonable compared to other counties. In the last four months, animal services has not euthanized any adoptable dogs, according to Brian Sheahan, director of the Department of Community Safety and Compliance and Nasons boss. The audit recommended a more formal process for deciding when to euthanize animals, as opposed to the director of animal services solely making the call. That process is already implemented, according to Nason. It is more of a group decision, she said. Since the audit was conducted, Sheahan said, the shelter has improved protocols for disease control and standard operating procedures for the vetting of animals, whether they are suitable for adoption or not. The continued goal, he added, is to reduce euthanasia overall. We can always do a better job with adoptions, and improving our relationship and coordination with rescue partners, he said. In 2013, 15 percent of dogs deemed adoptable found new homes. Melton said the Division of Inspector General plans to perform a follow-up audit of animal services to determine whether the recommendations were implemented. While the current spay and neutering rebate program has been successful, according to Nason, the county needs more low-cost spay and neutering programs. Funding, however, is a big concern. Lake County Commissioner Sean Parks voiced the same concern at a recent County Commission meeting. It is money well spent, he said of the programs. In October 2013, the county implemented a spay and neutering program. Residents can ll out paper work at animal services to receive a $50 rebate if they spay or neuter an animal. Doreen Barker, president of the South Lake An imal League, a no-kill animal shelter for dogs and cats, said spay and neuter programs are essential to reducing the pet population and euthanasia. The reason for the number of pets in the shelters is because people dont spay and neuter their pets, she said. Barker said the Animal Leagues mission is to get to the root of the problem of the overpopulation of pets and help the community understand the importance of spaying and neutering animals. ANIMALS FROM PAGE A1 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL A stray husky lies down in a kennel at Lake County Animal Services.month, Gray explained. City Attorney Daniel Mantzaris said a contract is a contract. We entered into a con tract agreement, and while stopping the right turns on red is not in breach of the contract, what enables the city to ensure they arent los ing money will go away, Mantzaris said. There may or may not be enough money at the end of the contract to pay for the cameras, so it adds that risk element. The six red light camer as went live in early Jan uary at troublesome in tersections. But almost immediately, motorists began to complain that they were being unfairly ticketed for making right turns on red. City ofcials expressed concerns as well, noting that about 90 percent of the 3,000-plus citations issued have been for right turns. Their concerns only grew when Police Chief Charles Broadway reviewed 59 right-turn violations and overturned 51. Gray said he thinks he can convince ATS to delay installing any other cam eras until the city resolves its concerns. He added that ATS representatives agreed that the percent age of tickets being issued for right-turn viola tions is kind of high. Its only in its rst month, so well have to wait and see how it goes from here, but they (ATS) did express to me that the 80-90 percent (of tick ets issued for right turns) was a high amount for a city, he said. Gray also reiterated that he has asked Broad way to review every rightturn violation approxi mately 3,000 sent out from Jan 3. to Feb. 11. As the city wrestles with implementing the cameras successfully, the Florida Legislature is ex pected in the upcoming session to consider lim iting or banning red-light cameras statewide. Gray believes a clause in the citys contract would let them out of it. Mantzaris, however, voiced some doubt. Theres concern whether the new legis lature can legally affect existing contracts that would otherwise be legal without the new laws, he said. Councilman Ray Good game said hed talked to Senator Alan Hays and understood that any legislation would be spe cically directed toward right turns on red. Matthew Modica, a longtime resident of Cler mont, expressed concern that the city is bound to the contract for three years and may even have to install the addition al cameras as originally agreed. I dont know what we can do about this. Im concerned about adding 18 more cameras, and so I dont see a solution for this, Modica said. Suzy Gibson, another local resident and busi nesswoman, told the council she believes the city and citizens were bamboozled by ATS. I understand the city of Clermont needs to make a prot, but I urge you to do your research in the future. Right now, were kind of stuck with it (contract) and we all got bamboozled and left asking, What are the consequences of our actions? Gibson said. TICKETS FROM PAGE A1 I understand the city of Clermont needs to make a profit, but I urge you to do your research in the future. Right now, were kind of stuck with it (contract) and we all got bamboozled and left asking, What are the consequences of our actions?Suzy Gibson,local resident and businesswoman

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Wednesday, March 5, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 route close to the Lake County line. We have looked at these options before but it has been awhile, said Dottie Keedy, director of community services. It hasnt been in the same circumstances. County Commissioner Sean Parks, who has fought for the routes reinstatement, said he was unhappy a new agreement could not be reached. I am extremely disappointed, he said. I am appreciative of the commission sup porting this, but LYNX needs to make this right with their riders. County commissioners approved a motion in January to work with LYNX ofcials to ex tend the evening bus service for Link 55. At the time, riders such as Celeste Clifford were paying about $10 a day for a cab home. In one week, Clifford said she spent $70 on cab fare. Clifford said she was saddened to hear there was no new agreement. It affects you, she said. You cant do the grocery shopping you normally do. You cant save. It is robbing Peter to pay Paul. It also doesnt help that the buses run late, sometimes by hours, she said. Some are waiting an hour and a half for a bus, she said. Buses are passing passen gers (on the side of the road) because they are behind schedule. Matt Friedman, spokesman for LYNX, said the bus service de lay depends on trafc. BUS FROM PAGE A1 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comAs city ofcials develop plans for converting the re cently purchased Cel ebration of Praise Church into a mu nicipal complex, the 69,000-square-foot building already has a temporary name and some new life. A youth basketball program is set to begin in March and events are being planned for May. A city spokeswom an said the grand opening for the Celebration Center is be ing planned for some time in June. City Manager Dar ren Gray said the city is focusing its efforts on the maintenance that needs to be com pleted before then. Inoperative locks have been repaired and estimates are being gathered for re-keying the entire building, Gray said. Gray said walls have to be repaired, lighting must be upgrad ed in the gymnasium, blocks will be leveled around the pool to avoid tripping hazards and restroom fa cilities must be made ADA compliant. In addition, re ex tinguishers and kitchen re-suppression systems must be inspected and certied and the building will be treated against ter mites. Gray also said that the re sprinklers were inspected and deciencies were found, something the city is repairing, along with several air conditioning units that must be serviced or replaced. Gray said th e roof warranty was just transferred to the city and event planning is underway. Meanwhile, the event schedule is ll ing up quickly. Last week, the city announced that the Pat Burke Hoops Life Basketball and Life Skills Program will vis it the site from March 10 through June 7. On May 8, city em ployees will be treat ed to breakfast at the new facility. On May 9, local children will enjoy a sympho ny jazz fest, with per formances by south Lakes three local high schools. And on May 17, there will be a wa ter safety day for the entire com munity. The ofcial opening of the pool is targeted for June 7. At a council meeting following the workshop and COP update, ofcials approved new positions in the Public Works, Facility Maintenance and Recreation and Events departments to staff the Celebration Center in the amount of $125,455 and a budget amend ment in the amount of $125,455. According to Gray, the city plans on hir ing eight life guards on a part-time basis and adding ve posi tions to operate the facility. Some city depart ments will also occu py the building, The Clermont Police De partment will occupy about 10,000 square feet and Lake County Tax Collector Bob McKee is interested in a long-term lease for about 10,000 square feet as well. Ofcials said they are considering ofcal names for the complex.CLERMONTCelebration Center fills first event slots ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comThe Clermont Police Department and Na tional Training Center played host to the inaugural World Police Soc cer 7s World Champi onship last week. Welcoming ofcers across the globe for the tournament was or ganizer Steve Crane, a former British police ofcer and professional soccer player who now runs Striker Soccer Academy in Winter Garden. Crane, along with the International Police Association Region 39, co-sponsored the event. Its cops helping cops, using service through friendship and no politics, said IPA President John Nabet. This tournament has been wonderful. We have seen some great games and some fantastic players, but its really more about camaraderie. Teams comprised of seven to 14 players came from as far away as Sweden, Wales, Chicago and Belgium and as near as Orlando and Tampa. Each team played at least seven games over three days and, on Fri day, Sweden played Wales for the champi onship. Chief Charles Broadway, who led the Or lando/Central Florida team, said they were impressed with the athletic skills of the Swed ish team. Groveland Ofcer Robert Mata, the teams goalie and MVP, put it a little more bluntly, declaring, They de stroyed us. Its been a lot of fun though. Weve gotten to meet a lot of people and its been an honor. Ofcers from all agencies have come togeth er to play and just have fun, Mata said. Originally from Costa Rica, Mata played soccer since he was 5 years old. He said he under stands the difference between the mentality of the internation al players and why they are sometimes better at soccer than many U.S. players. In Costa Rica, its like people say, Hey baby, welcome to the world, heres your (soc cer) ball, Mata joked. Peter Eriksson, who led the Swedish team to a 3-2 victory against Wales, said everyone on his team has played soc cer professionally. When in uniform, he and his teammates patrol the town of Eskilstvna. In Sweden, soccer is the biggest event. Its the national sport and ev eryone on our team has played at high levels, Eriksson said. Many of the players then seek their way into police work because they seek the adrenaline. Eriksson hopes his team will return to de fend its title next year.Policemen from across the globe compete in Clermont PHOTOS BY LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Clermont Police Chief Charles Broadway, left, scores a goal against the team from Belgium. Broadway was playing as part of the unied Orlando team. A player from Belgium, left, encounters two unied Orlando players.

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 5, 2014It recently came to light that a handful of schools in Lake County will not give students scores of less than 50 on class assignments, while several other schools do so only during ofcial grading periods four times a year. Its not a novel idea in education circles. Some school districts, in Florida and elsewhere, have adopted such approaches in hopes of improving the odds that struggling students will pass and, ultimately, graduate from school. The theory goes like this: A student who earns a very low grade early in a marking period may have trouble recovering from it and fail. Those students may become frustrated and consider dropping out. It is not clear how many schools in Lake County have adopted the more lenient grading system, but district administrators conrmed that at least some wont award any grade lower than 50 on class assignments, even if a student earns a zero. Daily Commercial reporter Livi Stanford reported last week that the practice has caused some debate among Lake County School Board members, some of whom want to eliminate that option. A board workshop is planned in March to discuss the issue. We agree that the practice should be abolished district-wide, and soon. This approach, however well-intentioned, is fraught with problems. Principal among these is that it rewards poor academic performance by providing an articial safety net that virtually assures every child of passing, no matter how little effort they invest in their studies. While we recognize that not every child will excel academically, we also recognize that the world is a cruel place for those who dont try, and the no-grade-lower-than-50 approach cer tainly removes some incentive for students to put forth the effort needed to achieve even a minimum level of academic success. You also have to question the basic fairness of this system. One child may try hard and fail a test with a grade of 59, and another may earn a 20 while putting in no effort and still come away with a 50. The message we send to the child who tried is this: Quit trying and you can get virtually the same result. Its a bad approach that provides articial results. The fact is, school ofcials have better tools at their disposal for ensuring that struggling students pass. They can offer extra credit to erase bad grades. And why not? Its a legitimate way of re warding a students effort while also offering enrichment. And best of all, the student must earn the grade. School grades, like real-world rewards, should be based on effort and merit, after all. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . ........................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTOPINION WHATS YOUR OPINION?The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be origi nal, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to: Letters to the Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711By fax to: 352-394-8001EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed.GUEST COLUMNSIf you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@daily commercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OURVIEW SOUTH LAKE PRESSYour community newspaper for more than 100 years.732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Florida 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region.All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Bad-grade policy should be dumped by Lakes schoolsScotts making bad appointmentsGovernor Rick Scotts appointees to the St. Johns River Water Management District are giving Floridas water away at no cost to the Niagara Water company so the company can sell it for huge prots. And his appointees to the Expressway Authority name an unqualied politician to run the Authority. Anyone who votes for Gov. Scotts re-election so he can make more appointments as mentioned is a complete idiot. SAMUEL E. LUELLEN | Grand IslandJust walk away from troubleThere are some activities we possibly engage in from time to time that may be illegal. Does it mean that someone has the right to take our life? When we were 17-years old, and even today, we all broke the law in some manner. It would be a sad state of affairs if a citizen responded to our trash talking with a gun and ended our life. Many of us have children, and so do our friends. Teenagers like to play their music very loud. I certainly would not want an adult to confront these youth to the point of ensuring an argument that ended with a death. Whatever happened to just walking away? In some cases we should give up our right for anothers wrong. Why cant we show love rather than hate? We can engage in peace rather than war and offer compassion rather than revenge. There are times when things do not go our way. If we would take a step back and ask God for tolerance, apply common sense to the situation and not always have to be right, there would be less need to lament If I could do it all over again... We are blessed to live in the greatest country on earth. In America we have many freedoms and of course we misuse some of them. Lets show how thankful we are to be citizens of this great land by treating others as we wish to be treated. With this simple rule our lives would be enriched with joy, peace and happiness. CELESTINE WRIGHT | LeesburgStop giving away waterI agree with Carole Rietzel in her letter from Jan. 12. I also think the St. Johns Water Management District does not have the authority to make decisions requesting that we conserve water, yet they are giving away thousands of gallons of water daily. I get a water bill every month that I pay. I wonder how much the St. Johns charges for water? The water belongs to the people that pay to use it each month. If this continues for long we will have less water. One of the main causes of sinkholes is the lack of water in the ground. The ground becomes dry with lack of water, at which point the sandy soil gives way and we have a sinkhole. When man takes away from the earth, the earth gets sick and takes away from man. ELMA NELSON | LeesburgThanks to the businesses that keep their property cleanI walk every day with my dog, and, as a Northerner I enjoy the green I see all around. However, the amount of trash that is on the sides of the roads spoils this beautiful area. I want to thank the two women I saw hauling a large trash bag on County Road 452 for collecting other peoples trash. There was a lot of trash on Florida Hospital Watermans property. When I contacted them, they promptly sent maintenance staff to clean the area. I wish people would stop tossing trash from their cars! But until that time, thanks to the individuals and Waterman Hospital for picking up after ir responsible litterers. If more businesses would clean around their proper ties, imagine how much nicer it would be. PENELOPE JOHNSON | TavaresIf you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veterans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to www.lakeveterans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANS YOURVOICESLETTERS TO THE EDITORRed-light camera program is a farceIn response to the current debate over the red light cameras in Clermont, I would like to offer this opinion. During earlier discussions regarding the possible use of red-light cameras at the city council meeting, I presented evidence from numerous studies across the U.S. that concluded the cameras were marginal at best for providing safety for drivers. Furthermore, these studies also indicated a heightened distrust by the general public for these devices. Under the assumption that safety and not revenue was the central motivation for the cameras, I provided the council members with several alternatives. These options included lengthening the duration of yellow caution lights; installing strobes within the green lights to warn of the forthcoming light change; setting up separate ashing lights at the roadside to do the same; or convening a committee to recommend other changes. I provided the council evidence that every single referendum taken in the country had turned down red light cameras. Its important to recognize that both Mayor Hal Turville and Councilman Keith Mullins had the foresight to realize the red light camera program was a farce, which now has turned into a asco. STERLING O. FREY Clermont LETTER of the WEEK HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO

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Wednesday, March 5, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5and Leon Hawkins during the argument, Miller pulled out a gun and pointed it at Rus sells face. Russell slapped the gun away and ran, at which point Miller red several times at Russell, striking him in the back, the afdavit stated. Russell died from multiple gunshot wounds, an autopsy showed. U.S. Marshals ar rested Miller at a rel atives home in Alba ny, N.Y., according to the Lake County Sher iffs Ofce, whose task force agent aid ed in the cap ture. The afdavit adds people from the two ar eas were appar ently feuding because some people in Stuckey believe people from Cler mont are responsible for the disappearance of Xavier Tarrand, a Groveland-area man. Tarrand was last seen in mid-January getting into a vehicle at a RaceTrac gas station on State Road 50 in Groveland in what the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce still considers a missing-person case. THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comJane Graham was 22 when she boarded a bus from her former West Virginia home more than 70 years ago and headed to Detroit, Mich., to become one of the Rosie the Riveter gals during World War II. On Feb. 25, the eve of her 92nd birthday, the Leesburg resident sat in her walker seat underneath the wings of a B-29 bomber at the Lees burg International Airport and recalled riveting the wings and tail gunner cabin on the B-29s. I really wanted to see this, Graham said. This is humongous. When we were working in it, it wasnt that big, but it was just the wings that we worked on. Wed go around the holes that the rivets went in and ream it out and make sure it was clean, with no pieces of met al in it. Graham was one of many women who left the rural mountain areas for the big city and lled the temporary industrial labor shortage created by the men serving overseas. She rode a street car to work. It was really cold in the winter time, but I wanted to make a living, Graham said. She recalled that the pay was good at $1.32 an hour, and her work on the B-29 was the job she loved the most throughout her working career. I thought it was great that I got to work on it. Graham beamed as she showed the rivets under neath the wings to her daughters, Rose Stafford and Denise Brewster, and sonin-law Dennis Brewster. Graham has outlived two sons who passed away one day apart in 2004. This might have been one of the very planes that you worked on, Mom, Rose said to her mother. Wouldnt that be something? Did you put your initials on any where? Graham chuckled. This is a part of history and it makes us a part of history, Denise said of seeing the B-29 and knowing that her mother had a vital part in the war effort during World War II. They were the greatest generation. LEESBURG BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Jane Graham, 92, center left, and Benjamin Staba, 94, center right, stop to talk. During World War II, Graham helped assemble the tail section of B-29s and Staba served on the aircraft carriers USS Wasp and USS Princeton. Graham is accompanied by her daughter Denise Brewster, 60. With Staba is his son-in-law John Hoban, 70.Woman, 92, was a Rosie who built planes like FifiI really wanted to see this. This is humongous. When we were working in it, it wasnt that big, but it was just the wings that we worked on. Wed go around the holes that the rivets went in and ream it out and make sure it was clean, with no pieces of metal in it.Jane Graham LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comWith lawmakers looking at a surplus in the states budget this year, and Gov. Rick Scott already planning to spend $185 million on water issues in Flor ida, local ofcials hope some money will trick le down from Tallahas see for a study to nd an alternative water supply in south Lake. County ofcials re cently attended an an nual event known as Lake County Days in Tallahassee, where they had the opportunity to meet with the Lake County Legislative Del egation to highlight key issues important to the county. One of those issues is funding a study to nd an alternative water supply to groundwater in south Lake, as the projected demand for water contin ues to grow. Water ex perts predict there will be demand for 300 mil lion gallons of water a day in 2035. The tradi tional source, the Flor idan aquifer, can cur rently meet a demand of only 50 million gallons, according to wa ter experts. Im very hopeful for funding for the study based on support expressed by Rep. Larry Metz, R-Groveland, and Sen. Alan Hays, R-Uma tilla, County Commis sioner Sean Parks said. I am looking forward to getting that (study) project listed as an ap propriation. The South Lake Re gional Water Initiative consisting of the South Lake Cham ber of Commerce, the county and the municipalities of Clermont, Groveland, Minneola, Mascotte and Montverde agreed in Jan uary to equally share in the cost of hiring a consultant to help nd an alternative water source for south Lake County. Working in conjunc tion with the Central Florida Water Initiative, which is developing a unied process to address Central Flori das current long-term water supply needs, the South Lake Regional Water Initiative must come up with $300,000 to fund a study to ex plore alternative water sources in the region. Hays said he did not know of any higher priority statewide than the protection of water re sources. Water has been an issue in Florida for years, he said. Now, we have more revenue and are able to do more than we previously could. Metz agreed. We are going to be addressing water issues on some level, he said. What you are going to see most of is the ability to fund water projects that havent been funded previously because we were in bud get-cutting mode the last couple of years. I think some of the water projects will be funded this year. Scott already has said he wants to spend $130 million this year for Ev erglades and other water projects, plus an other $55 million for springs protection.CLERMONTFunding eyed for south Lake water supply study MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillardives@dailycommercial.comA teen on the run after being sus pected in a Grove land shooting death, who was captured in New York last week, is now in the Lake County jail after waiv ing extradition. Travis Leomontez Miller, 18, was moved here on Thursday to face second-degree murder charges in the killing of 31-year-old Justin Russell in early February. Miller remained in jail Friday on no bond. The shooting occurred Feb. 1 in a eld just north of 15720 Stuckey Loop in Groveland, where a large number of people had gathered. According to a prob able cause afdavit, Miller, who has ties to Clermont but lives in Groveland, showed up with his mother and got into an argument with a man from the Stuckey area of Groveland, ap parently part of an on going feud over a missing Groveland man. The afdavit states that when Russell stepped between Miller Shooting suspect now in Lake jailGROVELAND MILLER Staff ReportBand students from all over Lake, Sumter and Marion counties recently met at Tavares High School for the Florida Bandmasters Association District 19 Solo & Ensemble Mu sic Performance Assessment. About 1,000 entries from 38 schools participated in the three-county festival. High school performers whose solo or ensemble met certain difculty standards, and whose performance was rated Superior, are eligible to repeat the process at the state level in about a month. LINDA CHARLTON / SPECIAL TO THE DAILY COMMERCIAL Kadeen Lyttle of East Ridge High School helps tune up the bands woodwind choir prior to its performance.Local bands compete in Tavares

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A6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 5, 2014 rfntfbtnf rfnftnbrbnrfn rfrntfbbrrfrntfbbrrfnt rf rfnfntbnf DEATH NOTICESLaura Lynn BeldingLaura Lynn Belding, 44, of Leesburg, died Saturday, February 22, 2014. Page-Theus Fu nerals & Cremations.Brian David ChamblissBrian David Cham bliss, 52, of Tavares, died Wednesday, February 26, 2014. Harden/ Pauli Funeral Home.Rosemarie Therese ChristRosemarie Therese Christ, 75, died Satur day March 1, 2014 in Fruitland Park. Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg.Maxinia EdwardsMaxinia Edwards, 63, of Orlando passed away on February 19, 2014. Anderson-Hence Funeral Home, Wildwood.Robert J. GrayfordRobert J. Grayford, 80, of Clermont, died Tuesday, February 25, 2014. Harden/Pauli Funeral Home.Philip L. HollenbeckPhilip L. Hollenbeck, 86, of Eustis, died Fri day, February 28, 2014. Hamlin & Hilbish Funeral Directors, Eustis.Jean P. JarochJean P. Jaroch, 85, of Wildwood, died Sunday, February 16, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations.Max E. LoveMax E. Love, 79, of Fruitland Park, died Tuesday, February 25, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg, FL.Alvin James NesbittAlvin James Nesbitt, 71, of Tavares, FL passed away on Tues day, February 25, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares, FLMary RyanMary Ryan, 70, of Al toona, died Wednesday, February 26, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home.Catherine SantielCatherine Santiel, 73, of Wildwood, passed away Wednesday,Febuary 26, 2014 Jacobs Funeral HomeRichard SmithRichard Smith, 88, of Leesburg, died Sat urday, March 1, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations.Ryan Addam SmithRyan Addam Smith, 29, of Welaka, died Thursday, February 27, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Astor.Ernest Mike TilghmanErnest Mike Tilghman, 68, of Eustis, died Wednesday, February 26, 2014. Hamlin & Hil bish Funeral Directors.Wylie TorranceWylie Torrance, 90, of Eustis, died Friday, February 28, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatilla.Brenda WalburnBrenda Walburn, 59, of Leesburg, died Friday, February 21, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home.Edna G. WillisEdna G Willis, 86, of Oxford, died Sun day, February 23, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations.IN MEMORY Staff ReportTwo Lake County reghters and a lieutenant recently were honored for their service in rescuing dozens of people from a resort building that collapsed into a Clermont-area sink hole last year. Lake County reghters Carlos Herrera and Matthew Barton, and Lt. Jeremy Hendrix, received plaques at Eustis Elks Lodge 1578 during its annual banquet recognizing top local law enforcement and re rescue personnel. The three were stationed at Fire Station 112 in Four Corners on Aug. 11 and were rst on the scene helping res idents evacuate a three-story structure at the Summer Bay Resort as it partially collapsed into a large sinkhole. Their actions that evening rose to the highest standards of Lake County reghters, Lake County Public Safe ty Fire Chief John Jolliff said in a press release. I am proud of each of them. About 30 percent of the three-story structure collapsed into the 100foot sinkhole, Lake County Fire Rescue Battalion Chief Tony Cuellar said at the time. The resort is at 17805 U.S. Highway 192, a half-mile east of U.S. Highway 27 and about 10 miles west of Disney World. It was like crack, crack, boom, guest Alma Villa Nueva told reporters on the scene of the building collapse. Then the building started sinking a little. Then again, a crack, crack, boom and it sinking lower.Firefighters honored for rescuesCLERMONT

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10% OFFAll options with this couponrffnntb B1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 5, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTSSPORTS EDITOR . ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE . .............................. 365-8268 FAX . .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL . ......... sports@dailycommercial.comSPORTSandLEISURE FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comLAKELAND Unnished business. Thats how Lake Minneo la boys basketball coach Fred die Cole looks at Saturdays 6044 loss to Miami Norland in the Florida High School Athletic As sociation Class 6A state champi onship at The Lakeland Center. Our goal this year, since our rst practice, was to win the state championship, said Cole. We didnt get that done, but that didnt make this an unsuc cessful season. We learned so much about what it takes to win at this level, but were going to approach next season like we left something on the table this time around. Miami Norland put the game away late in the fourth quar ter when its superior size the Vikings had three players tall er than 6-foot-6, while Lake Minneola had no starter taller than 6-foot-2 became a factor. On four-straight possessions midway through the peri od, Miami Norland was able to get to the rim for putback dunks or tip-ins. That enabled the Vikings to break open a tight game after trailing 36-35 heading into the fourth quarter. Until that point, Lake Minne ola was able to stay close with quickness, aggressive defense and ability to beat Miami Nor land to open areas on the oor. The Hawks attacked the bas ket for most of the game and led by as many as seven points but couldnt overcome a scoreless stretch in the fourth when the Vikings found their stride. That dry spell killed us, Cole said. You cant come into a game like this, against a team like Miami Norland, and not score the basketball. A lot of that was Miami Norland playing on-the-ball basketball and you have to give them credit for that, but we also didnt convert some makeable shots. Until the fourth quarter, I was pleased with the way we executed our game plan.Lake Minneola falls to Miami Norland in Class 6A state championship contestHAWKS GROUNDED PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Lake Minneola players sit on the bench after losing the class 6A state nal to Miamis Norland High School 60-44 at the Lakeland Center in Lakeland on March 1. ABOVE: Lake Minneola junior Avery Brown (5) shoots the ball over a Miami Norland defender during the rst quarter. RIGHT: Lake Minneola junior Anthony Brown (3) shoots the ball over Miami Norland senior Zachary Johnson (5) during the second quarter.SEE LMHS | B4 FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comIts likely that P.J. Fosters accomplishments on the basket ball court at Limestone College wont soon be forgotten. Foster, a former Leesburg High School standout, secured his place in history Satur day when he drained his 131st three point er of the season and established a new school record for long-range shots. The senior sharpshooter netted four three pointers in Sat urdays 80-75 loss against Mount Olive, adding on to his NCAA Division II lead in 3 pointers made and at tempted. Foster en tered Tuesdays game against Lees-McRae with 132 three pointers on the season. Following Satur days game, Foster leads all three NCAA divisions in made 3-point shots. NCAA all-time record hold er, Travis Bader of Oakland University, an NCAA Divison I school, had two fewer three pointers despite having played in ve more games. Foster established the new mark with 6 minutes, 52 seconds left in the game on a jumper from the left wing. With the bas ket, Foster surpassed Chuckie Scotland, who set the school mark of 130 in the 1989-90 season.Ex-Jacket in record books for three pointers PHOTO COURTESY OF LIMESTONE COLLEGE Former Leesburg High School and current Limestone College standout P.J. Foster drains a three pointer late in the second half of a game on Saturday against Mount Olive College in Gaffney, S.C. The basket gave Foster, a senior, a school single-season record with 131 three pointers. SEE RECORD | B3 FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comMany student-athletes at Carver Middle School eventually wind up at Leesburg High School. That being the case, supports of the Yellow Jackets boys basketball team likely are chomping at the bit in anticipation of future graduat ing classes at Carver. Especially after Wednesday night, when Carver blasted Clermont Middle School 7541 at the Big House in Tavares to complete an Carver boys wins second straight middle school titleLEESBURGSEE TITLE | B3

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B2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 5, 2014 HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. CLERMONT BLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSAMILYELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time! IRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONTL Many Other Activities each week Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.org LIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLCHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm SOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary); 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.org ST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am 10:00 am Beginning Oct. 6, 2013 5:00 pm Service Sunday School Youth Group Nursery Adult Bible Study Womens Bible Study Mens Prayer Breakfast WOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH GODINCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALE ERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for Children Groveland IRSTBAPTISTCHURCH GROVELAND Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pm MT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! MINNEOLA CONGREGATIONSMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club NEWLPRESBYTERIANCHURCH18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am TLIVINGGOD Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce Rowland MONTVERDE WOODLANDSLUTHERAN15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 am OAKLAND PRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforSouth Lake South LakeGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOMErfn tbt352-394-7121806 W. Minneola Ave.,Clermont,FL Cremation ChoicesDirect Cremation$675Plus Container Ron Becker,Director352-394-8228921 S.US Hwy 27,Minneola,FL N EW R EFORMED P LANT C HURCH We meet our God on Sunday at Superior Residence at 10:30 AM. 1600 Hunt Trace Blvd. (Behind Home Depot)Pastor Harm Biehl 407-325-8663 Lake-Sumter State College freshman Walker Sheller pitches during a game between LSSC and the Davenport University junior varsity at the LSSC baseball complex. BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comLake-Sumter State College fell behind early, but rebounded with nine unanswered runs on Feb. 26 in a 9-2 win against Dav enport University junior varsity team at the LSSC baseball complex. The Lakehawks improved to 9-4 with the win against the NAIA school from Caledonia Township, Mich. Davenport jumped on LSSC starter Michael Hennessey for two runs in third inning, but the Lakehawks offense got cranked up in fourth with two runs. LSSC added two runs in the sixth and seventh innings and put the game on ice with three runs in the eighth. Tanner Barnhard scored two runs for LSSC and Walker Sheller had three hits and four RBIs, including a home run. LSSC to taled 10 hits against four Davenport pitchers. Kyle Schackne picked up the win in relief and improved to 3-1 on the season.LSSC beats Davenport junior varsity

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Wednesday, March 5, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B3 $24.99Full Service Oil Change**Includes up to 5 quarts of Valvoline`s Conventional oil, standard oil filter, lube and maintenance check. Additional charge for premium filter. Offer not valid with any other same service offers or discounts (including fleets). Good at participating Orlando locations.$15 offany Additional Service**Includes Transmission Fluid Exchange, Radiator Service, Entire Fuel System Cleaning, or Serpentine Belt Offer not valid with any other same service offers or discounts (including fleets). Good at participating Orlando locations. Foster nished with 18 points in 38 minutes. He was 7-of-18 from the eld and went 4-for-15 from 3-point range. Limestone College, located in Gaffney, S.C., is a member of Con ference Carolinas. The Saints have a 17-8 over all record and a 9-6 mark in Conference Carolinas, not counting Tuesdays game. Foster leads the team with a 20.4 scoring average on 45 percent shooting. He is shoot ing 43 percent behind the 3-point line. Foster began his col lege career at Brevard Community College in Melbourne in 2009 and scored 20 points in the rst game. He averaged 9.8 points per game and hit 39 three pointers in his only season at BCC. From there, Foster transferred to Pas co-Hernando College in New Port Richey in 2010 and raised his scoring average to 15.3 points per game with a career high of 37 points. He was sixth in the National Junior College Athletic Asso ciation in three-point percentage. After being redshirted his rst year at Limestone, Foster stepped up as a redshirt junior to average 11.5 points per game and shot 42 percent from behind the three-point line. RECORD FROM PAGE B1 undefeated season and win the Lake County Middle School Championship for the second-straight season. Carver closed out the 2013-14 campaign with an 11-0 record. Carver led from start to nish, using relentless full-court pressure to build a 42-17 lead at half time. In the second half, Carver went to a zone defense and cruised to the championship. Calvin Hein led Carver with 13 points and 11 assists. Cordray ius Graham also had a double-double with 12 points and 10 assists. In addition, Kenny Jones had 11 points, Trey Johnson added nine and Wayne Watkins scored eight. After the game, Carv er coach Ben Nash praised his players. I am extremely proud of this group of kids, Nash said. They have worked hard since November and grew to gether as a team. They put themselves in a position to win. TITLE FROM PAGE B1 FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comLocal boys basketball players fared well recently when the Florida Athletic Coaches Asso ciation announced its postseason awards for District 8. Mount Dora Bibles Zac Ward and Eustis Kiron Williams earned three honors apiece among players, Mount Dora Bible coach Steven Hayes and Eustis Mike Bowe earned Coach of the Year accolades. Ward was named the Districts Class 3A Play er of the Year. The se nior averaged 23.5 points per game for the Bulldogs. Williams, one of four seniors in the Panthers starting lineup, aver aged 16.4 points per game en route to be ing named the Class 5A Player of the Year. He also grabbed 3.2 re bounds and led Eustis with 3.8 steals per game. In addition, Ward was the districts Most Valuable Player and Williams was the runner-up. Ward and Wil liams also earned dis trict nominations for All State. Hayes was the Class 3A coach of the Year. He paced Mount Dora Bi ble to a 21-7 record and won the Class 3A-Dis trict 5 championship. The Bulldogs reached the regional quarternals. Bowe, whose daughter Brittany repre sented Team USA in speedskating at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia, led Eustis to a 22-8 record. He had in the Class 5A Elite Eight for the sec ond straight year. In addition to the Class 5A award, Bowe was named the Dis tricts All Classication Coach of the Year and was nominated to coach in the District All-Star Game. Other awards handed out included East Ridges Isaiah Matthews earning Class 7A Player of the Year. Three local players also earned Academic All-State nomi nations Mount Dora Bibles Daniel Johnson in Class 3A, Eustis Coy Patterson in Class 5A and East Ridges Josh Click in Class 7A.Area players, coaches earn postseason honors

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B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 5, 2014We just couldnt get the ball t o fall in the fourth quarter. Lake Minneola (28-4) got out to an early lead when Carlyle Hold er scored on a layup on the games opening possession. The Hawks tried to attack the bas ket in the rst quar ter with mixed results but shot only 27 per cent from the eld and trailed 13-8. Even more telling was the Vikings dominance on the backboards. Mi ami Norland out-rebounded Lake Minneola 8-3 in the opening period and nished with a 41-24 advantage. We had to control the tempo against them and we did that by rebounding the basketball, said Miami Norland coach Lawton Williams. Our size had to be a factor on the boards. If we let them rebound the ball, they were going to run and that would create big problems for us. Lake Minneola junior Avery Brown helped the Hawks get back into the game in the second quarter. Brown got to the rim with a variety of drives, challenging the Vikings size and clos ing out the rst half with 14 points. In addition, the Hawks stepped up their backcourt pressure. When Brown ignited the Lake Minneola faithful with a thunder ous dunk at the 2-min ute mark, the Hawks took a 23-18 lead and seemed in control of the game. Less than a minute after Browns dunk, Lake Minneola suffered a devastating blow when Holder injured his right ankle. The in jury kept Holder on the bench at the start of the second half and even though he played most of the second half, his effectiveness was severely limited. We lost a lot when Carlyle got hurt, Cole said. We lost a scor er and we lost a lot of quickness on defense. It forced us to make adjustments and get away from our game plan some. In the third quarter, Lake Minneola came out and looked to run away from the Vikings. At the 5:09 mark, the Hawks had built their largest lead, 33-26, but a defensive switch by Miami Norland changed the complexion of the game. Williams began to look for someone to neutralize Brown and found his stopper in senior Zachary Johnson. The 6-foot-2 John son, who was named the tournaments Most Valuable Player, shut down the Hawks leading scorer, holding him scoreless for the nal 13 minutes. I asked if anyone could stop (Brown), Williams said. We werent going to change anything we were doing, as far as our game plan, but we need ed someone to step up and stop him. Zach went out and got the job done and still man aged to carry his load of the offense. That was part of our senior leadership. When weve asked someone to raise their game, our seniors have always stepped up. For the game, Lake Minneola shot 31 per cent from the eld and was 2-of-19 from behind the 3-point line. Brown, who was the Hawks tournament MVP, scored a team high 16 points, but was the only Hawk in dou ble gures. He and Andrew Mendoza led the team in rebounds with ve apiece. Miami Norland (275) shot 49 percent from the eld, including a blistering 58 percent in the second half. In the fourth quarter, Lake Minneola man aged to hit only 4-of-17 shots (24 percent). The victory was Mi ami Norlands thirdstraight Class 6A championship. It also marked Williams fth championship in nine years at Miami Nor land. Cole said he and his players, while disap pointed in the loss, are proud of their ac complishments and how far they have tak en the Lake Minneola program in only three years of existence. Some players and coaches never get to play for a state championship, Cole said. Were going to work even harder next year to get back to Lakeland and win it all. We have to get back here and n ish the job we started. Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) LMHS FROM PAGE B1 BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Avery Brown (5) dunks the ball over Miami Norland senior Larry McKnight (1) during the second quarter.

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Ann DupeeREMEMBER WHENA weekly column that reprints some of the more interesting news stories that have appeared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press.C1SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 5, 2014 www.southlakepress.comCOMMUNITYProudly servingCLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWSSTAFF WRITER . ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE . .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 E-MAIL . .... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com %  en HOMETOWN: Clermont %  en OCCUPATION: Holistic Health and Wellness Coach What do you enjoy most about South Lake County? When I was house hunting and drove to Clermont, I immediately fell in love with the beauty of the rolling hills and the tropical look, with the palm trees and the aroma of the orange groves. I love the weather and the idea of riding my bike on the trails in the middle of winter and then sending pictures to friends in the Midwest who are in freezing temperatures, and showing them what I am up to. 1) If you had to summarize your philosophy of life in one sentence, what would it be? Love God, love and serve others! 2) Name a person or incident youve come across recently thats touched you in some way. Why did this person or incident impress you so much? I have to say one person who comes to mind is Mo Mydlo. She has such a servant heart and a desire to encourage and support single moms. She is truly an inspi ration to me. 3) How does what you do contribute to the welfare of the area? I grew up learning about organic gardening, healthy eating, and exercising -as a result, having lots of energy and preventing disease. This is my mission, to encourage and support those busy individuals who want to live a healthy life full of energy and preventing disease. I also work with the Life Center in Clermont, and we offer a complete wellness opportunity to those individuals who are desiring a change in their lifestyle. I am also a part FROM THE FILES | 25 YEARS AGO 1989Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press Meet YourNEIGHBORJOANNEen RAFACZ SEE NEIGHBOR | C2CHAMBER INSTALLS OFFICERSClermont Chamber of Commerce Past President Mary Ogilvie installed new ofcers at the annual meeting Friday morning, Feb. 17 at the Citrus Tower Restaurant: Bobby Duncan, Market Basket, president; Bruce Yates, Subway Sandwiches and Salads, vice president; Jack Sar gent, Harold Roberts Realty, treasurer; and Amy Walker Wynn, Central Florida Blood Bank, secretary. Board of directors are: Keith Mullins, Lakeridge Winery; Bridgot Robinson, Dominos Pizza; Sharon Williams, Meritor Savings; Cecil Smart, Smarts Locksmith and Engravers (immediate past president); Gabby Monroe, United National Real Estate; Gene Landers, Private Ledger; Paul Lewis, Florida Power; and Bob Patterson, IDS Financial Ser vices. Outgoing board members are Diane James, Peggy Weatherbee, Roger Bornt, David Payne, Jim Hurtak and Michael Floyd. Chamber Executive Director Marge Tindal and Executive Secretary Carol Schommer selected Jack Sargent as Board Member of the Year. Susan Craycraft, SunBank; Susan Matthews, Hilltop Stationery; Gene Landers, Private Ledger; Joyce Driggers, Meritor Savings; and Dennis Horton, local attorney, won door prizes with a Valentines theme.BUSINESS NEWSBill Jayne Carpets has opened in Emerald Lakes Plaza. Hugh and Ida Johnson pur chased the shoe repair shop in South Lake Plaza from J.C. and Lois Coble. It has moved to larger quarters in the Plazas east end next to John York Jewelers, enlarged to include the sale of several nice lines of mens and womens shoes. The name is changed to Cobbler Shoe Repair. A popular eatery in Tavares was Chicagos on Hwy. 441, which on St. Patricks Day served Corned Beef and Cabbage Dinner for $5.99 and Irish Stew for $4.99.SOUTH LAKE DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL ELECTS OFFICERSSouth Lake Development ofcers are Bob Wade, president; Frank Bergau, vice president, Ed Augustine, treasur er; and Lucie Blake, secretary. Chairing standing committees are: Planning and Zoning, Jay Vander Meer and Lawson Wolfe; Government Regulation and Legislative, Roy Caldwell and Ed Augustine; Education, Bud Ambrose and Richard Bell; Commercial Development, John Hughes, Frank Bergau and Don Bailey; SEE HISTORY | C2 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comThe man who founded and built the popular Arabian Nights dinner theater equestrian show in Kissimmee opened his Cl ermont ranch Saturday in hopes of adopting out 16 of the horses that performed at the attraction before it closed. Mark Miller, who was raised around horses and learned all about the Al-Marah Arabian breed from his mother Ruth Bazy McCormick Tankersley, called it a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to acquire one of the highly trained show horses. All of the horses are beautiful. They are trained for riding and if you wanted to go to horse shows with them, a lot of them can still compete, Miller said. Al-Marah spokeswoman Eileen Daley said about 80 or 90 people showed up, and six of the horses found new homes. The six that sold are Ofcer, a grey Arabian gelding; Dark Storm, a black Arabian stallion; Luckys Queen, a half Grey, half Arabian Irish draft mare; Shift Work, a Grey Anglo Arabian gelding; Sonny, an 11-year-old Percheron gelding; and Regency Royal, a 5-year-old Belgian gelding. A couple of sales are still pending A lot of people came to check us out and we were pleased that six of our horses were able to nd new homes, Daley said. A press release issued by Al-Marah announcing the auction calls the animals the most famous horses in Central Florida. If not the entire country, said Miller. The horses have performed for 500,000 to 600,000 people annually at Arabian Nights. Millers ranch is on 80 acres off Lakeshore Drive overlooking Little Lake Nellie and Lake Nelli. Its name, Al-Marah, a word from the Budeon tribe that means An Oasis, is synonymous with the Tucson, Ariz., CLERMONTArabian Nights stars sold at auction Mark Miller with Nuncho Primero Whiz (AKA Rocky) a palomino quarter horse gelding and former show horse at Arabian Nights. PHOTOS BY ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Al-Marah Ranch owner Mark Miller with one of the Arabians he was selling Saturday at his Clermont farm. Miller founded the now-closed Arabian Nights dinner show in Orlando and decided to sell many of the show horses.All of the horses are beautiful. They are trained for riding and if you wanted to go to horse shows with them, a lot of them can still compete.Mark MillerSEE HORSES | C2

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C2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 5, 2014 REEL-LIFE ANNIVERSARY By A NAMESAKE OF 119-ACROSS / Edited by Will ShortzNo. 0223RELEASE DATE: 3/2/2014 ACROSS1 Bush judicial appointee8 Quarterbacks, often15 Bush judicial appointee20 Professional tennis since 196821 Rank22 Singer with the album Live at the Polynesian Palace23 Time for the best deals, maybe, in a going-out-ofbusiness sale24 *1939 Judy Garland film26 There was a great one in Genesis27 One-named designer28 Lava comes out of it29 Kind of car or tee32 Appear suddenly36 Slaughter in the 1946 World Series37 *1933 Jean Harlow film40 Nuts!41 Gators tail?43 D-backs, on scoreboards44 Daily riser45 How things may be brought47 Pass51 Restful places53 Each54 *1943 Spencer Tracy/Irene Dunne film56 Is threatening, in a way58 Colorist60 Self-absorbed sort61 Hit63 Some kitchenware66 Call from a curb67 Sprint competitor, once68 *1939 Vivien Leigh/ Clark Gable film73 ___ king76 Sprint77 Word of agreement78 2000s events in North Korea, for short82 Provider of music on the go?85 Court grp.88 Footnote abbr.89 *1942 Spencer Tracy/Hedy Lamarr film92 Odists preposition94 When repeated, a Polynesian capital95 Publish96 Drinkers toasts97 Brother of George W. and Jeb99 Award for Miss Hawaii, in addition to a tiara100 Summer hrs.102 Snow queen in Disneys Frozen103 *1948 Ingrid Bergman film105 Elegance108 eBay user110 Certain newspaper advertisement111 Like Christiane Amanpour, by upbringing113 Pub containers115 Perfect, as a home119 Director of the eight starred films in this puzzle, who was born on 2/23/1889123 Torrey Pines Golf Course locale125 Suffer humiliation, in slang126 Comeback127 Brooks Robinsons team128 Sitcom with a 1974 wedding129 Foreign travelers purchase, maybe130 Source of the line Whats past is prologue, with The DOWN1 Massage therapeutically2 ___-blue3 I should ___ lucky4 Put into a sepulcher5 *1932 Clark Gable/ Jean Harlow film6 La-la lead-in7 Perhaps8 Migratory seabird9 Vier + vier10 What Babe wants to be in Babe11 Finish (up)12 New Haven reuner13 Frasier role14 Major glitch15 Puts together16 Things that should be tied up by the curtain?17 Playfully18 Complete, informally19 Transudes25 Beatles title girl27 Queen of literature30 Send off31 Gave up33 Birthplace of 22-Across34 Hunts, with on35 Lacking variety37 Gives up, in slang38 Then again, I could be wrong39 Adults counterpart42 Obsessed with45 Fortunetelling aids46 1980s-s series based on the fictional firm McKenzie, Brackman, Chaney & Kuzak48 Doing ___ (dancing springily)49 Basis in accounting50 Head to Paris?52 Overly confident55 Recipe instruction57 Wiry-coated terriers59 Lead-in to Pen, commercially62 Genuflect64 Night that Friends aired: Abbr.65 Swashbuckles, say69 Some London lords70 Effected, in a bad way71 ___ ba-aack!72 Ed Wood star73 When the story begins, perhaps74 1960s U.S. bombing target75 Flight board info: Abbr.79 Milans La ___80 Go-getter81 Unemotive83 Means of access to a cafeteria, maybe84 In past centuries86 Joint parts87 Specialties90 Give off coherent light91 Overreacting sort93 Essen article98 *1925 Percy Marmont film101 One way to the top103 Pub measure104 1960s western sitcom105 Chopped ___106 ___ Heep (Dickens character)107 Blade brand109 Red opening?112 Bit114 Render ___ Caesar 116 Shelfmate of Vogue117 Tavern stock118 Place for a topgallant120 Lash holder121 Green monitor, for short?122 Finish (up)123 Fate124 ___ we done? 1234567 8910111213141516171819 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 293031 32333435 36 373839 40 4142 43 44 45 4647484950 51 5253 54 55 56 575859 60 61 62 63646566 67 68 6970 71 72 73747576 77 78 798081 82 83 84 85868788 89 9091 929394 95 96 97 9899 100101102 103 104 105106107 108109 110 111 112 113114 115116117118 119 120121122 123124 125 126 127 128 129 130 Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Solution on D3Residential Development, Richard Huff, Peggy Weatherbee and Joe Washuta; Environmental Impact, Dick Stokes; Finance, Ed Augustine; Public Relations, Lawson Wolfe; Program, Lucie Blake; Membership: Richard Huff.CLERMONT POLICE WANT PENSION CHANGEA petition signed by all but one member of the Clermont Police Department req uesting a change in the retirement age for police ofcers was brought before the Pension Fund Board of Trustees at its quarterly meeting. The request, presented by police department representative and board member Mitchell Rogers, was to reduce the retirement age, with full benets, from 60 to 55, to bring the plan in line with the retirement age for city re department employees. Several months ago, police ofcers voted to take increased benets with retirement at age 60 in lieu of the earlier retirement. Ofcers have re-evaluated their options and now feel it is in their best interest to be able to obtain full retirement benets at age 55. All city employees covered by the pension fund are fully vested after 10 years employment, according to City Manager Wayne Saunders. Saunders stated Clermonts pension plan benets were compared with those offered by other cities and found to be better than the aver age plan. The request will be considered at the next Pension Board meeting. HISTORY FROM PAGE C1 of Real Life Church, and there are so many wonderful outreach opportunities. 4) Name one of your greatest accomplishments so far. I have to say raising my children. I have a daughter and son. They are both adults now, and I am so proud of them. I really did focus on them when they were growing up. Now that they are off on their own, I am focusing on what my passion is and that is to change the world one person at a time regarding health and wellness. 5) Whats something youve always wanted to do but havent yet? I have always wanted to do more travel. I would especially love to travel to Europe. My grandparents were from Prague, and I have relatives there and would love to visit them. That is just one of the places out of the many on my list. 6) What advice would you give to people who want to help out in the community? I am a part of Real Life Church and there are so many wonderful outreach opportunities. One in partic ular, which I have been a part of since moving to the area, is called Real Help. We make over a home four times a year, similar to Extreme Home Makeover, and totally transform the home. We also support a single moms home. NEIGHBORFROM PAGE C1 ranch Millers mother ran. Miller has about nine national champion horses in Clermont, in addition to the 16 that came from Arabian Nights. Miller said while he personally loves the horses, he is keeping only a couple from the show to use on his ranch as teachers to some of the others. Thee rest are not from the core herd of horses his family has bred since the 1940s. Breeds available include Al-Marah Arabians, Percherons, Appaloosas, Saddlebreds, Belgians, Irish Sport Horses and Quarter Horses. Buyers had an opportunity to discuss the horses with Al-Marah Arabians staff, including Miller and head trainer Kassie Barteau. Prices ranged from $2,500 to $20,000. Theyre all like family to me really, and they each have their very own personality. They love being around people. Thats what they do, Miller said. Itll be nice for anyone interested to come out and have a look at them. HORSES FROM PAGE C1 ROXANNE BROWNStaff writer/roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comClermonts rst ever syna gogue Temple LChayim will celebrate its grand open ing Friday with a procession by the families that make up the congregation, board members and city ofcials. During the procession, To rah scrolls will be carried in side and placed into their new home. Temple LChayim board members Nathal Axel, Jay Forman and Andrew Feld man announced that Orlan dos Anne Perry, who accepted the post as the synagogues rabbi last week, will lead the Sabbath service to follow. This will by a joyous ser vice. We will have our spiritual leader there with us and we are looking forward to welcoming everyone into our new home and the growth that lies ahead of us, For man said. It has been a long time coming. Temple LChayim is located at 4420 South Highway 27, Suite 4, next to Walgreens in Clermont. The procession will begin at 7 / p .m. and be followed by the service. Worshipers and guests will get to meet the new rabbi during a reception at 6:30 / p .m. Services will also be followed by Shabbat, a social hour. We are sure that every one will be pleased with Rab bi Anne Perry. We would like everyone to join us in mak ing her feel welcome, board member Nathan Axel said. Forman said he wants vis itors and families to feel at home and wants everyone to know that there is much more in store for the temple. We want to provide the Jewish community with a place to gather for prayer, learning and socializing, but this is just the start, For man said. We have benefac tors made up of many Jewish organizations, including the Jewish Society of Florida, that have committed to fund ing land and a building so the synagogue will have a perma nent building pretty quickly. For now, however, we feel condent and are very happy, that the place we have chosen as our temporary home will be a great place for com ing together. Temple leaders say LChay im features members from a broad background, includ ing orthodox, conservative, traditional reform, interfaith families and Jews-by-Choice, made up of families, singles and people of all ages. The synagogue will provide a full range of services, includ ing weekly Sabbath services and the celebration of major Jewish holidays. It will also of fer Barmitzvahs and Batmitzvahs, baby naming services, funeral remembrances, wed ding and yarzit services. LChayim leaders would also like to establish a Hebrew school to provide instruction in coming of age rituals. Forman said those who miss the open house will still have the opportunity to sign up for Charter Membership status, which means no fees, includ ing building fund fees, and a cap on the membership costs so they will never go up in the future, at the service Friday. The deadline for the char ter membership at a cost of $350 per family or $175 per individual, runs through March 31. For information, call 352241-6030.Clermonts first synagogue opens Friday SUBMITTED PHOTO Nathan Axel, Andy Feldman and Jay Forman, board members, stand with Millie Altholz, the oldest congregant of Temple LChayim, during an open house for Temple LChayim, a new temple opening in Clermont this week.

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Wednesday, March 5, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C3 12thAnnualTHEGENERALFEDERATIONOFWOMENSCLUBS SPONSOREDBY THECLERMONT WOMANSCLUB DOOR PRIZESThroughout the day!ENTER TO WIN:Fabulous Prizesand much more...ADMISSIONFREE! HERESJUSTAFEWOFTHEPRODUCTS& SERVICES: HERESJUSTAFEWOFOURVENDORS: Saturday, March 22, 201410:00am 2:00pm Your First ChoiceIn-Print & On-Line To Apply for Scholarships from the Pig on the Pond Education Fund Vist Our Website: www.pigonthepond.org Come and Join our Family of Proud Sponsorsfor the 16th Annual Pig on the Pond For the Kids Pig on the Pond Mission Statement Jordan Anderson11:00 am 12:00 pm Clermonts Country Sweetheart Jordons latest singleYou Aint Ready For Me, shot straight to the Top 40 of the Music Row charts. HayFire Band2:15 pm 3:30 pmHAYFIRE has played all over the great state of Florida. They have been on stage with some of the biggest names in Country Music. The Down Brothers SUNDAY, March 9th a Day of Entertainment12:45 pm 1:45 pmThe Down Brothers perform Classic Rock throughout the Orlando area. The Abby Four4:15 pm 6:00 pmA Beatles tribute band with music and costumes from three different Beatle eras. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comThe head of Floridas Dem ocratic Black Caucus told a group gathered in Cler mont for Black History Month on Feb. 22 to embrace their differences and to be fearless about ghting against intolerance. Henry Crespo Sr. red up a crowd numbering about 200 when he reminded them that the promise of the civil rights movement has not been fullled 50 years after its birth. Crespo encouraged guests to throw away the African American title, accept their identities aside from race and to challenge the system by standing up for what they believe. Sometimes we blame our young people for not know ing, but we have to teach them to push back. Sometimes things dont happen because there was no push back, Crespo said. Dont be scared to challenge the system. The only reason we are here in the masses is be cause people were ghting, people were struggling. Never negate the black ness of who you are or the beauty it represents. The program, at Cler monts Community Center, drew a number of inuen tial speakers, including Pastor Mervin Morgan, Joan and Paul Johnson, Minister Nial Alvarez and Elder Evadnie Watkis. The event also featured a fashion show highlighting Afro-centric designs modeled by people from throughout the community. I think this is one of the highlights of the night, said Dr. Soyini Ayan, an herbal ist and doctor of naturopa thy who co-sponsored the event. Police Chief Charles Broadway, Clermonts rst black police chief, reected on his own past as well as the story of baseball great Jackie Robinson, reminding every one that results are achieved through perseverance, even in the toughest of times. His (Robinsons) life and the life of his family were threatened, and because of that, he could have played (in the Negro Leagues) and been done, but he chose not to, Broadway said. He chose to stick it out, he chose to persevere through the tough times and at one time became the highest paid Dodger of that time and was inducted into the Base ball Hall of Fame. Lastly, Dee Lee, a Christian stand-up comedian, took the microphone to deliver a message that was at once humorous and poignant. Racism is not born in you, its raised in you. Its taught to you, Lee said. But youve got to laugh at life. You cant let it get you down. You just have to get up every morn ing and thank your maker for another day to try to get things right.Black Caucus leader: Embrace your identity, battle injusticeCLERMONTROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIALA Black History Month presentation at Clermonts Community Center featured a fashion show modeled by local community members. CRESPO ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comBatteries Plus Bulbs has opened its 34th Central Florida location in Clermont. Owner Joe Kasper said hes been getting good response from people who say they have had a hard time nding special batter ies and bulbs. Ive had trouble nding certain size batteries for items I own and, if that hap pens, you just have to go without them, said shopper Jean Rhubin. Whats especially nice is that this store also has watch batteries. We go through a lot of watch batteries, and let me tell you, they are hard to nd around here. Batteries Plus Bulbs is in a 1,700-squarefoot Clermont location at 1120 State Road 50 in Clermont, next to Fedex/Kinkos. Kasper is a seasoned Batteries Plus Bulbs franchise owner, making the Clermont store the 11th on his ros ter, including others in Brandon, Gainesville, Jacksonville, Kissimmee, Lakeland, Ocala, Tampa, Winter Haven and two in Orlando. Florida has been wonderful to my business over the years, and I couldnt be happier with another op portunity to bring our breadth of products, services, expertise and helpful advice to the Clermont community, Kasper said. Batteries Plus Bulbs stores offer thousands of batteries for devic es including watches, cars, golf carts, digital cameras, laptops and cell phones, as well as hard-to-nd batteries for old toys and novelty or obscure devic es. The Clermont store also assembles, tests, conditions and de signs custom battery packs for rechargeable household and busi ness-to-business products. Kasper is working with t he South Lake Chamber of Commerce to set up a date and time for a formal ribbon cutting and grand opening celebration.Batteries Plus Bulbs opens 34th Central Florida location

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Wednesday, March 5, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C5

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C6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 5, 2014 Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...Totally UniqueTotally Unique is proud to be Clermonts first ORGANIC hair salon. We care about your beauty, your wellness, the environment and our community, so we use organic and sustainably harvested products whenever possible. We specialize in organic hair color, hair care products, nail and skin care lines. Our salon is one of the oldest salons in Clermont and is located at 786 W Montrose Street in Historic Downtown Clermont. Our stylists are experienced in all phases of hair care including color, straighteners, cuts, texture and styles. Hair stylists are Marjorie Morphet, Tina Foote, Sherie Wolkens and Jamie Rhoades. Our nail techs, Jennifer Vandergrift and Jamie Rhoades, perform pedicures and manicures using Zoya nail products (which are Big 5 free). Shellac manicures, lasting up to three weeks, are also available by Jennifer and Jamie. We have two pedicure chairs in a private room for your relaxation and enjoyment. Relaxing and therapeutic facials are available by Jennifer in our private upstairs facial room. Massage services include chair massage, Swedish and Deep Tissue. Massage services are also done in a private room in our upstairs area. We utilize several massage therapists and provide massage by appointment only. We also offer a small boutique with handcrafted jewelry and hair accessories, Art by Tina Foote and Jamie Rhoades, and other unique items. Salon hours are 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Saturday and open Sundays by appointment only. Evening hours are also available by appointment. We pride ourselves in providing a friendly, relaxing environment for our clients and friends. Stop by and visit or call 352-394-5005 for more information. We are also on Facebook and www.TotallyUniqueSalon.com. LOOKING FOR PARTS? SEE JULIE (352) 394-6111 Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! COMMUNITY CALENDAR TODAYASH WEDNESDAY SER -VICE AT WINDERMERE UNION CHURCH: 7 p.m., 10710 Park Ridge-Go -tha Road, with the Rev. Barton Buchanan ofci -ating. Go to www.wind -ermereunion.org or call 407-876-2112.PINE RIDGE ELEMEN -TARY SAC MEETING: At 7 p.m. in the media center.PLAY CANASTA ON WEDNESDAYS AT THE LI -BRARY: From 2 to 5 p.m., at Marianne Beck Memorial Library in Howey-in-the-Hills. For information, call 352-324-0254. THURSDAYFREE TRIATHLON CLINIC AT GEAR FOR MULTIS PORT: From 5:45 to 6:30 p.m., Thursdays in March, at the National Training Center in Cler mont. First-come, rst-served. Email Multis portgear@aol.com to reserve a spot, or go to www.gearformultisport.com. FRIDAY TO SUNDAYPIG ON THE POND SANCTIONED BARBECUE COMPETITION AND FES -TIVAL: At Waterfront Park in Clermont. Details by email to tandy@church -atsouthlake.com or pigonthepond@earthlink.net.HOWEY-IN-THE-HILLS GARDEN AND CIVIC CLUB YARD SALE: Through Sunday, 313 W. Central Ave., across from the Howey water tower. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Fri., and Sat.; 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Sunday. Call 352-324-6037 for details.SUNDAYLENTEN SERVICES AND POT LUCK DIN NERS AT WINDERMERE UNION CHURCH, UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST: Spe -cial Lenten services ev -ery Sunday evening preceded by a potluck dinner beginning at 5:30 p.m. A service on the theme of forgiveness follows at 6:30 p.m., 10710 Park Ridge-Go -tha Road. For informa -tion, go to www.wind -ermereunion.org or call 407-876-2112. MONDAYTODDLER STORY HOUR AT THE LIBRARY: At 10:30 a.m. at the Marianne Beck Memorial Library, Howey-in-the-Hills, for ages to 4 years. Call the library at 352-324-0254 for details. MARCH 14TOM JONES, NATIONALLY KNOWN WATERCOLORIST, TEACHES WORKSHOP: A three-day watercolor workshop at the South Lake Art Leagues Cagan Art Studio, 16640 Cagan Crossings Blvd., in Clermont, from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., March 14-16. Non-members $275, members $245. Deposit of $100 is re -quired to reserve a seat. Call 352-241-6407 or go to www.ButteryKisses -Studio.com.CAGAN CROSSINGS FARMERS MARKET HOSTS MARDI GRAS CELEBRA -TION: From 4 to 8 p.m., with a Mardi Gras Mask Contest, Mutti-Gras Pet Parade and Costume Contest. Regular ven -dors will be on-site with produce, food, arts and crafts, at Cagan Town Center, Cagan Cross -ings Blvd. in Clermont. Email cagancrossings -farmersmarket@gmail. com for details. MARCH 18THE TOPSHELF BOOK CLUB MEETS: At noon, Marianne Beck Memo -rial Library in Howey-in-the-Hills. The group will discuss the The Paris Wife by Paula Mc -Lain. Call 352-324-0254 for details. MARCH 19MINNEOLA ELEMEN -TARY SCHOOL CHARTER BOARD MEETING: At 7 p.m., media center at the school, 320 E. Pearl St. Call the school at 352-394-2600 for de -tails.MASCOTTE ELEMEN -TARY CHARTER SCHOOL VPK SIGN-UP: At 8:30 a.m. Children need to attend the day of regis -tration for testing. Ap -plications are available at the school or on line at www.lake.k12. fl.us. Children must be 4-years old by Sept. 1, 2014 to apply. Call Carol A. Mayer at 352-429-2294, ext. 5812. Ap-plications will not be ac-cepted before this date. MARCH 24-28SPRING BREAK CRAFT HOUR AT THE MARIANNE BECK MEMORIAL LI -BRARY: Every afternoon, Mon.-Fri., at 3 p.m. for a fun time. Ages 6-14 wel -come. Call the library at 352-324-0254 for details.To place an item on the calendar, send an email to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com.

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Wednesday, March 5, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D1 rfntbrr rfntbn tbttt ntbffbtbb r b t t t b t t t b fbtrb ntb b b b b r b t b t t t b t r f f b b t n t b t b f t r b b b t bntbtbb fftrf fttttbt r b t b n f t b t t t t f f b b n f f t b n n n b b r b ntbtbbbt btbtftrf tbtt r t t t f f b t bfbbtbttb fbttbtrf tttbnbf nbt ftbbt nbfbtbbt t ntbtrbfbtb bttfnbtr f t b t t b b b t b b b t b r b r f t t b t t r f b t t b t t t b t f t f b b b t b t r f b b b t b f f b b t b t t t t n n b r f t b t b b t n f b t b r f b t t f f b t b b t b f t t t b b t f f b t f f t n r b t t t b b b b t n n t t t t b n t b r f t t f f t b t f n t b t t b t t t t t b t b rf ftbt fbfttb ftttbt t ttbbtbt ttbb tbb ntffb ftbtffbbf bfbb tt ftfb ttt nrftt btbbtf r b t f f t t t t b n t b b n n n b t b b f t ntffn bn f t t b t b t r t nnt t b b b b b b t t f n t n t t b b t b f b b b f b b f b t n t b b t n t b b t b t n t b b f b b n t t f f t t b b b b b f b t t t t b n t b b t t n t b t b t b b b b t t t b b b b f f t b n t b b b t t b t f nr n t n t b b b t b b b t b b t t t b t b t t t t t t f b t t t t t b t b b b f b t f b t b b b b t t t b b b t f b t t f t b t b b ntffn rf tbbb bt ttntb ttftt brb tft fnf r nf nf n nf rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrff nrrrrrrrrrrff ttbrrrrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rfntbbt rfrntn nnnftbnbn brfbnrb bnbtn brnnrtnftbn tbrbttb nnnrfrbtb nbb n fbfn t brbnbbbtn nnnntnbbtr bbbfrf rtfnbtr rrbrfnnnrfnt t rf

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D2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 5, 2014 rfntbf rfntt bb nt b fffntt bbb tnrbbrf bn bb r f trb nnbf tffbbbbb n tnffbb tnt rbrff rf nftb ft nn ntffbbf nn ntbrf b f f b ft t ttt tnnff nfff nttnff b nf nfbbbf n t t b b r n t t b r ntnn nbr r tfb ft nntn rfnttbfr fbn ffnttbff ft n fb nttnt fnttfbfff tffbbb nt rfbf nrfbr bf nbfb b n n t n f t n t n n n n t t b r b r ft nntn nffnttfff nfbbrbrb tn nfbr nttn bbrf nnt nbr bf ntntn ffbbbr nt ffbfrr tn bfbrbr tt fnttbbrrbb tt nttbf tnnfb rff br ttfntt br n f n t t b f r tntn nff nttbffb tttt nttbbbr f f nn ttrffb n rfrb f b f f b f btntt n n ttffr nff nttb btt nttntff ntt bttnt ffbbrb tn fnttbbff tn fnttbbf bnttbrbb ntt nn nttbrf nbbr bf t nnffbb ntb tbbb n f f b f r f n n n n n n n t t n f n n n n t n n t n t ntt bb r nnnfrb f n t t b b b nnn ffnttbbrbb t n n n f b r tbf nbbfr ffft nbrrf tbt tnn fbr ff tffbfbrf ffnttb rf nb tnffnttbbrb t t bfnttbb f bttn nttbbrb t nttfbff nttt tnnn ffbff nft t n n t t n t t b t nf tbft n n n t t b b b nnn nntntnn ntnn rn n n t t b b r f f f b r n nntttnttf tnrnt ttnt nnt t n n f b n f f f n n n t n t n n f t t t t n t n n n n t n t n t n t t r b r b b b n t t t b f r n n n t n t t t b r n n n n n t t t n t n n t t b f r r r n n t n n b r t t t n t f n t t n t n t n t n n t n n t n t t n n n t n n n t n t n n n n t n n b r t t t n t f nnt tnnt ntnt tn tntb nttn n n n tf ttnnt ntnnn ttn nnnnt tnn ttnnnn nnnt t tnntnn nnttn tnntt nnn nnttn tn ttn t t n t n n n t n n t n n t t n n n b f b f n t t t n t n ntnftnn nnnttnnt ntt tnt ttn tntn n nttt nntn n n t t r r r r r f n n n t b f t n t t n ntntn n nntn t n n n t t t n t n n t t f f b b n t t b r t n b b b f f t r f f n n ttt t nnnt tnt nttt ntt ntntfn nn n t n n n t t nnn nnn ntn n t n nnnntt ntnt ttttn nnnnt nn tntn nttnn fnnn nntn n b b f n t t t n rn n t t b b r n t t n t n t n n f

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Wednesday, March 5, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D3 rfntbrr r frr f rfn f rtb r r rt n rb frf fn f frrfrr rfntnrbntbn nn bnbbr b rfrf fr bnn nb brb bb rb nbnnnnbb rrf nf bnr brnfrr ntbf brfn bntnb rn b n t bn fb bf rn nt nbn nr b fn nt nb bnbfn b fnbn bnbntt nn n nrrf f nbbt b rbn r b b n r b bnr n nn tbt tn brb nbr nbbbn n f tn br bn f rbn f nbtf b bf b bbfbrbr rfnnf nffn nfnb bn f nfrfbrb r fbrrnn nbrf t n nn frfbt tbr nb nn f t f tbt nft t nb nrnfbn tbnffb fn b n t b b b t b t b f n b b n t b f fbnb rtb fbbbn tbt nnf f nnntrf f bb fb n ff tf t b b b f t n t n b b r r r n r n n b b t f b n n n n nf f nnff f t n t n b b r r r n r n n b ftt t n t n b b r r r n r n n b b n t b b b t b t b f n b b n t b f fbnb b b t b b b n n t n trf fft f n n t n b n n t t f t brbb f r n fbfbnn bnnb n bn bnffbt tfrfnbbb fbn n n fnbn nn r bb frb f b r n r f n n b t n n tbb bt b ft ttn bnn bnnrbbn btf tn b b r t tf b n t b b b t b t b f n b b n t b f fbnb nff t tnnnrb f nf tf r b b b b t t t b t b b b t nft tbf n n b b n n b n n n rtt nbb n nft ttbf b b b r b b b n b n b f b n t t t t t f t t t t f t n b b b f b f b b n f b t n t b nbb nbrb b n t b b b t b t b f n b b n t b f fbnb nft ttbf brf ftbn nfnfbrt n n b b b t t b b n t rttr brfftn tbb nbn rbnt fntn rbfb n b n t b b b t b t b f n b b n t b f fbnb nf ttbf bbrn nfnn tbrff t nf tbf nnff ft n b nbf nbb tnrnb br b n bf bb f nbr t f n nbn bbr trrnbf rbtf nbn b b bnn nrbn frfbt nnbn br f n b fbbn nr fbbn nr fbbn nr nrb nrnn nb rb tnn n brnbn nbr brnnbr n nb n frfbt nbb tbn nnbb nb frbfbft t b t b rb tf tnf nbr tf b nbrf tbf bf n nfb br tft fbrfnf n nbr ntn b n n tnnn nbt rnnnfn b n n r b n n nb rbb ntrfrn b b r f r f b nnnnn f nnnn nbrn tnnb nbr n rnnbt bb b b tnn r t n rbn f bnnbrnb brf f nnbnnfnbn b nb bf nf f n b nnbr b n b r n r b nn nbrt bb tr f b rn nbrn bbn b bbb nn b nb tnn nb n bnnf n brf f bbbnf brf tf r n nf b f tfrnb b fbb fb fr t b b b nr t b b tn tb frrfrfb fbr n nf tbfb rnb n nt nb nbr bb b b nbr b r nb f nrr b nfrrnb ft

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D4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, March 5, 2014 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 725344767 1318315974 921FREE SPACE5372 216424863 529395268ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N IB O G BINGO B I N G O SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Shirley Claypool WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! B 7 I 25 G 47 O 67 N 34