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SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | C1SPORTS: Lake Minneola basketball advances to state tournament WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWST AND INSIDECLASSIFIED D1 CROSSWORDS C2 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN C1 SPORTS B1 VOICES A4WORD ON THE STREE T A2SOUTH LAKE PRESSV OLUME 99, NO. 9 5 SECTIOn N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reservedwww. southlakepress.com PRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comAs concerns mount over red-light camer as in Clermont, City Manager Darren Gray has called for a review of nearly 2,700 tickets is sued to date for drivers cited for turning right on red. With an aim to cut down on drivers running red lights and causing accidents, the city council last year approved placing up to 24 red-light cameras at 13 in tersections along State Road 50 and U.S. 27, but only six have been installed to date at the most problematic intersections. The camer as became operation al on Jan. 3, but roughly 90 percent of the citations have been issued to drivers turning right on red. Gray said he has di rected Police Chief Charles Broadway to work out the logistics to review the 3,000 tickets. Because of the high number of notices that appear to have been issued, I have asked Chief Broadway to review all the notices of violation that have been issued to right-hand turns on red since Jan. 3, 2013, which is when we start ed issuing notices of violation, Gray said in an email. Grays decision comes after a city council meeting last week during which dozens of people complained theyd been ticketed unfairly. Out of 3,086 drivers cited from Jan. 3 to Feb. 11, some 2,721 received tickets for supposed illegal right turns on red. Residents at the meeting many with tickets in hand told council members they felt they were un fairly ticketed based on a state statute that al lows right turns with out stopping, if it is done in a careful and prudent manner. In Clermont, police have said this means a right turn on red under 12 mph and without on coming vehicles. I did not come to a complete stop, but in the video of me at the light, you can see clearly that I applied my brakes and was going well under 10 mph, maybe 6 or 8 mph, when I turned, said John Corwin, a resident who asked for a review of his ticket.CLERMONTGray: Review all right-on-red camera tickets BROADWAY GRAY ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comA Lake County paramedic transporting a patient to the hos pital has been ticketed for run ning a red light after his ambu lance collided with a patrol car. Paramedic John Steadman, who was transporting a pa tient in non-emergency mode and using no lights or sirens, reportedly was speeding south on Citrus Tower Blvd. travel ing 42 mph in a 30 mph zone ran the red light at Northridge Blvd. and slammed into a Cler mont police car going west on Northridge on a green. Its regrettable that this in cident occurred, Lake County EMS Executive Director Jer ry Smith said. Although the crash happened in Clermont, Florida Highway Patrol troopers were called to investigate. A report said the crash was caught on tape by the ambulances on-board camera and reviewed by an investigating ofcer with FHP. The GPS captured its speed. FHP Spokesperson Sgt. Kim Montes said no one in the am bulance was injured, but Na than Farzati, the Clermont ofcer driving the car that was hit, was transported to South Lake Hospital with minor injuries. He has since been released. In an email, Montes also conrmed that Steadman was tick eted for running a red light. Smith said Steadman also has been suspended from his job with EMS while an internal review is conducted to deter mine further action, if any. Its been years since the last time one of our units was in volved in an accident of this magnitude, Smith said. Smith said he expects the in ternal review to be completed by the end of the week.CLERMONTEMS driver ticketed following collisionSEE CAMERAS | A2 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comResidents of the Hartwood Re serve subdivision in Clermont, where a sinkhole opened up last week, wonder if a drainage problem is to blame. The 15-foot-wide and 4-foot-deep hole, rst spotted Feb. 17 morning at the inter section of Powderhorn Place and Peaceful Valley Drive, is only about 100 feet away from another 10-foot-wide and 10-foot-deep hole that opened up at the subdivision last July because of an under ground leak. Its more like road erosion. Thats what we (some residents) are deducing, because this hole happened on the same street just a short CLERMONTSinkhole or drainage problem? THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Neighbors observe a 15-foot in diameter sinkhole at the intersection of Powderhorn Place Drive and Peaceful Valley Drive in Clermont. BELOW: Tim Rogers, with Bechtol Engineering and Testing, measures the depth of the sinkhole. WHITNEY WILLARD / STAFF GRAPHIC Hartwood Marsh Rd. Tumbling River Dr. Wind River RunPowderhorn Place Dr.Tumbling River Dr.Harts Cove Way N Peace Pipe Way Peaceful Valley Dr. Sinkhole SINKHOLE LOCATIONA sinkhole opened at the intersection of Powderhorn Place Drive and Peaceful Valley Drive near Hartwood Marsh Road in Clermont. SEE SINKHOLE | A2

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 26, 2014 MINNEOLA South Lake Mardi Gras scheduled for SaturdayThe 10th annual Mardi Gras event will take place in Minneola from 6:30 to 11 / p.m. on Saturday at city hall. Dinner will be offered by Oakwood Smokehouse and Grill, with dancing and entertainment by Past Tense. Costumes are optional with prizes for the best costume. Door prizes, a silent auction and reasonably priced cash bar will also be available. Tickets are $40. The event is presented by the Sisters of Beta Theta ESA, with proceeds returned to the community for high school scholarships, Cornerstone Hospice, Horses With A Mission, South Lake Boys & Girls Club, Cooper Memorial Library, New Beginnings and others. To purchase tickets and for information, call Janet Hawkins at 351-394-7131.CLERMONT Relay For Life to host 50/50 Have a Heart drawingYour $10 donation gives participants a chance to be a lucky winner while helping to take a bite out of cancer by supporting the American Cancer Societys Relay For Life of South Lake-Cagan Crossings with the Have a Heart 50/50 chance drawing. The drawing will be held on Thursday during the Relay For Life of South Lake-Cagan Crossing team party at the South Lake Hospital Live Well Center, 1935 Don Wickham Dr. For information or to pur chase a ticket, call Kim Kitchen at 863-978-7563.CLERMONT Annual Teen Battle of the Bands is April 5The Cooper Memorial Librarys third annual Teen Battle of the Bands will take place from 2 to 5:30 / p.m. on April 5. This years battle will take place on the outdoors stage on the grounds of Lake-Sumter State College and includes rst place cash prize if $250; second place $125 and third place takes home $75. Band members between the ages of 12 to 18 should call to register at 352536-2275, or email lpiper@lakeline.lib. .us before March 15. The rst ve bands to register will compete for cash prizes.CLERMONT Tax service offered in March at LibertyLiberty Tax Service in Clermont is offering free tax preparation to new customers and to local community heroes, at their ofce 711 S. U.S. Highway 27, unit B, during March. Police and reghters should call for appointments through Sunday, teachers and school employees from March 3-9, medical providers and staff personnel from March 10-16 and people in the military and veterans from March 17-23. For information or to schedule an appointment, call 352-536-1829.CLERMONT Annual Scholarship Fair scheduled for March 11-12Back to School is COOL Lake County, a local nonprot organization, will host the 2014 Scholarship Fair from 4:30 to 7 / p.m., on March 11-12. The event, open to all Lake County seniors and their families will be held at the Clermont Community Center, 620 W. Montrose St., in downtown Clermont. Business sponsorships are available for $100 for both days of the event. Businesses, schools, civic groups and charities offering scholarships can participate free of charge, but registration is required. For information, go to www.backtoschooliscool.org, or email Julie Hulley at Julie@backtoschooliscool.org. Area Briefs What South Lake residents are saying about ...U.S. TAX CODEIf you could change one thing about the U.S. tax code, as it pertains to personal income tax, what would it be?When you make ear ly withdrawals from your 401, you have a short amount of time to replen ish the fund without pen alty. They should revisit the penalties when there is a needy situation. If you are out of work for a year, that short period of time to put the money back in does you no good. JERRY SULCENTI CLERMONT I would structure it that everybody got taxed, even those on welfare and the rich the same, equal tax across the board. ALLISON AULD CLERMONT Having been in the low end, in that posi tion, I honestly think that over-taxation of the wealthy would not result in the benets they think it will. I feel that the more relief, the more goes out in the economy, and I believe that tax relief helps on the high end. A healthy bal ance is in order. We are probably halfway to the way it was when Clinton was in ofce. RICHARD ARRIAGA CLERMONT A fair tax. I feel like I pay more taxes than a lot of people and I get less back. I see those that hardly pay any income tax at all and get back three or four times the amount in re tirement that I get. KERRY ANDREWS CLERMONT Word on theStreet Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 Corwin already paid the $158 ne but said he wanted his money refunded. Other residents said they came to a complete stop, but because they had to inch forward to get a better view of the inter section, they crossed over the white line (stop bar) at the intersection and received a ticket. At the meeting, Gray asked Broadway review the videos of every complainant present. Police looked at 59 videos and rescinded 51 tickets. When Gray learned of the number of tickets that had been dismissed, his feelings were clear. We apologize for the confusion and to any one who was issued a violation in error, he said. The intent of the program was to help keep our public safe. The program is just a few weeks old and, like any new pro gram, there is a learning curve. Even so, the integ rity of our red-light pro gram must be beyond reproach. Gray has spoken with the camera company American Trafc Solutions (ATS) about not issuing tickets for right turns on red, or not in stalling the additional 18 cameras the city contracted for but was told any changes to that con tract could end up cost ing the city money. Negotiations are continuing. Mayor Hal Turville, a strong opponent of the cameras, has said hed like to see the cameras removed altogether, even if it means a nancial loss for the city. Once someone at ATS reviews a video from a red-light camera and de termines a violation oc curred, the video is reviewed a second time by someone at the police department before a ci tation is issued. Accord ing to Broadway, from now on, a single per son at the police depart ment will review the vid eo. That person will have a clear understanding of what constitutes an ille gal right turn on red. Since the statute is so subjective, we will have only one person reviewing the violations so theres a consistent inter pretation of the statute, Broadway said. Weve directed our reviewer to look at the videos with a lot more discretion and in a less stringent manner when it comes to the interpretation of the stat ue. We will be looking at them differently and with a little more leniency. Drivers who still feel un justly ticketed can call or drop by the police station to request a person al review of their video vi olation. Broadway said a cut-off period for these re views will be announced at a later time. Drivers also have the option to dispute violations by following the instructions on their pa perwork or accompanying website. CAMERAS FROM PAGE A1 ways from the other one, almost one year ago, said a resident of the subdivision who did not want to be identied. If you look at it from the standpoint of mainly the drains, this hole is lower than where the last one was. Its like the water is coming down the road and overowing and the drain is not able to handle it, so it just collapsed. Austin Evans, another resident, said he wonders the same thing. He walks his dog in the area twice a day and he sees water buildup on the top of the road that wont go down the drain. The water settles on the road there, he said. Not all of it goes down the drain and sometimes theres so much you cant walk on it (the sidewalk). You have to walk around to get back onto the sidewalk, Evans said, pointing to the corner of Powderhorn Place and Peaceful Valley Drive. Bechtol Engineers from DeLand were called in to investigate after the sinkhole appeared near a bus stop on that corner and workers have been monitoring it since. Project Manager Tim Rogers said the hole has not grown since initial measurements were taken. He noted that sinkholes, which can open up any where, have a tendency to grow deeper or wider. However, Rogers could not rule out a sinkhole. Were pumping it with owable ll and stabilizing it so we can go down and see whats going on, he said. Once the ll is hardened, well be able to dig some holes to take samples of the dirt down below it to see what the strata is like, to see if there are any hollow spots down there and see how we can x it. Clermont ofcials said a city worker was sent out to monitor the lling because it is near an 8-inch water main pipe. The sinkhole is in a private gated community and a member of the subdivisions Homeowners Association Board has had Clermont police at least twice remove print and television reporters from the scene. That worries Miles Hensley, a resident just ve houses down from the latest hole, because he wonders what the HOA Board has to hide. This directly affects me and I know that the last hole stood open for about six months before it was xed, Hensley said. Another resident who did not want to be identied said she was wor ried about the potential for home depreciation if additional holes open up. Well have to wait and see, but what I and a lot of my neighbors dont want is to see the value of our homes go down no matter what it is causing these holes to happen here, she said. It also has me on edge because every little noise the house makes has me wondering if its not something happening under the ground. SINKHOLE FROM PAGE A1 THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Emily Hickey, middle, guides her children, Clare, left, and Ryan Hickey, around the sinkhole in the Hartwood Reserve neighborhood.

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Wednesday, February 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3 Staff ReportSisters of Sound womens a cappella chorus will host its Calendar Girls show at 7 / p.m., on Satur day at East Ridge Mid dle School, 13021 Exalibur Rd., in Clermont as a fundraiser for the group. The local award-win ing womens barber shop chorus, a chapter of Harmony Inc., hosts an array vocal talent under the direction of Shannon Elswick and Tiana Sandh. The show will highlight tradition al and non-traditional music, jazz and others. Tickets are $10 in ad vance, $12 at the door and $5 for students, available by calling 407-719-4363.CLERMONT Sisters of Sound to host annual production on Saturday Staff ReportThe South Lake Ju nior Womans Club will be giving away two $500 scholarships this year with one award ed to a high school student that resides in south Lake County and will be attending college this fall, and another awarded to a woman 21 years of age or older who would like to continue her education. For details on qual ications, application and deadline, go to www.slwjc.webs.com. For information, email rhonda_sljwc2011@yahoo.com, aimeeoptimaone@ gmail.com or go to facebook.com/sljwc.CLERMONTJunior Womans Club to award scholarships LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comA new Lake County schools district-wide anti-bullying initiative has been instrumental in making it easier for students to report bullying, school ofcials said. Implemented at the beginning of the 201314 school year, the ini tiative provides an an ti-bullying curriculum for each school, which is managed under the Safe Schools department. The initiative is comprehensive about educating about diversity and differenc es in students, said Bill Mathias, school board member. We have also made it easier for students to feel comfort able reporting it. Those students that feel threatened are coming forward. The initiative denes bullying so administrators know how to spot it wherever it takes place in the school, said Pam Beeler, program spe cialist for Safe Schools. School ofcials have reported 28 cases of bullying so far this school year. Thats eight more than in the 2012-13 school year. A number of highly publicized anti-bullying measures have been attempted in the school district in the last two years: Two students at Carver Middle School have been trying for two years to establish a GayStraight Alliance club to prevent bullying. Stormy Rich, an 18-year-old Umatilla High School student, intervened to stop bullying of a girl with men tal disabilities on a bus. As a result, she was kicked off the bus. In 2013, the Lake County School Board recognized Cypress Elementary students Kristopher Ganesh, Jamie Munoz and Mar leen Ryan for starting Bully Blockers, an anti-bullying program that includes Buddy, a mailbox fashioned out of cardboard to look like a huge os prey, the schools mas cot. Students can use the mailbox to deposit notes with concerns and questions related to bullying. Now, 15-year-old country singer Lizzie Sider is speaking on the issue locally, where is she is addressing more than 100 schools all over the state. On Wednesday, she is planning a presenta tion at Tavares Elementary School, and on Thursday she will give presentations at Semi nole Springs Elementary in Eustis and Windy Hill Middle School in Clermont. According to an ar ticle in the Daytona Beach News-Journal Sider said the issue is important to her because I had experi ence with bullying when I was in elementary school. The News-Journal re ported that her father gave her advice when she was dreading going to school. Nobody has the power to ruin your day, he told her, according to the News-Journal School ofcials said the hardest issue to confront currently is cyberbullying found on social media sites and in other areas on the Internet. It is very difcult for the school district to track it, said Chris Pat ton, spokesman for the school district. Many times, it is occurring off campus and after school hours. Stuart Klatte, president of the Lake Coun ty Education Association, agreed. That is a delicate balance, dealing with cyberbullying especially, he said. The schools have tried to take a stand and deal with it when they can. Bullying is a complex problem, and it is hard to gauge how big of an issue it is in Lake Coun ty, Klatte said. A lot of it is going to be follow through from the administrators af ter the report has been made by either the stu dent or teacher who has knowledge of it, he said of tackling each case of bullying. Tod Howard, school board member, said because there are so many programs on bullying it is imperative to identify which ones are working and which ones are not. Instead of doing all the programs, we need to identify which ones are working and make sure they are being re sourced properly, he said.Lake County schools initiative addressing bullying PHOTOS BY PETER BAUER / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP/ Singer Lizzie Sider relays her anti-bullying message through music, song and dance, with some help from her student band, at South Daytona Elementary School, in South Daytona, on Feb. 3.

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 26, 2014Governor Rick Scott represents the eliteGovernor Rick Scott was in the papers recently as saying he didnt favor a cost of living raise. In my opinion the governor of Florida is only representing the lthy rich as usual. I wonder if Florida doesnt lead the world in homelessness and poverty all around, and as for him getting better paying jobs, what a joke on us as taxpayers. PAUL J. ROBINSON | LeesburgDems favor state supremacy over individualsA recent urry of sycophantic letters selling the credits of the Democratic Party force me from under my cozy rock to point out a single fact that will trump every credit they own -Democrats are the party of state supremacy, which means, the rights of the individual can be trampled by the rights of the state, i.e. collectivism. The Founding Fathers framed a Constitution that identies a Republic founded on rights of the individual over the state, i.e., individualism. Every Democratic vote supports the rights of the state over the individual and I doubt thats really the way informed Americans want to go. Zionists? Yes. New World Or der supporters? Yes. Loyal Americans, no way! JOHN WHITAKER | TavaresBig water gulp will harm lakesNiagara Bottling wants to double the amount of water from the Florida aquifer. They make statements that the conditions in the permit would not harm water levels is not true. They contend the changes include conditions in the permit that withdraws should not contribute to a violation of water levels to a couple nearby lakes. This is not true. They try to tell us that the amount they plan to take will not effect our lakes, streams and rivers, not to mention the future development of businesses, homes, schools, drinking water, and swimming pools that a growing population will want to have. This also is not true. We are asked to reserve our water because our lakes and streams are drying up. Ten years ago when we moved here there was a river in back of our home. There were kayaks and boats traveling down the river. Now, there are no kayaks or boats because the river is dry. I hope the people of Leesburg and others in Florida will speak up and let Niagara know how we feel and how we love our beautiful state. We are asked to cut back on our water use, which we have done in our home. But, why do we have to do without because Niagara wants more? ELMA NELSON | LeesburgAlmos t t wo months into the red-lightcamera experiment in Clermont, this no ble effort to improve trafc safety ap pears to be unraveling quickly. When city leaders agreed to install the cameras, they did so in the hope that they would deter people from barreling through some of the citys busiest intersections. Now, they are expressing alarm over the high number of citations that have been issued to motorists turning right on red. It seems that the vast majority 90 percent of citations have been issued to drivers turning right on red and many of those have turned out to be questionable. In fact, when 59 angry drivers turned out to protest at a recent City Council meeting, City Manager Darren Gray asked Police Chief Charles Broadway to review the videos for each infraction. Broadway did, and he dismissed an astounding 51 of the 59 tickets. Gray subsequently ordered a review of each and every citation issued since the six cameras went live Jan. 3. Thats more than 3,000 tickets. So while the cameras are doing their jobs spitting out citations, ofcials are growing increasingly concerned that theyre not addressing a legitimate safety issue but are instead simply inconveniencing thousands of motorists. At the risk of saying we told you so, the controversy is not completely unexpected. Many towns around Florida that adopted the red-light cameras in recent years are already abandoning them after deciding that the angst they caused among citizens, visitors and tourists was not worth the revenue or the marginal improvement in trafc safety. Clermont city ofcials point out that it may be too early to pull the plug on the cameras there. After all, theyve been operational less than two months, and there is some tweaking that can be done. Some of that tweaking is already under way. Chief Broadway has decided to dedicate one person to reviewing the video of every red-light infraction in hopes of having more consistent enforcement. And Gray is talking to the camera company American Trafc Solutions (ATS) about doing away with citations for right turns on red. But ATS has a contract with Clermont, and any changes to the contract could cost the city money. So be it. More signicant than the cost of tweaking or abandoning the ATS contract is the cost to be paid by the motorists of Clermont, by the visitors, by the tourists, by the merchants. There is also the cost of Clermonts reputation to consider. Clermont does not need to be depicted as just another Florida town that should be avoided at all costs because of its overly aggressive trafc enforcement policies. We applaud the city for moving swiftly to resolve this simmering controversy before it boils over and encourage its decision-makers to not be swayed by the potential loss of dollars if they decide to alter the course set by the camera company. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . ........................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTOPINION WHATS YOUR OPINION?The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be origi nal, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to: Letters to the Editor, 732 W. Montrose St. Clermont, FL 34711By fax to: 352-394-8001EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed.OURVIEWIf you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veterans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to to www.lakeveterans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANS SOUTH LAKE PRESSYour community newspaper for more than 100 years.732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Florida 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region.All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Tap the brakes on red-light cameras LETTER of the WEEK YOURVOICESLETTERS TO THE EDITORRed light camera controversy is sillyWhy is there such a big hue and cry about cameras at trafc lights? Most people do stop at red lights, so why are they complaining? It is a law to stop on red trafc light signals. This isnt some new regulation. A recent study concluded that although there was an increase in minor collisions, fatal crashes were reduced by 49 percent. Complaints about the trafc ticket nes are minuscule compared to the estimated cost of a human life. The report did not give the total number of fatals, but the NHTSA, DOT HS 809-446 Economic Impact of Motor Vehicle Crashes report from 2000, estimates that each fatality results in an average discounted lifetime cost of $977,000. So let us assume that the red light cameras have reduced 10 fatal accidents in the past year. Thats over $9 million lost. No amount of dollars can pay for the pain and suffer ing of the familys loss of life. So lets stop this foolish debate about red light cameras. Just obey the law. WILTON NELSON | Leesburg HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO

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Wednesday, February 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5 Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...Totally UniqueTotally Unique is proud to be Clermonts first ORGANIC hair salon. We care about your beauty, your wellness, the environment and our community, so we use organic and sustainably harvested products whenever possible. We specialize in organic hair color, hair care products, nail and skin care lines. Our salon is one of the oldest salons in Clermont and is located at 786 W Montrose Street in Historic Downtown Clermont. Our stylists are experienced in all phases of hair care including color, straighteners, cuts, texture and styles. Hair stylists are Marjorie Morphet, Tina Foote, Sherie Wolkens and Jamie Rhoades. Our nail techs, Jennifer Vandergrift and Jamie Rhoades, perform pedicures and manicures using Zoya nail products (which are Big 5 free). Shellac manicures, lasting up to three weeks, are also available by Jennifer and Jamie. We have two pedicure chairs in a private room for your relaxation and enjoyment. Relaxing and therapeutic facials are available by Jennifer in our private upstairs facial room. Massage services include chair massage, Swedish and Deep Tissue. Massage services are also done in a private room in our upstairs area. We utilize several massage therapists and provide massage by appointment only. We also offer a small boutique with handcrafted jewelry and hair accessories, Art by Tina Foote and Jamie Rhoades, and other unique items. Salon hours are 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Saturday and open Sundays by appointment only. Evening hours are also available by appointment. We pride ourselves in providing a friendly, relaxing environment for our clients and friends. Stop by and visit or call 352-394-5005 for more information. We are also on Facebook and www.TotallyUniqueSalon.com. LOOKING FOR PARTS? SEE JULIE (352) 394-6111 Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! DEATH NOTICESAlbert AllenAlbert Allen, 59 of Yalaha, died, Monday, February 17, 2014 East side Funeral Home, Leesburg, FLRev. Calvin AshleyRev. Calvin Augustus Ashley, 84, of Deland, died Sunday, February 16, 2014. Rocker-Cu sack Mortuary, Lees burg, FL. Richard Buck BarnesRichard Buck Barnes, of Paisley, died Tuesday, February 18, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatilla.Gary Mark BeaulieuGary Mark Beaulieu, 75, of Coleman, died Sunday, February 16, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations.Jean BurrillJean Burrill, 93, of The Villages, died Thursday, February 20, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations.Cheryl L. di ButeraCheryl L. di Butera, 55, of Leesburg, died Monday, February 17, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg, FLBarbara Ann CoffeltBarbara Ann Coffelt, 71, of Talking Rock, Georgia, died Friday, February 21, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations, Wildwood.Mary Elizabeth ColemanMary Elizabeth Coleman, 93, of Clermont, died Saturday, February 15, 2014. Mar vin C. Zanders Funeral Home, Inc.Donald A. ConnorsDonald A. Connors, 84, of Fruitland Park, died on February 12, 2014. National Cremation Society.Lloyd E. CotmanLloyd E. Cotman, 77, of Wildwood, died Thursday, February 20, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations.Janet T. DavisJanet T. Davis, 87 of Leesburg, died Mon day, Feb 17, 2014. Bey ers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg, FL.Johnnie B. FinzelberJohnnie B. Finzelber, 86, of Eustis, died Saturday, February 22, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatilla.Delores Ann FrenchDelores Ann French, 68, of Umatilla, died Saturday, February 15, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home.Marva L. GrifthMarva L. Grifth, 78, of Grand Island, died Sunday, February 16, 2014. Hamlin & Hilbish Funeral Directors.Charlotte KirbyCharlotte Kirby, 85, of Tavares, died Friday, February 14, 2014. Bey ers Funeral Home.Jerry L. LathamJerry L. Latham, 69, of Fruitland Park, died Thursday, February 20, 2014. Page-Theus Fu nerals & Cremations.Dorothy MartinDorothy Martin, 104, of Leesburg, died Fri day, February 21, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations.Richard Merrill MayoRichard Merrill Mayo, 88, of Leesburg, died on Monday, February 17, 2014. National Cremation Society. Melvin C. McCreightMelvin C. McCreight, 90, of Lake City, died Thursday, February 20, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations.John R. MeeksJohn R. Meeks, 43, of Leesburg, died Tuesday, February 18, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg, FL.Beatrice MileraBeatrice Milera, 84, of Eustis, died Friday, February 14, 2014. Bey ers Funeral Home.Wayne Richard NealWayne Richard Neal, 87, of Leesburg, died on February 10, 2014. National Cremation Soci ety.Michelle Lynne NickleMichelle Lynne Nickle, 52, of Leesburg, died Sunday, February 16, 2014. Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations.Yvonne E. RiceYvonne E. Rice, 90, of Umatilla, died Friday, February 21, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatilla.Ruscher RichRuscher Rich, 96, of Orlando, died on Friday, February 14, 2014. Eastside Funeral Home.Sonny RossSonny Ross, 77, of Leesburg, died Sunday, February 9, 2014. East side Funeral Home.Juanita J. ShumpertJuanita J. Shumpert, 78, of Tavares, died Saturday, February 15, 2014. Marvin C. Zanders Funeral Home, Inc.Cindy SmithCindy Smith, 56, of Umatilla, died Wednesday, February 19, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home.Donald TrzuskowskiDonald Trzuskowski, 73, of The Villages, died Tuesday, February 18, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations.Vernon YoderVernon Yoder, 84, of Umatilla, died Thursday, February 20, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home.IN MEMORY

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A6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 26, 2014 12thAnnualTHEGENERALFEDERATIONOFWOMENSCLUBS SPONSOREDBY THECLERMONT WOMANSCLUB DOOR PRIZESThroughout the day!ENTER TO WIN:Fabulous Prizesand much more...ADMISSIONFREE! HERESJUSTAFEWOFTHEPRODUCTS& SERVICES: HERESJUSTAFEWOFOURVENDORS: Saturday, March 22, 201410:00am 2:00pm Your First ChoiceIn-Print & On-Line ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comThe South Lake Black Achiev ers recently hosted its 22nd annual awards banquet at the Lake Recep tions building in Mount Dora. The event was held to recognize people in the community who have achieved great success in their ca reers. We have gathered each year since 1992 to commend and honor the men and women who, through their tireless efforts, talents and dedica tion, have made their mark in soci ety, said a message from the South Lake Black Achievers Committee on its website. The South Lake Black Achievers Committee continues to strive at Keeping Alive Our Heritage and encourage us to all strive for excellence! To encourage excellence through out the community, the committee each year recognizes people who ex emplify its vision. This year, 13 re cipients in 11 categories were recog nized: %  en Law Enforcement: Sophia Threat, a law enforcement/correc tions ofcer with the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce %  en Service: Roger Pace, owner of PaceLogics Computer Graphics and Repair Company in Clermont %  en Military: Glenn Rodgers, a ser viceman with the U.S. Navy, work ing with the Aviation Support Equip ment Department %  en Para Professional: Regina Pen ny, the school secretary at Cecil E. Gray Middle School %  en Business Administration: Hattie McGriff with Orlando Health %  en Music/Entertainment: Thomas R. Ware Jr., the CEO of Ripple Effect, a not-for-prot organization mentoring inner city youth employed by Ware boyz Musik Publishing/Warner Brother Records/Premier Tracks of L.A. %  en Medical: Cassandra Allen, Med Tech certied nurses assistant at Oak Park in Clermont %  en Business: Owner Vincent Max well, a self-employed businessman who works for Genesis Transporta tion %  en Sabrina Gwynn Outstanding Youth Award: Matt Hoisington, Ash ley Johnson and Torrie McGriff, recent college graduates %  en Humanitarian: Gift of Love Foundation out of Groveland/Stuckey, a community outreach that helps families and children in need; Latoria Wilson-Robinson, recipient %  en Heritage Award: The Parker Family of Clermont, which came to the area in 1919, headed by Pearl Mama Parker of Brooksville, a sin gle mother of seven children and local restuarant/hotel chef and busi nesswoman most known for her roasted peanuts. Recipient, Joyce Freeman, 83, her last living child. Though award recipients were not required to live in south Lake County now, they had to have lived in there for 10 years or more at one time, made a big impression on the community or a combination of both, said Lucressie McGriff, the committees ticket chairperson and treasurer. Allen said receiving the award and recognition is an honor. I try to give it my all when Im at work, so it feels good to be recog nized, she said.MOUNT DORACareer success recognized by South Lake Black Achievers

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10% OFFAll options with this couponrffnntb B1SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 26, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTSSPORTS EDITOR . ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE . .............................. 365-8268 FAX . .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL . ......... sports@dailycommercial.comSPORTSandLEISURE CHRIS LEE | Staff WriterChris.Lee@dailycommercial.comLake Minneola High School earned the schools rst trip to the boys basketball state seminals with a 72-61 road win on Saturday against Lake Wales. Hawks coach Freddie Cole has turned Lake Minneola into the states top Class 6A pro gram, despite coaching at a school in only its third year of existence. Lake Minneola will play Ruskin Lennard at 4 / p .m. Friday at the Lakeland Center. A win will catapult the Hawks into Saturdays state championship game. But, to watch Lake Minneola as it prepared for Lake Wales, one mightve guessed the Hawks were preparing for a mundane midseason game. For example, Cole stood at the baseline with ball in hand during a recent practice. With an over-the-shoulder motion the kind that would have left Peyton Manning in envy he threw a completed pass to sophomore Drew Mendoza at half court for an apparent touchdown. Lake Minneolas coaches set a tone at the begin ning of practice that focused on keeping the players loose and having fun. The beginning of practice saw the players and coach attempting under-handed shots from half court. The more fun they have, the better we play, said Cole. On paper, Lake Wales, with a record of 18-12, was the worst team Lake Minneola has faced in the playoffs. But Cole insists they arent taking the Highland ers lightly. Lake Minneola has been dominant this season, with a 27-3 record and win ning by an average of 27 points per game. The most impressive win, arguably, was an 81-point victory against Umatilla. Lake Wales was no stranger to the postseason, unlike the Hawks. Lake Minneola preps for Class 6A state semifinals IF YOU GOWHAT: FHSAA State Final Four, Class 6A seminals WHEN: 4 / p.m. Friday WHERE: The Lakeland Center (Tickets: $10 at the gate, park ing $8) WHO: Lake Minneola vs. Ruskin Lennard BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Lake Minneola senior Jean Francois (12) shoots the ball between Deltona seniors Jerome Monroe (32) and Christian Rodriguez (15) during the class 6A-Region 2 playoff game between Lake Minneola High School and Deltona High School in Minneola on Feb. 13. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comThe Lake-Sumter State College softball team has reached one of its goals. It has a viable pro gram capable of beat ing any team on any given day. The Lakehawks evened their record at 10-10 Thursday with a 17-9 win against South Florida State College in the rst game of a dou bleheader at the National Training Center. The win marked the rst time LSSC has hit the .500 mark in recent memory. In the nightcap, the Lakehawks climbed over .500 with a 5-4 win. LSSC got on the board with two runs in the second inning and added two more in the third, but trailed 9-4 heading into the bottom of the fth. The Lakehawks put the game away with its best offensive outburst of the season 10 runs on 11 hits. Mackenzie Heggie led the outburst with a grand slam ho mer to left eld. A three-run spot in the sixth inning gave the Lakehawks a mer cy-rule win. LSSC powered out 21 hits in the win. Heg gie and Kayla Fuller led the way with three hits each, followed by two hits apiece from Jodi Pierce, Michelle Breen, Zoe Hart, Taylor Dou glass and Savannah LaLande. In the second game, Mellissa Webb was the winning pitcher. Douglass went 2-for3 with an RBI and Full er was 1-for-3 with a home run and an RBI.Lake Sumter softball team hits .500 mark BRETT LEBLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Lake Sumters Zoe-Rae Hart heads for home as head coach Jill Semento waves runners around the bases during a game against South Florida State College on Feb. 19. MARK FISHER Special to the Daily CommercialThe Eustis Panthers came up short in their effort to advance to the FHSAA Final Four in Class 5A, falling Saturday night, 52-47, to the American Heritage Patriots (23-7) in the Panther Den. The Panthers (23-8) strug gled against the taller Patri ot front, anchored by 6-foot10 senior Drake Lamont. His presence forced Eustis to al ter its shots on drives to the basket where Lamont swatted them away or cleaned the glass, leaving few offensive rebounds for the Panthers. Lamont keyed a Patriot offense that never trailed in the contest, scoring eight points in the rst as American Her itage opened a 19-10 lead by periods end. Only a late 7-0 run by the Panthers to end the half kept the game from get ting out of control as they were able to overcome a 16-point decit to get to 31-22. An 8-3 run to open the third period brought the Pan thers within ve with Kiron Williams hitting a late trey en route to his team-high 18 points. Eustis trailed 38-33 entering the nal period. Another bomb from be yond the arc by Williams and strong play by Antwon Clay ton near the basket allowed Eustis to slowly edge back into the game, reducing the Patriot lead to four points when Coy Patterson drove the length of oor for a con tested layup with 20.2 sec onds remaining. His drive made it a one-possession game at 48-46. With only seconds remaining and desperately needing the ball, Eustis repeatedly fouled to send the Patriots to the line in the hopes of pulling off the comeback. But the Panthers came up short as the Patriots Keyshawn Evans went 4-for-4 from the line to protect the victory.Eustis falls to American Heritage in Class 5A-4 title game BRETT LEBLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Eustis senior Coy Patterson dribbles around an American Heritage defender during the Class 5A Region 4 championship game on Friday. SEE PLAYOFFS | B3

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B2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 26, 2014 CHAMBER AWARDS & NEWSChamber Ambassadors welcomed Dianne Davis and all of the Mitre Accounting staff to their new offices located at 15701 State Rd. 50 in Clermont (inside the Mizz Realty building). Stop by for a visit or see them first virtually at www.mitreaccountingandtax.com. Marholin Medical Institute & Taylor-Made Health & Wellness were the sponsors for the January Chamber Business After Hours, which was held at their offices located in the shadow of the Citrus Tower (185 N. Highway 27 Clermont, FL 34711). You can check out Dr. Maurice Marholins and Dr. JP Silveras services online at www.marholinmedicalinstitute.com and www.tayloredwellness.com. The South Lake Young Professionals (SLYP), a standing committee of the South Lake Chamber, recently held a social event at Graffiti Junktion in Clermont. The event was open to any Young Professionals doing business in South Lake County. The mission of the SLYP is to identify & cultivate young professionals to become leaders in business and community through networking, mentoring, volunteering and leadership development. You can follow them at www.facebook.com/SouthLakeYP The Chamber Ambassadors held a ribbon cutting to welcome four Chamber Member businessesAmerican Backflow Testing Gary Gamache, Ana Ivonne Aviles, CPA, Limitless Cleaning Cynthia Acosta, and Tri-HR Solutions Jacqueline Rogers who recently moved to their new 3rd Floor offices at 1230 Oakley Seaver Blvd. (above Elite Car Wash) in Clermont. There was musical entertainment, food, beverages and a wonderful crowd on hand to help celebrate the event. Congratulations on your new 'digs'! Christine Krebs, a senior at East Ridge High School, is presented the award by Wesley Reed from Ameriprise Financial. The award recognizes our future community leaders for their academic and volunteer excellence. Ms. Krebs involves herself in many different areas as a Student Delegate, as the Vice President of the National Honor Society, as the Captain of the Varsity Swim Team, as a volunteer at the South Lake Animal League and at Sawgrass Bay Elementary all the while working at the NTC/Livewell Center as a Lifeguard and achieving the "A" Honor roll though out her High School career. Congratulations from the South Lake Chamber! Over 200 Lake Minneola High School Seniors & Juniors gathered to hear about life in the real business world, thanks to the efforts of the Chamber Education Committee headed by Clinton Pownall from Computer Business Consultants. Discussing topics such as "How to properly dress for job interviews", these students are now well-versed on how to navigate the business waters, as they take their next major steps in life and into the community. 21 volunteer Chamber business & not for profit professionals shared their wisdom through the program to help prepare our future business & community leaders. Pictured above (L to R): 2014 Citizen of the Year Winner Rob Berens; John & George Schmid Schmid Construction; Wendy Terry Chairman of the South Lake Chamber Board, Marcy & Ron Becker Becker Funeral Home; Brian Hammond The Church at South Lake; Ray San Fratello President of the South Lake Chamber; Dr. Paula Whetro Building Blocks Ministries Each year at the Chairmans Gala, the South Lake Chamber installs their incoming Board of Directors while also presenting several business awards and the prestigious South Lake Citizen of the Year (COTY) award. The Gala was held recently in the Magnolia House at Trilogy located in Groveland with almost 300 people attending a formal evening with cocktails & dinner. Lake County Sheriff Gary Borders presided over the swearing in of the Chamber Board members, while Wesley Reed from Ameriprise Financial served as Master of Ceremonies. The following awards were presented: Business of the Year Award: Schmid Construction Heritage Award: Becker Funeral Home Revitalization Award: The Church at South Lake Oakley Seaver Service Award: Building Blocks Ministries Citizen of the Year Award: Rob Berens www.southlakechamber-fl.com

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Wednesday, February 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B3 To Apply for Scholarships from the Pig on the Pond Education Fund Vist Our Website: www.pigonthepond.org Come and Join our Family of Proud Sponsorsfor the 16th Annual Pig on the Pond For the Kids Pig on the Pond Mission Statement Jordan Anderson11:00 am 12:00 pm Clermonts Country Sweetheart Jordons latest singleYou Aint Ready For Me, shot straight to the Top 40 of the Music Row charts. HayFire Band2:15 pm 3:30 pmHAYFIRE has played all over the great state of Florida. They have been on stage with some of the biggest names in Country Music. The Down Brothers SUNDAY, March 9th a Day of Entertainment12:45 pm 1:45 pmThe Down Brothers perform Classic Rock throughout the Orlando area. The Abby Four4:15 pm 6:00 pmA Beatles tribute band with music and costumes from three different Beatle eras. HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. The Highlanders played in the Class 5A Region al nals last season. The H ighlanders had more experience in the play offs, but Cole was su premely condent in his play ers. Most of the guys have been here since the school opened, Cole said. They be lieve this is their year. Lennar d Ruskin en ters Fridays state seminal game with a 27-4 r ecord. The Hawks use a ve-guard setup most of the time, which fea tures twin brothers A very and Anthony Brown with a sixth sense of where each other is on the court. I know that when he is on the court it is easy to nd him and get him easy buckets, Avery Brown said. Just as im portant is the brothers ability to kno w where to move without the basketball. Ive got to move around and I know where he likes the drive and penetrate, and I al ways get to the open spot based on who s go ing to drive, Anthony B rown said. The defense has been terric all sea son for the Hawks and has allo wed an average of 51 points per game. Our defense has been tremendous and we probably score half if not most of our points on good defense, said Cole. Cole felt Satur days game showcased what the H awks have been building toward over the last three years. Lake Wales has his tory, they truly do, but it s our turn, said Cole. And now, the Hawks get to add to their own growing basketball legacy. PLAYOFFS FROM PAGE B1 LL ake Minneola junior A A very Brown dribbles the ball around a Deltona defender in Minneola on FF eb 13BRETT L eE BLANC / D AILY COMMERCIAL

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B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 26, 2014 Do it for yourself andFree yourself from home ownership worries and spend more quality time with those you love. Enjoy delightful dining companions in three distinct on-campus venues join your neighbors for a game of golf or bocce ball venture into Mount Dora with friends or take a dance class with the one you love. Choosing a secure, maintenance-free lifestyle at Waterman Village allows you stay connected with those who matter most. Contact us today!Call (352) 385-1126. 255 Waterman Avenue Mount Dora, FL 32757 www.WatermanVillage.com CHRIS LEE | Staff Writer Chris.Lee@dailycommercial.comLake-Sumter State College dominated Community College of Baltimore Coun ty-Dundalk in a base ball doubleheader on Feb. 19 at the LSSC baseball complex. The rst game was a 9-2 win, and the Lake hawks were even more dominant in game two an 8-0 victory for LSSC. Starting pitcher Kyle Schackne allowed only two runs and had seven strikeouts in a complete-game perfor mance to get the win in the opener. Schackne allowed just one walk in an 85-pitch performance 66 of which were strikes. The LSSC hitters could do no wrong against Dundalk pitcher Shawn Pass, who surrendered 11 hits and eight earned runs in six innings. We have been strug gling offensively over the last couple of games so it was good to get off to a good start, LSSC head coach Josh Holt said. The second game was similar to the opener. LSSC once again started off the rst in ning on re with a four-run outburst. Hig don, Barnhard, Curtis and Sam Thomas each scored, due in part to two errors to give the Lakehawks the 4-0 lead. In the third, Thomas scored off of a mis played ground ball and Blanton chased Baziel Cabrera home on a double to deep right-center eld, giv ing Lake Sumter a 6-0 advantage. The nal scoring punch came in the sixth inning when Blanton hammered a solo home run. Saris also scored in the inning.Lakehawks take two from CCBC-Dundalk

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Ann DupeeREMEMBER WHENA weekly column that reprints some of the more interesting news stories that have appeared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press.C1SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 26, 2014 www.southlakepress.comCOMMUNITYProudly servingCLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWSSTAFF WRITER . ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE . .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 EMAIL..... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com %  en HOMETOWN: Clermont %  en OCCUPATION: Student %  en FAMILY: Dad, mom, younger brother, younger sister, dog What do you enjoy most about south Lake County? I like the quaintness of it. We dont have big clubs or concerts. But when my friends come to town I show them things like the Citrus Tower and that one haunted house downtown. Its nice. 1) If you had to summarize your philosophy of life in one sentence, what would it be? If you think positively, things might not be better, but theyll seem better. 2) Name a person or incident youve come across recently thats touched you in some way. Why did this person or incident impress you so much? I saw a series of notes on the door of a bathroom stall. One girl asked how she should deal with being raped, and the rest of the notes were all supportive responses and lists of resources. I was impressed that people felt pulled to take time and write something to this anonymous person. It shows we still have true empathy. 3) How does what you do contribute to the welfare of the area? I am studying to be a teacher, and I think this helps the welfare because the number one thing that can help solve issues is awareness. Awareness comes with more education. 4) Name one of your greatest accomplishments so far. I won a scholarship, which allowed me to do research at a university in Switzerland for a summer. 5) Whats something youve always wanted to do but havent yet? Ive always wanted to go skydiving! FROM THE FILES | 25 YEARS AGO 1989Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press Meet YourNEIGHBORMEGAN FRUGOLI FEDERAL PRISON FOR LAKE COUNTY?Gonna Get Our selves a Prison? The county-owned property on US 27 at the Turnpike interchange is being considered as a site for a Federal Cor rections Institution. Mid-Florida Economic Development Council and Feder al Bureau of Prisons representatives approached Lake County commissioners individually in February to discuss the subject. The Federal Corrections Institution would require 200 acres from the county, of which 60 would be actually utilized. The remainder is for a buffer area. Jobs created would pay an average of $25,500 to $27,000, and historically, 60 percent of the po sitions are lled locally. The medium-security facility would employ between 100 and 150 people and house 500 to 1,000 inmates, supposedly mostly white-collar criminals. An estimated $15 million would be pumped into the local economy annually.COUNTY APPROVES SAND MINE NEAR CLERMONTCounty commissioners supported the Planning and Zoning Commissions recommendation and approved a 21.4-acre sand mine operation southeast of Clermont on SR 50. The area is south of an existing sand mine owned by Clermont attor ney Tom Dougherty. Dougherty represented the petitioner, William K. Stosberg. City of Clermont planner Jim McAllister hand-delivered a letter requesting the county postpone (deny) the petition until such time as a comprehensive standard mining ordinance is adopted by Lake County. Should the board approve the mining oper ation, Clermont asked that an excel lane to DOT standards be constructed on the eastbound lane and that a grade no greater than 8 percent be maintained on Hooks Street. County Commissioner Richard Swartz, who represents Clermont, twice made motions for amendments. Both died for lack of a second. Mr. Swartz was the only negative vote when the board approved the mining operation.SHERIFF OPENS LOCAL SUBSTATIONFor the convenience of south Lake County residents and efciency of the Lake County Sheriffs Department, Sheriff George Knupp has opened a new sher iffs substation on the back topside of Sunny side Plaza on SR 50. A uniformed deputy is on SEE HISTORY | C2 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comEach year for the past four years, Minneola Elementary Schools fth grad ers have been made to feel like stars. This year is no different, since for the fth time, the schools choir director An gelo Caponi, has auditioned his fth-grade students for a chance to sing at Downtown Disneys main stage. Caponis classes com bined to form one giant choir performed a 2025 minute Disney-themed show, complete with vocals and dance moves. Caponi even gave stu dents the opportunity to audition for vocal and dance solos. Its kind of their sendoff before middle school, since I have been with them since kindergarten. Ive seen most of these kids, and even some of their siblings, grow up before my eyes, Caponi said. Caponi doesnt leave the other grade levels out, ei ther. Each year, he also works with the pre-K, kindergarten, rst-, second-, thirdand fourth-grade classes on elaborate musi cal shows they practice for the entire year, to be put on for parents. Even the fth graders get to perform the show for parents who cant make the show at Downtown Disney on another night at the school. Caponi said Disney of cials told him his cho ral group is the largest one in the country to perform at Downtown Disney each year. The maximum num ber of performers allowed in one group is 75. This year, however, Minneola Elementary has nine fth-grade classes, with a total of 185 students, so as to not exclude any student wishing to participate, Caponi asked for two sep arate Downtown Disney dates so he could split his students into two groups and involve all of them. The rst group of stu dents performed on Feb. 4, and the second group took to the stage Monday. My brother was part of this last year and now I get to do it. He was the prince, said Victoria Houghton, 10. Im really happy I got a (solo) part too and just excited to be a part of it. Its so much fun. Another difference, and one that Caponi is excited about, is that this year the time slots Disney granted were in the late afternoon instead of morning or mid day, meaning that more of the students parents, friends and family members could attend.MINNEOLAFifth graders perform at Disney ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Minneola Elementary Schools fth-grade students, led by Choir Director Angelo Caponi, sang Disney classics at Downtown Disney on Monday afternoon. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comPig on the Pond For the Kids is back for its 16th year, March 7-9, to raise money for local educational programs and scholarships for college-bound students graduating from south Lake schools. Since the event rst began in 1998, nearly $700,000 has been raised for education. Local businesses, schools, individuals, organizations and event sponsors have pulled together to host the week end of events, starting Friday evening, March 7, with The Great Chili Challenge, a competition featuring a va riety of tasty chili, music by T. Scott Walker and Clemons Road, the midway, a crafter show, boat show and more. Saturday begins with the 5k Rib Run/Walk for Education, sponsored by First Green Bank, at 8 / a.m. Pig on the Pond ofcially opens at 10 / a.m. and will be a sanctioned bar becue competition, midway, kids zone, dessert bake-off competition and the Apopka Shores Districts an nual Cub Scout pinewood derby from noon to 1:30 / p.m. Usually, the event spans Friday night and all day Saturday, but this year organizers added one more day Sunday, March 9. Day three will fea ture a music showcase, as well as the No Duck Left Behind rubber ducky race. One Lake County child will win a $5,000 scholarship. The musical lineup for Sunday will feature Jordan Anderson, a former Cl ermont resident and Nashvilles new -Pig on the Pond adds an extra day of funCLERMONT SEE PIG | C3

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C2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 26, 2014 PASSING GRADES By YAAKOV BENDAVID / Edited by Will ShortzNo. 0216 RELEASE DATE: 2/23/2014 ACROSS1 Summer refreshers5 Israels Netanyahu, informally 9 Bowler and sailor 13 Tracking systems 19 Ports 21 Memphis deity 22 Actress Cuthbert of 23 One who turned Cinderellas pumpkin into pumpkin cheesecake? 25 Drive away 26 Reference 27 New Yorks Jacob ___ Park 28 Crude coconut opener 29 Cherry part 30 Worth mentioning 32 Iglu and yoghurt, e.g. 33 Bad beginning? 36 ___ cycle 37 Dustin Hoffman title role 39 County or lake of Cooperstown, N.Y. 42 Dunking cookie 44 Be too syrupy 45 Liquor unit 49 Snorkeling bargain? 52 Hip-hop artist with the 2013 #1 album Born Sinner53 Up to, shortly 54 French noodles? 55 What makes blue jeans blue 56 Shes got electric boots, a ___ suit (Bennie and the Jets lyric) 57 Rust-causing agents59 Vex 60 Stomachs 61 Fit to ___ 62 Tin can plinker, maybe 63 Challenge for a speech coach 64 Oscar winner Leachman 67 Setting of The Crucible 68 Nappy fabric 72 Undeveloped 73 Elizabeth Taylor role of 74 Roman ruler before Caesar 75 Subj. of Snowden leaks 76 Dismantle on a ship 77 Transportation company that skimps on safety? 80 Conk 81 Wisecrack 82 Of the flock 83 Lawn care brand 84 Mythological monster 87 Addr. book datum 88 Even if, in brief 89 Corkscrewed 92 ___ no turning back 95 Dress accessory 99 Knacks 100 Reason for an ophthalmologists visit 101 It might be answered, Muy bien, gracias 104 Sergeants order 105 Stephen Hawkings computergenerated voice? 107 Church vessel 108 Bring in 109 Duvel pub offering 110 Prepares to propose 111 Kind of rug 112 Buttonhole, for example 113 NASAs ___ Research Center DOWN1 Acting family 2 Did a Vegas job 3 Return option 4 Pulled strings, maybe? 5 Former 6 N.B.A.er Hayes, to fans 6 What did ___ deserve this? 7 Comfortable state 8 Suffix with age 9 Bands cue 10 More wan 11 Draws 12 Old atlas initials 13 Force under Stalin 14 Keys on a piano 15 Two things seen beside James Bond at a casino? 16 Popular ski spot 17 Butler of literature 18 Register ring-ups 20 Screenwriting guru Field 24 Call from a balcony 28 Massenet opera 31 Indoor balls 32 In a loathsome way 34 Starting trouble 35 Tryst site 38 Directors cry 39 The Simpsons character with a habit of calling things gnarly 40 Candy bar that comes two to a pack 41 Most arias 43 Insect repellent ingredient 46 Artery 47 Thats ___! 48 Bodies of eau 50 Little: Suffix 51 Per ___ 52 Use for a rsum 56 Spammer enabler 58 Oh, yeah? Lets see you hold your breath for two minutes! e.g.? 59 Better qualified 62 Like Bruce Willis, in his later movie roles 63 She drank champagne and danced all night, in song 64 Crude weapon 65 46-Down division 66 Spanish alternative? 67 Checked (out) 68 Myocyte 69 Sweater, e.g. 70 ___ it rich? (Sondheim lyric) 71 Highlands refusals 74 Better at conniving 77 Handles 78 Triangular sail 79 Infuser contents 81 Altar no-shows 85 Gingerbread house visitor 86 Enrobe 89 Heap 90 Eucharist holder 91 TV actress Graff 93 Spotted scavenger 94 Ditto 96 Take me ___ 97 Lifted 98 Hosiery brand 100 Kind of tissue 102 Coin grade 103 Repetitive behavior condition, for short 105 View from a boardwalk 106 Grammy Awards airer 1234 5678 9101112131415161718 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3031 32 33343536 3738 394041 42 4344 45464748 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 646566 67 68 697071 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 8485 8687 88 899091 9293 94 95969798 99 100 101102103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113For any three answers, call from a touch-tone phone: 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Solution on D3 duty between 8:30 / a.m. and 5 / p.m., Monday through Saturday.CPR SAVES A LIFEDuring V.F.W. Post 5277s monthly dinner meeting, auxiliary member Dorothy Dulin began choking and pointing to her throat. Paul Hollenbach, who received CPR training in Pennsylvania years ago while working for the coal mines, quickly wrapped his arms around Dotty and with his sts attempted to thrust up on her stomach. After three attempts, the meat was dislodged and Dotty began to breathe nor mally. Hollenbach has been a V.F.W. member for more than 30 years. His home on Minneola Avenue is also known as Santas House. Each year it is beautifully decorated and he and his wife distribute food and toys to the needy.CLERMONT CONSIDERS SKATEBOARD REGULATIONSClermont Council introduced an ordinance regulating the riding of skateboards on the streets and sidewalks in the city. Skateboarding will be allowed on residential sidewalks but not on those located in commercial areas. Master Clay Turville questioned not being able to ride on a sidewalk at a public park. He was assured riding on the sidewalk at a public park would be allowed, providing it was a designated area. Clermonts Parks and Recreation Chairman Cuqui Whitehead reported to the council that her committee, in cooperation with the Clermont Garden Club, had handed out 3,000 trees to local residents to be planted in primarily the Clermont area. She said a total of 35,000 trees had been given out by Clermont since her involvement. HISTORY FROM PAGE C1 SUBMITTED PHOTO The sisters of Beta Theta ESA will hold a Mardi Gras event Saturday to benet the Mike Conley Hospice House. Current President Pat Moore, center, presents a $500 check to Carol Felder, director of development, and Cornerstone Hospice Foundation Director Nick Buchholz. The 10th annual Mardi Gras event twill be from 6:30-11 / p.m. at Minneola City Hall. The $40 ticket includes dinner by Oakwood Smokehouse and Grill, entertainment and dancing by Past Tense. Costumes are optional. There will be a silent auction, cash bar and door prizes. Call Co-Chairman Janet Hawkins at 352-394-7131 for tickets and BETA THETA MARDI GRAS FUNDRAISER SET Staff ReportThe Lake County Public Safety Department and the Groveland Fire Department signed an automat ic aid agreement Monday at Grovelands Fire Station 94 at 193 Cherry Valley Trail. County ofcials hope additional pacts with other cities will be signed. The Groveland agreement states that the closest emergency unit, whether Lake County Fire or Groveland Fire, will respond to emergency incidents within the Inter-local Ser vice Boundary Agreement, or ISBA area. This agreement is a win-win sit uation for our citizens, said Lake County Commissioner Jimmy Con ner. Together, we can better protect lives and property and reduce in surance costs for residents in unin corporated Lake County, and within participating cities. The county is also imple menting an Automatic Vehicle Location or AVL system, which is similar to a GPS monitoring system that will dispatch the closest unit to any emergency, whether county or city. We will share a centralized dis patch and the costs of responding to emergencies in the Groveland area, said Lake County Public Safety De partment Chief John Jolliff. This agreement will improve response times and offer citizens an improved level of protection. The agreement with Groveland goes into effect on Saturday. Lake County is also working with other municipalities in the hopes of strik ing similar agreements throughout the county. This is truly a big deal for the citi zens of Lake County, said Commis sioner Welton Cadwell. I hope every city in Lake County that has a re department will sign onto this agreement.GROVELANDLake signs mutual aid pact with fire department, envisions others Call the South Lake Press to get your ad in! 394-2183

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Wednesday, February 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C3 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 CLERMONT BLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSAMILYELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time! IRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONTL Many Other Activities each week Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.org LIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLCHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm SOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary); 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.org ST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am 10:00 am Beginning Oct. 6, 2013 5:00 pm Service Sunday School Youth Group Nursery Adult Bible Study Womens Bible Study Mens Prayer Breakfast WOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH GODINCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALE ERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for Children Groveland IRSTBAPTISTCHURCH GROVELAND Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pm MT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! MINNEOLA CONGREGATIONSMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club NEWLPRESBYTERIANCHURCH18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am TLIVINGGOD Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce Rowland MONTVERDE WOODLANDSLUTHERAN15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 am OAKLAND PRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforSouth Lake South LakeGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOMErfn tbt352-394-7121806 W. Minneola Ave.,Clermont,FL Cremation ChoicesDirect Cremation$675Plus Container Ron Becker,Director352-394-8228921 S.US Hwy 27,Minneola,FL N EW R EFORMED P LANT C HURCH We meet our God on Sunday at Superior Residence at 10:30 AM. 1600 Hunt Trace Blvd. (Behind Home Depot)Pastor Harm Biehl 407-325-8663 est country sweetheart; the Down Brothers, who perform classic rock throughout the Orlando area; Hay Fire, a local band with a southern sound and the Abbey Four Band, a Beatles tribute band known for completely involving the audience in their performances. Everyone who has seen the Abbey Four Band in person says they are great, Fishel said. The popular Robinsons Racing Pigs races are back this year with pigs diving into a swim ming pool and swim ming for the nish line. Races will be spread throughout the entire weekend, according to event organizers. The Pig on the Pond For the Kids festival is being sponsored by Pig on the Pond Inc. and presented by the City of Clermont, Brighthouse Networks and News 13. The event is also be ing sponsored in part by Beef OBradys, Cler mont Chiropractic Life Center, the Daily Commercial, the South Lake Press and Napleton-Clermont at the Water front Park in Clermont. We are so excited for this years Pig on the Pond festival. There are some great new things that will be added to the things that people in the entire communi ty look forward to each year, Event Coordina tor Cheryl Fishel said. For information, vis it www.pigonthepond. org. PIG FROM PAGE C1 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMascotte police ofcials have red a sergeant because he reportedly refused to cooperate with an inter nal investigation into allegations that he harassed a fe male ofcer. The sergeant, David Grice, is the same ofcer who claimed last July that Police Chief Ronaldo Banasco had bugged Grices patrol car, an allegation City Manager Jim Gleason found groundless. According to documents obtained from the city, Ofcer Toni Hart complained last November that Grice was following her. She claimed on several occasions, while working the night shift, she noticed Grice nearby, sitting in his patrol car with the lights off, watching her while she did her job. Hart also stated that Grice, her immediate supervisor, would do the same thing while she was on lunch breaks. I have worked with Sgt. Grice on a past rotation and do not recall experiencing this course of conduct, nor was I followed around as much, Hart wrote in her complaint. He appears to frequently patrol the area that I am assigned to now more than before. I have also limited my conversation with Sgt. Grice to work duties and orders in hopes this would cease I am sure there is a reason able explanation, or perhaps these are just coincidences, with a solution that works out for everyone. An internal investigation was started, but Grice would not cooperate, Banasco said. He failed to cooperate or answer any question in the investigation, the chief wrote in a disciplinary ac tion form, where he recommended on Jan. 29 that Grice be terminated. While Deputy City Manager/Finance Manager Dolly Miller said its not uncommon for a supervisor to drive up on ofcers in the eld to see if they are OK, she con sidered Grices behavior to ward Hart rather odd. Although Sergeant D. Grice failed to comply with the questioning and internal in vestigation process, I was un able to complete and under stand fully his actions towards Ofcer Hart, but in fact, his supervision towards Ofcer Hart was different than the other supervisors at the Mas cotte police, she stated. Miller supported Banascos recommendation to terminate Grice for not cooperating with an internal investigation. In addition to Grices bug ging allegation, he has complained to the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce, the State At torneys Ofce and the Florida Department of Law Enforce ment that he was the subject of age discrimination by Banasco because the chief made Grice work a night shift.Mascotte officer fired during investigation of conduct

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C6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 26, 2014 Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) TODAYCAREER DAY WITH THE ARMY AT THE LIBRARY: At 4:30 p.m., giving teens, parents and adults tips about varying military careers, 756 W. Broad St. Groveland. Call 352429-5840 for details. THURSDAYSOUTH LAKE 912 PROJ -ECT MEETING WITH DR. WAYNE BROUGH: At 7 p.m., Clermont Com -munity Building, down-town. Brough is the chief economist and vice president of research at Freedom Works.DEADLINE FOR VENDORS IS THURSDAY FOR CLER -MONT COMMUNITY YARD SALE: From 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., March 2 on Mon-trose Street in down town Clermont. Ven dor spaces are $15. Go to www.clermontdown -townpartership.com for an application, email clermontfarmersmarket@gmail.com or call Betty Whittaker at 352-874-9535. Space is limited. SHEILA RAY CHARLES COMES TO FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH TO CELEBRATE RECOVERY: Daughter of the late Ray Charles will deliver a message of hope from 7 to 9 p.m., at 950 Seventh St., in Clermont. For in -formation, call 352-394-2412 or go to www.FUMC-Clermont.org. SATURDAYFREE GARDENING PROGRAM AT THE CLERMONT GARDEN CLUB: Next pro -gram in the First Satur -day Education Series from 10 a.m. to noon, at the club, 849 West Ave., downtown Clermont. Kim Rutledge of Ocalas Southern Charm Land-scaping and Nursery is the guest. SUNDAYCLERMONT DOWNTOWN PARTNERSHIP AND CLERMONT FARMERS MARKET HOST THE COMMUNITY YARD SALE: From 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., on Montrose Street in historic down-town Clermont. Call Betty Whittaker at 352-874-9535. MONDAYSAC MEETING: At 6 p.m., Sawgrass Bay Elemen -tary School media cen -ter. Call 352-243-1845. MARCH 5ASH WEDNESDAY SERVICE AT WINDER MERE UNION CHURCH: At 7 p.m., 10710 Park Ridge-Gotha Rd. A sol -emn and inspirational service. The Rev. Bar -ton Buchanan will of-ciate. For information, go to www.windermere-union.org or call 407-876-2112.PINE RIDGE ELEMEN -TARY SAC MEETING: At 7 p.m. in the media center. MARCH 6 FREE TRIATHLON CLINIC AT GEAR FOR MULTIS PORT: From 5:45 to 6:30 p.m., Thursdays in March, at the National Training Center in Cler -mont. First come, rst serve. Email Multisport-gear@aol.com to reserve a spot, or go to www.gearformultisport.com. MARCH 7PIG ON THE POND SANCTIONED BARBECUE COMPETITION AND FESTI-VAL: March 7-9 at Water -front Park in Clermont. Email tandy@churchat -southlake.com or go to pigonthepond@earthlink.net for details.HOWEY-IN-THE-HILLS GARDEN AND CIVIC CLUB YARD SALE: March 7-9, 313 W. Central Ave., across from the Howey water tower. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., March 7-8, and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., March 9. Call 352-324-6037 for details. MARCH 9 LENTEN SERVICES AND POTLUCK DIN NERS THROUGH APRIL 13 AT WINDERMERE UNION CHURCH, UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST: Spe -cial services every Sun -day evening preceeded by a potluck dinner, be-ginning at 5:30 p.m. with the service on the theme of forgiveness following at 6:30 p.m., 10710 Park Ridge-Gotha Rd. For in -formation, go to www.windermereunion.org or call 407-876-2112. MARCH 19MINNEOLA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CHARTER BOARD MEETING: At 7 p.m., me dia center at the school, 320 E. Pearl St, Call the school at 352-394-2600 for details. COMMUNITY CALENDAR

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Wednesday, February 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D1 rfntbrr rfntbrfffrn nnbrnrff tnbntnbnrrfrfb bnbrtn r f n b r r f r r f n t b r f rrbbbrnbtrb rfr rrfbffb trtbnffnnnr tnbb rrfrbffbbn tbbnrfr r n r b b t b r b n t r t n r b b f r b n f r r n n n n f f n b b n b n f f b r b b t n n b f r b b r r b b r f r f n t r t f n r f f n t tnbrrfrfnb frfrfbfbtbfn brntbntrf bfbtffrbnbr rbrrfr f r n r n b t b rb rnr rnrfn b b b fbr r rfrffrbr rfttbbtf b r n t r r b b n b n b f b r r r f f r f r r r f b r r n r f n n b r b f n b r f f r b r f r n n r b f t t f r f n r f r f r b n r f r n r f r f f t r r n n r f r r b n n b r f r f b r n t b r b n n n t t f b f n t t f r b b f b n r r b f r f n b n n b f r bbrbbrf nbnfrbbrf nnnbtbbn bnnrfnnrnf nbtbfr bftrtfn ntnrfnfrbtb rnnnb n r n b n r n b n n n fnt bbrnn tbrbnttb ftrbtrfbn trfrnrrb r f f b r f n r f f bn r t b b r n b n t f r b f f r nnrfrnnb rnbrrfr t t f b n r b t b b b b r b t r f f n t f r n r f f r b r f r b n b r t t f t n r n b r f f r r n f rbr bbtnbrrfrf fftrfn bffnbn brntbrbtr nbbrfbr rtnnrf bbrf rbnffn b n b f f r f f n n b b tbnbrb fffnb nnbtb f rrbnbrtfn fnbrbfbn bnrtfnffb rbnnffn rfbrfnr rrbn r f n b r n t r b r b f b bn r f r b t f r f t r n b rrrtbrff trbfrttf ffbnbnnffnr tnbrbbbrrfbrb nnrtnb bnfrfbr nbrffrr trtrbtrb rtbbnrfr r n b r f b f f fnt n r f r f r b r f f f b r r n b r r f b r f f f b r r t t r f b r n n t b b n b r t b b b t n f f n r n b n n r f r t t r r f f r f n b r f r n n f r f f ff rt tt b b b fbr r rfrffrbr rfttbbtf fnt f f b n r n b t n n b r r f t r b n r f b b t r f t n n r f t n n b r f b f b b r n r r r n b r r f r n b n t r n b f fftnbrrnbrfn rnbrfrbb rfntnrnr rbffbtnbr tbnbrrbnbrr tnnrfrffb ttfrrfnffntb trrfbrf fbtfbrnntt f r n n n n r b b f b b t f f t n b b r f f t n b r n r r f t t b b t f t nbbrfbffr rnbtrbtb nffnrnbbbn r f n b n r n t rbrbffrtfn t t f t n t f r b f f r ffbtnbrrf rfrbrbfnnn nnrfrfr nttbbnbnffn rfrb ttrfr brfbbffb bn r f n r f r b n b f r f n r f b r b f f r r t rrbrb nbrnft nbrbbbbbrfn n b b n r ft n b t t t f t n b b n r b r f n r r b t n r r f f r n r f r f n t r n n r n f b r b b r f r t b n b t n b f r n t t b b r f b b n t r r n n b b r r f r f t t f r b r r f r r t t r f r b r f r b r f b ft f tt n r t r n f b r f f n f r b n f n f n n r f f t t nbnbnrnnbn tfbnbrff f f f r n f r t n n f t r n t b r b t rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff n tbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff n trrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrff nrrrrrrrrrrff ttbrrrrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rfntbbt rfrntn nnnftbnbn brfbnrb bnbtn brnnrtnftbn tbrbttb nnnrfrbtb nbb n fbfn tbrbnbbbtn nnnntnbbtr bbbfrf rtfnbtr rrbrfnnnrfnt t rf

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D2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS W ednesday, February 26, 2014 rfntbtrf rfn tbr nbtbt rr r t b r r ntb r t t ttbrr rff n tb fbttt fr f btrr r rfr b b fr r fr b bnbt bnnb r ff b n r rr r tt r ffr t fr r tbb n b n b r r r b nbbr r tb b tb b n n t t b r t tff f b tb b bn tbn brr bnf tbb brr b ff ffr rfrr tf n t b r tntbt f bbtt tbnrr nb r f r r tbn tbf bt fr nr b b n n f r r t trtrrr b b t b r f r f r btbn tb bbt rr ttn tb tbb fr b r t f r bntbn rr ttf rb bb rrff b tb ff b tb bbbt f b r ttbf r b r tbb tb ff b tbb r bttrrr b f fr trr tbrb t bbfr t ff f bb ftrrfr fb rr f tb frf n br bnbfrf n f tr r t r bf n nfr trft t b br r tt rf tnb bbt tb b tbrr b b n t r r tb fbt r rrbbbbn bff tb bfbr f f f r f btb bnr nr r rf tt fr b tbn b t tbrr bbb rf tb rf r r r r f f bbtb rr bb b b n trrrr n bnr nrf n ntr rb bn ff bb r b f fb tb tfr bbbb bnt ff b rr b tn ff ntbbnb nr ttbn nfr rft brf t tbt tr nt r nttb r t b b n b b b n b f r f b ttb tbff r bb b n t r b tbrr tttb r tttb r br bntb rff bttb r tbb f bn tb rrr b ntbf bntb r t br ttbb frr b btr f frf nf n rfbr t r tb trf tbb r tbbr tbn brf n t tbrr bn tbrfr r tbnr r bt bntb tb rr tt tbrr fr b r n f r r r b t t b b n b b b t b t t t rb btfrf rf bf tbb brfr rfttb r rr btbb tbrf b nbf bbb frfr nf tn tbrrf nrfr br frr ttb rrrr nbnbb f tb r f rb b n bt tb nb b b t b

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Wednesday, February 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D3 rfntbrr rfr rr frn r trrr r br rr rrr rn r rr rrr br frrfrr rfntb nnb nfrfnbb rbnn ttnftfb b rtrrb rtnbnnft nftbb nn fnftf fbb ft nbrfft bbnn rnft bnbb n trbnn bbt ftbb bb bbnn n bnbb b r tbnbb b tnbbnn rrf f b t r t b ntbf rbn bbb nnn ntnbb rtbb b nbb b nn b bf nn ttnb rb b b trnftb rbnn nrrf f nbbt nbn bb nnrb bnn btbb nn bbb tbb b n n n bb tnnbb b bb n n b b n nn tbt bb btn tbbb n f b nft rtbb nbtf b bf bb rbnnb b rrnr bf nfttbf tfbftb ntft ntb nn f ntb bb n fnnf nrnnfb tfbtb b n nn frfbt nn f t f bntf tbnnb ttbnn n fnbtf bbnbtfb rnb nn nnf f tfb bftfb tbnb fbnnrbb nn ntbnbbnb ttfbrntnn bnn n tbb nnf f nnntrf f bnt ttnnftt ftbfnnt trbbrb b n trf n t f n n t t b n t t b r t b n n b b r r b t t b n n n n n t t b t b nf f nnff f t t b n n n n n t t b t b ftt nn tn bnn trf fft t t b n n n n n t t b t b n b r t t b n t b b n n trf fft f t t r t b t b t b f r r b frb f ftftf nbnn n n t b n b f t b n b n r n n t n b b t t b f f ntn tbb rfnn nb b ttbnttnb tfb tbnn b t tf t t f f r b b t t f f r b b nf tf rrb fbntbnbnb ttb nft tbf b n n b n b n b n b b b b b n b b b b b nft tbf t t r r r b n b n t t t n n t n t b b r n b b n t b n n t f t n b r f b r f b n n t r r b f n f n b r t f t b n n b n n btb nn r tbb r f t n b b fnrb ffb nnbnb nft ttbf nnnbnr nbt tbnn fbn fnt tfntfb tbnn b b t n n b n n n n n t b b nnnr nbrbtnntb nntrb fttb fb n r r b b nf ttbf nnff ft ttt bb rtbb nttn bb btbnn bbnn ttb rtfbb rbtf tnbnb bnn bbb bnnnn b rbttnnb ntnfrb nbb trntb nn f n n b t b b bbb tbb bbnn nfrt nnt tnttbn b ntnbtt tbnb frfbt ttnb rbntbb ntbb tnnbb nntt nbb nntt nbb n nnnbb frbfbft

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D4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 26, 2014 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 725344767 1318315974 921FREE SPACE5372 216424863 529395268ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N IB O G BINGO B I N G O SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Mary Holman WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! O 74 O 72 O 63 O 68 O 67



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SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | C1 SPORTS: Lake Minneola basketball advances to state tournament WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWSTAND INSIDE CLASSIFIED D1 CROSSWORDS C2 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN C1 SPORTS B1 VOICES A4 WORD ON THE STREE T A2 SO UTH LAKE PRE SS V OLUME 99, NO. 9 5 SECTIO N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reserved www. southlakepress.com PRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com As concerns mount over red-light camer as in Clermont, City Manager Darren Gray has called for a review of nearly 2,700 tickets is sued to date for drivers cited for turning right on red. With an aim to cut down on drivers run ning red lights and causing ac cidents, the city council last year approved placing up to 24 red-light cameras at 13 in tersections along State Road 50 and U.S. 27, but only six have been installed to date at the most problematic in tersections. The camer as became operation al on Jan. 3, but roughly 90 percent of the cita tions have been issued to drivers turning right on red. Gray said he has di rected Police Chief Charles Broadway to work out the logistics to review the 3,000 tickets. Because of the high number of notices that appear to have been is sued, I have asked Chief Broadway to review all the notices of violation that have been issued to right-hand turns on red since Jan. 3, 2013, which is when we start ed issuing notices of vi olation, Gray said in an email. Grays decision comes after a city coun cil meeting last week during which dozens of peo ple complained theyd been tick eted unfairly. Out of 3,086 drivers cited from Jan. 3 to Feb. 11, some 2,721 received tickets for sup posed illegal right turns on red. Residents at the meeting many with tick ets in hand told council members they felt they were un fairly ticketed based on a state statute that al lows right turns with out stopping, if it is done in a careful and prudent manner. In Clermont, police have said this means a right turn on red under 12 mph and without on coming vehicles. I did not come to a complete stop, but in the video of me at the light, you can see clearly that I applied my brakes and was go ing well under 10 mph, maybe 6 or 8 mph, when I turned, said John Corwin, a resident who asked for a review of his ticket. CLERMONT Gray: Review all right-on-red camera tickets BROADWAY GRAY ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com A Lake County paramedic transporting a patient to the hos pital has been ticketed for run ning a red light after his ambu lance collided with a patrol car. Paramedic John Steadman, who was transporting a pa tient in non-emergency mode and using no lights or sirens, reportedly was speeding south on Citrus Tower Blvd. travel ing 42 mph in a 30 mph zone ran the red light at Northridge Blvd. and slammed into a Cler mont police car going west on Northridge on a green. Its regrettable that this in cident occurred, Lake Coun ty EMS Executive Director Jer ry Smith said. Although the crash happened in Clermont, Florida Highway Patrol troopers were called to investigate. A report said the crash was caught on tape by the ambulances on-board camera and reviewed by an investigat ing ofcer with FHP. The GPS captured its speed. FHP Spokesperson Sgt. Kim Montes said no one in the am bulance was injured, but Na than Farzati, the Clermont of cer driving the car that was hit, was transported to South Lake Hospital with minor injuries. He has since been released. In an email, Montes also con rmed that Steadman was tick eted for running a red light. Smith said Steadman also has been suspended from his job with EMS while an internal review is conducted to deter mine further action, if any. Its been years since the last time one of our units was in volved in an accident of this magnitude, Smith said. Smith said he expects the in ternal review to be completed by the end of the week. CLERMONT EMS driver ticketed following collision SEE CAMERAS | A2 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com R esidents of the Hartwood Re serve subdivision in Clermont, where a sinkhole opened up last week, wonder if a drainage problem is to blame. The 15-foot-wide and 4-foot-deep hole, rst spotted Feb. 17 morning at the inter section of Powderhorn Place and Peaceful Val ley Drive, is only about 100 feet away from an other 10-foot-wide and 10-foot-deep hole that opened up at the sub division last July be cause of an under ground leak. Its more like road erosion. Thats what we (some residents) are deducing, because this hole happened on the same street just a sh ort CLERMONT Sinkhole or drainage problem? THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Neighbors observe a 15-foot in diameter sinkhole at the intersection of Powderhorn Place Drive and Peaceful Valley Drive in Clermont. BELOW: Tim Rogers, with Bechtol Engineering and Testing, measures the depth of the sinkhole. WHITNEY WILLARD / STAFF GRAPHIC Hartwood Marsh Rd. Tumbling River Dr. Wind River RunPowderhorn Place Dr.Tumbling River Dr.Harts Cove Way N Peace Pipe Way Peaceful Valley D r Sinkhole SINKHOLE LOCATIONA sinkhole opened at the intersection of Powderhorn Place Drive and Peaceful Valley Drive near Hartwood Marsh Road in Clermont. SEE SINKHOLE | A2

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 26, 2014 MINNEOLA South Lake Mardi Gras scheduled for Saturday The 10th annual Mardi Gras event will take place in Minneola from 6:30 to 11 p.m. on Saturday at city hall. Dinner will be offered by Oakwood Smokehouse and Grill, with dancing and entertainment by Past Tense. Costumes are optional with prizes for the best costume. Door prizes, a silent auction and rea sonably priced cash bar will also be available. Tickets are $40. The event is presented by the Sisters of Beta Theta ESA, with proceeds re turned to the community for high school scholarships, Cornerstone Hospice, Horses With A Mission, South Lake Boys & Girls Club, Cooper Memorial Library, New Beginnings and others. To purchase tickets and for in formation, call Janet Hawkins at 351-394-7131. CLERMONT Relay For Life to host 50/50 Have a Heart drawing Your $10 donation gives partici pants a chance to be a lucky winner while helping to take a bite out of cancer by supporting the American Cancer Societys Relay For Life of South Lake-Cagan Crossings with the Have a Heart 50/50 chance drawing. The drawing will be held on Thursday during the Relay For Life of South Lake-Cagan Crossing team party at the South Lake Hospital Live Well Center, 1935 Don Wickham Dr. For information or to pur chase a ticket, call Kim Kitchen at 863-978-7563. CLERMONT Annual Teen Battle of the Bands is April 5 The Cooper Memorial Librarys third annual Teen Battle of the Bands will take place from 2 to 5:30 p.m. on April 5. This years battle will take place on the outdoors stage on the grounds of Lake-Sumter State College and in cludes rst place cash prize if $250; second place $125 and third place takes home $75. Band members between the ages of 12 to 18 should call to register at 352536-2275, or email lpiper@lakeline.lib. .us before March 15. The rst ve bands to register will compete for cash prizes. CLERMONT Tax service offered in March at Liberty Liberty Tax Service in Clermont is offering free tax preparation to new customers and to local commu nity heroes, at their ofce 711 S. U.S. Highway 27, unit B, during March. Police and reghters should call for appointments through Sunday, teachers and school employees from March 3-9, medical providers and staff personnel from March 10-16 and people in the military and veterans from March 17-23. For information or to schedule an appointment, call 352-536-1829. CLERMONT Annual Scholarship Fair scheduled for March 11-12 Back to School is COOL Lake County, a local nonprot organiza tion, will host the 2014 Scholarship Fair from 4:30 to 7 p.m., on March 11-12. The event, open to all Lake County seniors and their families will be held at the Clermont Community Center, 620 W. Montrose St., in downtown Clermont. Business sponsorships are available for $100 for both days of the event. Businesses, schools, civic groups and charities offering scholarships can participate free of charge, but regis tration is required. For information, go to www.backto schooliscool.org, or email Julie Hulley at Julie@backtoschooliscool.org. Area Briefs What South Lake residents are saying about ... U.S. TAX CODE If you could change one thing about the U.S. tax code, as it pertains to personal income tax, what would it be? When you make ear ly withdrawals from your 401, you have a short amount of time to replen ish the fund without pen alty. They should revisit the penalties when there is a needy situation. If you are out of work for a year, that short period of time to put the money back in does you no good. JERRY SULCENTI CLERMONT I would structure it that everybody got taxed, even those on welfare and the rich the same, equal tax across the board. ALLISON AULD CLERMONT Having been in the low end, in that posi tion, I honestly think that over-taxation of the wealthy would not result in the benets they think it will. I feel that the more relief, the more goes out in the economy, and I believe that tax relief helps on the high end. A healthy bal ance is in order. We are probably halfway to the way it was when Clinton was in ofce. RICHARD ARRIAGA CLERMONT A fair tax. I feel like I pay more taxes than a lot of people and I get less back. I see those that hardly pay any income tax at all and get back three or four times the amount in re tirement that I get. KERRY ANDREWS CLERMONT Word on the Street Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 Corwin already paid the $158 ne but said he wanted his money re funded. Other residents said they came to a complete stop, but because they had to inch forward to get a better view of the inter section, they crossed over the white line (stop bar) at the intersection and received a ticket. At the meeting, Gray asked Broadway review the videos of every com plainant present. Police looked at 59 videos and rescinded 51 tickets. When Gray learned of the number of tickets that had been dismissed, his feelings were clear. We apologize for the confusion and to any one who was issued a vi olation in error, he said. The intent of the pro gram was to help keep our public safe. The pro gram is just a few weeks old and, like any new pro gram, there is a learning curve. Even so, the integ rity of our red-light pro gram must be beyond re proach. Gray has spoken with the camera company American Trafc Solu tions (ATS) about not issuing tickets for right turns on red, or not in stalling the additional 18 cameras the city con tracted for but was told any changes to that con tract could end up cost ing the city money. Nego tiations are continuing. Mayor Hal Turville, a strong opponent of the cameras, has said hed like to see the cameras re moved altogether, even if it means a nancial loss for the city. Once someone at ATS reviews a video from a red-light camera and de termines a violation oc curred, the video is re viewed a second time by someone at the police department before a ci tation is issued. Accord ing to Broadway, from now on, a single per son at the police depart ment will review the vid eo. That person will have a clear understanding of what constitutes an ille gal right turn on red. Since the statute is so subjective, we will have only one person review ing the violations so theres a consistent inter pretation of the statute, Broadway said. Weve directed our reviewer to look at the videos with a lot more discretion and in a less stringent man ner when it comes to the interpretation of the stat ue. We will be looking at them differently and with a little more leniency. Drivers who still feel un justly ticketed can call or drop by the police sta tion to request a person al review of their video vi olation. Broadway said a cut-off period for these re views will be announced at a later time. Drivers also have the option to dispute violations by following the instructions on their pa perwork or accompanying website. CAMERAS FROM PAGE A1 ways from the other one, almost one year ago, said a resident of the subdivi sion who did not want to be identied. If you look at it from the standpoint of mainly the drains, this hole is lower than where the last one was. Its like the water is coming down the road and overowing and the drain is not able to handle it, so it just col lapsed. Austin Evans, another resident, said he wonders the same thing. He walks his dog in the area twice a day and he sees water buildup on the top of the road that wont go down the drain. The water settles on the road there, he said. Not all of it goes down the drain and sometimes theres so much you cant walk on it (the sidewalk). You have to walk around to get back onto the side walk, Evans said, point ing to the corner of Powderhorn Place and Peaceful Valley Drive. Bechtol Engineers from DeLand were called in to investigate after the sink hole appeared near a bus stop on that co rner and workers have been moni toring it since. Project Manager Tim Rogers said the hole has not grown since initial measurements were taken. He noted that sinkholes, which can open up any where, have a tendency to grow deeper or wider. However, Rogers could not rule out a sinkhole. Were pumping it with owable ll and stabiliz ing it so we can go down and see whats going on, he said. Once the ll is hardened, well be able to dig some holes to take samples of the dirt down below it to see what the strata is like, to see if there are any hollow spots down there and see how we can x it. Clermont ofcials said a city worker was sent out to monitor the ll ing because it is near an 8-inch water main pipe. The sinkhole is in a pri vate gated communi ty and a member of the subdivisions Homeown ers Association Board has had Clermont po lice at least twice remove print and television re porters from the scene. That worries Miles Hensley, a resident just ve houses down from the latest hole, because he wonders what the HOA Board has to hide. This directly affects me and I know that the last hole stood open for about six months be fore it was xed, Hens ley said. Another resident who did not want to be iden tied said she was wor ried about the potential for home depreciation if additional holes open up. Well have to wait and see, but what I and a lot of my neighbors dont want is to see the value of our homes go down no matter what it is caus ing these holes to hap pen here, she said. It also has me on edge be cause every little noise the house makes has me wondering if its not something happening under the ground. SINKHOLE FROM PAGE A1 THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Emily Hickey, middle, guides her children, Clare, left, and Ryan Hickey, around the sinkhole in the Hartwood Reserve neighborhood.

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Wednesday, February 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3 Staff Report Sisters of Sound womens a cappel la chorus will host its Calendar Girls show at 7 p.m., on Satur day at East Ridge Mid dle School, 13021 Exal ibur Rd., in Clermont as a fundraiser for the group. The local award-win ing womens barber shop chorus, a chapter of Harmony Inc., hosts an array vocal talent under the direction of Shannon Elswick and Tiana Sandh. The show will highlight tradition al and non-traditional music, jazz and others. Tickets are $10 in ad vance, $12 at the door and $5 for students, available by calling 407-719-4363. CLERMONT Sisters of Sound to host annual production on Saturday Staff Report The South Lake Ju nior Womans Club will be giving away two $500 scholarships this year with one award ed to a high school student that resides in south Lake Coun ty and will be attend ing college this fall, and another awarded to a woman 21 years of age or older who would like to continue her educa tion. For details on qual ications, application and deadline, go to www.slwjc.webs.com. For information, email rhonda_sl jwc2011@yahoo.com, aimeeoptimaone@ gmail.com or go to facebook.com/sljwc. CLERMONT Junior Womans Club to award scholarships LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com A new Lake Coun ty schools district-wide anti-bullying initiative has been instrumental in making it easier for students to report bul lying, school ofcials said. Implemented at the beginning of the 201314 school year, the ini tiative provides an an ti-bullying curriculum for each school, which is managed under the Safe Schools depart ment. The initiative is comprehensive about educating about di versity and differenc es in students, said Bill Mathias, school board member. We have also made it easier for stu dents to feel comfort able reporting it. Those students that feel threatened are coming forward. The initiative denes bullying so administra tors know how to spot it wherever it takes place in the school, said Pam Beeler, program spe cialist for Safe Schools. School ofcials have reported 28 cas es of bullying so far this school year. Thats eight more than in the 2012-13 school year. A number of high ly publicized anti-bul lying measures have been attempted in the school district in the last two years: Two students at Carv er Middle School have been trying for two years to establish a GayStraight Alliance club to prevent bullying. Stormy Rich, an 18-year-old Umatilla High School student, intervened to stop bul lying of a girl with men tal disabilities on a bus. As a result, she was kicked off the bus. In 2013, the Lake County School Board recognized Cypress El ementary students Kristopher Ganesh, Ja mie Munoz and Mar leen Ryan for starting Bully Blockers, an an ti-bullying program that includes Bud dy, a mailbox fash ioned out of cardboard to look like a huge os prey, the schools mas cot. Students can use the mailbox to depos it notes with concerns and questions related to bullying. Now, 15-year-old country singer Lizzie Sider is speaking on the issue locally, where is she is addressing more than 100 schools all over the state. On Wednesday, she is planning a presenta tion at Tavares Elemen tary School, and on Thursday she will give presentations at Semi nole Springs Elementa ry in Eustis and Windy Hill Middle School in Clermont. According to an ar ticle in the Daytona Beach News-Journal Sider said the issue is important to her be cause I had experi ence with bullying when I was in elemen tary school. The News-Journal re ported that her father gave her advice when she was dreading going to school. Nobody has the power to ruin your day, he told her, according to the News-Journal School ofcials said the hardest issue to confront currently is cyberbullying found on social media sites and in other areas on the Internet. It is very difcult for the school district to track it, said Chris Pat ton, spokesman for the school district. Many times, it is occurring off campus and after school hours. Stuart Klatte, presi dent of the Lake Coun ty Education Associa tion, agreed. That is a delicate balance, dealing with cyberbullying espe cially, he said. The schools have tried to take a stand and deal with it when they can. Bullying is a complex problem, and it is hard to gauge how big of an issue it is in Lake Coun ty, Klatte said. A lot of it is going to be follow through from the administrators af ter the report has been made by either the stu dent or teacher who has knowledge of it, he said of tackling each case of bullying. Tod Howard, school board member, said because there are so many programs on bullying it is imperative to identify which ones are working and which ones are not. Instead of doing all the programs, we need to identify which ones are working and make sure they are being re sourced properly, he said. Lake County schools initiative addressing bullying PHOTOS BY PETER BAUER / HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP/ Singer Lizzie Sider relays her anti-bullying message through music, song and dance, with some help from her student band, at South Daytona Elementary School, in South Daytona, on Feb. 3.

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 26, 2014 Governor Rick Scott represents the elite Governor Rick Scott was in the papers recently as saying he didnt favor a cost of living raise. In my opinion the governor of Florida is only representing the lthy rich as usual. I wonder if Florida doesnt lead the world in homelessness and poverty all around, and as for him getting better paying jobs, what a joke on us as tax payers. PAUL J. ROBINSON | Leesburg Dems favor state supremacy over individuals A recent urry of sycophan tic letters selling the credits of the Democratic Party force me from under my cozy rock to point out a single fact that will trump every credit they own -Democrats are the party of state supremacy, which means, the rights of the individual can be trampled by the rights of the state, i.e. collectivism. The Founding Fathers framed a Constitution that identies a Republic founded on rights of the individual over the state, i.e., individualism. Every Democratic vote sup ports the rights of the state over the individual and I doubt thats really the way informed Ameri cans want to go. Zionists? Yes. New World Or der supporters? Yes. Loyal Americans, no way! JOHN WHITAKER | Tavares Big water gulp will harm lakes Niagara Bottling wants to double the amount of water from the Florida aquifer. They make statements that the con ditions in the permit would not harm water levels is not true. They contend the changes in clude conditions in the permit that withdraws should not con tribute to a violation of water levels to a couple nearby lakes. This is not true. They try to tell us that the amount they plan to take will not effect our lakes, streams and rivers, not to mention the future development of busi nesses, homes, schools, drink ing water, and swimming pools that a growing population will want to have. This also is not true. We are asked to reserve our water because our lakes and streams are drying up. Ten years ago when we moved here there was a river in back of our home. There were kayaks and boats traveling down the river. Now, there are no kayaks or boats be cause the river is dry. I hope the people of Leesburg and others in Florida will speak up and let Niagara know how we feel and how we love our beautiful state. We are asked to cut back on our water use, which we have done in our home. But, why do we have to do without because Niagara wants more? ELMA NELSON | Leesburg A lmos t t wo months into the red-lightcamera experiment in Clermont, this no ble effort to improve trafc safety ap pears to be unraveling quickly. When city leaders agreed to install the cameras, they did so in the hope that they would deter people from barreling through some of the citys busiest intersections. Now, they are expressing alarm over the high number of citations that have been issued to motorists turning right on red. It seems that the vast majority 90 percent of citations have been issued to drivers turning right on red and many of those have turned out to be questionable. In fact, when 59 angry drivers turned out to protest at a recent City Council meeting, City Manager Darren Gray asked Police Chief Charles Broadway to review the videos for each infraction. Broadway did, and he dismissed an astounding 51 of the 59 tickets. Gray subsequently ordered a review of each and every citation issued since the six cameras went live Jan. 3. Thats more than 3,000 tickets. So while the cameras are doing their jobs spitting out citations, ofcials are growing increasingly co ncerned that theyre not addressing a legitimate safety issue but are instead simply inconveniencing thousands of motorists. At the risk of saying we told you so, the controversy is not completely unexpected. Many towns around Florida that adopted the red-light cameras in recent years are already abandoning them after deciding that the angst they caused among citizens, visitors and tourists was not worth the revenue or the marginal improvement in trafc safety. Clermont city ofcials point out that it may be too early to pull the plug on the cameras there. After all, theyve been operational less than two months, and there is some tweaking that can be done. Some of that tweaking is already under way. Chief Broadway has decided to dedicate one person to reviewing the video of every red-light infraction in hopes of having more consistent enforcement. And Gray is talking to the camera company American Trafc Solutions (ATS) about doing away with citations for right turns on red. But ATS has a contract with Clermont, and any changes to the contract could cost the city money. So be it. More signicant than the cost of tweaking or abandoning the ATS contract is the cost to be paid by the motorists of Clermont, by the visitors, by the tourists, by the merchants. There is also the cost of Clermonts reputation to consider. Clermont does not need to be depicted as just another Florida town that should be avoided at all costs because of its overly aggressive trafc enforcement policies. We applaud the city for moving swiftly to re solve this simmering controversy before it boils over and encourage its decision-makers to not be swayed by the potential loss of dol lars if they decide to alter the course set by the camera company. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD ........................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST O PINION WHATS YOUR OPINION? The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the ed itor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be origi nal, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Letters to the Editor, 732 W. Montrose St. Clermont, FL 34711 By fax to: 352-394-8001 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. OUR VIEW If you know of a veteran living in Lake, Sumter or Marion counties whose name should be added to the Lake County Veter ans Memorial, call 352-314-2100, or go to to www.lake vet erans.com. CALLING ALL VETERANS S OUTH LAKE PRESS Your community newspaper for more than 100 years. 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001 The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Flori da 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region. All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Tap the brakes on red-light cameras LETTER of the WEEK YOUR VOICES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Red light camera controversy is silly Why is there such a big hue and cry about cameras at traf c lights? Most people do stop at red lights, so why are they complaining? It is a law to stop on red traf c light signals. This isnt some new regulation. A recent study concluded that although there was an increase in minor col lisions, fatal crashes were re duced by 49 percent. Complaints about the traf c ticket nes are minus cule compared to the esti mated cost of a human life. The report did not give the to tal number of fatals, but the NHTSA, DOT HS 809-446 Eco nomic Impact of Motor Vehi cle Crashes report from 2000, estimates that each fatality re sults in an average discounted lifetime cost of $977,000. So let us assume that the red light cameras have reduced 10 fatal accidents in the past year. Thats over $9 million lost. No amount of dollars can pay for the pain and suffer ing of the familys loss of life. So lets stop this foolish debate about red light cameras. Just obey the law. WILTON NELSON | Leesburg HALIFAX MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO

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Wednesday, February 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5 Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...Totally UniqueTotally Unique is proud to be Clermonts first ORGANIC hair salon. We care about your beauty, your wellness, the environment and our community, so we use organic and sustainably harvested products whenever possible. We specialize in organic hair color, hair care products, nail and skin care lines. Our salon is one of the oldest salons in Clermont and is located at 786 W Montrose Street in Historic Downtown Clermont. Our stylists are experienced in all phases of hair care including color, straighteners, cuts, texture and styles. Hair stylists are Marjorie Morphet, Tina Foote, Sherie Wolkens and Jamie Rhoades. Our nail techs, Jennifer Vandergrift and Jamie Rhoades, perform pedicures and manicures using Zoya nail products (which are Big 5 free). Shellac manicures, lasting up to three weeks, are also available by Jennifer and Jamie. We have two pedicure chairs in a private room for your relaxation and enjoyment. Relaxing and therapeutic facials are available by Jennifer in our private upstairs facial room. Massage services include chair massage, Swedish and Deep Tissue. Massage services are also done in a private room in our upstairs area. We utilize several massage therapists and provide massage by appointment only. We also offer a small boutique with handcrafted jewelry and hair accessories, Art by Tina Foote and Jamie Rhoades, and other unique items. Salon hours are 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Saturday and open Sundays by appointment only. Evening hours are also available by appointment. We pride ourselves in providing a friendly, relaxing environment for our clients and friends. Stop by and visit or call 352-394-5005 for more information. We are also on Facebook and www.TotallyUniqueSalon.com. LOOKING FOR PARTS? SEE JULIE (352) 394-6111 Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! DEATH NOTICES Albert Allen Albert Allen, 59 of Yalaha, died, Monday, February 17, 2014 East side Funeral Home, Leesburg, FL Rev. Calvin Ashley Rev. Calvin Augustus Ashley, 84, of Deland, died Sunday, February 16, 2014. Rocker-Cu sack Mortuary, Lees burg, FL. Richard Buck Barnes Richard Buck Barnes, of Paisley, died Tuesday, February 18, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatilla. Gary Mark Beaulieu Gary Mark Beau lieu, 75, of Coleman, died Sunday, February 16, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations. Jean Burrill Jean Burrill, 93, of The Villages, died Thurs day, February 20, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations. Cheryl L. di Butera Cheryl L. di Butera, 55, of Leesburg, died Monday, February 17, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg, FL Barbara Ann Coffelt Barbara Ann Cof felt, 71, of Talking Rock, Georgia, died Friday, February 21, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations, Wildwood. Mary Elizabeth Coleman Mary Elizabeth Cole man, 93, of Clermont, died Saturday, Feb ruary 15, 2014. Mar vin C. Zanders Funeral Home, Inc. Donald A. Connors Donald A. Connors, 84, of Fruitland Park, died on February 12, 2014. National Crema tion Society. Lloyd E. Cotman Lloyd E. Cotman, 77, of Wildwood, died Thursday, February 20, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations. Janet T. Davis Janet T. Davis, 87 of Leesburg, died Mon day, Feb 17, 2014. Bey ers Funeral Home and Crematory, Leesburg, FL. Johnnie B. Finzelber Johnnie B. Finzel ber, 86, of Eustis, died Saturday, February 22, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatilla. Delores Ann French Delores Ann French, 68, of Umatilla, died Saturday, February 15, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home. Marva L. Grifth Marva L. Grifth, 78, of Grand Island, died Sunday, February 16, 2014. Hamlin & Hilbish Funeral Directors. Charlotte Kirby Charlotte Kirby, 85, of Tavares, died Friday, February 14, 2014. Bey ers Funeral Home. Jerry L. Latham Jerry L. Latham, 69, of Fruitland Park, died Thursday, February 20, 2014. Page-Theus Fu nerals & Cremations. Dorothy Martin Dorothy Martin, 104, of Leesburg, died Fri day, February 21, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations. Richard Merrill Mayo Richard Merrill Mayo, 88, of Leesburg, died on Monday, February 17, 2014. National Crema tion Society. Melvin C. McCreight Melvin C. McCreight, 90, of Lake City, died Thursday, February 20, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations. John R. Meeks John R. Meeks, 43, of Leesburg, died Tues day, February 18, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home and Crematory, Lees burg, FL. Beatrice Milera Beatrice Milera, 84, of Eustis, died Friday, February 14, 2014. Bey ers Funeral Home. Wayne Richard Neal Wayne Richard Neal, 87, of Leesburg, died on February 10, 2014. Na tional Cremation Soci ety. Michelle Lynne Nickle Michelle Lynne Nick le, 52, of Leesburg, died Sunday, February 16, 2014. Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations. Yvonne E. Rice Yvonne E. Rice, 90, of Umatilla, died Fri day, February 21, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home, Umatilla. Ruscher Rich Ruscher Rich, 96, of Orlando, died on Friday, February 14, 2014. Eastside Funeral Home. Sonny Ross Sonny Ross, 77, of Leesburg, died Sunday, February 9, 2014. East side Funeral Home. Juanita J. Shumpert Juanita J. Shumpert, 78, of Tavares, died Sat urday, February 15, 2014. Marvin C. Zan ders Funeral Home, Inc. Cindy Smith Cindy Smith, 56, of Umatilla, died Wednes day, February 19, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home. Donald Trzuskowski Donald Trzuskows ki, 73, of The Villages, died Tuesday, February 18, 2014. Banks/PageTheus Funerals and Cremations. Vernon Yoder Vernon Yoder, 84, of Umatilla, died Thurs day, February 20, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home. IN MEMORY

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A6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 26, 2014 12thAnnualTHEGENERALFEDERATIONOFWOMENSCLUBS SPONSOREDBY THECLERMONT WOMANSCLUB DOOR PRIZESThroughout the day!ENTER TO WIN:Fabulous Prizesand much more...ADMISSIONFREE! HERESJUSTAFEWOFTHEPRODUCTS& SERVICES: HERESJUSTAFEWOFOURVENDORS: Saturday, March 22, 201410:00am 2:00pm Your First ChoiceIn-Print & On-Line ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com The South Lake Black Achiev ers recently hosted its 22nd annual awards banquet at the Lake Recep tions building in Mount Dora. The event was held to recognize people in the community who have achieved great success in their ca reers. We have gathered each year since 1992 to commend and honor the men and women who, through their tireless efforts, talents and dedica tion, have made their mark in soci ety, said a message from the South Lake Black Achievers Committee on its website. The South Lake Black Achievers Committee continues to strive at Keeping Alive Our Heritage and encourage us to all strive for ex cellence! To encourage excellence through out the community, the committee each year recognizes people who ex emplify its vision. This year, 13 re cipients in 11 categories were recog nized: Law Enforcement: Sophia Threat, a law enforcement/correc tions ofcer with the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce Service: Roger Pace, owner of PaceLogics Computer Graphics and Repair Company in Clermont Military: Glenn Rodgers, a ser viceman with the U.S. Navy, work ing with the Aviation Support Equip ment Department Para Professional: Regina Pen ny, the school secretary at Cecil E. Gray Middle School Business Administration: Hat tie McGriff with Orlando Health Music/Entertainment: Thomas R. Ware Jr., the CEO of Ripple Effect, a not-for-prot organization mentoring inner city youth employed by Ware boyz Musik Publishing/Warner Broth er Records/Premier Tracks of L.A. Medical: Cassandra Allen, Med Tech certied nurses assistant at Oak Park in Clermont Business: Owner Vincent Max well, a self-employed businessman who works for Genesis Transporta tion Sabrina Gwynn Outstanding Youth Award: Matt Hoisington, Ash ley Johnson and Torrie McGriff, re cent college graduates Humanitarian: Gift of Love Foundation out of Groveland/Stuck ey, a community outreach that helps families and children in need; Lato ria Wilson-Robinson, recipient Heritage Award: The Park er Family of Clermont, which came to the area in 1919, headed by Pearl Mama Parker of Brooksville, a sin gle mother of seven children and lo cal restuarant/hotel chef and busi nesswoman most known for her roasted peanuts. Recipient, Joyce Freeman, 83, her last living child. Though award recipients were not required to live in south Lake County now, they had to have lived in there for 10 years or more at one time, made a big impression on the community or a combination of both, said Lucressie McGriff, the committees ticket chairperson and treasurer. Allen said receiving the award and recognition is an honor. I try to give it my all when Im at work, so it feels good to be recog nized, she said. MOUNT DORA Career success recognized by South Lake Black Achievers

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10% OFFAll options with this couponrffnntb B1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 26, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTS SPORTS EDITOR ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE .............................. 365-8268 FAX .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL ......... sports@dailycommercial.com S PORTS and LEISURE CHRIS LEE | Staff Writer Chris.Lee@dailycommercial.com Lake Minneola High School earned the schools rst trip to the boys basketball state semi nals with a 72-61 road win on Saturday against Lake Wales. Hawks coach Freddie Cole has turned Lake Minneola into the states top Class 6A pro gram, despite coaching at a school in only its third year of existence. Lake Minneola will play Ruskin Lennard at 4 p.m. Friday at the Lakeland Center. A win will catapult the Hawks into Saturdays state champi onship game. But, to watch Lake Minne ola as it prepared for Lake Wales, one mightve guessed the Hawks were preparing for a mundane midseason game. For example, Cole stood at the baseline with ball in hand during a recent practice. With an over-the-shoulder motion the kind that would have left Peyton Manning in envy he threw a completed pass to sophomore Drew Mendo za at half court for an apparent touchdown. Lake Minneolas coaches set a tone at the begin ning of practice that focused on keeping the players loose and having fun. The beginning of practice saw the players and coach attempting under-hand ed shots from half court. The more fun they have, the better we play, said Cole. On paper, Lake Wales, with a re cord of 18-12, was the worst team Lake Minneola has faced in the playoffs. But Cole insists they arent taking the Highland ers lightly. Lake Minneola has been dominant this season, with a 27-3 record and win ning by an average of 27 points per game. The most impressive win, arguably, was an 81-point victory against Umatilla. Lake Wales was no stranger to the postseason, unlike the Hawks. Lake Minneola preps for Class 6A state semifinals IF YOU GO WHAT: FHSAA State Final Four, Class 6A seminals WHEN: 4 p.m. Friday WHERE: The Lakeland Center (Tickets: $10 at the gate, park ing $8) WHO: Lake Minneola vs. Ruskin Lennard BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Lake Minneola senior Jean Francois (12) shoots the ball between Deltona seniors Jerome Monroe (32) and Christian Rodriguez (15) during the class 6A-Region 2 playoff game between Lake Minneola High School and Deltona High School in Minneola on Feb. 13. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com The Lake-Sumter State College softball team has reached one of its goals. It has a viable pro gram capable of beat ing any team on any given day. The Lakehawks evened their record at 10-10 Thursday with a 17-9 win against South Florida State College in the rst game of a dou bleheader at the Na tional Training Center. The win marked the rst time LSSC has hit the .500 mark in recent memory. In the nightcap, the Lakehawks climbed over .500 with a 5-4 win. LSSC got on the board with two runs in the second inning and added two more in the third, but trailed 9-4 heading into the bot tom of the fth. The Lakehawks put the game away with its best offensive outburst of the season 10 runs on 11 hits. Mackenzie Heggie led the outburst with a grand slam ho mer to left eld. A three-run spot in the sixth inning gave the Lakehawks a mer cy-rule win. LSSC powered out 21 hits in the win. Heg gie and Kayla Fuller led the way with three hits each, followed by two hits apiece from Jodi Pierce, Michelle Breen, Zoe Hart, Taylor Dou glass and Savannah LaLande. In the second game, Mellissa Webb was the winning pitcher. Douglass went 2-for3 with an RBI and Full er was 1-for-3 with a home run and an RBI. Lake Sumter softball team hits .500 mark BRETT LEBLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Lake Sumters Zoe-Rae Hart heads for home as head coach Jill Semento waves runners around the bases during a game against South Florida State College on Feb. 19. MARK FISHER Special to the Daily Commercial The Eustis Panthers came up short in their effort to ad vance to the FHSAA Final Four in Class 5A, falling Sat urday night, 52-47, to the American Heritage Patriots (23-7) in the Panther Den. The Panthers (23-8) strug gled against the taller Patri ot front, anchored by 6-foot10 senior Drake Lamont. His presence forced Eustis to al ter its shots on drives to the basket where Lamont swat ted them away or cleaned the glass, leaving few offensive rebounds for the Panthers. Lamont keyed a Patriot of fense that never trailed in the contest, scoring eight points in the rst as American Her itage opened a 19-10 lead by periods end. Only a late 7-0 run by the Panthers to end the half kept the game from get ting out of control as they were able to overcome a 16-point decit to get to 31-22. An 8-3 run to open the third period brought the Pan thers within ve with Kiron Williams hitting a late trey en route to his team-high 18 points. Eustis trailed 38-33 entering the nal period. Another bomb from be yond the arc by Williams and strong play by Antwon Clay ton near the basket allowed Eustis to slowly edge back into the game, reducing the Patriot lead to four points when Coy Patterson drove the length of oor for a con tested layup with 20.2 sec onds remaining. His drive made it a one-possession game at 48-46. With only seconds remaining and des perately needing the ball, Eustis repeatedly fouled to send the Patriots to the line in the hopes of pulling off the comeback. But the Pan thers came up short as the Patriots Keyshawn Evans went 4-for-4 from the line to protect the victory. Eustis falls to American Heritage in Class 5A-4 title game BRETT LEBLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Eustis senior Coy Patterson dribbles around an American Heritage defender during the Class 5A Region 4 championship game on Friday. SEE PLAYOFFS | B3

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B2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 26, 2014 CHAMBER AWARDS & NEWSChamber Ambassadors welcomed Dianne Davis and all of the Mitre Accounting staff to their new offices located at 15701 State Rd. 50 in Clermont (inside the Mizz Realty building). Stop by for a visit or see them first virtually at www.mitreaccountingandtax.com. Marholin Medical Institute & Taylor-Made Health & Wellness were the sponsors for the January Chamber Business After Hours, which was held at their offices located in the shadow of the Citrus Tower (185 N. Highway 27 Clermont, FL 34711). You can check out Dr. Maurice Marholins and Dr. JP Silveras services online at www.marholinmedicalinstitute.com and www.tayloredwellness.com. The South Lake Young Professionals (SLYP), a standing committee of the South Lake Chamber, recently held a social event at Graffiti Junktion in Clermont. The event was open to any Young Professionals doing business in South Lake County. The mission of the SLYP is to identify & cultivate young professionals to become leaders in business and community through networking, mentoring, volunteering and leadership development. You can follow them at www.facebook.com/SouthLakeYP The Chamber Ambassadors held a ribbon cutting to welcome four Chamber Member businessesAmerican Backflow Testing Gary Gamache, Ana Ivonne Aviles, CPA, Limitless Cleaning Cynthia Acosta, and Tri-HR Solutions Jacqueline Rogers who recently moved to their new 3rd Floor offices at 1230 Oakley Seaver Blvd. (above Elite Car Wash) in Clermont. There was musical entertainment, food, beverages and a wonderful crowd on hand to help celebrate the event. Congratulations on your new 'digs'! Christine Krebs, a senior at East Ridge High School, is presented the award by Wesley Reed from Ameriprise Financial. The award recognizes our future community leaders for their academic and volunteer excellence. Ms. Krebs involves herself in many different areas as a Student Delegate, as the Vice President of the National Honor Society, as the Captain of the Varsity Swim Team, as a volunteer at the South Lake Animal League and at Sawgrass Bay Elementary all the while working at the NTC/Livewell Center as a Lifeguard and achieving the "A" Honor roll though out her High School career. Congratulations from the South Lake Chamber! Over 200 Lake Minneola High School Seniors & Juniors gathered to hear about life in the real business world, thanks to the efforts of the Chamber Education Committee headed by Clinton Pownall from Computer Business Consultants. Discussing topics such as "How to properly dress for job interviews", these students are now well-versed on how to navigate the business waters, as they take their next major steps in life and into the community. 21 volunteer Chamber business & not for profit professionals shared their wisdom through the program to help prepare our future business & community leaders. Pictured above (L to R): 2014 Citizen of the Year Winner Rob Berens; John & George Schmid Schmid Construction; Wendy Terry Chairman of the South Lake Chamber Board, Marcy & Ron Becker Becker Funeral Home; Brian Hammond The Church at South Lake; Ray San Fratello President of the South Lake Chamber; Dr. Paula Whetro Building Blocks Ministries Each year at the Chairmans Gala, the South Lake Chamber installs their incoming Board of Directors while also presenting several business awards and the prestigious South Lake Citizen of the Year (COTY) award. The Gala was held recently in the Magnolia House at Trilogy located in Groveland with almost 300 people attending a formal evening with cocktails & dinner. Lake County Sheriff Gary Borders presided over the swearing in of the Chamber Board members, while Wesley Reed from Ameriprise Financial served as Master of Ceremonies. The following awards were presented: Business of the Year Award: Schmid Construction Heritage Award: Becker Funeral Home Revitalization Award: The Church at South Lake Oakley Seaver Service Award: Building Blocks Ministries Citizen of the Year Award: Rob Berens www.southlakechamber-fl.com

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Wednesday, February 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B3 To Apply for Scholarships from the Pig on the Pond Education Fund Vist Our Website: www.pigonthepond.org Come and Join our Family of Proud Sponsorsfor the 16th Annual Pig on the Pond For the Kids Pig on the Pond Mission Statement Jordan Anderson11:00 am 12:00 pm Clermonts Country Sweetheart Jordons latest singleYou Aint Ready For Me, shot straight to the Top 40 of the Music Row charts. HayFire Band2:15 pm 3:30 pmHAYFIRE has played all over the great state of Florida. They have been on stage with some of the biggest names in Country Music. The Down Brothers SUNDAY, March 9th a Day of Entertainment12:45 pm 1:45 pmThe Down Brothers perform Classic Rock throughout the Orlando area. The Abby Four4:15 pm 6:00 pmA Beatles tribute band with music and costumes from three different Beatle eras. HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. The Highlanders played in the Class 5A Region-al nals last season. The Highlanders had more experience in the play-offs, but Cole was su-premely condent in his players. Most of the guys have been here since the school opened, Cole said. They be-lieve this is their year. Lennard Ruskin en-ters Fridays state semi-nal game with a 27-4 record. The Hawks use a ve-guard setup most of the time, which fea-tures twin brothers Avery and Anthony Brown with a sixth sense of where each other is on the court. I know that when he is on the court it is easy to nd him and get him easy buckets, Avery Brown said. Just as im-portant is the brothers ability to know where to move without the basketball. Ive got to move around and I know where he likes the drive and penetrate, and I al-ways get to the open spot based on whos go-ing to drive, Anthony Brown said. The defense has been terric all sea-son for the Hawks and has allowed an average of 51 points per game. Our defense has been tremendous and we probably score half if not most of our points on good defense, said Cole. Cole felt Satur-days game showcased what the Hawks have been building toward over the last three years. Lake Wales has his-tory, they truly do, but its our turn, said Cole. And now, the Hawks get to add to their own growing basketball legacy. PLAYOFFS FROM PAGE B1 Lake Minneola junior Avery Brown dribbles the ball around a Deltona defender in Minneola on F eb. 13BRETT LEBLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL

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B4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 26, 2014 Do it for yourself andFree yourself from home ownership worries and spend more quality time with those you love. Enjoy delightful dining companions in three distinct on-campus venues join your neighbors for a game of golf or bocce ball venture into Mount Dora with friends or take a dance class with the one you love. Choosing a secure, maintenance-free lifestyle at Waterman Village allows you stay connected with those who matter most. Contact us today!Call (352) 385-1126. 255 Waterman Avenue Mount Dora, FL 32757 www.WatermanVillage.com CHRIS LEE | Staff Writer Chris.Lee@dailycommercial.com Lake-Sumter State College dominated Community College of Baltimore Coun ty-Dundalk in a base ball doubleheader on Feb. 19 at the LSSC baseball complex. The rst game was a 9-2 win, and the Lake hawks were even more dominant in game two an 8-0 victory for LSSC. Starting pitcher Kyle Schackne allowed only two runs and had sev en strikeouts in a com plete-game perfor mance to get the win in the opener. Schackne allowed just one walk in an 85-pitch performance 66 of which were strikes. The LSSC hitters could do no wrong against Dundalk pitcher Shawn Pass, who surrendered 11 hits and eight earned runs in six innings. We have been strug gling offensively over the last couple of games so it was good to get off to a good start, LSSC head coach Josh Holt said. The second game was similar to the opener. LSSC once again started off the rst in ning on re with a four-run outburst. Hig don, Barnhard, Curtis and Sam Thomas each scored, due in part to two errors to give the Lakehawks the 4-0 lead. In the third, Thom as scored off of a mis played ground ball and Blanton chased Baziel Cabrera home on a double to deep right-center eld, giv ing Lake Sumter a 6-0 advantage. The nal scoring punch came in the sixth inning when Blanton hammered a solo home run. Saris also scored in the inning. Lakehawks take two from CCBC-Dundalk

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Ann Dupee REMEMBER WHEN A weekly column that reprints some of the more interest ing news stories that have ap peared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press. C1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 26, 2014 www.southlakepress.com C OMMUNITY Proudly serving CLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWS STAFF WRITER ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 EMAIL ..... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com HOMETOWN: Clermont OCCUPATION: Student FAMILY: Dad, mom, younger brother, younger sister, dog What do you enjoy most about south Lake County? I like the quaintness of it. We dont have big clubs or concerts. But when my friends come to town I show them things like the Citrus Tower and that one haunt ed house downtown. Its nice. 1) If you had to summarize your philosophy of life in one sentence, what would it be? If you think positively, things might not be better, but theyll seem better. 2) Name a person or incident youve come across recently thats touched you in some way. Why did this person or incident impress you so much? I saw a series of notes on the door of a bathroom stall. One girl asked how she should deal with being raped, and the rest of the notes were all supportive responses and lists of resources. I was im pressed that people felt pulled to take time and write something to this anonymous person. It shows we still have true empathy. 3) How does what you do contrib ute to the welfare of the area? I am studying to be a teacher, and I think this helps the welfare be cause the number one thing that can help solve issues is aware ness. Awareness comes with more education. 4) Name one of your greatest ac complishments so far. I won a scholarship, which allowed me to do research at a university in Switzerland for a summer. 5) Whats something youve al ways wanted to do but havent yet? Ive always wanted to go skydiving! FROM THE FILES | 25 YEARS AGO 1989 Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press Meet Your NEIGHBOR MEGAN FRUGOLI FEDERAL PRISON FOR LAKE COUNTY? Gonna Get Our selves a Prison? The county-owned prop erty on US 27 at the Turnpike interchange is being considered as a site for a Federal Cor rections Institution. Mid-Florida Eco nomic Development Council and Feder al Bureau of Prisons representatives ap proached Lake Coun ty commissioners indi vidually in February to discuss the subject. The Federal Correc tions Institution would require 200 acres from the county, of which 60 would be actually uti lized. The remainder is for a buffer area. Jobs created would pay an average of $25,500 to $27,000, and historical ly, 60 percent of the po sitions are lled locally. The medium-secu rity facility would em ploy between 100 and 150 people and house 500 to 1,000 inmates, supposedly mostly white-collar criminals. An estimated $15 mil lion would be pumped into the local economy annually. COUNTY APPROVES SAND MINE NEAR CLERMONT County commis sioners supported the Planning and Zoning Commissions recom mendation and ap proved a 21.4-acre sand mine operation southeast of Clermont on SR 50. The area is south of an exist ing sand mine owned by Clermont attor ney Tom Dougherty. Dougherty represented the petitioner, William K. Stosberg. City of Clermont planner Jim McAllister hand-delivered a letter requesting the coun ty postpone (deny) the petition until such time as a comprehen sive standard mining ordinance is adopted by Lake County. Should the board ap prove the mining oper ation, Clermont asked that an excel lane to DOT standards be con structed on the east bound lane and that a grade no greater than 8 percent be maintained on Hooks Street. County Commission er Richard Swartz, who represents Clermont, twice made motions for amendments. Both died for lack of a sec ond. Mr. Swartz was the only negative vote when the board approved the mining operation. SHERIFF OPENS LOCAL SUBSTATION For the convenience of south Lake County residents and efcien cy of the Lake County Sheriffs Department, Sheriff George Knupp has opened a new sher iffs substation on the back topside of Sunny side Plaza on SR 50. A uniformed deputy is on SEE HISTORY | C2 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Each year for the past four years, Minneola Ele mentary Schools fth grad ers have been made to feel like stars. This year is no different, since for the fth time, the schools choir director An gelo Caponi, has auditioned his fth-grade students for a chance to sing at Downtown Disneys main stage. Caponis classes com bined to form one giant choir performed a 2025 minute Disney-themed show, complete with vocals and dance moves. Caponi even gave stu dents the opportunity to audition for vocal and dance solos. Its kind of their sendoff before middle school, since I have been with them since kindergarten. Ive seen most of these kids, and even some of their siblings, grow up before my eyes, Caponi said. Caponi doesnt leave the other grade levels out, ei ther. Each year, he also works with the pre-K, kin dergarten, rst-, second-, thirdand fourth-grade classes on elaborate musi cal shows they practice for the entire year, to be put on for parents. Even the fth graders get to perform the show for parents who cant make the show at Down town Disney on another night at the school. Caponi said Disney of cials told him his cho ral group is the largest one in the country to perform at Downtown Disney each year. The maximum num ber of performers allowed in one group is 75. This year, however, Minneola Elementary has nine fth-grade classes, with a total of 185 students, so as to not exclude any stu dent wishing to participate, Caponi asked for two sep arate Downtown Disney dates so he could split his students into two groups and involve all of them. The rst group of stu dents performed on Feb. 4, and the second group took to the stage Monday. My brother was part of this last year and now I get to do it. He was the prince, said Victoria Houghton, 10. Im really happy I got a (solo) part too and just ex cited to be a part of it. Its so much fun. Another difference, and one that Caponi is excited about, is that this year the time slots Disney granted were in the late afternoon instead of morning or mid day, meaning that more of the students parents, friends and family mem bers could attend. MINNEOLA Fifth graders perform at Disney ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Minneola Elementary Schools fth-grade students, led by Choir Director Angelo Caponi, sang Disney classics at Downtown Disney on Monday afternoon. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Pig on the Pond For the Kids is back for its 16th year, March 7-9, to raise money for local educational programs and scholarships for col lege-bound students graduating from south Lake schools. Since the event rst began in 1998, nearly $700,000 has been raised for education. Local businesses, schools, individu als, organizations and event sponsors have pulled together to host the week end of events, starting Friday evening, March 7, with The Great Chili Chal lenge, a competition featuring a va riety of tasty chili, music by T. Scott Walker and Clemons Road, the mid way, a crafter show, boat show and more. Saturday begins with the 5k Rib Run/Walk for Education, sponsored by First Green Bank, at 8 a.m. Pig on the Pond ofcially opens at 10 a.m. and will be a sanctioned bar becue competition, midway, kids zone, dessert bake-off competition and the Apopka Shores Districts an nual Cub Scout pinewood derby from noon to 1:30 p.m. Usually, the event spans Friday night and all day Saturday, but this year organizers added one more day Sunday, March 9. Day three will fea ture a music showcase, as well as the No Duck Left Behind rubber ducky race. One Lake County child will win a $5,000 scholarship. The musical lineup for Sunday will feature Jordan Anderson, a former Cl ermont resident and Nashvilles new Pig on the Pond adds an extra day of fun CLERMONT SEE PIG | C3

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C2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 26, 2014 PASSING GRADES By YAAKOV BENDAVID / Edited by Will ShortzNo. 0216 RELEASE DATE: 2/23/2014 ACROSS1 Summer refreshers5 Israels Netanyahu, informally 9 Bowler and sailor 13 Tracking systems 19 Ports 21 Memphis deity 22 Actress Cuthbert of 23 One who turned Cinderellas pumpkin into pumpkin cheesecake? 25 Drive away 26 Reference 27 New Yorks Jacob ___ Park 28 Crude coconut opener 29 Cherry part 30 Worth mentioning 32 Iglu and yoghurt, e.g. 33 Bad beginning? 36 ___ cycle 37 Dustin Hoffman title role 39 County or lake of Cooperstown, N.Y. 42 Dunking cookie 44 Be too syrupy 45 Liquor unit 49 Snorkeling bargain? 52 Hip-hop artist with the 2013 #1 album Born Sinner53 Up to, shortly 54 French noodles? 55 What makes blue jeans blue 56 Shes got electric boots, a ___ suit (Bennie and the Jets lyric) 57 Rust-causing agents59 Vex 60 Stomachs 61 Fit to ___ 62 Tin can plinker, maybe 63 Challenge for a speech coach 64 Oscar winner Leachman 67 Setting of The Crucible 68 Nappy fabric 72 Undeveloped 73 Elizabeth Taylor role of 74 Roman ruler before Caesar 75 Subj. of Snowden leaks 76 Dismantle on a ship 77 Transportation company that skimps on safety? 80 Conk 81 Wisecrack 82 Of the flock 83 Lawn care brand 84 Mythological monster 87 Addr. book datum 88 Even if, in brief 89 Corkscrewed 92 ___ no turning back 95 Dress accessory 99 Knacks 100 Reason for an ophthalmologists visit 101 It might be answered, Muy bien, gracias 104 Sergeants order 105 Stephen Hawkings computergenerated voice? 107 Church vessel 108 Bring in 109 Duvel pub offering 110 Prepares to propose 111 Kind of rug 112 Buttonhole, for example 113 NASAs ___ Research Center DOWN1 Acting family 2 Did a Vegas job 3 Return option 4 Pulled strings, maybe? 5 Former 6 N.B.A.er Hayes, to fans 6 What did ___ deserve this? 7 Comfortable state 8 Suffix with age 9 Bands cue 10 More wan 11 Draws 12 Old atlas initials 13 Force under Stalin 14 Keys on a piano 15 Two things seen beside James Bond at a casino? 16 Popular ski spot 17 Butler of literature 18 Register ring-ups 20 Screenwriting guru Field 24 Call from a balcony 28 Massenet opera 31 Indoor balls 32 In a loathsome way 34 Starting trouble 35 Tryst site 38 Directors cry 39 The Simpsons character with a habit of calling things gnarly 40 Candy bar that comes two to a pack 41 Most arias 43 Insect repellent ingredient 46 Artery 47 Thats ___! 48 Bodies of eau 50 Little: Suffix 51 Per ___ 52 Use for a rsum 56 Spammer enabler 58 Oh, yeah? Lets see you hold your breath for two minutes! e.g.? 59 Better qualified 62 Like Bruce Willis, in his later movie roles 63 She drank champagne and danced all night, in song 64 Crude weapon 65 46-Down division 66 Spanish alternative? 67 Checked (out) 68 Myocyte 69 Sweater, e.g. 70 ___ it rich? (Sondheim lyric) 71 Highlands refusals 74 Better at conniving 77 Handles 78 Triangular sail 79 Infuser contents 81 Altar no-shows 85 Gingerbread house visitor 86 Enrobe 89 Heap 90 Eucharist holder 91 TV actress Graff 93 Spotted scavenger 94 Ditto 96 Take me ___ 97 Lifted 98 Hosiery brand 100 Kind of tissue 102 Coin grade 103 Repetitive behavior condition, for short 105 View from a boardwalk 106 Grammy Awards airer 1234 5678 9101112131415161718 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3031 32 33343536 3738 394041 42 4344 45464748 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 646566 67 68 697071 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 8485 8687 88 899091 9293 94 95969798 99 100 101102103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113For any three answers, call from a touch-tone phone: 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Solution on D3 duty between 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Saturday. CPR SAVES A LIFE During V.F.W. Post 5277s monthly din ner meeting, auxilia ry member Dorothy Dulin began chok ing and pointing to her throat. Paul Hol lenbach, who received CPR training in Penn sylvania years ago while working for the coal mines, quick ly wrapped his arms around Dotty and with his sts attempted to thrust up on her stom ach. After three at tempts, the meat was dislodged and Dotty began to breathe nor mally. Hollenbach has been a V.F.W. member for more than 30 years. His home on Minneola Av enue is also known as Santas House. Each year it is beautifully decorated and he and his wife distribute food and toys to the needy. CLERMONT CONSIDERS SKATEBOARD REGULATIONS Clermont Council in troduced an ordinance regulating the riding of skateboards on the streets and sidewalks in the city. Skateboarding will be allowed on res idential sidewalks but not on those located in commercial areas. Master Clay Turville questioned not being able to ride on a side walk at a public park. He was assured rid ing on the sidewalk at a public park would be allowed, providing it was a designated area. Clermonts Parks and Recreation Chairman Cuqui Whitehead re ported to the council that her committee, in cooperation with the Clermont Garden Club, had handed out 3,000 trees to local residents to be planted in pri marily the Clermont area. She said a total of 35,000 trees had been given out by Clermont since her involvement. HISTORY FROM PAGE C1 SUBMITTED PHOTO The sisters of Beta Theta ESA will hold a Mardi Gras event Saturday to benet the Mike Conley Hospice House. Current President Pat Moore, center, presents a $500 check to Carol Felder, director of development, and Cornerstone Hospice Foundation Director Nick Buchholz. The 10th annual Mardi Gras event twill be from 6:30-11 p.m. at Minneola City Hall. The $40 ticket includes dinner by Oakwood Smokehouse and Grill, entertainment and dancing by Past Tense. Costumes are optional. There will be a silent auction, cash bar and door prizes. Call Co-Chairman Janet Hawkins at 352-394-7131 for tickets and BETA THETA MARDI GRAS FUNDRAISER SET Staff Report The Lake County Public Safety De partment and the Groveland Fire Department signed an automat ic aid agreement Monday at Grove lands Fire Station 94 at 193 Cherry Valley Trail. County ofcials hope additional pacts with other cities will be signed. The Groveland agreement states that the closest emergency unit, whether Lake County Fire or Grove land Fire, will respond to emergency incidents within the Inter-local Ser vice Boundary Agreement, or ISBA area. This agreement is a win-win sit uation for our citizens, said Lake County Commissioner Jimmy Con ner. Together, we can better protect lives and property and reduce in surance costs for residents in unin corporated Lake County, and within participating cities. The county is also imple menting an Automatic Vehicle Location or AVL system, which is similar to a GPS monitoring system that will dispatch the closest unit to any emergency, whether county or city. We will share a centralized dis patch and the costs of responding to emergencies in the Groveland area, said Lake County Public Safety De partment Chief John Jolliff. This agreement will improve response times and offer citizens an improved level of protection. The agreement with Groveland goes into effect on Saturday. Lake County is also working with other municipalities in the hopes of strik ing similar agreements throughout the county. This is truly a big deal for the citi zens of Lake County, said Commis sioner Welton Cadwell. I hope every city in Lake County that has a re department will sign onto this agreement. GROVELAND Lake signs mutual aid pact with fire department, envisions others Call the South Lake Press to get your ad in! 394-2183

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Wednesday, February 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C3 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 CLERMONT BLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSAMILYELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time! IRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONTL Many Other Activities each week Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.org LIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLCHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm SOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary); 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.org ST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am 10:00 am Beginning Oct. 6, 2013 5:00 pm Service Sunday School Youth Group Nursery Adult Bible Study Womens Bible Study Mens Prayer Breakfast WOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH GODINCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALE ERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for Children Groveland IRSTBAPTISTCHURCH GROVELAND Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pm MT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! MINNEOLA CONGREGATIONSMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club NEWLPRESBYTERIANCHURCH18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am TLIVINGGOD Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce Rowland MONTVERDE WOODLANDSLUTHERAN15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 am OAKLAND PRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforSouth Lake South LakeGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOMErfn tbt352-394-7121806 W. Minneola Ave.,Clermont,FL Cremation ChoicesDirect Cremation$675Plus Container Ron Becker,Director352-394-8228921 S.US Hwy 27,Minneola,FL N EW R EFORMED P LANT C HURCH We meet our God on Sunday at Superior Residence at 10:30 AM. 1600 Hunt Trace Blvd. (Behind Home Depot)Pastor Harm Biehl 407-325-8663 est country sweetheart; the Down Brothers, who perform classic rock throughout the Orlando area; Hay Fire, a local band with a southern sound and the Abbey Four Band, a Beatles tribute band known for completely involving the audience in their performances. Everyone who has seen the Abbey Four Band in person says they are great, Fishel said. The popular Robin sons Racing Pigs races are back this year with pigs diving into a swim ming pool and swim ming for the nish line. Races will be spread throughout the entire weekend, according to event organizers. The Pig on the Pond For the Kids festival is being sponsored by Pig on the Pond Inc. and presented by the City of Clermont, Brighthouse Networks and News 13. The event is also be ing sponsored in part by Beef OBradys, Cler mont Chiropractic Life Center, the Daily Com mercial the South Lake Press and Napleton-Cl ermont at the Water front Park in Clermont. We are so excited for this years Pig on the Pond festival. There are some great new things that will be added to the things that people in the entire communi ty look forward to each year, Event Coordina tor Cheryl Fishel said. For information, vis it www.pigonthepond. org. PIG FROM PAGE C1 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Mascotte police ofcials have red a sergeant be cause he reportedly refused to cooperate with an inter nal investigation into allega tions that he harassed a fe male ofcer. The sergeant, David Grice, is the same ofcer who claimed last July that Police Chief Ronaldo Banasco had bugged Grices patrol car, an allegation City Manager Jim Gleason found groundless. According to documents obtained from the city, Of cer Toni Hart complained last November that Grice was following her. She claimed on several occasions, while working the night shift, she noticed Grice nearby, sit ting in his patrol car with the lights off, watching her while she did her job. Hart also stated that Grice, her immediate supervisor, would do the same thing while she was on lunch breaks. I have worked with Sgt. Grice on a past rotation and do not recall experienc ing this course of conduct, nor was I followed around as much, Hart wrote in her complaint. He appears to frequently patrol the area that I am assigned to now more than before. I have also limited my conversation with Sgt. Grice to work duties and orders in hopes this would cease I am sure there is a reason able explanation, or perhaps these are just coincidences, with a solution that works out for everyone. An internal investigation was started, but Grice would not cooperate, Banasco said. He failed to cooperate or answer any question in the investigation, the chief wrote in a disciplinary ac tion form, where he recom mended on Jan. 29 that Grice be terminated. While Deputy City Man ager/Finance Manager Dol ly Miller said its not uncom mon for a supervisor to drive up on ofcers in the eld to see if they are OK, she con sidered Grices behavior to ward Hart rather odd. Although Sergeant D. Grice failed to comply with the questioning and internal in vestigation process, I was un able to complete and under stand fully his actions towards Ofcer Hart, but in fact, his supervision towards Ofcer Hart was different than the other supervisors at the Mas cotte police, she stated. Miller supported Bana scos recommendation to terminate Grice for not co operating with an internal investigation. In addition to Grices bug ging allegation, he has com plained to the Lake County Sheriffs Ofce, the State At torneys Ofce and the Florida Department of Law Enforce ment that he was the subject of age discrimination by Ban asco because the chief made Grice work a night shift. Mascotte officer fired during investigation of conduct

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Wednesday, February 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C5

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C6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 26, 2014 Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) TODAY CAREER DAY WITH THE ARMY AT THE LIBRARY: At 4:30 p.m., giving teens, parents and adults tips about varying military careers, 756 W. Broad St. Groveland. Call 352429-5840 for details. THURSDAY SOUTH LAKE 912 PROJ ECT MEETING WITH DR. WAYNE BROUGH: At 7 p.m., Clermont Com munity Building, down town. Brough is the chief economist and vice president of research at Freedom Works. DEADLINE FOR VENDORS IS THURSDAY FOR CLER MONT COMMUNITY YARD SALE: From 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., March 2 on Mon trose Street in down town Clermont. Ven dor spaces are $15. Go to www.clermontdown townpartership.com for an application, email cl ermontfarmersmarket@ gmail.com or call Betty Whittaker at 352-8749535. Space is limited. SHEILA RAY CHARLES COMES TO FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH TO CELEBRATE RECOVERY: Daughter of the late Ray Charles will deliver a message of hope from 7 to 9 p.m., at 950 Seventh St., in Clermont. For in formation, call 352394-2412 or go to www. FUMC-Clermont.org. SATURDAY FREE GARDENING PRO GRAM AT THE CLERMONT GARDEN CLUB: Next pro gram in the First Satur day Education Series from 10 a.m. to noon, at the club, 849 West Ave., downtown Clermont. Kim Rutledge of Ocalas Southern Charm Land scaping and Nursery is the guest. SUNDAY CLERMONT DOWNTOWN PARTNERSHIP AND CLER MONT FARMERS MARKET HOST THE COMMUNITY YARD SALE: From 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., on Montrose Street in historic down town Clermont. Call Betty Whittaker at 352874-9535. MONDAY SAC MEETING: At 6 p.m., Sawgrass Bay Elemen tary School media cen ter. Call 352-243-1845. MARCH 5 ASH WEDNESDAY SERVICE AT WINDER MERE UNION CHURCH: At 7 p.m., 10710 Park Ridge-Gotha Rd. A sol emn and inspirational service. The Rev. Bar ton Buchanan will of ciate. For information, go to www.windermere union.org or call 407876-2112. PINE RIDGE ELEMEN TARY SAC MEETING: At 7 p.m. in the media center. MARCH 6 FREE TRIATHLON CLINIC AT GEAR FOR MULTIS PORT: From 5:45 to 6:30 p.m., Thursdays in March, at the National Training Center in Cler mont. First come, rst serve. Email Multisport gear@aol.com to reserve a spot, or go to www. gearformultisport.com. MARCH 7 PIG ON THE POND SANCTIONED BARBECUE COMPETITION AND FESTI VAL: March 7-9 at Water front Park in Clermont. Email tandy@churchat southlake.com or go to pigonthepond@earth link.net for details. HOWEY-IN-THE-HILLS GARDEN AND CIVIC CLUB YARD SALE: March 7-9, 313 W. Central Ave., across from the Howey water tower. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., March 7-8, and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., March 9. Call 352-3246037 for details. MARCH 9 LENTEN SERVICES AND POTLUCK DIN NERS THROUGH APRIL 13 AT WINDERMERE UNION CHURCH, UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST: Spe cial services every Sun day evening preceeded by a potluck dinner, be ginning at 5:30 p.m. with the service on the theme of forgiveness following at 6:30 p.m., 10710 Park Ridge-Gotha Rd. For in formation, go to www. windermereunion.org or call 407-876-2112. MARCH 19 MINNEOLA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CHARTER BOARD MEETING: At 7 p.m., me dia center at the school, 320 E. Pearl St, Call the school at 352-394-2600 for details. COMMUNITY CALENDAR

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Wednesday, February 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D1 rfntbrr rfntbrfffrn nnbrnrff tnbntnbnrrfrfb bnbrtn r f n b r r f r r f n t b r f rrbbbrnbtrb rfr rrfbffb trtbnffnnnr tnbb rrfrbffbbn tbbnrfr r n r b b t b r b n t r t n r b b f r b n f r r n n n n f f n b b n b n f f b r b b t n n b f r b b r r b b r f r f n t r t f n r f f n t tnbrrfrfnb frfrfbfbtbfn brntbntrf bfbtffrbnbr rbrrfr f r n r n b t b rb rnr rnrfn b b b fbr r rfrffrbr rfttbbtf b r n t r r b b n b n b f b r r r f f r f r r r f b r r n r f n n b r b f n b r f f r b r f r n n r b f t t f r f n r f r f r b n r f r n r f r f f t r r n n r f r r b n n b r f r f b r n t b r b n n n t t f b f n t t f r b b f b n r r b f r f n b n n b f r bbrbbrf nbnfrbbrf nnnbtbbn bnnrfnnrnf nbtbfr bftrtfn ntnrfnfrbtb rnnnb n r n b n r n b n n n fnt bbrnn tbrbnttb ftrbtrfbn trfrnrrb r f f b r f n r f f bn r t b b r n b n t f r b f f r nnrfrnnb rnbrrfr t t f b n r b t b b b b r b t r f f n t f r n r f f r b r f r b n b r t t f t n r n b r f f r r n f rbr bbtnbrrfrf fftrfn bffnbn brntbrbtr nbbrfbr rtnnrf bbrf rbnffn b n b f f r f f n n b b tbnbrb fffnb nnbtb f rrbnbrtfn fnbrbfbn bnrtfnffb rbnnffn rfbrfnr rrbn r f n b r n t r b r b f b bn r f r b t f r f t r n b rrrtbrff trbfrttf ffbnbnnffnr tnbrbbbrrfbrb nnrtnb bnfrfbr nbrffrr trtrbtrb rtbbnrfr r n b r f b f f f nt n r f r f r b r f f f b r r n b r r f b r f f f b r r t t r f b r n n t b b n b r t b b b t n f f n r n b n n r f r t t r r f f r f n b r f r n n f r f f ff rt tt b b b fbr r rfrffrbr rfttbbtf fnt f f b n r n b t n n b r r f t r b n r f b b t r f t n n r f t n n b r f b f b b r n r r r n b r r f r n b n t r n b f fftnbrrnbrfn rnbrfrbb rfntnrnr rbffbtnbr tbnbrrbnbrr tnnrfrffb ttfrrfnffntb trrfbrf fbtfbrnntt f r n n n n r b b f b b t f f t n b b r f f t n b r n r r f t t b b t f t nbbrfbffr rnbtrbtb nffnrnbbbn r f n b n r n t rbrbffrtfn t t f t n t f r b f f r ffbtnbrrf rfrbrbfnnn nnrfrfr nttbbnbnffn rfrb ttrfr brfbbffb bn r f n r f r b n b f r f n r f b r b f f r r t rrbrb nbrnft nbrbbbbbrfn n b b n r ft n b t t t f t n b b n r b r f n r r b t n r r f f r n r f r f n t r n n r n f b r b b r f r t b n b t n b f r n t t b b r f b b n t r r n n b b r r f r f t t f r b r r f r r t t r f r b r f r b r f b ft f tt n r t r n f b r f f n f r b n f n f n n r f f t t nbnbnrnnbn tfbnbrff f f f r n f r t n n f t r n t b r b t rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff n tbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff n trrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrff nrrrrrrrrrrff ttbrrrrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rfntbbt rfrntn nnnftbnbn brfbnrb bnbtn brnnrtnftbn tbrbttb nnnrfrbtb nbb n fbfn tbrbnbbbtn nnnntnbbtr bbbfrf rtfnbtr rrbrfnnnrfnt t rf

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D2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 26, 2014 rfntbtrf rfn tbr nbtbt rr r t b r r ntb r t t ttbrr rff n tb fbttt fr f btrr r rfr b b fr r fr b bnbt bnnb r ff b n r rr r tt r ffr t fr r tbb n b n b r r r b nbbr r tb b tb b n n t t b r t tff f b tb b bn tbn brr bnf tbb brr b ff ffr rfrr tf n t b r tntbt f bbtt tbnrr nb r f r r tbn tbf bt fr nr b b n n f r r t trtrrr b b t b r f r f r btbn tb bbt rr ttn tb tbb fr b r t f r bntbn rr ttf rb bb rrff b tb ff b tb bbbt f b r ttbf r b r tbb tb ff b tbb r bttrrr b f fr trr tbrb t bbfr t ff f bb ftrrfr fb rr f tb frf n br bnbfrf n f tr r t r bf n nfr trft t b br r tt rf tnb bbt tb b tbrr b b n t r r tb fbt r rrbbbbn bff tb bfbr f f f r f btb bnr nr r rf tt fr b tbn b t tbrr bbb rf tb rf r r r r f f bbtb rr bb b b n trrrr n bnr nrf n ntr rb bn ff bb r b f fb tb tfr bbbb bnt ff b rr b tn ff ntbbnb nr ttbn nfr rft brf t tbt tr nt r nttb r t b b n b b b n b f r f b ttb tbff r bb b n t r b tbrr tttb r tttb r br bntb rff bttb r tbb f bn tb rrr b ntbf bntb r t br ttbb frr b btr f frf nf n rfbr t r tb trf tbb r tbbr tbn brf n t tbrr bn tbrfr r tbnr r bt bntb tb rr tt tbrr fr b r n f r r r b t t b b n b b b t b t t t rb btfrf rf bf tbb brfr rfttb r rr btbb tbrf b nbf bbb frfr nf tn tbrrf nrfr br frr ttb rrrr nbnbb f tb r f rb b n bt tb nb b b t b

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Wednesday, February 26, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D3 rfntbrr rfr rr frn r trrr r br rr rrr rn r rr rrr br frrfrr rfntb nnb nfrfnbb rbnn ttnftfb b rtrrb rtnbnnft nftbb nn fnftf fbb ft nbrfft bbnn rnft bnbb n trbnn bbt ftbb bb bbnn n bnbb b r tbnbb b tnbbnn rrf f b t r t b ntbf rbn bbb nnn ntnbb rtbb b nbb b nn b bf nn ttnb rb b b trnftb rbnn nrrf f nbbt nbn bb nnrb bnn btbb nn bbb tbb b n n n bb tnnbb b bb n n b b n nn tbt bb btn tbbb n f b nft rtbb nbtf b bf bb rbnnb b rrnr bf nfttbf tfbftb ntft ntb nn f ntb bb n fnnf nrnnfb tfbtb b n nn frfbt nn f t f bntf tbnnb ttbnn n fnbtf bbnbtfb rnb nn nnf f tfb bftfb tbnb fbnnrbb nn ntbnbbnb ttfbrntnn bnn n tbb nnf f nnntrf f bnt ttnnftt ftbfnnt trbbrb b n trf n t f n n t t b n t t b r t b n n b b r r b t t b n n n n n t t b t b nf f nnff f t t b n n n n n t t b t b ftt nn tn bnn trf fft t t b n n n n n t t b t b n b r t t b n t b b n n trf fft f t t r t b t b t b f r r b frb f ftftf nbnn n n t b n b f t b n b n r n n t n b b t t b f f ntn tbb rfnn nb b ttbnttnb tfb tbnn b t tf t t f f r b b t t f f r b b nf tf rrb fbntbnbnb ttb nft tbf b n n b n b n b n b b b b b n b b b b b n ft tbf t t r r r b n b n t t t n n t n t b b r n b b n t b n n t f t n b r f b r f b n n t r r b f n f n b r t f t b n n b n n btb nn r tbb r f t n b b fnrb ffb nnbnb nft ttbf nnnbnr nbt tbnn fbn fnt tfntfb tbnn b b t n n b n n n n n t b b nnnr nbrbtnntb nntrb fttb fb n r r b b nf ttbf nnff ft ttt bb rtbb nttn bb btbnn bbnn ttb rtfbb rbtf tnbnb bnn bbb bnnnn b rbttnnb ntnfrb nbb trntb nn f n n b t b b bbb tbb bbnn nfrt nnt tnttbn b ntnbtt tbnb frfbt ttnb rbntbb ntbb tnnbb nntt nbb nntt nbb n nnnbb frbfbft

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D4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 26, 2014 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 7 25 34 47 67 13 18 31 59 74 9 21FREE SPACE53 72 2 16 42 48 63 5 29 39 52 68ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N I B O G BINGO B I N G O SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Mary Holman WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! O 74 O 72 O 63 O 68 O 67