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rfntb Phone: 352-326-2623LEARN TO RIDE! DON'T WAIT! SCHEDULE YOUR BIKE FOR SERVICE NOW! PRE-BIKE WEEK PARTY: MARCH 1STSTARTS AT 10AM, WORLD CLASS MUSIC BY 3RING CIRCUS& BEEF 'O' BRADY'S COOKIN! BIKINI BIKE WASH & RADICAL RANDY SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | C1SPORTS: Lake Minneola advances in regional playoffs WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWST AND INSIDECLASSIFIED D1 CROSSWORDS C2 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN C1 SPORTS B1 VOICES A4WORD ON THE STREE T A2SOUTH LAKE PRESSV OLUME 99, NO. 8 5 SECTIOn N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reservedwww. southlakepress.com PRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comClermont city ofcials are talking about removing the recently installed red-light cameras, cutting back on them or at least doing away with cita tions for right turns on red, but they are now realizing those options wouldnt be cheap. City council members last week instructed City Manager Darren Gray to meet with the red-light camera company, American Trafc Solu tions (ATS), about why 90 percent of the citations forwarded to police are for right-turn violations, not for drivers barreling through intersections. Gray reported back to council mem bers this week about that meeting. We met with ATS and one question we had was if we can eliminate the right-hand turn violations altogether, Gray said. To do that, Clermont would have to re negotiate the contract with ATS, but there could be some nancial obligation for the city should we decid ed to take that out. Citing concerns about drivers run ning red lights and causing accidents, the council previously approved installing up to 24 red-light cameras at 13 intersections along State Road 50 and U.S. Highway 27, but only six have been installed to date at the most prob lematic intersections. Gray said his ATS discussion also touched upon the pos sibility of removing the cameras altogether, but that would end up costing the city, too, because it would mean CLERMONTCity council considers yanking red light cameras SUBMITTED PHOTO From left, MEMCO Production Manager Skeeter Glover, President Michael Evans, and Sales and Administration Manager Curtis Evans, oversee a workers progress on one of the companys above-ground fuel storage tanks being built in Clermont. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMike Evans Ma chinery Compa ny (MEMCO), a 20-year-old fuel-tank manufacturer in Cler mont, plans to move to a facility in Bushnell with more than ve times the square footage it has in south Lake. Weve outgrown the place were in, Ser vice and Administration Manager Curtis Evans said. Our production line is jammed up here (in Clermont) because we are getting so much interest. The building were moving into (in Bushnell) is much larger and will allow us to produce the tanks faster and more efciently. Theres also more room for us to grow out there. Doing business under the name Envirosafe, the company has a 15,000-square-foot manufacturing facility at 901 12th St. in Clermont. It has become the No. 1 manufacturer of aboveground fuel systems in the U.S., thanks in part to the worldwide attention it has received on the Web since 2008. The fuel systems store gasoline, diesel fuel or liquid chemicals. The company has been leasing its Cler mont site since 2004, but recently bought a 50,000-square-foot building off of County Road 747 in Bushnell, where it plans to build another 30,000-squarefoot building. MEMCOs investment in the new building, which included the pur chase price, renovations and new equipment, is estimated at nearly $2 million. According to Evans, the building should be completed around April and will bring 22 to 35 new jobs to the area.CLERMONTFuel-tank manufacturer plans large-scale expansionWe met with ATS and one question we had was if we can eliminate the righthand turn violations altogether.City Manager Darren Gray LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comThe St. Johns River Water Management Districts Gov erning Board has approved Niagara Bottlings request to more than double the amount of water it draws from the Flor idan aquifer. The approval came after Wa ter Management ofcials mod ied the permit to stipulate that withdrawals should not cause or contribute to a violation of the adopted minimum levels to a couple of nearby lakes. If this occurs, the water management district can revoke the permit, in whole or in part, or reduce the permitted allocation. The permit, approved last week by a 6-2 vote of the board, requires the Groveland bottled water company to shift its to tal withdrawal from the upper aquifer to the lower aquifer by 2024. The governing board con sidered a great many factors, including the input provided by the public, Board Chairman John Miklos of Orlando said in a statement. Ultimately, we determined that this withdraw al will have a negligible impact on the environment, and there are conditions in place to en sure that there is no unaccept able harm to water resources. A permit condition also was included in the agreement that PALATKANiagara Bottling allowed to draw twice as much water from aquiferSEE WATER | A2SEE FUEL | A2SEE CAMERAS | A5

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 19, 2014 CLERMONT Aida to be presented at East Ridge High SchoolThe musical Aida will be presented at 7 / p.m., today through Friday, with a matine on Saturday at 2 / p.m., at East Ridge High School auditorium, 13322 Excalibur Rd. Tickets are $10 and can be reserved by emailing Vince Santo at santov@ lake.k12..us.CLERMONT Participants sought for annual bake-off on March 8The 16th annual Pig on the Pond Dessert Bake-Off is scheduled for March 8, part of the Pig on the PondSanctioned Barbecue Competition and Festival March 7-9. The bakeoff, organized by the Church at South Lake, raises funds for their Buses and Backpacks program, a weekly effort to feed elementary-aged children. Categories for the bake-off which is for amateur bakers only, include cakes, pies, brownies and miscellaneous desserts. Entry fee is the donation of your dessert, which will be sold by Buses and Backpacks at Pig on the Pond, and prizes will be awarded. Entry forms for the bake-off must be received by March 8, with desserts delivered to the event by 9:30 / a.m. Go to www.pigonthepond.org or call Tandy Hammond at 352-243-1155.CLERMONT Vendors sought for annual South Lake Womens ExpoThe 12th annual South Lake Womens Expo is seeking vendors for the event sponsored by the Clermont Womens Club to be held March 22 at the Wesley Center at First United Methodist Church, at 950 7th St., north of State Road 50. Applications are now being accepted for the event, which offers a bonus included in the vendor fee: a business card ad to be published in the March 19 edition of the South Lake Press. Admission is free for the public from 10 / a.m. to 2 / p.m. For information or an application, email Basha Schlazer at BSsportzfan@ aol.com.CLERMONT Relay For Life to host 50/50 Have a Heart drawingYour $10 donation gives participants a chance to be a lucky winner while helping to take a bite out of cancer by supporting the American Cancer Societys Relay For Life of South Lake-Cagan Crossings with the Have a Heart 50/50 chance drawing. The drawing will be held on Feb. 27 during the Relay For Life of South Lake-Cagan Crossing team party at the South Lake Hospital Live Well Center, 1935 Don Wickham Dr. For information or to pur chase a ticket, call Kim Kitchen at 863-978-7563.MOUNT DORA Food trucks will return to downtown on ThursdayBeginning Thursday, food trucks will once again appear in downtown Mount Dora on the third Thursday of every month. Hosted by the Mount Dora Area Chamber of Commerce, the trucks will be located in the Chamber parking lot and on Sunset Park at the cor ner of 4th and Alexander Streets, with tables and chairs set up to offer par ticipants a gathering and seating area. Ten to 15 unique food trucks offer ing a wide variety of different food styles will participate in the event, opening for service from 5:30 to 8:30 / p.m. For information, call 352-383-2165.LEESBURG Meet llamas at the library on Feb. 27 Meet live llamas at 10:30 / a.m., on Feb. 27 at the Leesburg Public Library, 100 E. Main St. For information, call 352-728-9790 or email hannah.barreto@leesburgorida.gov. Area Briefs What South Lake residents are saying about ...FOOD STAMPSIf you could change one thing about the food stamp system, what would it be?The food stamp program, the usage needs to be tighter. They need to revisit the kinds of items that can be purchased. Some foods that can be purchased probably shouldnt be purchased by people who need food stamps. At the same time, they should be able to pur chase non-food items such as toothpaste. JERRY SULCENTI CLERMONT I wouldnt say do away with it, because its important for those who need it, but I think there needs to be a time lim it. If its indenite you be come dependent on government help. If you have eight months or a year or two years, if theres a time limit after which you wont be eligible, I think that gives you motivation as a human being to do something about it. LESLIE KIRKLAND CLERMONT If youre going to get food stamps, you have to volunteer. At least with the taxes we are paying, they would get something done. Three strikes if you dont show up, you lose your food stamps and you have to re-apply. If you lose it three times, youre out. KRISTIAN WARE SUMMERFIELD The screening process that theyre really checking that the people really need it, that they are going to use it for food for themselves and their children not for their nails, their shoes. VIVIANA RIOS KISSIMMEE Word on theStreet Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 ROXANNE BROWNStaff writerA sinkhole measuring about 15 feet in diameter opened up in a populous Clermont neighborhood early Monday morning. The sinkhole, at the intersection of Powderhorn Place Drive and Peaceful Valley Drive near Hart wood Marsh Road, was roughly four feet deep, ofcials say. Fireghters responding to the call said the hole did not appear to put any homes in immediate danger and they did not observe any other hazards, city ofcials said. They noted that a gas line and wa ter main were nearby, but all utili ties appeared to be undisturbed. State and county ofcials, along with the City of Clermont Public Works Department, arrived on the scene to assist the private proper ty owners since it is at the entrance of a cul-de-sac with several homes. A representative from Sentry Management which manag es the subdivision, told Clermont city ofcials that an engineer from Bechtol Engineering & Testing in DeLand made a preliminary as sessment and advised the management company to watch the sink hole for the next 24 hours. City spokeswoman Doris Bloodsworth said Public Works employ ees brought in ground-up asphalt to make a ramp over the curb so that the roughly 15 homeowners in the Peaceful Valley Drive cul-desac can enter and exit, as well as any emergency vehicles.Sinkhole opens in neighborhoodCLERMONTallows the permit to be revoked or the withdraw al reduced if aquifer tests demonstrate that using water from the lower aquifer does not provide the benet anticipated, a press release from the district states. Joe Kilsheimer, spokes man for Niagara, said he believed the request met all of the legal and tech nical justication for ap proval. We are pleased the board agreed with the staffs recommendation, he said. The assurances that the staff and Niagara want to build into the per mit will ensure that the water resources will not be adversely affected. Hank Largin, spokes man for the SJRWMD, said board members Douglas Burnett of St. Augustine and Maryam Ghyabi of Ormond Beach voted against the permit. Burnetts concern was that there wasnt enough evidence regarding the lower Floridan aquifer and that it would not have an impact on the water source, Largin said. Niagara applied to the water management dis trict last September to increase its average dai ly withdrawal from the aquifer from 484,000 gal lons to 910,000 gallons. In December, the company changed its application to request that the bulk of its water will come from the lower Floridan aqui fer by 2016. Niagara contends that withdrawing water from the lower aquifer instead of the upper aquifer will have less impact on lake levels. The two aquifers are separated by a barrier called the middle-conning unit or, in places, the semi-conn ing unit where water can leak through. In some places in Flor ida, the conning unit is less than 50 feet thick and composed of permeable limestone and dolomite, whereas Niagara contends the area its looking at has a conning unit of clay up to 75 feet thick. District staff deter mined because of the semi-conning unit and the productive na ture of the lower Floridan aquifer, the withdraw al will have less potential to impact the surround ing natural systems than the previously permitted withdrawal. Alan Oyler, consultant for the water manage ment district, said previ ously water withdrawn from the lower aquifer can affect water in the upper aquifer. It is diffusing the im pact, he said, empha sizing it will not have the same effect as water withdrawn from the upper aquifer. It all depends on where the water is being with drawn from in the lower aquifer, he said. If you have a good conning layer that separates the lower from the upper aquifer you have less of an impact, he said. It takes both modeling to predict the im pact and monitoring to verify whether the impact is or is not happening. According to a permit fact sheet from the water management district: %  en From 2014 to 2015, Niagaras withdrawals from the upper aquifer will not exceed 484,000 gallons per day. %  en From 2016 to 2023, that amount will be reduced to no more than 334,000 gallons per day. %  en By 2024, if Niagara hasnt shifted all its withdrawals to the lower aquifer, its permitted allocation of water drops to zero. WATER FROM PAGE A1 Evans, along with company President Mike Evans and Production Manager Skeeter Glover, are unsure at this time if theyll keep the Clermont location open as well, but most of the workers there will be relocating. We have so much steel, big equipment and a lot of tanks. Its going to be a big move, Evans said. Were thinking about keeping our Cler mont location, too, but well have to wait and see whether we need it or not. When the company rst began, Evans said the tanks were going to big ready-mix and waste companies, along with municipalities. Since appearing on the Web, the company has added contractors, farming operations, hospitals, trucking, aviation and marine companies and even governmental agencies and the U.S. military to its customer list. Many are located outside the United States. Although the tanks MEMCO manufactures are for storing regular gasoline and diesel fuel, it also produces bio-diesel, oil, ethanol and different chemical tanks, Evans said, adding that the custom-built tanks are all manufactured using a double wall system and comply with all local, state and federal regulations. Tank sizes vary from 300 to 35,000 gallons. Were excited, Evans said of the move. Its a big step forward from where we started in 1992. We went from a little place in Oakland to the facility in Clermont where weve been for 10 years, and now were looking forward to the new facility in Bushnell. For information, call 352-241-2302, 800555-4754 or visit abovegroundfuelstoragetanks.com. FUEL FROM PAGE A1

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Wednesday, February 19, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3 Staff ReportStudents in Lake Minneola High Schools Game, Simulation and Animation courses have created a mobile application that offers an ar ray of information about the school for students, faculty and parents. James Martin, who teaches this Ca reer-Technical Education course, challenged students to create an informational mobile application that would represent the high school. By Dec. 20, the stu dents had accom plished their goal when the Lake Minneola High School App was approved by Goo gle and available for download on the Android Market. The informational app features up-todate news from the school, calendar of events, bell schedule, course descriptions and more. Anything a student would need to learn about the school, Mar tin said, this app gives them the information right at their nger tips. Finding its way onto Apples App Store proved to be a greater challenge than the An droid Market. The rst time we submitted to Apple we got rejected, Martin said. Students stayed on task and nearly a month later, on Jan. 22, the Lake Minneola High School Mo bile Application was cleared for the Apple App Store. The Android version (Android 2.3 or later), Apple iPad ver sion (iOS 5.1 or later) and Apple iPhone ver sion (iOS 5.1 or later) of the app are all currently available to download. They did an amazing job by remaining focused and profes sional throughout the entire effort, Martin said of the students. LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comOver the last 10 years, many public projects have come to fruition in Lake County, from the construc tion of the new Emergency Operations and Communi cations Center, to the manu facturer of the new Clermont Community Center, to the rebuilding and moderniza tion of Tavares High School. All of which shows how far a penny will go. These projects are examples of how revenue from the one-cent sales tax for in frastructure is spent. The tax yielded $34.8 million last year, which was divided between the cities, school district and the county. The 14 cities then must divide up their alloca tion proportionally. As the tax is set to expire in 2017, county ofcials said last week at a board work shop they would like resi dents to have the opportunity to vote on whether to renew it in 2015. However, there is some de bate about how the tax reve nue should be divided, with some school board members suggesting that half a cent be allocated for new schools to handle the ex pected increase in student enrollment by 2020. County commissioners want to keep the status quo and agreed last week to draft a letter to the School Board and the cities, asking them to support this. The matter will be discussed and voted upon at a future commission meeting. Commission Chairman Jimmy Conner has stated previously that if the sales tax is not renewed, there would be no option other than to raise property taxes to pay for needed capital improvement projects. We use it to buy ambu lances, patrol cars and for parks, Conner said of the revenue. It is really an important quality of life issue. Commissioner Timothy Sullivan, who serves as a li aison to the Lake County League of Cities, said the cities, school and county, need to see these dollars contin ue so it doesnt have an impact on property taxes. The benet of the onecent sales tax is it spreads the load not only among residents, but anyone that does business in Lake County, he said. Property taxes hurt the people you are trying to protect the most, while the sales tax is based on people who spend money, and it doesnt include food or medicines. Penny sales tax money has been spent on rebuild ing and modernizing several of the countys high schools, including Eustis High School and Umatilla High School. As the school district looks at its future needs, ofcials say several schools, such as Beverly Shores Elemen tary School, Oak Park Mid dle School and Treadway El ementary may need to be modernized or rebuilt. Further, a consultant for the school district in No vember 2013 projected that by 2020, there will 2,297 new students in the schools, par ticularly in the southern part of the county. As a result, school ofcials see the need to build two new schools there within seven years. In the last ve years, the school district has lost more than $67 million in capi tal property tax revenue be cause the stagnant economy has kept property values low, and the Florida Legislature has cut the maximum allowable millage for capi tal purposes from 2 mills to 1.5 mills. School Board Members Tod Howard, Bill Mathias and Debbie Stivender agree the district needs additional funding from the sales tax. We need about a half cent to do the repairs and replacements to the older schools, Howard said. School board ofcials have not yet determined how the sales tax revenue would be spent. County Commissioner Sean Parks said he rec ognized the School Boards plight but added that it is equally important they work together on the issue. For its part, the county spent its portion of the pen ny sales tax revenue on proj ects such as the EOC, expan sion of the Judicial Center and the planned historic courthouse renovation. About half of the countys portion is also spent on road reconstruction, resur facing and sidewalks, which received the smallest part of revenue. Some of the money is also earmarked for public safety and equipment. Parks said the renewal of the penny sales tax is vital. We need the current con guration, referring to each party receiving a third. Our population has grown 80,000 to 100,000 people and we have an increasing level of service needs. At the budget workshop, Conner expressed concerns about the school district as a partner in receiving sales tax revenue. My concern is if you in clude the school board, it (a renewal of the tax) wont pass, based on all the prob lems they have, he said, re ferring to six principals who inaccurately reported their class sizes to the state, leading Superintendent Susan Moxley to call for an inde pendent review of all schools in the district. Then again, if you dont include them, it may not pass. Commissioner Welton Cadwell also believes voters wont renew the tax unless the school district receives some of the revenue. While the county commission has not determined spe cically how their portion will be spent, they agreed public safety, quality of life projects such as parks and sidewalks and roads are top spending priorities. I want to say, to me, the biggest issue facing us over the next three years is this sales tax, Conner said. I know everybody likes sidewalks and parks, but should you put ambulances in ser vice 12 hours instead of 24 hours there would be quite the outrage. Jim Myers, executive di rector of the Lake County League of Cities and nance director for the city of Eustis, said the penny sales tax is vi tal for meeting cities capital project needs. In Eustis, it means $1.4 million in capital projects and infrastructure in Eustis annually, he said. We are able to utilize that money each year. $24.99Full Service Oil Change**Includes up to 5 quarts of Valvoline`s Conventional oil, standard oil filter, lube and maintenance check. Additional charge for premium filter. Offer not valid with any other same service offers or discounts (including fleets). Good at participating Orlando locations.$15 offany Additional Service**Includes Transmission Fluid Exchange, Radiator Service, Entire Fuel System Cleaning, or Serpentine Belt Offer not valid with any other same service offers or discounts (including fleets). Good at participating Orlando locations. MINNEOLALake Minneola students create mobile applicationAnything a student would need to learn about the school, this app gives them the information right at their fingertips.James Martin BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL A truck passes the penny sales tax sign on Lakeshore Drive in Mount Dora on Feb. 12. PENNY SALES TAX BREAKDOWN The penny sales tax is split evenly between the cities, county and school district, with each receiving a third. In 2013-14, each received $11.6 million, with the cities having to split that $11.6 million between the 14 municipalities. COUNTYWHITNEY WILLARD / STAFF GRAPHICSOURCE: Sales Surtax Oversight Advisory Committee Roads and transportation Public safety facilities and equipment Construction, remodeling of facilities Parks and recreation Other infrastructure Examples: Judicial center expansion, eet operations center, EOC historic courthouse renovation, and sheriffs vehicles.SCHOOL DISTRICT CITIES Construction, renovation and remodeling of facilities Examples: Eustis Heights Elementary and Umatilla Middle remodeling Construction, renovation and remodeling of facilities Public safety facilities and equipment Roads and transportation Utilities, drainage improvements Examples: CDBG sewer forcemain project on Highway 50 in Mascotte. Local governments wrestle over penny sales tax

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 19, 2014The reappearance of Lynx buses on the streets of south Lake County in recent weeks has been a welcome sight for those who depend on mass transit for their livelihoods. Many residents in this area work in neighboring counties and count on these buses to ferry them to jobs in Orange and Osceola counties. Without them, some may be relegated needlessly to the unemployment line. Lynx had discontinued service some time ago between south Lake and those counties but brought it back at the behest of the Lake County Commission, which agreed in October to shoulder some of the cost. But when the service returned in January, riders discovered that Lynx was offering just eight round-trips a day instead of the 16 it had offered previously. Further, the last trip was at 6:15 / p.m., which meant some commuters who worked late had to scramble for a way home. County commissioners, responding to the anger of their constituents, said this wasnt what they bargained for. They called for Lynx ofcials to restore the full service 16 trips a day, both day and night. We concur. Mass transit is more than a convenience to those who use it. As Daily Commercial Staff Writer Livi Stanford reported in a recent story about Lynx, for many it is a vital lifeline to shopping, medical appointments and, yes, their jobs. Many commuters who travel to neighboring counties for work dont have the luxury of working 9 to 5 and require access to bus service late into the evening. Some told us that, without it, they are forced to invest signicant percentages of their income on cab fare. This problem is easy to solve. Lynx should heed the request of the Lake County Commission to restore the full bus service. Certainly, the cost of providing that service is an issue. But between the county, Lynx and the riders themselves many of whom say theyd be willing to shoulder higher fares if necessary the cost consideration can be overcome. Local ofcials must come together to solve this problem. This is not just about the individual riders. This is about the economic health of a community whose workforce relies partly on neighboring counties for their jobs. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . ........................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTOPINION WHATS YOUR OPINION?The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be origi nal, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Letters to the Editor 732 W. Montrose St. Clermont, FL 34711By fax to: 352-394-8001EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed.GUEST COLUMNSIf you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@daily commercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OURVIEW SOUTH LAKE PRESSYour community newspaper for more than 100 years.732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Florida 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region.All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Bring back full Lynx bus service LETTER of the WEEKJames Holden (Congress is only working for themselves) got it right. They no longer work for the people. The solution to the problems of America could be easily solved by simply passing an amendment for term limits. It will have to be voted for by the people because it would never get introduced into either part of Congress. The American people can vote out any thing or anyone with a 75 per cent popular vote. There are only 118 members of Congress that served in this great countrys military. They have no business running the military. Thirty years ago there were 298. It should be a requirement. The average age of senators is 62.1 years and in the House of Representatives it is 57.0. There are 38 old enough to go on Social Security. There are two more than 80 years of age. Imagine getting rid of Rangel, Reid, Pelosi, McCain and all the congressmen and women that are giving away our childrens futures by loading up every bill that is introduced with billions in pork to garner re-election votes to extend their careers. No one is in Washington anymore with the express pur pose of doing what We the People want done. If they could seek ofce knowing that they could open their mouth and not be threatened by the old established career congressmen something just might get done. What a novel idea. Two terms and you sit out the next two. Compensation given based on production. Require them to practice what they pass. Retirement would be earned. JOHN COHN | TavaresCongress no longer works for the people FILE PHOTO Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz. speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington.Dems are misguidedA recent urry of sycophantic letters selling the credits of the Democratic Party force me from under my cozy rock to point out a single fact that will trump every credit they own Democrats are the party of state supremacy, which means, the rights of the individual can be trampled by the rights of the state, i.e., collectivism. The Founding Fathers framed a Constitution that identies a Republic founded on rights of the individual over the state, i.e., individualism. Every Democratic vote supports the rights of the state over the individual and I doubt thats really the way informed Americans want to go. Zionists? Yes. New World Or der supporters? Yes. Loyal Americans, no way. JOHN WHITAKER | TavaresColumnist off base on Obama criticismIn his recent diatribe, Russ Sloan digs down into his deepest pit of hatred for the president. He states that in his 2008 campaign the president promised to cut the decit by half in his rst term in ofce, but the debt grew by $5 trillion. Well, the fact is the decit was $932 billion in scal year, Oct. 1, 2008-Sept. 30, 2009, and was $232 billion in the scal year Oct. 1, 2012 to Sept. 30, 2013, a decrease of $700 billion in his rst term, which is much more than half. I would think someone of Sloans background would know the difference between the decit, which is the annual amount we are in the red and the national debt, which is the total accumulated amount we are in the red. It is true the actual debt grew by $5 trillion, but the decit was reduced by $700 billion, so President Obama certainly did keep his promise. The lengths Sloan will go to try to malign the president, even making blatantly false statements is sad, unless he is truly ignorant of the facts. MARY OHANLON | ClermontNot allowing certain rights is unconstitutionalWe are blessed to live in this country of laws where most citi zens obey and understand their purpose. Still there are some who fail in understanding and represent some laws to t their beliefs and desires. From health care to mar riage, some think they should dictate needs, which in reality takes away civil rights from others. We press religious teaching of one sect but fail to understand the effects it might have for people of different beliefs. Although its difcult to accomplish a fair position on these values, its still one of the main benets of being American. Being an American is more than just enjoying the laws of our nation, but also allowing all others the same position. While some want others to follow their morals and desires, it takes away the freedom of choice for all citizens. Blocking the ability to mar ry a loved one or to prevent the choice of family planning for those of varied values is simply unconstitutional and unfair. Our law of freedom of choice is being able to have a choice in the direction you wish to reach. America is great because of these laws not because some are prevented from having them. God bless America. WILLIAM CAMPBELL | Leesburg YOURVOICESLETTERS TO THE EDITOR

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Wednesday, February 19, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5 backing out of a con tract. As for not installing all two-dozen cameras, the city manager said ATS was willing to talk about this. I see some agree able terms on their part when it comes to re ducing the number of red-lights cameras on the contract, Gray told the council. At the meeting this week, Gail Ash, a resident and former councilwoman, told the board she understands the city may lose mon ey by changing contract terms, but she asked council members to consider this because it is negatively affecting residents. Ash said she has bee n a nervous wreck on the road because of the confusion over what constitutes a legal right-hand turn. Although a state statute says motorists have to come to a complete stop before turning right on red, a separate state statute pertaining to red-light cameras says drivers can turn right on red with out a camera citation if they do it in a careful and prudent manner at less than 12 mph. Its up to the camera com pany and a police rep resentative reviewing the tape to determine if a violation occurred. I think that weve got a can of worms here, resident Matthew Modica told the board. Weve got a liability here. Its not a healthy situation for the city of Clermont, because I can see a class-action suit stemming from something like this and then the city will really be losing money. Besides that, it might just be one of the most negative things Ive seen here in my 45 years. Its like big broth er gone mad and its going to cost people on the council their seat. Resident Jim Pur vis also said the cameras are causing con fusion and anxiety for drivers he believes will take side or back roads to avoid them, funneling additional trafc and the potential for more accidents on secondary roads. He cit ed Hooks Street, where two schools are located, as an alternative route drivers might take to avoid the cameras at State Road 50 and Hancock Road. I was for the cam eras because I, too, thought they were going to stop red-light runners, but by target ing right turns on red, all were doing is dividing this town up like mincemeat for no rea son at all, Purvis said. Councilman Ray Goodgame, a support er of the cameras for safety reasons only, said hed like to see if the right-turn violations can be eliminated and the $158 tickets refund ed for those who have already received them. Mayor Hal Turville, who said he has been strongly against the cameras from the start, said he wants to talk about just bailing out of the contract, have the city take its losses and move on. Turville said he be lieves that people are driving around with anxieties associat ed with the red-light cameras will probably cause more accidents and problems than before the city had them installed. Gray said he is waiting for ATS to come back with information about how much it will cost to re-negotiate its contract and what options the city has re garding reducing or removing cameras. CAMERAS FROM PAGE A1 MILLARD IVES | Staff Writermillard.ives@dailycommercial.comClermont police captured a juvenile suspected of robbing a hardware store at gunpoint last week. Police provided few details about the robbery, which oc curred at 8:30 / a.m. F eb. 12 at the Hilltop Ace Hardware store at 859 State Road 50, west of U.S. Highway 27. However, Po lice Capt. Michael McMaster said store employees were able to provide a description of the suspects vehicle. Assisted by Lake County dep uties, ofcers set up a perime ter around hundreds of homes southwest of the interchange at U.S. 27 and State Road 50 as they searched for the suspect. Family Christian Center School on U.S. 27, just south of State Road 50, was locked down during the search. This alarmed parents such as Jessica Pendley. Its really scary, Pend ley told a local television sta tion. Im glad they do lock the school down in situations like this, said Pendley. Ive got two kids in school up there, so its really scary when something like this happens. Ofcers eventually spotted the suspects vehicle. The teen reportedly crashed into a tree, got out and ed, McMaster said. Police dogs tracked the teen and ofcers arrested him at Hooks Street and U.S. 27. Because of the suspects age, his name wasnt released. McMaster said police recovered the gun as well as the suspects phone, which he allegedly used to contact family mem bers to tell them of his loca tion, which led to the suspects mother being arrested. Tanya Harrison, 33, was charged with attempted obstruction without violence.CLERMONTJuvenile in custody after armed holdup AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comKohan Retail Investment Group of Great Neck, N.Y., has fallen out of contract to buy the Lake Square Mall, according to mall Property Manager Ron Sikora. Sikora was unable to pro vide any additional details on the matter but said cur rent mall owner Macerich has told him it will be busi ness as usual at the mall. However, according to Mike Kohan of Kohan Re tail Investment Group, he is still trying to make the sale happen. Were still negotiating the deal; I dont have any denite answer, he said last week. Kohan went on to say that, Whatever is gonna happen is gonna happen very soon and Im talking about the next couple weeks. His company currently owns 15 malls from Wash ington State to New York to Florida in Crystal River and Graceville. According to multiple media reports, Kohan has had mixed results with some of the malls he has bought, including two that ofcials tried to close because they were so di lapidated. Kohan, though, said that is the nature of buying distressed malls. Its a very, very chal lenging situation for you to bring another anchor, which is close to impossi ble, but we are trying. We are trying, he said. The public relations de partment at Macerich, which has sold Kohan at least one other mall in the past, could not im mediately provide comment. Macerich sold Lake Square Mall last Novem ber at an online auction for $13.6 million. Built in 1980, the 470,943-square-foot mall has seen reduced foot trafc over the past few years, and two under-performing anchor stores, Target and J.C. Penney, both recently announced closings. Kohan targets older malls. In fact, his companys web site says, The Kohan Retail Investment Group sees the future of aging malls as a place of mixed use that is more than just for shopping. Target, which closed Feb. 1, owns its 88,000-squarefoot store space and is ac tively marketing it with CBRE, a real estate services company with 332 ofces in 42 counties, Target spokesperson Luz Varela said. The J.C. Penney store is expected to close by May. The aging, 12-screen AMC theater at the mall, which was cited for sanitary violations recently, will be facing some tough competition next year when Epic Theatres opens a new, state-of-theart, 14-screen facility in Mount Dora.LEESBURGPurchase of Lake Square Mall still up in the airIts really scary. Im glad they do lock the school down in situations like this. Ive got two kids in school up there, so its really scary when something like this happens.Jessica Pendley

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A6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 19, 2014 OBITUARIESClarence E. HardenClarence E. Harden, 84, of Eustis, passed away Wednesday, February 12, 2014. Born and raised in Montverde, to the late Clarence E. Sr. & Margaret Harden, he was a lifelong resident of Lake County. He at tended and graduated from the Cincinnati College of Embalming in 1954. He and Al bert Layton co-found ed Layton Harden Fu neral Home of Eustis in 1958, becoming Harden/Pauli Funer al Home in 1982. He was a very active mem ber and Deacon Emeritus of Bay Street Baptist Church, Eustis. Clar ence was also a mem ber of the Lake Eustis Area Chamber of Commerce, V.F.W., American Legion, Elks and Masonic Lodges, all of Eustis. He served his country in the US Army during Korea. He is sur vived by his wife of 54 years, Dorothy A. Harden, Eustis; 2 daughters, Kathy L. Walker (Bruce Williams), Lake Mary, Ann Maria Share (Kev in), Eustis; 3 brothers, David Harden, Mont verde, Roddy Harden, Shelby, NC, Joe Harden, Umatilla; 2 sisters, Jean Gonzales, Montverde, Linda Harden, Montverde; grandson, Car ter Allen Naisbett, Eu stis. He was preceded in death by his brother, Carey Harden and sis ter, Laverne McCarthy. Services will be held at Bay Street Baptist Church, Eustis on Sun day, February 16, 2014 at 3:00 PM. Interment will follow at Greenwood Cemetery, Eustis. The family will receive friends at the Harden/ Pauli Funeral Home, Eustis on Saturday from 4:00 6:00 PM. Memorial donations may be made to Bay Street Baptist Church Building Fund, 37181 North SR 19, Umatil la, FL 32784. Online Guestbook available at www.hardenpauli. com Arrangements by Harden/Pauli Funeral Home, Eustis.DEATH NOTICESVenita BeckVenita Beck, 82, of Oxford, died Wednesday, February 12, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations.Darrell Thomas BradenDarrell Thomas Braden, 45, of Leesburg, died Thursday, February 13, 2014. Beyers Fu neral Home and Cre matory, Leesburg.Winston ChurchillWinston Churchill, 69, of Leesburg, FL., died Thursday, February 6, 2014. Rocker-Cu sack Mortuary, Lees burg.Donald A. ConnorsDonald A. Connors, 83, of Fruitland Park, died on February 12, 2014. National Cremation Society.Sylvester CrawfordSylvester Crawford, 94, of Groveland, died Friday, February 14, 2014. Marvin C. Zanders Funeral Home, Inc.Carl J. FilippiniCarl J. Filippini, 87, of Leesburg, passed away on Wednesday, February 12, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Fu nerals and Cremations, Tavares, FL.Ross L. FleckRoss L. Fleck, 83, Eustis, died on February 2, 2014.Grace I. HarveyGrace I. Harvey, 99, of Eustis, died Tues day, February 11, 2014. Harden/Pauli Funeral Home.Jack HoffmasterJack Hoffmaster, 86, of Leesburg, died Feb ruary 12, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home.Albert Jackson Jr.Albert Jackson Jr. 81, of Wildwood, Fl. died Saturday, Febuary 8, 2014 Jacobs Funeral Home.Roy E. MaxwellRoy E. Maxwell, 90, of Tavares died on Fri day, February 14, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funeral& Cre mations, Tavares.Harold McBrayerHarold McBrayer, 75, of Avon Park, died Tues day, February 11, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations.Shirley MonthonyShirley Monthony, 76, of Leesburg, died Monday, February 10, 2014. Page-Theus Fu nerals & Cremations.Ida Mae RauschIda Mae Rausch, 91, of Leesburg, died Wednesday, February 12, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations.Tammy D. TiqueTammy D. Tique, 44, of Leesburg, died Sunday, February 16, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations.Edna M. WilsonEdna M. Wilson, 77, of Sebring, died Mon day, February 10, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Cremations.IN MEMORY HARDEN Staff ReportLake County, in partnership with Orange County and the St. Johns River Water Management District, will hold a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Thursday for the Phase 2 opening of the Lake Apopka Loop Trail. The ribbon cutting will open 6.3 miles of trail at the Orange-Lake County line in the districts scenic Lake Apopka North Shore Resto ration Area, which is surrounded by levees and is ideal for viewing hundreds of species of wildlife. Presenters at the event include Lake County Commissioner Leslie Campione, Orange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs, Orange County Commissioner Frederick C. Brummer, Orange County Parks Manager Matt Suedmeyer and Robert Christian son, director of districts Division of Strategic Planning and Financial Services. As a runner for many years, I am personally excited about the open ing of the Lake Apopka Loop Trail, as it extends into Lake County at the Lake County-Orange County line, said Campione, who has asked members of the Mount Dora Road runners to accompany her on a vemile trail run to the ribbon cutting. This trail will prove to be a beautiful and vital asset to nature lovers, run ners and athletes alike. This portion of the Lake Apopka Loop Trail, which meanders through the districts Lake Apopka North Shore Restoration Area, is designed as a multiple use passive trail for hik ing and bicycling. Phase 1 of the trail, which starts at Orange Countys Magnolia Park, opened in June 2012 and encom passes roughly four miles. Future work includes Lake County com pleting a portion of the trail at the western edge of the northern shore of Lake Apopka. Lake County has se cured funding to purchase private ly owned property that adjoins land owned by the district to construct an overlook onto Lake Apopka. The county also has plans to im prove a boat ramp that will provide boating access to the Apopka-Beauclair Canal and Lake Apopka. For more than 15 years, The Friends of Lake Apopka has worked with local governments and the SJR WMD on ecotourism in the area, in cluding construction of the loop trail, which began two years ago.Another Lake Apopka Loop Trail phase set to openAs a runner for many years, I am personally excited about the opening of the Lake Apopka Loop Trail, as it extends into Lake County at the Lake County-Orange County line. This trail will prove to be a beautiful and vital asset to nature lovers, runners and athletes alike.Leslie Campione,Lake County Commissioner

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10% OFFAll options with this couponrffnntb B1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 19, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTSSPORTS EDITOR . ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE . .............................. 365-8268 FAX . .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL . ......... sports@dailycommercial.comSPORTSandLEISURE MARK FISHERSpecial to the Daily CommercialThe Lake Minneola High School boys basketball team has developed a reputation for playing hard from opening tip to nal horn. That approach has taken the Hawks to a 25-3 record this season and a No. 1 ranking in Class 6A. Lake Minneolas latest win came Thursday in the Class 6A-Region 2 quarternals against Deltona in the rst re gional playoff home game in school history. Avery Brown scored 14 points to lead a bal anced attack for the Hawks in a 75-40 win against the Wolves. Lake Minneola set the tempo with a suffocating defensive effort. Despite playing with ve guards on the oor for most of the game, the Hawks over came Deltonas size advantage to control the game. The Hawks speed resulted in turnovers, which were turned into points. In addition, Lake Minneolas high-octane offense beat its taller, slower opponents down the oor. After trailing 8-2 early in the rst period, the Hawks turned on their defense and quickly used the turnovers they forced to fuel a 7-0 mini-run en route to a 13-10 lead heading into the second period. After initially allowing the Wolves to get touches around the basket in the rst period, the Hawks clamped down in the second quarter. Marcus Dod son and Brown wreaked havoc throughout the game, creating transition baskets with steals. After taking a 30-19 lead at half, the Hawks smothered the Wolves in the third period, opening with a 13-0 run during which Brown and his twin brother, Anthony, dominated. Lake Minneola held Deltona scoreless for the rst four min utes of the third quarter, lim iting the Wolves to free throws until the closing minute of the period. By then, the Hawks had built a 30-point lead. In the fourth quarter, Lake Minneola coach Freddie Cole emptied his bench, but still managed to add on to the lead. In addition to Avery Brown, Carlyle Holder added 12 points, Andrew Mendoza and Ben Hull dropped in nine points apiece and Anthony Brown had seven. In other regional quarter nals games involving area teams on Thursday, Eustis got 26 points from Kiron Williams and 13 from Coy Patterson in a 68-52 win against Rockledge in a Class 5A-Region 4 contest.Lake Minneola, Eustis advance in regional playoffs BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Lake Minneola sophomore Marcus Dodson dribbles around a Deltona defender during the Class 6A-Region 2 playoff game between Lake Minneola High School and Deltona High School at Lake Minneola High School on Thursday. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comAbdul Bello never played in an organized football game until September. Now, despite hav ing only six games of playing experience under his belt, the Montverde Academy junior offensive lineman is one of the areas most sought-after players. Even though he has a year of eligibility left, Bello has already received scholarship offers from a variety of schools, including the Florida State University and the universi ties of Florida, Tennes see, Kentucky, Indiana, Maryland and Missouri. In addition, the 6-foot-6, 300 pounder, has been invited to play in two of the nations top postseason AllStar games the Un der Armour All-American game at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, and the U.S. Army All-American game in San Antonio. The postseason invi tations are the rst for the second-year program, which has been built from the ground up by Montverde Acad emy head coach Bri an Treweek and offensive coordinator Walter Banks. Bello could be the most-decorated football star signing at the college preparatory school in southeast Lake County, but he will not be the rst. Defensive lineman Cedric Udegbe was the Eagles rst football signee, inking a deal with the University of Delaware in 2013. We knew he had some natural football ability the rst time we saw him move, Banks said. For a big man with very little coaching, he had very good lateral movement and was able to block down eld. In a lot of ways, he reminds me of other guys Ive coached, like Jonotthan Har rison and Ryan Carter. Banks coached Harrison and Carter at South Lake and helped both earned scholarships to the University of Florida. A nonprot foundation the Ejike Ug boaja Foundation that makes two or three trips a year to Nigeria discovered Bello last year and arranged for him to attend Mont verde Academy. The foundation works to bring teenagers from Nigeria to schools throughout the United States. Bello was introduced to football in Africa by the foundation, but he had never played in a game when he turned up at Montverde Acad emys practice eld. Abdul had never even put on a helmet and shoulder pads until last spring, Banks said. He didnt even Bello earning national attention on football field BELLO FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comMount Dora Bible quietly celebrated National Signing Day last week by honoring a number of student-athletes who signed National Letters of Intent to play at the next level. Track and cross country standouts Christina McKinney and Troy Clark signed with the University of North Florida and Florida Gulf Coast University, respectively, while Tevin Symon ette inked a baseball pact with Lipscomb Univerisity in Nashville, Tenn. McKinney and Clark have been running to gether at Mount Dora Bible for seven years. Both are leaving an impressive legacy with the Bulldogs. McKinney is considered by many longtime supporters of the school to be the greatest female runner in Bulldogs history. She is the record holder at 800 meters, as well as 1,600 and 3,200 meters, and powered the 4x800-meter relay team. McKinney has turned competitive run ning into a year-round endeavor by heading up the Bulldogs cross country team. She holds the school record at 5 ki lometers with a time of 18 minutes, 43 seconds. Clark has been one of the top area runners for most of his high school career, too. He is the school-re cord holder at 1,600 and 3,200 meters, and blistered a 5-kilometer cross country course with a time of 15:40.88 his personal-best time at the Florida State Invita tional in Tallahassee.Mount Dora Bible celebrates signings PHOTO COURTESY OF MOUNT DORA BIBLE Mount Dora Bible Track and Field and Cross Country runners Christina McKinney, seated left, and Troy Clark look on after signing National Letters of Intent to compete at the University of North Florida and Florida Gulf Coast University, respectively.SEE MDB | B3SEE BELLO | B2

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B2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 19, 2014 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...Totally UniqueTotally Unique is proud to be Clermonts first ORGANIC hair salon. We care about your beauty, your wellness, the environment and our community, so we use organic and sustainably harvested products whenever possible. We specialize in organic hair color, hair care products, nail and skin care lines. Our salon is one of the oldest salons in Clermont and is located at 786 W Montrose Street in Historic Downtown Clermont. Our stylists are experienced in all phases of hair care including color, straighteners, cuts, texture and styles. Hair stylists are Marjorie Morphet, Tina Foote, Sherie Wolkens and Jamie Rhoades. Our nail techs, Jennifer Vandergrift and Jamie Rhoades, perform pedicures and manicures using Zoya nail products (which are Big 5 free). Shellac manicures, lasting up to three weeks, are also available by Jennifer and Jamie. We have two pedicure chairs in a private room for your relaxation and enjoyment. Relaxing and therapeutic facials are available by Jennifer in our private upstairs facial room. Massage services include chair massage, Swedish and Deep Tissue. Massage services are also done in a private room in our upstairs area. We utilize several massage therapists and provide massage by appointment only. We also offer a small boutique with handcrafted jewelry and hair accessories, Art by Tina Foote and Jamie Rhoades, and other unique items. Salon hours are 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Saturday and open Sundays by appointment only. Evening hours are also available by appointment. We pride ourselves in providing a friendly, relaxing environment for our clients and friends. Stop by and visit or call 352-394-5005 for more information. We are also on Facebook and www.TotallyUniqueSalon.com. LOOKING FOR PARTS? SEE JULIE (352) 394-6111 Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! begin practicing with us until September, but hes so smart and has so much natural ability that he gured the game out in a cou ple of weeks. He also plays with so much energy and enthusi asm that he can hide his inexperience. Some recruiting services like to call him a Monster with a Mo tor, and thats a pretty good description. He doesnt ever quit when hes on the eld. Banks said, despite his natural talent and the attention he is beginning to attract, Bello is like many of his team mates. He said Bello is a standout in the class room and respects his teachers, coaches and teammates. Hes an overall good person, Banks said. Still, despite his intelligence and natural ability on the football eld, Banks said he is often reminded that Bello still has a great deal to learn about the game. I was talking about blocking once and mentioned the importance of not giving a quarterback sack, Banks said. Later on a few days later (Bello) came up to make and asked, Coach, whats a sack? After I told him, he said, Oh thats a bad thing. It was hard not laugh, but it served as a reminder about how little he really knows about the game. Bello helped Montverde Academy to a 7-3 season in 2013 af ter the Eagles posted a winless campaign in 2012 the schools rst football season since the 1930s. Behind Bello and his fel low offensive line men, Montverde Academy scored at least 28 points in six games in 2013 after scoring only 45 points in 2012. BELLO FROM PAGE B1 Staff ReportJack Curtis scored on a wild pitch in the bottom of the ninth inning to help the Lake Sumter State College Lakehawks eke out a 4-3 win over visiting Polk State College on Feb. 10 in Leesburg. LSSC (3-1) collected seven hits off three Polk hurlers with right elder Dakota Higdon leading the way with a pair of hits while Tanner Barnhard, Kris Hodges, Tanner Elsbernd, Sam Thomas and Austin Simmons all collect ed one each. For Polk, rst baseman Sam Machonis led the way with a two-run homer. Neither team was able to score for the rst ve innings before Polk collected a pair of runs in the sixth inning when Machonis slammed a circuit shot over the right eld fence. The Lakehawks struck back in their half of the inning when Hodges singled through the hole at short, went to third on Higdons base hit and scored on a elders choice. LSSC then went ahead in the seventh when Curtis doubled to deep left, advanced to third on Elsbernds single and scored on Blantons ground ball to sec ond. Simmons singled in a run to complete scoring. Polk tied the game in the eighth before the Lakehawks scored the decider in the ninth when Thomas singled, setting the stage for the game-ending wild pitch. Reliever Walker Sheller (10) got the win for LSSC, while Devin Vainer (2-1) picked up his rst loss of the season for Polk.LSSC tops Polk to move to 3-1PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIALLake Sumter freshman Austin Simmons beats a pick-off throw to rst base during the Lake Sumter-Polk State game on Feb. 10 at Lake Sumter State College in Leesburg. Lake Sumter freshman Michael Howe throws a pitch during the Lake Sumter-Polk State baseball game at Lake Sumter State College in Leesburg, Feb. 10.

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Wednesday, February 19, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B3 To Apply for Scholarships from the Pig on the Pond Education Fund Vist Our Website: www.pigonthepond.org Come and Join our Family of Proud Sponsorsfor the 16th Annual Pig on the Pond For the Kids Pig on the Pond Mission Statement Saturday, March 8thClermont Waterfront ParkCarnival Unlimited Rides Armbands Carnival Unlimited Rides Armbands Register at pigonthepond.org or online at Active.com$20Great Chili Challenge Great Chili ChallengeDESSERT BAKE-OFF rf Pig Racing Is Back!Entry Deadline March 1stArmbands Will Only Be Available for Purchase This will be Hoof Pounding Action for All Ages ntbr FRI-March 7th 5-8 pmGrand Champion: $200 & Trophy Other Category Winners: $100 & Trophy Yes-Pigs Can Fly Yes-Pigs Can Fly Find us on FacebookApplications Available at www.pigonthepond.org HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. At the 2013 Flori da High School Ath letic Association Cross Country Championships at Apalachee Regional Park in Talla hassee, Clark lead for much of the early going and nished fourth overall, stopping the clock in 16:10.07. He was the areas top nisher at the state meet. Florida Gulf Coast coach Cassandra Goodson praised Clarks signing. Troy, Goodson said, is a great start to our recruiting class. We will continue our recruiting through the spring, but (Clark and two other spring signings) establish a great foundation for next years incom ing freshman class. Symonette helped Mount Dora Bible to a 14-11 record on the baseball eld in 2013. He batted .370 with three home runs and 25 RBIs. In addition, he had a team high seven doubles. Symonette also had a 2-1 record on the mound for Mount Dora Bible. MDB FROM PAGE B1 PHOTO COURTESY OF MOUNT DORA BIBLE Mount Dora Bible baseball standout Tevin Symonette, seated center, poses for pictures after signing a National Letter of Intent recently to play at Lipscomb University in Nashville, Tenn.

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C1SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 19, 2014 www.southlakepress.comCOMMUNITYProudly servingCLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWSSTAFF WRITER . ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE . .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 EMAIL..... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com %  en HOMETOWN: Allentown, Pa. %  en OCCUPATION: Industrial Maintenance Electrician & Metaphysician/Parapsychologist %  en FAMILY: Mother, Edythe Ambeault, and uncle Roger Kolowitz live in Minneola What do you enjoy most about south Lake County? I enjoy south Lake County because of its remoteness in the Central Florida area. Its out of the congested areas yet close to everything. It is the geographical center of the state and Clermont is right in the center of most of Central Floridas main highways US 27, State Road 50 and the Turnpike. I love the South Lake area because it also reminds me a little of the rolling mountains of Pennsylvania. It is one of the very few places in Florida that you will see topography like this. It gives you a sense of still living up north. 1) If you had to summarize your philosophy of life in one sentence, what would it be? How conscious are we throughout our lives? I believe we have the ability to raise our vibrations and tap into levels of higher consciousness. Our lives can be even more enjoyable as well as more fullling if we are more aware of ourselves and our potential. I feel that technology is diminishing our potential of being human. Our interactions with society have brought us to a level that we no longer socialize face to face. Texting, emailing, video chats and general telephone calls. Will technology destroy our social human qualities or will it enhance them? A lack of communication will kill ANY relationship, and I stress any. Meet YourNEIGHBORREV. PAUL G. MECKES Ann DupeeREMEMBER WHENA weekly column that reprints some of the more interesting news stories that have appeared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press.FROM THE FILES | 54 YEARS AGO 1960Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press Staff ReportLakeridge Winery near Clermont, Floridas largest premium winery, recently won eight awards during the 26th annual Florida State Fair Inter national Wine and Grape Juice Competition in Tampa. The winery won a gold medal for its Southern Red, silver medals for its White Muscadine Juice and Pink Crescendo and bronze medals for its Reserve Cuvee Noir, Cuvee Blanc, South ern White, Sunblush and Chablis. Lakeridges owner, Seavin Inc., also owns the states second largest premium winery, San Sebastian Winery in St. Augustine, which took home 10 awards during the competition. Lakeridge followed its success by hosting Winefest XXIV on Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Winefest is an opportunity to enjoy all the fruits of our bountiful previous years harvest, the winery stated on its website. More than 80 local artists and crafters attended, as well as an array of musical acts that included Airtight, The Robert Harris Group, The Ladys & The Boys, Baby Blues & the No Attitude Band, The Grovemasters, and Beautiful Bobby Blackmon & the B3 Blues Band. The winery, at 19239 U.S. Highway 27 North, is situated among the rolling hills of Clermont. It was founded in 1988 when Gary Cox and some investors out of Orlando decided to open a winery in the Central Florida area. The facility opened its doors in 1989. In 1992, Garys son, Charles, joined the team at Lakeridge Winery. The business prospered, which has allowed the Cox family to open San Sebastian Winery. Complimentary tours and wine tasting are offered seven days a week and usually run every 15-20 minutes. They begin in the upstairs theater with a 12-minute video presentation which shows the growing of the Flor ida grapes to the wine-making process, the bottling and labeling.CLERMONTLakeridge Winery wins eight medals COURTESY PHOTO ABOVE, BELOW: Lakeridge Winery won eight medals for its wines at the Florida State Fair in Tampa. FIRST LABOR DAY CELEBRATION An estimated 2,500 people attended the rst Labor Day Jamboree, sponsored by American Legion South Lake Memorial Post 55 at Lake Minneola Beach, a project of the Junior Chamber of Commerce, according to Legion committee member Jim McDonald. This number includes duplicates. Some people made two or three trips to the beach during the day. Treasuries of the cooperating organizations will be enriched, according to early indications. On the basis of early sell-outs at the various booths, the nancial statement should be a healthy one. The Jaycees sold out of meat early and had to replenish their store, while the Boy Scouts hot dog stand did a thriving business that exhausted its supplies. The chuck-a-luck, wheel of for tune, Dutch auction and other games all had a big play. The Legion will receive 20 percent of the prots. Members of the Legion committee sponsoring the event were Orrin Ward, chair man; Bert Willis, Dick Willis, Col. Louis Ford, Charles Pool, Jr. and Jim McDonald. Cooperating organizations and their representatives were: Welfare League, Mrs. Dorothy Smith; Veter ans of Foreign Wars Auxiliary, Mrs. Regina Harper; Altar Society, Mrs. Fran Sherry; American Legion Committee, Charles Pool, Jr.; American Legion Auxiliary, Mrs. Bert Willis; Clermont Fire Department, Dick Willis; Boy Scouts, Harry L. Brown; Girl Scouts, Mrs. Orrin S. Frase; Garden Club, Mrs. Vic Oswalt; Cler mont Womans Club, Miss Florence Holton; Lions Club, D.L. Moore; Junior Chamber of Commerce, Curtis Reed; Varsity C Club, Ed Stack and Minneola Progressive Club, Bob Black. Although there were crowds and lots of excitement in town during the Labor Day weekend, Clermont passed through the entire weekend without a singe trafc accident.25 YEARS AGO 1989COUNTY APPROVES LAKE SUSAN LANDINGGem of the Hills owners Grace and William Strosberg and Dale and Darryl Ladd were pleased when county commissioners approved their planned unit development Jan. 10. County Planning and Zoning denied the request 8-0 in December. Commissioners voted 4-1, with Commissioner Richard Swartz voting against.SEE HISTORY | C2SEE NEIGHBOR | C3

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C2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 19, 2014 IT WAS 50 YEARS AGO By CHARLES M. DEBER / Edited by Will Shortz No. 0209RELEASE DATE: 2/16/2014 ACROSS1 Cellphones, in Britain8 Alone13 13-Down, in Dresden20 A debater takes it21 Jazz count?22 In that direction23 One favoring a strong central government24 ___ Vista25 Turns in26 Film terrier27 Bar order, with the29 Sadness31 Narrow cut32 Move in an ungainly way34 Mine, in Madrid36 Cherished by38 Literary inits.40 Its below the humerus41 Trig. function42 Let ___43 ___ deferens46 Dweller on the Red Sea48 Less than right50 Crme de la crme52 1996-2001 show featuring home videos53 Actress Gardner54 The Peoples Champion56 The Battleship Potemkin locale57 An ONeill58 More appropriate60 Houston sch.62 Followers of exes63 Detour, e.g.65 Coal distillate67 Announcers aid69 Plural French word that spells its singular English form in reverse70 Much of the audience for 6-Downs show on 2/9/6473 Trounces74 When ___ younger, so much younger (Help! lyric)76 More modern, in Munich77 Relative of a convertible79 Part of a train from a refinery82 Servant, e.g.86 Why ___ so shy when ? (Its Only Love lyric)87 Snack chip89 Nest on a cliff91 Author Umberto92 Dave Clark ___94 ___ the time 96 Playwright Fugard97 General ___ chicken98 Attractive legs, in slang100 Yuck!101 Actor Hemsworth of The Hunger Games102 Bold103 Stuck, after in104 Queen who fell for Zeus swan song?105 It may be a plot106 Lone-Star State sch.107 500 letters?108 Cause of the witchs demise in Hansel and Gretel110 s war zone112 Rice-A-___114 Fraternity chapter116 Big to-do120 Theyre played at un conservatoire122 Undermines, as support123 Living in a swing state?124 Kind of jacket with pockets on the chest125 Tilted126 Oxfords St. ___ College127 City on the Seine upstream from Paris DOWN1 A majority2 Aware of3 Craze caused by this puzzles subjects 4 Schoolyard rejoinder5 Card count in Caesars Palace?6 Host for this puzzles subjects on 2/9/647 Places atop8 Eban of Israel9 With 11-Down, subjects of this puzzle10 Enzyme suffix11 See 9-Down12 Rampage13 Way to go14 Nickname for this puzzles subjects15 Free16 Bikini blast, informally17 Song sung by this puzzles subjects on 6-Downs show on 2/9/64 18 Big rig19 Lead-in to while28 ___ creek30 Dictator Amin33 Broadways ___-Fontanne Theater35 Promise of payment37 Frists successor as Senate majority leader38 One of the six counties of Northern Ireland39 Escort to the door44 Yes45 Balanced conditions47 Band material48 Park, e.g., in N.Y.C.49 Wallach of The Misfits51 Subtitle for Star Wars Episode IV, with A53 Just so, after to55 Bakeshop worker59 Free throw avgs., e.g.61 One team in the N.B.A. All-Star Game, with the64 City on the Nile66 Junior Olympics org.68 Certain NASA launch71 Had a ball at72 Unpredictable75 Composer Khachaturian78 Slave79 Apes80 Apes81 Where this puzzles subjects got their start83 Song sung by this puzzles subjects on 6-Downs show on 9/12/6584 Earths habitable parts85 Dawnlike88 Common monthly expense90 Ladies man93 Prey for a dingo95 Molly formerly on S.N.L.96 Like some dessert orders97 King in 1922 news99 Hot102 Instrument depicted by the shaded squares in this grid107 1965 and 1966 concert site for this puzzles subjects109 Sweeping111 Soon113 Be domestic115 Medical suffix117 Calendar keeper, for short118 Medical suffix119 The S of CBS: Abbr.121 Sci-fi sighting 1234567 8910111213141516171819 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 2728 2930 31 3233 3435 36 37 3839 40 41 42 434445 46 47 48 49 5051 52 53 545556 57 5859 60 61 62 63 64 6566 67 68 69 7071 72 73 7475 76 7778 798081 82 838485 86 8788 8990 91 92 9394 9596 97 98 99100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108109 110111 112113 114115 116 117 118 119 120121 122 123 124 125 126 127 Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Solution on D3 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comA popular dance troupe in The Villages plans to dazzle au diences with inno vative dances and a daring aerial routine in its seventh original show, Music in Motion Rocks VEGAS. Showtimes are 7 / p .m. Feb. 24-26 at the Sa vannah Center in The Villages, where the dancers will perform 25 innovative dance numbers in 90-min ute shows, lled with tap, jazz, disco, lyrical, mambo, country west ern, burlesque, theatrical production num bers, mime, military, aerial acrobatics, rope dancing and swing. There are a marvel ous variety of inventive dance routines in a de licious complexity of styles, glued together by a clever little plot, said dancer Sue Rowley, who believes the audience will enjoy seeing a riv eting routine on the acrobatic silks by Carolyn Caos and dancers por traying a pinball machine and forming a live roulette wheel. The show is fun and uplifting, said danc er Carol Putrelo. You smile, laugh and sway in your seat to the music. The choreography will astonish you. Co-producers and directors are Dianne Bolton and Jim Caisse. The story takes you on a quirky adventure with three naive mem bers of the Bootstrap, Nevada Town Council, who hope to save their small town from bankruptcy by going to Vegas for some business ideas, Rowley said. There they are treated by the sight of beautiful blondes, a sizzling all-male re vue, roulette, blackjack and pinball, boxing at the MGM Grand, Ve gas-style weddings, tall glasses of champagne, feathers, sequins, par ty girls, a mob boss and much more, por trayed through song and dance. The shows choreography team is comprised of career dance professionals Jim Caisse, Helene Yelver ton, Karen Bouffard and Vicky Magee. Caisse and Yelverton will perform Blackjack, a swing tap in the jive style of the 1920s. That number alone is worth the price of admission, said Diane Arduin. Jeanne Riordan believes the audience will go absolutely nuts when 10 Villages men transform from Vegas security guards to hunky burlesque dancers in a steamy male revue reminiscent of Chippendales fame. ts almost naughty, but not quite, she said. The dances are choreographed to the music of Elvis, Michael Jackson, Bette Midler, The Doors, Britney Spears, plus songs from Broad way musicals Girl Cra zy, GiGi, Hairspray, An American in Par is, Annie, Guys and Dolls, Will Rogers Follies and Tommy. Vegas scene vocalists in the show are Jan et Maloney, Jan Lavin, David Leshay, Beverly Wehrheim, John Manion, Marlene Ca plis and Ralph Dinome, while the Bootstrap singers will be por trayed by Otto Canis, Donna Cipollone, Lisa Hunter, Debbie Carter, Dale Gagne, Don Volk man and Jim Flynn. Some of the songs in the show are Smooth Criminal, Luck Be a Lady Tonight, Devil in Disguise, The Night They Invented Cham pagne, City Lights and My Way. Rowley said the dance troupe has prac ticed seven to 15 hours each week to learn the shows fast and furious dance routines, some requiring costume changes in less than two minutes. Show tickets are $21 for Villages residents and $26 for nonresidents. For reservations, go to thevillagesenter tainment.com or call 352-753-3229 for box ofce locations. Proceeds from the performances will benet Alzheimers Association and Villagers for Hospice.THE VILLAGESMusic in Motion ready to rock with Vegas-style show SUBMITTED PHOTO Music in Motion dance troupe will perform its seventh annual show in The Villages, Feb. 24-26, where proceeds from the performances will benet Alzheimers Association and Villagers for Hospice. The proposed totally private housing development in the Clermont area is to be enclosed by a privacy wall with a security entrance and is on Lake Shore Drive west of Lake Susan on proper ty adjoining the re station on 561. The original request was for 223 units on the 95acre site. Commissioner Tom Windram moved for approval, providing the treatment plant be internalized and that the total number be reduced to 195 single-family dwellings, for a net density of 3.5 units per acre, and that the twoacre area for commercial be zoned C-1 for 6,500 square feet of building space.GROVELAND WOMAN WINS COUNTY JUDGES AWARDMary Louise Haack of Groveland has garnered another award for her excellent administration of the Groveland Neighborhood Center and for her love and caring for the people it serves. She was one of two people honored with the rst Judges Award for outstanding contributions to Lake County at the Jan. 11 awards banquet and ceremony of the Lake County League of Cities and sponsored by the Lake Sentinel.NEWS OF NOTECounty Commissioners voted to accept title to the property in the Okahumpka area where the Garbage Burn Plant is being constructed. Ogden Martin Systems, which is building the plant, will lease the site from the county. Las Vegas Night, Saturday, Jan. 28, 8 / p.m.-12 / a.m. Elks Club Clermont. Donation $15 per couple. All Proceeds Go To Charity. Hors doeuvres, Door Prizes, Prizes to Top Winners. Beta Theta Chapter ESA, Clermont. Tickets available at the Chamber and Hilltop Stationery. HISTORY FROM PAGE C1 SUBMITTED PHOTO To celebrate Floridas Arbor Day, members of the Clermont Garden Club and the city of Clermont gave away trees at the Citrus Tower Publix store. Shown from left to right are club members Sandi Eckstein, Edie Peters, Barbara Williams, Nancy Hendrix and Tom Werner.GARDEN CLUB RECOGNIZES ARBOR DAY

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Wednesday, February 19, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C3 CLERMONT BLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSAMILYELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time! IRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONTL Many Other Activities each week Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.org LIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLCHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm SOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary); 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.org ST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am 10:00 am Beginning Oct. 6, 2013 5:00 pm Service Sunday School Youth Group Nursery Adult Bible Study Womens Bible Study Mens Prayer Breakfast WOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH GODINCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALE ERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for Children Groveland IRSTBAPTISTCHURCH GROVELAND Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pm MT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! MINNEOLA CONGREGATIONSMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club NEWLPRESBYTERIANCHURCH18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am TLIVINGGOD Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce Rowland MONTVERDE WOODLANDSLUTHERAN15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 am OAKLAND PRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforSouth Lake South LakeGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOMErfn tbt352-394-7121806 W. Minneola Ave.,Clermont,FL Cremation ChoicesDirect Cremation$675Plus Container Ron Becker,Director352-394-8228921 S.US Hwy 27,Minneola,FL N EW R EFORMED P LANT C HURCH We meet our God on Sunday at Superior Residence at 10:30 AM. 1600 Hunt Trace Blvd. (Behind Home Depot)Pastor Harm Biehl 407-325-8663 2) How does what you do contribute to the welfare of the area? My mission is to help people overcome pos sessions in their lives. When I mean pos sessions, I refer to possessions of all kinds. A vast amount of people are possessed or consumed by their jobs, family members, children, managers or bosses at work, tax es, the IRS, ex wives and the list can go on forever. We allow things in our life that we cant control to take hold of us and drain us of our life force. This diminishes our self-es teem, causes stress, weakens our immune system and can slowly eat away at us emo tionally, mentally, physically and needless to say psychologically. In turn these param eters can eventually end up causing problem in our lives, which can portray itself as anomalous phenomena. I am here to distin guish whether the anomalous phenomena is paranormal in nature or is of natural origin. 3) Name one of your greatest accomplishments so far. My biggest accomplishment would be going back to school and getting my PhD. 4) Whats something youve always wanted to do but havent yet? Write my books and travel around Europe and the world and promote my books about my research of the human condition and consciousness within the context of anomalous and paranormal phenomena. 5) What advice would you give to people who want to help out in the community? Dont be afraid to stand out. If you have passion for the general welfare for the human race and compassion for those in need and see that there is something that the community should be aware of, express it. Find like-minded individuals to organize with and the rest will fall into place. You will ultimately attract energy that are in direct vibration with and your efforts which will be brought to light and are meant to be. NEIGHBORFROM PAGE C1COMMUNITY CALENDAR TODAYCOLLEGE DAY WITH FULL SAIL UNIVERSITY AT THE LIBRARY: At 4:30 p.m., Marion Baysinger Memorial Library, 756 W. Broad St., in Grove-land. Giving teens, par-ents and adults infor -mation for successful graduation and career placement. Call 352-429-5840 for details. THURSDAYPET FIRST AID AT THE LIBRARY: At 6 p.m., with Dr. Stone of Vet -erinary Trauma Center in Groveland, giving Pet First Aid instruction at the Marion Baysinger Memorial County Library, 756 W. Broad St. Call 352-429-5840 for details. FRIDAYFREE SEMINAR AND LUNCH FOR DISABLED PERSONS AT ANOINTED COMMUNITY SERVICES: From 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. A representative from the Agency for Persons with Disabil -ity will speak about cerebal palsy, autism and others. Call 352-404-7898 to RSVP. Staff ReportRookie Teacher of the Year and School-Related Employee of the Year candi dates were tapped Friday by Superintendent of Schools Susan Moxley, school board members and board mem bers of the Education Foundation of Lake County. The candidates will be honored along with 42 Teacher of the Year nominees. The winner will be announced on March 19 at Lake Sumter State Col lege at an event sponsored by Ernie Morris Enterpris es and the HON Company. The Rookie Teacher of the Year nominees are: Cynthia Murray from Eustis Heights Elemen tary. The Howey-in-theHills resident teaches kin dergarten and has been with the school system for three years. The core of my teaching philosophy is based on developing a car ing relationship with each of my kindergarteners, she said. Students need to know that you honestly care about and believe in them, and they will strive to reach their highest potential. %  en Laura Fagan from Windy Hill Middle School in Clermont. The Minneo la resident teaches eighthgrade social studies and has been with the school system for 18 months. My philosophy of teaching is centered on the idea that students should interact with history instead of reciting it, she said. History can be made meaningful by making it applicable. %  en Lindsey Massaro of Umatilla Middle School. The Apopka resident is band director at the school and has been with the school system for ve months. It is my desire as an educator to help my students meet their full est potential... by provid ing an environment that is safe, supports risk-taking and involves a sharing of ideas, she said. The School-Related Em ployee of the Year nomi nees are: %  en Nilda Rivera of the school systems human resources department in Tav ares. The Clermont resident has been with the department for 16 months as a secretary and assists with background screenings. Nilda is very organized and contributes to better ways to get tasks completed in the department, said her supervisor, Carolyn Samu el. She is always looking for better ways to increase pro ductivity in the job that she is assigned. %  en Lydia Flores of the school systems Feder al Compensatory Depart ment (Title 1) in Clermont. The Groveland resident has been with that department for seven years. Her dependability and organiza tion are obvious as she always strives to perform any given task with excellence, Administrative Coordinator L.R. Dusty Ross said. %  en Allison Auld, a book keeper at Leesburg High School, where she has been for two years. She brings expertise, insight and com passion to our school, Principal Bill Miller said. She has forged great rela tionships with the commu nity, students and staff.LEESBURGTop candidates for rookie teacher, school worker awards are named

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C4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 19, 2014 A/C Services Auto Service Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Marine Services Cabinetry Services Carpet Repair Services Cleaning Services Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Concrete Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Handyman Services Adult Care Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. Insurance Services Irrigation Services Land Clearing Services Landscaping Services Lawn Services Lawn Services Legal Services Moving Services Painting Services Airport Transportation Enclosure Screening Flooring Services Bathroom Remodeling

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Wednesday, February 19, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C5 Professional Services Psychic Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Painting Services Pool Services Pressure Cleaning Plumbing Services Plumbing Services Roofing Services Tile Service Shower Doors Service Tree Service Tree Service Veterinarian Services Window Services All About Appliances repairs and installs all brands of major appliances. We are a small husband/wife company. Eric has over 15 years experience repairing appliances and Lavinia (Vinnie) has over 20 years in business management experience. Together, we strive to offer you prompt, professional, courteous and personal services far beyond your expectations, both by phone and in your home. We respect you and your time and make every effort to be in and out of your home as quickly as possible yet provide a thorough diagnosis and timely repair. We genuinely appreciate all your business. Pals Gals Services, Inc. has been owned and operated by Patti Kauffman and Kellie Kennedy since 1986. They are a multifaceted business offering a wide a variety of services, which include interior and exterior painting, faux painting, wallpaper removal and installation, tile and grout cleaning, tile and grout removal and installation, and grout staining. They also install wood floors and can refinished your old wood floors, to make them look brand new. They can help you with color choices and give advice on what is practical or not! They can help resolve your honeydo list such as minor plumbing, electrical, drywall, cabinets, counter tops for your home or office. They pride themselves on quality womanship, dependability and trust. They know how difficult it is to find someone you trust and actually show up on time. They are a referral based business relying on previous clients to spread the word. They are two very talented ladies that take extreme pride in their work and take each job personally. They know how important making choices about your home or office can be and are more than willing to help with each decision. GIVE THE GALS A CALL, THEY CAN DO IT ALL!!! 352-787-4089 Veterinary Care in the Convenience of your own home! and for you Services include Wellness exams, including vaccines and parasite screening, Blood work, Skin and ear issues, Digestive or Urinary tract issues, Health certificates, Kathie L. Robinson, DVMDr. Robinson has over 16 years experience as a veterinarian.VISITING VETERINARIAN, LLC 352-408-3666 FAX: 352-253-2443VISITINGVETERINARIAN@AOL.COM To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact Michelle in the Classified Department at (352) 365-8233 or by email michelle.fuller@dailycommercial.com

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C6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 19, 2014 Friday, January 10th 7PM FREE Admission Public Invited Love Offering will be taken First Christian 306 College St Carrollton GASheila Raye Charles delivers a heart wrenchi ng story of abuse, crack cocaine and prison through her music and story of her personal journey to salvation. You will be touched and inspired by this daughter of a music legend as she shares her walk from despair and darkness into the love and forgiveness of the Lord. Spend an Evening and Celebrate Recovery with Sheila Raye Charles at the Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) Community Health FairSaturday, February 22nd from 8am to 11am Total Family Healthcare, 3115 Citrus Tower Blvd., Clermont Come meet Dr. Cruz and the dedicated staff of Total Family Healthcare at this years Community Health Fair. Dr. Cruz strongly believes in preventive care, education and patient centered medical care. He helps the patients to participate, as the most important member of the team, in their healthcare. As a very strong Christian person he understands that health is the balance of body, mind and spirit. He is completely bilingual in English and Spanish, and is always aware of cultural differences, compassionate and very professional.Enter the Best Decorated Bike ContestThis contest is exclusively for children 5 to 8 years old. Bring your decorated bike and helmet and win a prize!Save The Date! Friday March 7th,Dr. Cruzs Interactive Presentation On Clinical Depression With A Biblical Approach.Health Screenings Bouncy HouseFree Food! SUBMITTED PHOTOS The Board of Directors of the Community Foundation of South Lake has announced the hiring of two new staff members, Bryan Williams as executive director and Kathy Smith as director of community investments. Williams and Smith were welcomed at a meet and greet on Jan. 23 at the Foundation ofce, 2150 Oakley Seaver Dr., in Clermont. The mission of the Community Foundation of South Lake is to provide leadership to enhance the quality of life in South Lake County by identifying community needs and seeking philanthropic support as permanent funding to meet those needs. For information, call 352-394-3818. SUBMITTED PHOTO Terric Kids at Cypress Ridge Elementary in Clermont: Kymber Black, Zander Arnold, Parker Trowbridge, Prachi Patel, Ava Pike, Gracie McClain, Gavin Boronat, Jaya Rougas, Will Delaney, Lola Ressler, Addison Ciccotelli, Conlin Sloan, Jake Saunders, Rees Weldon, Hayden Violette, Tyler Mattingly, Khari McElvin, Kaito Powell, Landen Sit, Kaitlyn Altmeyer, Vishal Narine, Mason Pinto, Nick Adams, Aron Quickel, Grace Holt, Owen Degges, Makenzie Merkey, Madai Cuevas, Cassidy Russell, Johanna Abraham, Austin Bunting, Paul Odell, Nora Grogan, Rylee Puglisi and Lucas Nassar.CYPRESS RIDGE TERRIFIC KIDS NEW COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF SOUTH LAKE STAFF MEMBERS

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Wednesday, February 19, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D1 rfntb nftb r t f t t r b n b n r t r f r r trtttff tnbftr rfrrfrfr frfrnb n f t t f t f f t t f r t f f r r t r t n t b t b t r r b t f f t f r t b r f t r f t r f t b f f f t r f f b t r b t b t b t r f r t f t b f r f b t r b r r f n t b n n r t t r n t r b r f b t t r t t r t r n t r b t t r r b r f f t r f t t f f r t r t r b t r r t r b f n t t f f r t n r b b b b fn t r r t r b f n t t f f r t n r b b b b fn f f t t f f r b n r t f r r f r b n f b f r f tb b rtfffrftr ftbtfrtft rfrfbtbrfr fttrb ftrrfrt fbbrr nttrttftrrf ntbtrrfb t t t f t f t b t fb b t r t b n r t n b b r r t t t b n r t f t r b t b t t f b trftftb tnnrfb r r f r f t t r f t f n f r t t r r f t b t r f r r t f r ttrtfttrt rrfrfrfrrb rbbb ftnfttrt fttffrnb ffrtrftr trb trfft rfrrb r r r f t r b f t r b r r f r r r f b f t r t n r f r f b n b b b f f r f b r f r f r t b n r t b t f tffr bb t r t f r r b f tfrtrt rntfrfrr tftnrrt trffrbft ntrf trbftttrff rbtn ttb brtrfbtft rrb r f r b frtfrrrrffr frbtfrftf rrntfn rbftrrfrb t f b t n t f t b r f r r r f n n b t n t f t b f t t r f f n r r f b t r t t b r t f t r t n b r f f n r t f f n f b f r f f t t r f t r t n r b f f r t r n t f r r b r t f r t r t f f f r f b n t f t n n t b f f t f b r n b r f r b f nttrftftb frb ftfffrffrb t f f n t r b r b t n b t t r t t t r b fb rfttr trtrtr ftrtrtbr nfntt nfrrftf rrrrftfrb n r b f b t r t f b f b f tfnrtrf tffrrttfnft ftf trbrrt bfrfrr fttftfnf trtff tfrrrtrr frftbff fttrtffr nftffbrftf rffrfrfr tbtnbtb r f r t r f r f t r t f t r f f n b t b rftrff rffftrtff rrttrt fbtfrfn nftt tbbnbt f f rr r t r f r f r b r b t t r f f f f f f r r t t n t r n r n t r f f r n f t f t f f f f t f r n n t r f f r t r f f t r f t r r f f t f f r t r r b t r f f f f f t t f r r t r r f n r f f r r r f r t f r f f f f t n r t r r f n b f f f r f n r f t f t f r r f r t b b b b r r t t n t f t f t f t t r f t f f t t r f t f r r r f r b f t r t b b r r r r r t t f r b r r t r t r f r f t f f f r t f r f f t f f t r t t t n b t r r f t f b t f r t t t b t f r r r f r f f b f r t n n t t t r r r r b f f n b r n r r t t t f r r b b b b b b f br rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrff nrrrrrrrrrrff ttbrrrrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rfntbbt rfrntn nnnftbnbn brfbnrb bnbtn brnnrtnftbn tbrbttb nnnrfrbtb nbb n fbfn tbrbnbbbtn nnnntnbbtr bbbfrf r tfnbtr rrbrfnnnrfnt t rf

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D2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 19, 2014 rfntbt fr rft r b r t t tfrr rrrf ft rf r rfff t trr ft nnf rff tnf rff tnf r r r f r r t rrf t rrf rr rrrf rftnf r r f r rfnnf nt tnf ftrr r rfrrft rrftnft rrfr rrfrfrf rf nt rrnfn t ntb b f rttr tt rfrtf ffr t n f rr fff ft f tt ft f t rt trt f t t n t t r r f t rff rff f t t n r r f t r n r r f r f f r f t f f tr rffrt tt r trt rtrff rrf tftnt r fnf t r b r r f tr rrt rf t t t f rrn r t nf tn n nf nfttt tt f fnf rf t frrr rf t frrr rf fr trt rnt t btr fr bb trrtfrf f tt f fr bb trt rfr rrnf r rrnf r fftrrtr rrrf fftrrtr rrrf r r ffrfr nfr t r r ftt t n rrrt rftrnrr rftrnrr tr rr nf rrn t t r f r rnf r rrt r rrr r n tnf rrftftr rrrf frt fn frt trn ttfrr r t t r f r r f f t f f n f r bbr rf rf r f r r rrrf ftrrtr rf nt rf fn rrtrrrf rr nftrrrf rr ftrrf f r r f r r f r f nftrr rnft rfrf b ft rrrf ftrf rrftrrrf rrttf f rf t ft t ft t rrtt tnrfrr t n f trrnf rrrfnrf rfrrtrr rf t r f rr b ft ft r ftrtrf rntft rr nnt rf r f f r r n f f r f r r f r t t r f t r r f r n r f frr rt f rnrfr nfrfr f rf rf fftf rf b rrft f n rtr rt n r rf nf t rfrt rfftrf bb t n rr rrf ffn

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Wednesday, February 19, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D3 r f rr f nff rf f r f f rfntbn rf rntbftfbbftn rbntftb f n f fbrftf fbfr f b rrb trr ffrtr trnb ntbf ft rrftbrft tbff rrf brtfr ntbf rtntft f nffb frbrf tfbf bf rrf rntfbtb rr r btrftb f tffbb tfbf rtf rrf nrrf f nbbt rrb rrfrrtnrr b f n nn tbt fr b n f f bfftnftfb f fttfbb tftrfrr rf n f f rt nbtf b bf tn rrr rrfftb rbrrrt tftrrf rft tfttnttr rrtrr n nn frfbt ff frbbbbrf nn f t f tfftr nntbrtfbr brr rrtfff trftrrt frrftfntf tf f r b f n f t n b b f f f r t t r f nntb fttrtftrtb fttbr trrtf rttrf rrbrtf t f f rtf trr r b r f f f f b ttr r rtrttfbr f tf ffrrtb frr nnf f tf ffrrtb frr nnf f nnntrf f bnrfrb rnfttrft ttb ftrtnfntb rbrff fb f b f n ff f f t r f t t r f f f t f f r tfr fftbrttb tfrrf nfftrnf rbrrb r f b f b r f r nf f nnff f t r n t r b r b f b t f b rttrf rrbrtf t f f rtf trr r b r f f f f b ttr r rtrttfbr f t t f n f t n b b r n b r t t f trf fft f t r n b b b t n r b f t b f r r t r r r frb f t brtbfbbf tfrntrbrrn rbntf f r t tf rttrf rrbrtf t f f rtf trr r b r f f f f b ttr r rtrttfbr f nff r r t f r f r n t n f r f r n t r n nft tbf n b b t t f r t f r f b t b t r r b b r r t r f t b f t t f t f r f t r n f f r b f n f f f r r n r r n f b r t f r r f t f f f f n t f b r r n r n n t f b n n r f b r n n r b r b r f r f r n b n r trrfn t r b t r r b f b f t f rttrf rrbrtf t f f rtf trr r b r f f f f b ttr r rtrttfbr f nft ttbf fff ffrb bntf nftf ftftr rt nf ttbf b r t f r t r t f r r rnb rtr rb r r tbrtbrtrnb rf rttrf rrbrtf t f f rtf trr r b r f f f f b ttr r rtrttfbr f nf ttbf r bnt nf tbf nnff ft tf brtf fnt rtnb bf fr f fn f tfbbtt f rbf frf t f b f n r r r b f b f b b b b r b t f b r r rnfnt rnb ffbtrtf rrtr rbtf bftr f rf rr nbrrrbfrtf nbftrb nbrrrbfrtf nbftrb rtft rrf f tnbb f t n f t f f b bftbftb nrrr rfbttfb frfbt rrrbrnbtn b rrrbrnbtn b frfbt fnbtb ft rbrf r ft frbfbft f tftb f ft nb nbrf tbf bf frnbrrr br tft rrbbr bnf fnn rrf trffbfr nbtrr b r t f nft fbbrtbf trf fbfb rtnt tftbfrr ftrnbbbb f fbfbftb f r f b b t f t b b ftfbr rtf ftfbr rtf ffb fnf t f t r f fttf tnb brbbrfnb bb f r t tb tfbbftf rftrr f ft b r r r fnftfttrbf btftbff tffttb ftfbr rft brf f

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D4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 19, 2014 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 725344767 1318315974 921FREE SPACE5372 216424863 529395268ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N IB O G BINGO B I N G O SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Malcia Laurence WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! N 39 FREE N 42 N 31 N 34



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rfntb Phone: 352-326-2623LEARN TO RIDE! DON'T WAIT! SCHEDULE YOUR BIKE FOR SERVICE NOW! PRE-BIKE WEEK PARTY: MARCH 1STSTARTS AT 10AM, WORLD CLASS MUSIC BY 3RING CIRCUS& BEEF 'O' BRADY'S COOKIN! BIKINI BIKE WASH & RADICAL RANDY SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | C1 SPORTS: Lake Minneola advances in regional playoffs WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWSTAND INSIDE CLASSIFIED D1 CROSSWORDS C2 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN C1 SPORTS B1 VOICES A4 WORD ON THE STREE T A2 SO UTH LAKE PRE SS V OLUME 99, NO. 8 5 SECTIO N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reserved www. southlakepress.com PRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Clermont city ofcials are talking about removing the recently installed red-light cameras, cutting back on them or at least doing away with cita tions for right turns on red, but they are now realiz ing those op tions wouldnt be cheap. City council members last week instructed City Manager Darren Gray to meet with the red-light cam era company, American Trafc Solu tions (ATS), about why 90 percent of the citations forwarded to police are for right-turn violations, not for drivers barreling through intersections. Gray reported back to council mem bers this week about that meeting. We met with ATS and one question we had was if we can eliminate the right-hand turn violations altogether, Gray said. To do that, Clermont would have to re negotiate the contract with ATS, but there could be some nancial obligation for the city should we decid ed to take that out. Citing concerns about drivers run ning red lights and causing accidents, the council previously approved in stalling up to 24 red-light cameras at 13 intersections along State Road 50 and U.S. Highway 27, but only six have been installed to date at the most prob lematic intersections. Gray said his ATS discussion also touched upon the pos sibility of removing the cameras alto gether, but that would end up costing the city, too, because it would mean CLERMONT City council considers yanking red light cameras SUBMITTED PHOTO From left, MEMCO Production Manager Skeeter Glover, President Michael Evans, and Sales and Administration Manager Curtis Evans, oversee a workers progress on one of the companys above-ground fuel storage tanks being built in Clermont. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com M ike Evans Ma chinery Compa ny (MEMCO), a 20-year-old fuel-tank manufacturer in Cler mont, plans to move to a facility in Bushnell with more than ve times the square footage it has in south Lake. Weve outgrown the place were in, Ser vice and Administration Manager Curtis Evans said. Our production line is jammed up here (in Clermont) because we are getting so much interest. The building were moving into (in Bushnell) is much larger and will allow us to pro duce the tanks faster and more efciently. Theres also more room for us to grow out there. Doing business un der the name Enviro safe, the company has a 15,000-square-foot man ufacturing facility at 901 12th St. in Clermont. It has become the No. 1 manufacturer of aboveground fuel systems in the U.S., thanks in part to the worldwide atten tion it has received on the Web since 2008. The fuel systems store gaso line, diesel fuel or liquid chemicals. The company has been leasing its Cler mont site since 2004, but recently bought a 50,000-square-foot building off of Coun ty Road 747 in Bushnell, where it plans to build another 30,000-squarefoot building. MEMCOs investment in the new building, which included the pur chase price, renovations and new equipment, is estimated at nearly $2 million. According to Ev ans, the building should be completed around April and will bring 22 to 35 new jobs to the area. CLERMONT Fuel-tank manufacturer plans large-scale expansion We met with ATS and one question we had was if we can eliminate the righthand turn violations altogether. City Manager Darren Gray LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com The St. Johns River Water Management Districts Gov erning Board has approved Niagara Bottlings request to more than double the amount of water it draws from the Flor idan aquifer. The approval came after Wa ter Management ofcials mod ied the permit to stipulate that withdrawals should not cause or contribute to a viola tion of the adopted minimum levels to a couple of nearby lakes. If this occurs, the water management district can re voke the permit, in whole or in part, or reduce the permitted allocation. The permit, approved last week by a 6-2 vote of the board, requires the Groveland bottled water company to shift its to tal withdrawal from the upper aquifer to the lower aquifer by 2024. The governing board con sidered a great many factors, including the input provided by the public, Board Chairman John Miklos of Orlando said in a statement. Ultimately, we determined that this withdraw al will have a negligible impact on the environment, and there are conditions in place to en sure that there is no unaccept able harm to water resources. A permit condition also was included in the agreement that PALATKA Niagara Bottling allowed to draw twice as much water from aquifer SEE WATER | A2 SEE FUEL | A2 SEE CAMERAS | A5

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 19, 2014 CLERMONT Aida to be presented at East Ridge High School The musical Aida will be presented at 7 p.m., today through Friday, with a matine on Saturday at 2 p.m., at East Ridge High School auditorium, 13322 Excalibur Rd. Tickets are $10 and can be reserved by emailing Vince Santo at santov@ lake.k12..us. CLERMONT Participants sought for annual bake-off on March 8 The 16th annual Pig on the Pond Dessert Bake-Off is scheduled for March 8, part of the Pig on the PondSanctioned Barbecue Competition and Festival March 7-9. The bakeoff, organized by the Church at South Lake, raises funds for their Buses and Backpacks program, a weekly effort to feed elementary-aged children. Categories for the bake-off which is for amateur bakers only, include cakes, pies, brownies and miscella neous desserts. Entry fee is the dona tion of your dessert, which will be sold by Buses and Backpacks at Pig on the Pond, and prizes will be awarded. Entry forms for the bake-off must be received by March 8, with desserts delivered to the event by 9:30 a.m. Go to www.pigonthepond.org or call Tandy Hammond at 352-243-1155. CLERMONT Vendors sought for annual South Lake Womens Expo The 12th annual South Lake Womens Expo is seeking vendors for the event sponsored by the Clermont Womens Club to be held March 22 at the Wesley Center at First United Methodist Church, at 950 7th St., north of State Road 50. Applications are now being accept ed for the event, which offers a bonus included in the vendor fee: a business card ad to be published in the March 19 edition of the South Lake Press Admission is free for the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For information or an application, email Basha Schlazer at BSsportzfan@ aol.com. CLERMONT Relay For Life to host 50/50 Have a Heart drawing Your $10 donation gives partici pants a chance to be a lucky win ner while helping to take a bite out of cancer by supporting the American Cancer Societys Relay For Life of South Lake-Cagan Crossings with the Have a Heart 50/50 chance drawing. The drawing will be held on Feb. 27 during the Relay For Life of South Lake-Cagan Crossing team party at the South Lake Hospital Live Well Center, 1935 Don Wickham Dr. For information or to pur chase a ticket, call Kim Kitchen at 863-978-7563. MOUNT DORA Food trucks will return to downtown on Thursday Beginning Thursday, food trucks will once again appear in downtown Mount Dora on the third Thursday of every month. Hosted by the Mount Dora Area Chamber of Commerce, the trucks will be located in the Chamber park ing lot and on Sunset Park at the cor ner of 4th and Alexander Streets, with tables and chairs set up to offer par ticipants a gathering and seating area. Ten to 15 unique food trucks offer ing a wide variety of different food styles will participate in the event, opening for service from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. For information, call 352-383-2165. LEESBURG Meet llamas at the library on Feb. 27 Meet live llamas at 10:30 a.m., on Feb. 27 at the Leesburg Public Library, 100 E. Main St. For information, call 352-728-9790 or email hannah.barreto@leesburg orida.gov. Area Briefs What South Lake residents are saying about ... FOOD STAMPS If you could change one thing about the food stamp system, what would it be? The food stamp pro gram, the usage needs to be tighter. They need to revisit the kinds of items that can be purchased. Some foods that can be purchased probably shouldnt be purchased by people who need food stamps. At the same time, they should be able to pur chase non-food items such as toothpaste. JERRY SULCENTI CLERMONT I wouldnt say do away with it, because its im portant for those who need it, but I think there needs to be a time lim it. If its indenite you be come dependent on gov ernment help. If you have eight months or a year or two years, if theres a time limit after which you wont be eligible, I think that gives you motivation as a human being to do something about it. LESLIE KIRKLAND CLERMONT If youre going to get food stamps, you have to volunteer. At least with the taxes we are paying, they would get some thing done. Three strikes if you dont show up, you lose your food stamps and you have to re-apply. If you lose it three times, youre out. KRISTIAN WARE SUMMERFIELD The screening pro cess that theyre really checking that the people really need it, that they are going to use it for food for themselves and their chil dren not for their nails, their shoes. VIVIANA RIOS KISSIMMEE Word on the Street Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 ROXANNE BROWN Staff writer A sinkhole measuring about 15 feet in diameter opened up in a populous Clermont neighborhood early Monday morning. The sinkhole, at the intersection of Powderhorn Place Drive and Peaceful Valley Drive near Hart wood Marsh Road, was roughly four feet deep, ofcials say. Fireghters responding to the call said the hole did not appear to put any homes in immediate dan ger and they did not observe any other hazards, city ofcials said. They noted that a gas line and wa ter main were nearby, but all utili ties appeared to be undisturbed. State and county ofcials, along with the City of Clermont Public Works Department, arrived on the scene to assist the private proper ty owners since it is at the entrance of a cul-de-sac with several homes. A representative from Sen try Management which manag es the subdivision, told Clermont city ofcials that an engineer from Bechtol Engineering & Testing in DeLand made a preliminary as sessment and advised the manage ment company to watch the sink hole for the next 24 hours. City spokeswoman Doris Blood sworth said Public Works employ ees brought in ground-up asphalt to make a ramp over the curb so that the roughly 15 homeowners in the Peaceful Valley Drive cul-desac can enter and exit, as well as any emergency vehicles. Sinkhole opens in neighborhood CLERMONT allows the permit to be revoked or the withdraw al reduced if aquifer tests demonstrate that us ing water from the lower aquifer does not provide the benet anticipated, a press release from the district states. Joe Kilsheimer, spokes man for Niagara, said he believed the request met all of the legal and tech nical justication for ap proval. We are pleased the board agreed with the staffs recommendation, he said. The assurances that the staff and Niagara want to build into the per mit will ensure that the water resources will not be adversely affected. Hank Largin, spokes man for the SJRWMD, said board members Douglas Burnett of St. Augustine and Maryam Ghyabi of Ormond Beach voted against the permit. Burnetts concern was that there wasnt enough evidence regarding the lower Floridan aquifer and that it would not have an impact on the water source, Largin said. Niagara applied to the water management dis trict last September to increase its average dai ly withdrawal from the aquifer from 484,000 gal lons to 910,000 gallons. In December, the company changed its application to request that the bulk of its water will come from the lower Floridan aqui fer by 2016. Niagara contends that withdrawing water from the lower aquifer in stead of the upper aqui fer will have less impact on lake levels. The two aquifers are separated by a barrier called the mid dle-conning unit or, in places, the semi-conn ing unit where water can leak through. In some places in Flor ida, the conning unit is less than 50 feet thick and composed of permeable limestone and dolomite, whereas Niagara con tends the area its looking at has a conning unit of clay up to 75 feet thick. District staff deter mined because of the semi-conning unit and the productive na ture of the lower Floridan aquifer, the withdraw al will have less potential to impact the surround ing natural systems than the previously permitted withdrawal. Alan Oyler, consultant for the water manage ment district, said previ ously water withdrawn from the lower aquifer can affect water in the upper aquifer. It is diffusing the im pact, he said, empha sizing it will not have the same effect as water withdrawn from the up per aquifer. It all depends on where the water is being with drawn from in the lower aquifer, he said. If you have a good conning layer that sep arates the lower from the upper aquifer you have less of an impact, he said. It takes both mod eling to predict the im pact and monitoring to verify whether the impact is or is not happening. According to a permit fact sheet from the water management district: From 2014 to 2015, Niagaras withdrawals from the upper aquifer will not exceed 484,000 gallons per day. From 2016 to 2023, that amount will be re duced to no more than 334,000 gallons per day. By 2024, if Niagara hasnt shifted all its with drawals to the lower aquifer, its permitted al location of water drops to zero. WATER FROM PAGE A1 Evans, along with com pany President Mike Evans and Production Manager Skeeter Glover, are unsure at this time if theyll keep the Clermont location open as well, but most of the workers there will be relocating. We have so much steel, big equipment and a lot of tanks. Its going to be a big move, Ev ans said. Were thinking about keeping our Cler mont location, too, but well have to wait and see whether we need it or not. When the company rst began, Evans said the tanks were going to big ready-mix and waste companies, along with municipalities. Since appearing on the Web, the company has added contractors, farm ing operations, hospitals, trucking, aviation and marine companies and even governmental agen cies and the U.S. military to its customer list. Many are located outside the United States. Although the tanks MEMCO manufactures are for storing regular gasoline and diesel fuel, it also produces bio-die sel, oil, ethanol and dif ferent chemical tanks, Evans said, adding that the custom-built tanks are all manufactured us ing a double wall system and comply with all lo cal, state and federal reg ulations. Tank sizes vary from 300 to 35,000 gallons. Were excited, Ev ans said of the move. Its a big step forward from where we started in 1992. We went from a lit tle place in Oakland to the facility in Clermont where weve been for 10 years, and now were looking forward to the new facility in Bushnell. For information, call 352-241-2302, 800555-4754 or visit abo vegroundfuelstorage tanks.com. FUEL FROM PAGE A1

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Wednesday, February 19, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3 Staff Report Students in Lake Minneo la High Schools Game, Simulation and Animation courses have created a mobile appli cation that offers an ar ray of information about the school for students, faculty and parents. James Martin, who teaches this Ca reer-Technical Educa tion course, challenged students to create an informational mobile application that would represent the high school. By Dec. 20, the stu dents had accom plished their goal when the Lake Minne ola High School App was approved by Goo gle and available for download on the An droid Market. The information al app features up-todate news from the school, calendar of events, bell schedule, course descrip tions and more. Anything a student would need to learn about the school, Mar tin said, this app gives them the information right at their nger tips. Finding its way onto Apples App Store proved to be a greater challenge than the An droid Market. The rst time we submitted to Apple we got rejected, Martin said. Students stayed on task and nearly a month later, on Jan. 22, the Lake Minne ola High School Mo bile Application was cleared for the Apple App Store. The Android version (Android 2.3 or later), Apple iPad ver sion (iOS 5.1 or later) and Apple iPhone ver sion (iOS 5.1 or later) of the app are all currently available to downloa d. They did an amaz ing job by remaining focused and profes sional throughout the entire effort, Martin said of the students. LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com Over the last 10 years, many public projects have come to fruition in Lake County, from the construc tion of the new Emergency Operations and Communi cations Center, to the manu facturer of the new Clermont Community Center, to the rebuilding and moderniza tion of Tavares High School. All of which shows how far a penny will go. These projects are exam ples of how revenue from the one-cent sales tax for in frastructure is spent. The tax yielded $34.8 million last year, which was divided between the cities, school district and the county. The 14 cities then must divide up their alloca tion proportionally. As the tax is set to expire in 2017, county ofcials said last week at a board work shop they would like resi dents to have the opportu nity to vote on whether to renew it in 2015. However, there is some de bate about how the tax reve nue should be divided, with some school board mem bers suggesting that half a cent be allocated for new schools to handle the ex pected increase in student enrollment by 2020. County commissioners want to keep the status quo and agreed last week to draft a letter to the School Board and the cities, asking them to support this. The matter will be discussed and voted upon at a future commission meeting. Commission Chairman Jimmy Conner has stated previously that if the sales tax is not renewed, there would be no option other than to raise property taxes to pay for needed capital im provement projects. We use it to buy ambu lances, patrol cars and for parks, Conner said of the revenue. It is really an im portant quality of life issue. Commissioner Timothy Sullivan, who serves as a li aison to the Lake County League of Cities, said the cit ies, school and county, need to see these dollars contin ue so it doesnt have an im pact on property taxes. The benet of the onecent sales tax is it spreads the load not only among res idents, but anyone that does business in Lake County, he said. Property taxes hurt the people you are trying to pro tect the most, while the sales tax is based on people who spend money, and it doesnt include food or medicines. Penny sales tax money has been spent on rebuild ing and modernizing several of the countys high schools, including Eustis High School and Umatilla High School. As the school district looks at its future needs, ofcials say several schools, such as Beverly Shores Elemen tary School, Oak Park Mid dle School and Treadway El ementary may need to be modernized or rebuilt. Further, a consultant for the school district in No vember 2013 projected that by 2020, there will 2,297 new students in the schools, par ticularly in the southern part of the county. As a result, school ofcials see the need to build two new schools there within seven years. In the last ve years, the school district has lost more than $67 million in capi tal property tax revenue be cause the stagnant econo my has kept property values low, and the Florida Legisla ture has cut the maximum allowable millage for capi tal purposes from 2 mills to 1.5 mills. School Board Members Tod Howard, Bill Mathias and Debbie Stivender agree the district needs addition al funding from the sales tax. We need about a half cent to do the repairs and replacements to the older schools, Howard said. School board ofcials have not yet determined how the sales tax revenue would be spent. County Commission er Sean Parks said he rec ognized the School Boards plight but added that it is equally important they work together on the issue. For its part, the county spent its portion of the pen ny sales tax revenue on proj ects such as the EOC, expan sion of the Judicial Center and the planned historic courthouse renovation. About half of the coun tys portion is also spent on road reconstruction, resur facing and sidewalks, which received the smallest part of revenue. Some of the money is also earmarked for public safety and equipment. Parks said the renewal of the penny sales tax is vital. We need the current con guration, referring to each party receiving a third. Our population has grown 80,000 to 100,000 people and we have an increasing level of service needs. At the budget workshop, Conner expressed concerns about the school district as a partner in receiving sales tax revenue. My concern is if you in clude the school board, it (a renewal of the tax) wont pass, based on all the prob lems they have, he said, re ferring to six principals who inaccurately reported their class sizes to the state, lead ing Superintendent Susan Moxley to call for an inde pendent review of all schools in the district. Then again, if you dont include them, it may not pass. Commissioner Welton Cadwell also believes voters wont renew the tax unless the school district receives some of the revenue. While the county commis sion has not determined spe cically how their portion will be spent, they agreed public safety, quality of life projects such as parks and sidewalks and roads are top spending priorities. I want to say, to me, the biggest issue facing us over the next three years is this sales tax, Conner said. I know everybody likes side walks and parks, but should you put ambulances in ser vice 12 hours instead of 24 hours there would be quite the outrage. Jim Myers, executive di rector of the Lake County League of Cities and nance director for the city of Eustis, said the penny sales tax is vi tal for meeting cities capital project needs. In Eustis, it means $1.4 million in capital pro jects and infrastructure in Eustis annually, he said. We are able to utilize that money each year. $24.99Full Service Oil Change**Includes up to 5 quarts of Valvoline`s Conventional oil, standard oil filter, lube and maintenance check. Additional charge for premium filter. Offer not valid with any other same service offers or discounts (including fleets). Good at participating Orlando locations.$15 offany Additional Service**Includes Transmission Fluid Exchange, Radiator Service, Entire Fuel System Cleaning, or Serpentine Belt Offer not valid with any other same service offers or discounts (including fleets). Good at participating Orlando locations. MINNEOLA Lake Minneola students create mobile application Anything a student would need to learn about the school, this app gives them the information right at their fingertips. James Martin BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL A truck passes the penny sales tax sign on Lakeshore Drive in Mount Dora on Feb. 12. PENNY SALES TAX BREAKDOWN The penny sales tax is split evenly between the cities, county and school district, with each receiving a third. In 2013-14, each received $11.6 million, with the cities having to split that $11.6 million between the 14 municipalities. COUNTY WHITNEY WILLARD / STAFF GRAPHIC SOURCE: Sales Surtax Oversight Advisory Committee Roads and transportation Public safety facilities and equipment Construction, remodeling of facilities Parks and recreation Other infrastructure Examples : Judicial center expansion, eet operations center, EOC historic courthouse renovation, and sheriffs vehicles. SCHOOL DISTRICT CITIES Construction, renovation and remodeling of facilities Examples : Eustis Heights Elementary and Umatilla Middle remodeling Construction, renovation and remodeling of facilities Public safety facilities and equipment Roads and transportation Utilities, drainage improvements Examples: CDBG sewer forcemain project on Highway 50 in Mascotte Local governments wrestle over penny sales tax

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 19, 2014 T he reappearance of Lynx buses on the streets of south Lake County in recent weeks has been a welcome sight for those who depend on mass transit for their livelihoods. Many residents in this area work in neighboring counties and count on these buses to ferry them to jobs in Orange and Osceola counties. Without them, some may be relegated needlessly to the unemployment line. Lynx had discontinued service some time ago between south Lake and those counties but brought it back at the behest of the Lake County Commission, which agreed in October to shoulder some of the cost. But when the service returned in January, riders discovered that Lynx was offering just eight round-trips a day instead of the 16 it had offered previously. Further, the last trip was at 6:15 p.m., which meant some commuters who worked late had to scramble for a way home. County commissioners, responding to the anger of their constituents, said this wasnt what they bargained for. They called for Lynx ofcials to restore the full service 16 trips a day, both day and night. We concur. Mass transit is more than a convenience to those who use it. As Daily Commercial Staff Writer Livi Stanford reported in a recent story about Lynx, for many it is a vital lifeline to shopping, medical appointments and, yes, their jobs. Many commuters who travel to neighboring counties for work dont have the luxury of working 9 to 5 and require access to bus service late into the evening. Some told us that, without it, they are forced to invest signicant percentages of their income on cab fare. This problem is easy to solve. Lynx should heed the request of the Lake County Commission to restore the full bus service. Certainly, the cost of providing that service is an issue. But between the county, Lynx and the riders themselves many of whom say theyd be willing to shoulder higher fares if necessary the cost consideration can be overcome. Local ofcials must come together to solve this problem. This is not just about the individual riders. This is about the economic health of a community whose workforce relies partly on neighboring counties for their jobs. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD ........................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST O PINION WHATS YOUR OPINION? The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the ed itor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be origi nal, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Letters to the Editor 732 W. Montrose St. Clermont, FL 34711 By fax to: 352-394-8001 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. GUEST COLUMNS If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@daily commercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OUR VIEW S OUTH LAKE PRESS Your community newspaper for more than 100 years. 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001 The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Flori da 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region. All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Bring back full Lynx bus service LETTER of the WEEK James Holden (Congress is only working for themselves) got it right. They no longer work for the people. The solution to the prob lems of America could be easi ly solved by simply passing an amendment for term limits. It will have to be voted for by the people because it would nev er get introduced into either part of Congress. The Ameri can people can vote out any thing or anyone with a 75 per cent popular vote. There are only 118 members of Congress that served in this great countrys military. They have no business running the military. Thirty years ago there were 298. It should be a re quirement. The average age of senators is 62.1 years and in the House of Representatives it is 57.0. There are 38 old enough to go on Social Security. There are two more than 80 years of age. Imagine getting rid of Ran gel, Reid, Pelosi, McCain and all the congressmen and women that are giving away our childrens futures by load ing up every bill that is intro duced with billions in pork to garner re-election votes to ex tend their careers. No one is in Washington anymore with the express pur pose of doing what We the People want done. If they could seek ofce knowing that they could open their mouth and not be threatened by the old es tablished career congress men something just might get done. What a novel idea. Two terms and you sit out the next two. Compensation giv en based on production. Re quire them to practice what they pass. Retirement would be earned. JOHN COHN | Tavares Congress no longer works for the people FILE PHOTO Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz. speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. Dems are misguided A recent urry of sycophan tic letters selling the credits of the Democratic Party force me from under my cozy rock to point out a single fact that will trump every credit they own Democrats are the party of state suprema cy, which means, the rights of the individual can be trampled by the rights of the state, i.e., collec tivism. The Founding Fathers framed a Constitution that identies a Republic founded on rights of the individual over the state, i.e., individualism. Every Democratic vote sup ports the rights of the state over the individual and I doubt thats really the way informed Ameri cans want to go. Zionists? Yes. New World Or der supporters? Yes. Loyal Americans, no way. JOHN WHITAKER | Tavares Columnist off base on Obama criticism In his recent diatribe, Russ Sloan digs down into his deep est pit of hatred for the presi dent. He states that in his 2008 campaign the president prom ised to cut the decit by half in his rst term in ofce, but the debt grew by $5 trillion. Well, the fact is the decit was $932 billion in scal year, Oct. 1, 2008-Sept. 30, 2009, and was $232 billion in the scal year Oct. 1, 2012 to Sept. 30, 2013, a decrease of $700 billion in his rst term, which is much more than half. I would think someone of Sloans background would know the difference between the de cit, which is the annual amount we are in the red and the na tional debt, which is the total accumulated amount we are in the red. It is true the actual debt grew by $5 trillion, but the decit was reduced by $700 billion, so President Obama certainly did keep his promise. The lengths Sloan will go to try to malign the president, even making blatantly false statements is sad, unless he is truly ignorant of the facts. MARY OHANLON | Clermont Not allowing certain rights is unconstitutional We are blessed to live in this country of laws where most citi zens obey and understand their purpose. Still there are some who fail in understanding and represent some laws to t their beliefs and desires. From health care to mar riage, some think they should dictate needs, which in reali ty takes away civil rights from others. We press religious teaching of one sect but fail to understand the effects it might have for people of different be liefs. Although its difcult to accomplish a fair position on these values, its still one of the main benets of being Ameri can. Being an American is more than just enjoying the laws of our nation, but also allowing all others the same position. While some want others to fol low their morals and desires, it takes away the freedom of choice for all citizens. Blocking the ability to mar ry a loved one or to prevent the choice of family planning for those of varied values is sim ply unconstitutional and unfair. Our law of freedom of choice is being able to have a choice in the direction you wish to reach. America is great because of these laws not because some are prevented from having them. God bless America. WILLIAM CAMPBELL | Leesburg YOUR VOICES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

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Wednesday, February 19, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5 backing out of a con tract. As for not installing all two-dozen cameras, the city manager said ATS was willing to talk about this. I see some agree able terms on their part when it comes to re ducing the number of red-lights cameras on the contract, Gray told the council. At the meeting this week, Gail Ash, a resi dent and former coun cilwoman, told the board she understands the city may lose mon ey by changing con tract terms, but she asked council mem bers to consider this because it is negatively affecting residents. Ash said she has bee n a nervous wreck on the road because of the confusion over what constitutes a legal right-hand turn. Although a state stat ute says motorists have to come to a complete stop before turning right on red, a separate state statute pertain ing to red-light cam eras says drivers can turn right on red with out a camera citation if they do it in a careful and prudent manner at less than 12 mph. Its up to the camera com pany and a police rep resentative reviewing the tape to determine if a violation occurred. I think that weve got a can of worms here, resident Matthew Modica told the board. Weve got a liability here. Its not a healthy situation for the city of Clermont, because I can see a class-action suit stemming from something like this and then the city will really be losing money. Besides that, it might just be one of the most negative things Ive seen here in my 45 years. Its like big broth er gone mad and its go ing to cost people on the council their seat. Resident Jim Pur vis also said the cam eras are causing con fusion and anxiety for drivers he believes will take side or back roads to avoid them, funnel ing additional trafc and the potential for more accidents on sec ondary roads. He cit ed Hooks Street, where two schools are locat ed, as an alternative route drivers might take to avoid the cam eras at State Road 50 and Hancock Road. I was for the cam eras because I, too, thought they were go ing to stop red-light runners, but by target ing right turns on red, all were doing is divid ing this town up like mincemeat for no rea son at all, Purvis said. Councilman Ray Goodgame, a support er of the cameras for safety reasons only, said hed like to see if the right-turn violations can be eliminated and the $158 tickets refund ed for those who have already received them. Mayor Hal Turville, who said he has been strongly against the cameras from the start, said he wants to talk about just bailing out of the contract, have the city take its losses and move on. Turville said he be lieves that people are driving around with anxieties associat ed with the red-light cameras will probably cause more accidents and problems than be fore the city had them installed. Gray said he is wait ing for ATS to come back with information about how much it will cost to re-negotiate its contract and what op tions the city has re garding reducing or re moving cameras. CAMERAS FROM PAGE A1 MILLARD IVES | Staff Writer millard.ives@dailycommercial.com Clermont police captured a juvenile suspected of robbing a hardware store at gunpoint last week. Police provided few details about the robbery, which oc curred at 8:30 a.m. Feb. 12 at the Hilltop Ace Hardware store at 859 State Road 50, west of U.S. Highway 27. However, Po lice Capt. Michael McMaster said store employees were able to provide a description of the suspects vehicle. Assisted by Lake County dep uties, ofcers set up a perime ter around hundreds of homes southwest of the interchange at U.S. 27 and State Road 50 as they searched for the suspect. Family Christian Center School on U.S. 27, just south of State Road 50, was locked down during the search. This alarmed parents such as Jessi ca Pendley. Its really scary, Pend ley told a local television sta tion. Im glad they do lock the school down in situations like this, said Pendley. Ive got two kids in school up there, so its really scary when some thing like this happens. Ofcers eventually spotted the suspects vehicle. The teen reportedly crashed into a tree, got out and ed, McMaster said. Police dogs tracked the teen and ofcers arrested him at Hooks Street and U.S. 27. Because of the suspects age, his name wasnt released. Mc Master said police recovered the gun as well as the suspects phone, which he allegedly used to contact family mem bers to tell them of his loca tion, which led to the suspects mother being arrested. Tanya Harrison, 33, was charged with attempted ob struction without violence. CLERMONT Juvenile in custody after armed holdup AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com Kohan Retail Invest ment Group of Great Neck, N.Y., has fallen out of contract to buy the Lake Square Mall, according to mall Property Manager Ron Sikora. Sikora was unable to pro vide any additional details on the matter but said cur rent mall owner Macerich has told him it will be busi ness as usual at the mall. However, according to Mike Kohan of Kohan Re tail Investment Group, he is still trying to make the sale happen. Were still negotiating the deal; I dont have any denite answer, he said last week. Kohan went on to say that, Whatever is gonna happen is gonna happen very soon and Im talking about the next couple weeks. His company currently owns 15 malls from Wash ington State to New York to Florida in Crystal River and Graceville. According to multiple media reports, Kohan has had mixed results with some of the malls he has bought, including two that ofcials tried to close because they were so di lapidated. Kohan, though, said that is the nature of buying distressed malls. Its a very, very chal lenging situation for you to bring another anchor, which is close to impossi ble, but we are trying. We are trying, he said. The public relations de partment at Macerich, which has sold Kohan at least one other mall in the past, could not im mediately provide com ment. Macerich sold Lake Square Mall last Novem ber at an online auction for $13.6 million. Built in 1980, the 470,943-square-foot mall has seen reduced foot traf c over the past few years, and two under-performing anchor stores, Target and J.C. Penney, both recently announced closings. Kohan targets older malls. In fact, his compa nys web site says, The Kohan Retail Investment Group sees the future of aging malls as a place of mixed use that is more than just for shopping. Target, which closed Feb. 1, owns its 88,000-squarefoot store space and is ac tively marketing it with CBRE, a real estate services company with 332 ofces in 42 counties, Target spokes person Luz Varela said. The J.C. Penney store is expected to close by May. The aging, 12-screen AMC theater at the mall, which was cited for san itary violations recent ly, will be facing some tough competition next year when Epic Theatres opens a new, state-of-theart, 14-scre en facility in Mount Dora. LEESBURG Purchase of Lake Square Mall still up in the air Its really scary. Im glad they do lock the school down in situations like this. Ive got two kids in school up there, so its really scary when something like this happens. Jessica Pendley

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A6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 19, 2014 OBITUARIES Clarence E. Harden Clarence E. Harden, 84, of Eustis, passed away Wednesday, Feb ruary 12, 2014. Born and raised in Mont verde, to the late Clarence E. Sr. & Marga ret Harden, he was a lifelong resident of Lake County. He at tended and graduat ed from the Cincinnati College of Embalming in 1954. He and Al bert Layton co-found ed Layton Harden Fu neral Home of Eustis in 1958, becoming Harden/Pauli Funer al Home in 1982. He was a very active mem ber and Deacon Emeri tus of Bay Street Baptist Church, Eustis. Clar ence was also a mem ber of the Lake Eustis Area Chamber of Com merce, V.F.W., Ameri can Legion, Elks and Masonic Lodges, all of Eustis. He served his country in the US Army during Korea. He is sur vived by his wife of 54 years, Dorothy A. Hard en, Eustis; 2 daughters, Kathy L. Walker (Bruce Williams), Lake Mary, Ann Maria Share (Kev in), Eustis; 3 brothers, David Harden, Mont verde, Roddy Harden, Shelby, NC, Joe Harden, Umatilla; 2 sisters, Jean Gonzales, Montverde, Linda Harden, Mont verde; grandson, Car ter Allen Naisbett, Eu stis. He was preceded in death by his brother, Carey Harden and sis ter, Laverne McCarthy. Services will be held at Bay Street Baptist Church, Eustis on Sun day, February 16, 2014 at 3:00 PM. Interment will follow at Green wood Cemetery, Eustis. The family will receive friends at the Harden/ Pauli Funeral Home, Eustis on Saturday from 4:00 6:00 PM. Memorial donations may be made to Bay Street Baptist Church Building Fund, 37181 North SR 19, Umatil la, FL 32784. Online Guestbook available at www.hardenpauli. com Arrangements by Harden/Pauli Funeral Home, Eustis. DEATH NOTICES Venita Beck Venita Beck, 82, of Oxford, died Wednes day, February 12, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations. Darrell Thomas Braden Darrell Thomas Bra den, 45, of Leesburg, died Thursday, Febru ary 13, 2014. Beyers Fu neral Home and Cre matory, Leesburg. Winston Churchill Winston Churchill, 69, of Leesburg, FL., died Thursday, Febru ary 6, 2014. Rocker-Cu sack Mortuary, Lees burg. Donald A. Connors Donald A. Connors, 83, of Fruitland Park, died on February 12, 2014. National Crema tion Society. Sylvester Crawford Sylvester Crawford, 94, of Groveland, died Friday, February 14, 2014. Marvin C. Zan ders Funeral Home, Inc. Carl J. Filippini Carl J. Filippini, 87, of Leesburg, passed away on Wednesday, Febru ary 12, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Fu nerals and Cremations, Tavares, FL. Ross L. Fleck Ross L. Fleck, 83, Eus tis, died on February 2, 2014. Grace I. Harvey Grace I. Harvey, 99, of Eustis, died Tues day, February 11, 2014. Harden/Pauli Funeral Home. Jack Hoffmaster Jack Hoffmaster, 86, of Leesburg, died Feb ruary 12, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home. Albert Jackson Jr. Albert Jackson Jr. 81, of Wildwood, Fl. died Saturday, Febuary 8, 2014 Jacobs Funeral Home. Roy E. Maxwell Roy E. Maxwell, 90, of Tavares died on Fri day, February 14, 2014. Steverson, Hamlin & Hilbish Funeral& Cre mations, Tavares. Harold McBrayer Harold McBrayer, 75, of Avon Park, died Tues day, February 11, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations. Shirley Monthony Shirley Monthony, 76, of Leesburg, died Monday, February 10, 2014. Page-Theus Fu nerals & Cremations. Ida Mae Rausch Ida Mae Rausch, 91, of Leesburg, died Wednesday, February 12, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations. Tammy D. Tique Tammy D. Tique, 44, of Leesburg, died Sun day, February 16, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations. Edna M. Wilson Edna M. Wilson, 77, of Sebring, died Mon day, February 10, 2014. Banks/Page-Theus Fu nerals and Cremations. IN MEMORY HARDEN Staff Report Lake County, in partnership with Orange County and the St. Johns River Water Management District, will hold a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Thursday for the Phase 2 opening of the Lake Apopka Loop Trail. The ribbon cutting will open 6.3 miles of trail at the Orange-Lake County line in the districts scenic Lake Apopka North Shore Resto ration Area, which is surrounded by levees and is ideal for viewing hun dreds of species of wildlife. Presenters at the event include Lake County Commissioner Leslie Campione, Orange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs, Orange County Com missioner Frederick C. Brummer, Orange County Parks Manager Matt Suedmeyer and Robert Christian son, director of districts Division of Strategic Planning and Financial Services. As a runner for many years, I am personally excited about the open ing of the Lake Apopka Loop Trail, as it extends into Lake County at the Lake County-Orange County line, said Campione, who has asked members of the Mount Dora Road runners to accompany her on a vemile trail run to the ribbon cutting. This trail will prove to be a beautiful and vital asset to nature lovers, run ners and athletes alike. This portion of the Lake Apopka Loop Trail, which meanders through the districts Lake Apopka North Shore Restoration Area, is designed as a multiple use passive trail for hik ing and bicycling. Phase 1 of the trail, which starts at Orange Countys Magnolia Park, opened in June 2012 and encom passes roughly four miles. Future work includes Lake County com pleting a portion of the trail at the western edge of the northern shore of Lake Apopka. Lake County has se cured funding to purchase private ly owned property that adjoins land owned by the district to construct an overlook onto Lake Apopka. The county also has plans to im prove a boat ramp that will provide boating access to the Apopka-Beau clair Canal and Lake Apopka. For more than 15 years, The Friends of Lake Apopka has worked with local governments and the SJR WMD on ecotourism in the area, in cluding construction of the loop trail, which began two years ago. Another Lake Apopka Loop Trail phase set to open As a runner for many years, I am personally excited about the opening of the Lake Apopka Loop Trail, as it extends into Lake County at the Lake County-Orange County line. This trail will prove to be a beautiful and vital asset to nature lovers, runners and athletes alike. Leslie Campione, Lake County Commissioner

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10% OFFAll options with this couponrffnntb B1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 19, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTS SPORTS EDITOR ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE .............................. 365-8268 FAX .......................................... 394-8001 EMAIL ......... sports@dailycommercial.com S PORTS and LEISURE MARK FISHER Special to the Daily Commercial The Lake Minneola High School boys basketball team has developed a reputation for playing hard from opening tip to nal horn. That approach has taken the Hawks to a 25-3 record this sea son and a No. 1 ranking in Class 6A. Lake Minneolas latest win came Thursday in the Class 6A-Region 2 quarternals against Deltona in the rst re gional playoff home game in school history. Avery Brown scored 14 points to lead a bal anced attack for the Hawks in a 75-40 win against the Wolves. Lake Minneola set the tempo with a suffocating defensive ef fort. Despite playing with ve guards on the oor for most of the game, the Hawks over came Deltonas size advantage to control the game. The Hawks speed resulted in turnovers, which were turned into points. In addition, Lake Minneolas high-octane of fense beat its taller, slower op ponents down the oor. After trailing 8-2 early in the rst period, the Hawks turned on their defense and quickly used the turnovers they forced to fuel a 7-0 mini-run en route to a 13-10 lead heading into the second period. After initially allowing the Wolves to get touches around the basket in the rst period, the Hawks clamped down in the second quarter. Marcus Dod son and Brown wreaked havoc throughout the game, creating transition baskets with steals. After taking a 30-19 lead at half, the Hawks smothered the Wolves in the third period, opening with a 13-0 run during which Brown and his twin brother, Anthony, dominated. Lake Minneola held Deltona scoreless for the rst four min utes of the third quarter, lim iting the Wolves to free throws until the closing minute of the period. By then, the Hawks had built a 30-point lead. In the fourth quarter, Lake Minneola coach Freddie Cole emptied his bench, but still managed to add on to the lead. In addition to Avery Brown, Carlyle Holder added 12 points, Andrew Mendoza and Ben Hull dropped in nine points apiece and Anthony Brown had seven. In other regional quarter nals games involving area teams on Thursday, Eustis got 26 points from Kiron Williams and 13 from Coy Patterson in a 68-52 win against Rockledge in a Class 5A-Region 4 contest. Lake Minneola, Eustis advance in regional playoffs BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Lake Minneola sophomore Marcus Dodson dribbles around a Deltona defender during the Class 6A-Region 2 playoff game between Lake Minneola High School and Deltona High School at Lake Minneola High School on Thursday. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Abdul Bello never played in an organized football game until September. Now, despite hav ing only six games of playing experience un der his belt, the Mont verde Academy junior offensive lineman is one of the areas most sought-after players. Even though he has a year of eligibil ity left, Bello has already received scholarship offers from a variety of schools, includ ing the Florida State University and the universi ties of Florida, Tennes see, Kentucky, Indiana, Maryland and Mis souri. In addition, the 6-foot-6, 300 pounder, has been invited to play in two of the nations top postseason AllStar games the Un der Armour All-Ameri can game at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, and the U.S. Army All-American game in San Antonio. The postseason invi tations are the rst for the second-year pro gram, which has been built from the ground up by Montverde Acad emy head coach Bri an Treweek and offen sive coordinator Walter Banks. Bello could be the most-decorated football star signing at the college preparato ry school in southeast Lake County, but he will not be the rst. Defensive lineman Cedric Udegbe was the Eagles rst football signee, inking a deal with the University of Delaware in 2013. We knew he had some natural football ability the rst time we saw him move, Banks said. For a big man with very little coach ing, he had very good lateral movement and was able to block down eld. In a lot of ways, he reminds me of other guys Ive coached, like Jonotthan Har rison and Ryan Carter. Banks coached Harrison and Carter at South Lake and helped both earned scholarships to the Uni versity of Florida. A nonprot founda tion the Ejike Ug boaja Foundation that makes two or three trips a year to Nigeria discovered Bello last year and arranged for him to attend Mont verde Academy. The foundation works to bring teenagers from Nigeria to schools throughout the United States. Bello was introduced to football in Africa by the foundation, but he had never played in a game when he turned up at Montverde Acad emys practice eld. Abdul had never even put on a helmet and shoulder pads un til last spring, Banks said. He didnt even Bello earning national attention on football field BELLO FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Mount Dora Bible qui etly celebrated National Signing Day last week by honoring a number of student-athletes who signed National Letters of Intent to play at the next level. Track and cross coun try standouts Christi na McKinney and Troy Clark signed with the University of North Flori da and Florida Gulf Coast University, respective ly, while Tevin Symon ette inked a baseball pact with Lipscomb Univerisi ty in Nashville, Tenn. McKinney and Clark have been running to gether at Mount Dora Bible for seven years. Both are leaving an im pressive legacy with the Bulldogs. McKinney is consid ered by many longtime supporters of the school to be the greatest female runner in Bulldogs his tory. She is the record holder at 800 meters, as well as 1,600 and 3,200 meters, and powered the 4x800-meter relay team. McKinney has turned competitive run ning into a year-round endeavor by heading up the Bulldogs cross country team. She holds the school record at 5 ki lometers with a time of 18 minutes, 43 seconds. Clark has been one of the top area runners for most of his high school career, too. He is the school-re cord holder at 1,600 and 3,200 meters, and blis tered a 5-kilometer cross country course with a time of 15:40.88 his personal-best time at the Florida State Invita tional in Tallahassee. Mount Dora Bible celebrates signings PHOTO COURTESY OF MOUNT DORA BIBLE Mount Dora Bible Track and Field and Cross Country runners Christina McKinney, seated left, and Troy Clark look on after signing National Letters of Intent to compete at the University of North Florida and Florida Gulf Coast University, respectively. SEE MDB | B3 SEE BELLO | B2

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B2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 19, 2014 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...Totally UniqueTotally Unique is proud to be Clermonts first ORGANIC hair salon. We care about your beauty, your wellness, the environment and our community, so we use organic and sustainably harvested products whenever possible. We specialize in organic hair color, hair care products, nail and skin care lines. Our salon is one of the oldest salons in Clermont and is located at 786 W Montrose Street in Historic Downtown Clermont. Our stylists are experienced in all phases of hair care including color, straighteners, cuts, texture and styles. Hair stylists are Marjorie Morphet, Tina Foote, Sherie Wolkens and Jamie Rhoades. Our nail techs, Jennifer Vandergrift and Jamie Rhoades, perform pedicures and manicures using Zoya nail products (which are Big 5 free). Shellac manicures, lasting up to three weeks, are also available by Jennifer and Jamie. We have two pedicure chairs in a private room for your relaxation and enjoyment. Relaxing and therapeutic facials are available by Jennifer in our private upstairs facial room. Massage services include chair massage, Swedish and Deep Tissue. Massage services are also done in a private room in our upstairs area. We utilize several massage therapists and provide massage by appointment only. We also offer a small boutique with handcrafted jewelry and hair accessories, Art by Tina Foote and Jamie Rhoades, and other unique items. Salon hours are 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Saturday and open Sundays by appointment only. Evening hours are also available by appointment. We pride ourselves in providing a friendly, relaxing environment for our clients and friends. Stop by and visit or call 352-394-5005 for more information. We are also on Facebook and www.TotallyUniqueSalon.com. LOOKING FOR PARTS? SEE JULIE (352) 394-6111 Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! begin practicing with us until September, but hes so smart and has so much natural ability that he gured the game out in a cou ple of weeks. He also plays with so much energy and enthusi asm that he can hide his inexperience. Some recruiting services like to call him a Monster with a Mo tor, and thats a pretty good description. He doesnt ever quit when hes on the eld. Banks said, despite his natural talent and the attention he is be ginning to attract, Bello is like many of his team mates. He said Bello is a standout in the class room and respects his teachers, coaches and teammates. Hes an overall good person, Banks said. Still, despite his in telligence and natural ability on the football eld, Banks said he is often reminded that Bello still has a great deal to learn about the game. I was talking about blocking once and mentioned the im portance of not giving a quarterback sack, Banks said. Later on a few days later (Bel lo) came up to make and asked, Coach, whats a sack? After I told him, he said, Oh thats a bad thing. It was hard not laugh, but it served as a reminder about how little he really knows about the game. Bello helped Mont verde Academy to a 7-3 season in 2013 af ter the Eagles posted a winless campaign in 2012 the schools rst football season since the 1930s. Be hind Bello and his fel low offensive line men, Montverde Academy scored at least 28 points in six games in 2013 after scoring only 45 points in 2012. BELLO FROM PAGE B1 Staff Report Jack Curtis scored on a wild pitch in the bottom of the ninth inning to help the Lake Sumter State College Lakehawks eke out a 4-3 win over visiting Polk State College on Feb. 10 in Leesburg. LSSC (3-1) collected seven hits off three Polk hurlers with right elder Dakota Higdon leading the way with a pair of hits while Tanner Barnhard, Kris Hodges, Tanner Elsbernd, Sam Thomas and Austin Simmons all collect ed one each. For Polk, rst baseman Sam Machonis led the way with a two-run homer. Neither team was able to score for the rst ve innings before Polk collected a pair of runs in the sixth inning when Machonis slammed a circuit shot over the right eld fence. The Lakehawks struck back in their half of the inning when Hodges singled through the hole at short, went to third on Higdons base hit and scored on a elders choice. LSSC then went ahead in the seventh when Curtis doubled to deep left, advanced to third on Elsbernds single and scored on Blantons ground ball to sec ond. Simmons singled in a run to complete scoring. Polk tied the game in the eighth before the Lakehawks scored the decider in the ninth when Thomas singled, setting the stage for the game-ending wild pitch. Reliever Walker Sheller (10) got the win for LSSC, while Devin Vainer (2-1) picked up his rst loss of the season for Polk. LSSC tops Polk to move to 3-1 PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL Lake Sumter freshman Austin Simmons beats a pick-off throw to rst base during the Lake Sumter-Polk State game on Feb. 10 at Lake Sumter State College in Leesburg. Lake Sumter freshman Michael Howe throws a pitch during the Lake Sumter-Polk State baseball game at Lake Sumter State College in Leesburg, Feb. 10.

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Wednesday, February 19, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B3 To Apply for Scholarships from the Pig on the Pond Education Fund Vist Our Website: www.pigonthepond.org Come and Join our Family of Proud Sponsorsfor the 16th Annual Pig on the Pond For the Kids Pig on the Pond Mission Statement Saturday, March 8thClermont Waterfront ParkCarnival Unlimited Rides Armbands Carnival Unlimited Rides Armbands Register at pigonthepond.org or online at Active.com$20Great Chili Challenge Great Chili ChallengeDESSERT BAKE-OFF rf Pig Racing Is Back!Entry Deadline March 1stArmbands Will Only Be Available for Purchase This will be Hoof Pounding Action for All Ages ntbr FRI-March 7th 5-8 pmGrand Champion: $200 & Trophy Other Category Winners: $100 & Trophy Yes-Pigs Can Fly Yes-Pigs Can Fly Find us on FacebookApplications Available at www.pigonthepond.org HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. At the 2013 Flori da High School Ath letic Association Cross Country Champion ships at Apalachee Re gional Park in Talla hassee, Clark lead for much of the early go ing and nished fourth overall, stopping the clock in 16:10.07. He was the areas top n isher at the state meet. Florida Gulf Coast coach Cassandra Goodson praised Clarks signing. Troy, Goodson said, is a great start to our recruiting class. We will continue our recruiting through the spring, but (Clark and two other spring signings) estab lish a great foundation for next years incom ing freshman class. Symonette helped Mount Dora Bible to a 14-11 record on the baseball eld in 2013. He batted .370 with three home runs and 25 RBIs. In addition, he had a team high seven doubles. Symonette also had a 2-1 record on the mound for Mount Dora Bible. MDB FROM PAGE B1 PHOTO COURTESY OF MOUNT DORA BIBLE Mount Dora Bible baseball standout Tevin Symonette, seated center, poses for pictures after signing a National Letter of Intent recently to play at Lipscomb University in Nashville, Tenn.

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C1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 19, 2014 www.southlakepress.com C OMMUNITY Proudly serving CLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWS STAFF WRITER ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 EMAIL ..... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com HOMETOWN: Allentown, Pa. OCCUPATION: Industrial Main tenance Electrician & Metaphysi cian/Parapsychologist FAMILY: Mother, Edythe Am beault, and uncle Roger Kolowitz live in Minneola What do you enjoy most about south Lake County? I enjoy south Lake County be cause of its remoteness in the Central Florida area. Its out of the congested areas yet close to everything. It is the geographical center of the state and Clermont is right in the center of most of Central Floridas main highways US 27, State Road 50 and the Turnpike. I love the South Lake area because it also reminds me a little of the rolling mountains of Pennsylvania. It is one of the very few places in Florida that you will see topography like this. It gives you a sense of still living up north. 1) If you had to summarize your philosophy of life in one sen tence, what would it be? How conscious are we through out our lives? I believe we have the ability to raise our vibrations and tap into levels of higher con sciousness. Our lives can be even more enjoyable as well as more fullling if we are more aware of ourselves and our potential. I feel that technology is diminish ing our potential of being human. Our interactions with society have brought us to a level that we no longer socialize face to face. Tex ting, emailing, video chats and general telephone calls. Will tech nology destroy our social human qualities or will it enhance them? A lack of communication will kill ANY relationship, and I stress any. Meet Your NEIGHBOR REV. PAUL G. MECKES Ann Dupee REMEMBER WHEN A weekly column that reprints some of the more interest ing news stories that have ap peared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press. FROM THE FILES | 54 YEARS AGO 1960 Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press Staff Report Lakeridge Winery near Clermont, Floridas largest premium winery, re cently won eight awards during the 26th annual Florida State Fair Inter national Wine and Grape Juice Com petition in Tampa. The winery won a gold medal for its Southern Red, silver medals for its White Muscadine Juice and Pink Cre scendo and bronze medals for its Re serve Cuvee Noir, Cuvee Blanc, South ern White, Sunblush and Chablis. Lakeridges owner, Seavin Inc., also owns the states second largest pre mium winery, San Sebastian Winery in St. Augustine, which took home 10 awards during the competition. Lakeridge followed its success by hosting Winefest XXIV on Friday, Sat urday and Sunday. Winefest is an opportunity to en joy all the fruits of our bountiful pre vious years harvest, the winery stat ed on its website. More than 80 local artists and craft ers attended, as well as an array of musical acts that included Airtight, The Robert Harris Group, The Ladys & The Boys, Baby Blues & the No At titude Band, The Grovemasters, and Beautiful Bobby Blackmon & the B3 Blues Band. The winery, at 19239 U.S. Highway 27 North, is situated among the roll ing hills of Clermont. It was found ed in 1988 when Gary Cox and some investors out of Orlando decided to open a winery in the Central Flori da area. The facility opened its doors in 1989. In 1992, Garys son, Charles, joined the team at Lakeridge Winery. The business prospered, which has allowed the Cox family to open San Sebastian Winery. Complimentary tours and wine tasting are offered seven days a week and usually run every 15-20 minutes. They begin in the upstairs theater with a 12-minute video presentation which shows the growing of the Flor ida grapes to the wine-making pro cess, the bottling and labeling. CLERMONT Lakeridge Winery wins eight medals COURTESY PHOTO ABOVE, BELOW: Lakeridge Winery won eight medals for its wines at the Florida State Fair in Tampa. FIRST LABOR DAY CELEBRATION An estimated 2,500 peo ple attended the rst Labor Day Jamboree, sponsored by American Legion South Lake Memorial Post 55 at Lake Minneola Beach, a proj ect of the Junior Chamber of Commerce, according to Le gion committee member Jim McDonald. This number in cludes duplicates. Some peo ple made two or three trips to the beach during the day. Treasuries of the cooperat ing organizations will be en riched, according to early in dications. On the basis of early sell-outs at the various booths, the nancial state ment should be a healthy one. The Jaycees sold out of meat early and had to re plenish their store, while the Boy Scouts hot dog stand did a thriving business that exhausted its supplies. The chuck-a-luck, wheel of for tune, Dutch auction and oth er games all had a big play. The Legion will receive 20 percent of the prots. Members of the Legion committee sponsoring the event were Orrin Ward, chair man; Bert Willis, Dick Willis, Col. Louis Ford, Charles Pool, Jr. and Jim McDonald. Cooperating organiza tions and their representa tives were: Welfare League, Mrs. Dorothy Smith; Veter ans of Foreign Wars Auxilia ry, Mrs. Regina Harper; Al tar Society, Mrs. Fran Sherry; American Legion Committee, Charles Pool, Jr.; American Legion Auxiliary, Mrs. Bert Willis; Clermont Fire Depart ment, Dick Willis; Boy Scouts, Harry L. Brown; Girl Scouts, Mrs. Orrin S. Frase; Garden Club, Mrs. Vic Oswalt; Cler mont Womans Club, Miss Florence Holton; Lions Club, D.L. Moore; Junior Chamber of Commerce, Curtis Reed; Varsity C Club, Ed Stack and Minneola Progressive Club, Bob Black. Although there were crowds and lots of excitement in town during the Labor Day weekend, Clermont passed through the entire weekend without a singe trafc acci dent. 25 YEARS AGO 1989 COUNTY APPROVES LAKE SUSAN LANDING Gem of the Hills owners Grace and William Strosberg and Dale and Darryl Ladd were pleased when coun ty commissioners approved their planned unit develop ment Jan. 10. County Plan ning and Zoning denied the request 8-0 in December. Commissioners voted 4-1, with Commissioner Richard Swartz voting against. SEE HISTORY | C2 SEE NEIGHBOR | C3

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C2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 19, 2014 IT WAS 50 YEARS AGO By CHARLES M. DEBER / Edited by Will Shortz No. 0209RELEASE DATE: 2/16/2014 ACROSS1 Cellphones, in Britain8 Alone13 13-Down, in Dresden20 A debater takes it21 Jazz count?22 In that direction23 One favoring a strong central government24 ___ Vista25 Turns in26 Film terrier27 Bar order, with the29 Sadness31 Narrow cut32 Move in an ungainly way34 Mine, in Madrid36 Cherished by38 Literary inits.40 Its below the humerus41 Trig. function42 Let ___43 ___ deferens46 Dweller on the Red Sea48 Less than right50 Crme de la crme52 1996-2001 show featuring home videos53 Actress Gardner54 The Peoples Champion56 The Battleship Potemkin locale57 An ONeill58 More appropriate60 Houston sch.62 Followers of exes63 Detour, e.g.65 Coal distillate67 Announcers aid69 Plural French word that spells its singular English form in reverse70 Much of the audience for 6-Downs show on 2/9/6473 Trounces74 When ___ younger, so much younger (Help! lyric)76 More modern, in Munich77 Relative of a convertible79 Part of a train from a refinery82 Servant, e.g.86 Why ___ so shy when ? (Its Only Love lyric)87 Snack chip89 Nest on a cliff91 Author Umberto92 Dave Clark ___94 ___ the time 96 Playwright Fugard97 General ___ chicken98 Attractive legs, in slang100 Yuck!101 Actor Hemsworth of The Hunger Games102 Bold103 Stuck, after in104 Queen who fell for Zeus swan song?105 It may be a plot106 Lone-Star State sch.107 500 letters?108 Cause of the witchs demise in Hansel and Gretel110 s war zone112 Rice-A-___114 Fraternity chapter116 Big to-do120 Theyre played at un conservatoire122 Undermines, as support123 Living in a swing state?124 Kind of jacket with pockets on the chest125 Tilted126 Oxfords St. ___ College127 City on the Seine upstream from Paris DOWN1 A majority2 Aware of3 Craze caused by this puzzles subjects 4 Schoolyard rejoinder5 Card count in Caesars Palace?6 Host for this puzzles subjects on 2/9/647 Places atop8 Eban of Israel9 With 11-Down, subjects of this puzzle10 Enzyme suffix11 See 9-Down12 Rampage13 Way to go14 Nickname for this puzzles subjects15 Free16 Bikini blast, informally17 Song sung by this puzzles subjects on 6-Downs show on 2/9/64 18 Big rig19 Lead-in to while28 ___ creek30 Dictator Amin33 Broadways ___-Fontanne Theater35 Promise of payment37 Frists successor as Senate majority leader38 One of the six counties of Northern Ireland39 Escort to the door44 Yes45 Balanced conditions47 Band material48 Park, e.g., in N.Y.C.49 Wallach of The Misfits51 Subtitle for Star Wars Episode IV, with A53 Just so, after to55 Bakeshop worker59 Free throw avgs., e.g.61 One team in the N.B.A. All-Star Game, with the64 City on the Nile66 Junior Olympics org.68 Certain NASA launch71 Had a ball at72 Unpredictable75 Composer Khachaturian78 Slave79 Apes80 Apes81 Where this puzzles subjects got their start83 Song sung by this puzzles subjects on 6-Downs show on 9/12/6584 Earths habitable parts85 Dawnlike88 Common monthly expense90 Ladies man93 Prey for a dingo95 Molly formerly on S.N.L.96 Like some dessert orders97 King in 1922 news99 Hot102 Instrument depicted by the shaded squares in this grid107 1965 and 1966 concert site for this puzzles subjects109 Sweeping111 Soon113 Be domestic115 Medical suffix117 Calendar keeper, for short118 Medical suffix119 The S of CBS: Abbr.121 Sci-fi sighting 1234567 8910111213141516171819 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 2728 2930 31 3233 3435 36 37 3839 40 41 42 434445 46 47 48 49 5051 52 53 545556 57 5859 60 61 62 63 64 6566 67 68 69 7071 72 73 7475 76 7778 798081 82 838485 86 8788 8990 91 92 9394 9596 97 98 99100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108109 110111 112113 114115 116 117 118 119 120121 122 123 124 125 126 127 Online subscriptions: Todays puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Solution on D3 THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com A popular dance troupe in The Villag es plans to dazzle au diences with inno vative dances and a daring aerial routine in its seventh original show, Music in Motion Rocks VEGAS. Showtimes are 7 p.m. Feb. 24-26 at the Sa vannah Center in The Villages, where the dancers will perform 25 innovative dance numbers in 90-min ute shows, lled with tap, jazz, disco, lyrical, mambo, country west ern, burlesque, theat rical production num bers, mime, military, aerial acrobatics, rope dancing and swing. There are a marvel ous variety of inventive dance routines in a de licious complexity of styles, glued together by a clever little plot, said dancer Sue Rowley, who believes the audience will enjoy seeing a riv eting routine on the ac robatic silks by Carolyn Caos and dancers por traying a pinball ma chine and forming a live roulette wheel. The show is fun and uplifting, said danc er Carol Putrelo. You smile, laugh and sway in your seat to the mu sic. The choreography will astonish you. Co-producers and directors are Dianne Bolton and Jim Caisse. The story takes you on a quirky adventure with three naive mem bers of the Bootstrap, Nevada Town Coun cil, who hope to save their small town from bankruptcy by go ing to Vegas for some business ideas, Row ley said. There they are treated by the sight of beautiful blondes, a sizzling all-male re vue, roulette, blackjack and pinball, boxing at the MGM Grand, Ve gas-style weddings, tall glasses of champagne, feathers, sequins, par ty girls, a mob boss and much more, por trayed through song and dance. The shows chore ography team is com prised of career dance professionals Jim Caisse, Helene Yelver ton, Karen Bouffard and Vicky Magee. Caisse and Yelverton will perform Blackjack, a swing tap in the jive style of the 1920s. That number alone is worth the price of admission, said Diane Arduin. Jeanne Riordan be lieves the audience will go absolutely nuts when 10 Villages men transform from Ve gas security guards to hunky burlesque danc ers in a steamy male revue reminiscent of Chippendales fame. ts almost naughty, but not quite, she said. The dances are cho reographed to the music of Elvis, Michael Jack son, Bette Midler, The Doors, Britney Spears, plus songs from Broad way musicals Girl Cra zy, GiGi, Hairspray, An American in Par is, Annie, Guys and Dolls, Will Rogers Fol lies and Tommy. Vegas scene vocal ists in the show are Jan et Maloney, Jan Lavin, David Leshay, Bev erly Wehrheim, John Manion, Marlene Ca plis and Ralph Dinome, while the Bootstrap singers will be por trayed by Otto Canis, Donna Cipollone, Lisa Hunter, Debbie Carter, Dale Gagne, Don Volk man and Jim Flynn. Some of the songs in the show are Smooth Criminal, Luck Be a Lady Tonight, Devil in Disguise, The Night They Invented Cham pagne, City Lights and My Way. Rowley said the dance troupe has prac ticed seven to 15 hours each week to learn the shows fast and furious dance routines, some requiring costume changes in less than two minutes. Show tickets are $21 for Villages residents and $26 for nonresi dents. For reservations, go to thevillagesenter tainment.com or call 352-753-3229 for box of ce locations. Proceeds from the performances will benet Alzheimers Association and Villag ers for Hospice. THE VILLAGES Music in Motion ready to rock with Vegas-style show SUBMITTED PHOTO Music in Motion dance troupe will perform its seventh annual show in The Villages, Feb. 24-26, where proceeds from the performances will benet Alzheimers Association and Villagers for Hospice. The proposed totally pri vate housing development in the Clermont area is to be enclosed by a privacy wall with a security entrance and is on Lake Shore Drive west of Lake Susan on proper ty adjoining the re station on 561. The original request was for 223 units on the 95acre site. Commissioner Tom Win dram moved for approval, providing the treatment plant be internalized and that the total number be reduced to 195 single-family dwellings, for a net density of 3.5 units per acre, and that the twoacre area for commercial be zoned C-1 for 6,500 square feet of building space. GROVELAND WOMAN WINS COUNTY JUDGES AWARD Mary Louise Haack of Groveland has garnered an other award for her excellent administration of the Grov eland Neighborhood Center and for her love and caring for the people it serves. She was one of two people honored with the rst Judges Award for outstanding contri butions to Lake County at the Jan. 11 awards banquet and ceremony of the Lake Coun ty League of Cities and spon sored by the Lake Sentinel. NEWS OF NOTE County Commissioners voted to accept title to the property in the Okahumpka area where the Garbage Burn Plant is being construct ed. Ogden Martin Systems, which is building the plant, will lease the site from the county. Las Vegas Night, Saturday, Jan. 28, 8 p.m.-12 a.m. Elks Club Clermont. Donation $15 per couple. All Proceeds Go To Charity. Hors doeuvres, Door Prizes, Prizes to Top Winners. Beta Theta Chap ter ESA, Clermont. Tickets available at the Chamber and Hilltop Stationery. HISTORY FROM PAGE C1 SUBMITTED PHOTO To celebrate Floridas Arbor Day, members of the Clermont Garden Club and the city of Clermont gave away trees at the Citrus Tower Publix store. Shown from left to right are club members Sandi Eckstein, Edie Peters, Barbara Williams, Nancy Hendrix and Tom Werner. GARDEN CLUB RECOGNIZES ARBOR DAY

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Wednesday, February 19, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C3 CLERMONT BLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSAMILYELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time! IRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONTL Many Other Activities each week Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.org LIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLCHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm SOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary); 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.org ST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am 10:00 am Beginning Oct. 6, 2013 5:00 pm Service Sunday School Youth Group Nursery Adult Bible Study Womens Bible Study Mens Prayer Breakfast WOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH GODINCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALE ERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for Children Groveland IRSTBAPTISTCHURCH GROVELAND Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pm MT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! MINNEOLA CONGREGATIONSMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club NEWLPRESBYTERIANCHURCH18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am TLIVINGGOD Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce Rowland MONTVERDE WOODLANDSLUTHERAN15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 am OAKLAND PRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforSouth Lake South LakeGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOMErfn tbt352-394-7121806 W. Minneola Ave.,Clermont,FL Cremation ChoicesDirect Cremation$675Plus Container Ron Becker,Director352-394-8228921 S.US Hwy 27,Minneola,FL N EW R EFORMED P LANT C HURCH We meet our God on Sunday at Superior Residence at 10:30 AM. 1600 Hunt Trace Blvd. (Behind Home Depot)Pastor Harm Biehl 407-325-8663 2) How does what you do contribute to the welfare of the area? My mission is to help people overcome pos sessions in their lives. When I mean pos sessions, I refer to possessions of all kinds. A vast amount of people are possessed or consumed by their jobs, family members, children, managers or bosses at work, tax es, the IRS, ex wives and the list can go on forever. We allow things in our life that we cant control to take hold of us and drain us of our life force. This diminishes our self-es teem, causes stress, weakens our immune system and can slowly eat away at us emo tionally, mentally, physically and needless to say psychologically. In turn these param eters can eventually end up causing prob lem in our lives, which can portray itself as anomalous phenomena. I am here to distin guish whether the anomalous phenomena is paranormal in nature or is of natural origin. 3) Name one of your greatest accomplish ments so far. My biggest accomplishment would be going back to school and getting my PhD. 4) Whats something youve always wanted to do but havent yet? Write my books and travel around Europe and the world and promote my books about my research of the human condition and consciousness within the context of anom alous and paranormal phenomena. 5) What advice would you give to people who want to help out in the community? Dont be afraid to stand out. If you have passion for the general welfare for the hu man race and compassion for those in need and see that there is something that the community should be aware of, express it. Find like-minded individuals to organize with and the rest will fall into place. You will ultimately attract energy that are in direct vibration with and your efforts which will be brought to light and are meant to be. NEIGHBOR FROM PAGE C1 COMMUNITY CALENDAR TODAY COLLEGE DAY WITH FULL SAIL UNIVERSITY AT THE LIBRARY: At 4:30 p.m., Marion Baysinger Memorial Library, 756 W. Broad St., in Grove land. Giving teens, par ents and adults infor mation for successful graduation and career placement. Call 352429-5840 for details. THURSDAY PET FIRST AID AT THE LIBRARY: At 6 p.m., with Dr. Stone of Vet erinary Trauma Center in Groveland, giving Pet First Aid instruc tion at the Marion Baysinger Memorial County Library, 756 W. Broad St. Call 352-4295840 for details. FRIDAY FREE SEMINAR AND LUNCH FOR DISABLED PERSONS AT ANOINTED COMMUNITY SERVICES: From 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. A representative from the Agency for Persons with Disabil ity will speak about cerebal palsy, autism and others. Call 352404-7898 to RSVP. Staff Report Rookie Teacher of the Year and School-Related Em ployee of the Year candi dates were tapped Friday by Superintendent of Schools Susan Moxley, school board members and board mem bers of the Education Foun dation of Lake County. The candidates will be honored along with 42 Teacher of the Year nom inees. The winner will be announced on March 19 at Lake Sumter State Col lege at an event sponsored by Ernie Morris Enterpris es and the HON Company. The Rookie Teacher of the Year nominees are: Cynthia Murray from Eustis Heights Elemen tary. The Howey-in-theHills resident teaches kin dergarten and has been with the school system for three years. The core of my teaching philosophy is based on developing a car ing relationship with each of my kindergarteners, she said. Students need to know that you honestly care about and believe in them, and they will strive to reach their highest potential. Laura Fagan from Windy Hill Middle School in Clermont. The Minneo la resident teaches eighthgrade social studies and has been with the school system for 18 months. My philosophy of teaching is centered on the idea that students should interact with history instead of re citing it, she said. History can be made meaningful by making it applicable. Lindsey Massaro of Umatilla Middle School. The Apopka resident is band director at the school and has been with the school system for ve months. It is my desire as an educator to help my students meet their full est potential... by provid ing an environment that is safe, supports risk-taking and involves a sharing of ideas, she said. The School-Related Em ployee of the Year nomi nees are: Nilda Rivera of the school systems human re sources department in Tav ares. The Clermont resident has been with the depart ment for 16 months as a secretary and assists with background screenings. Nilda is very organized and contributes to better ways to get tasks completed in the department, said her supervisor, Carolyn Samu el. She is always looking for better ways to increase pro ductivity in the job that she is assigned. Lydia Flores of the school systems Feder al Compensatory Depart ment (Title 1) in Clermont. The Groveland resident has been with that department for seven years. Her de pendability and organiza tion are obvious as she al ways strives to perform any given task with excellence, Administrative Coordinator L.R. Dusty Ross said. Allison Auld, a book keeper at Leesburg High School, where she has been for two years. She brings expertise, insight and com passion to our school, Principal Bill Miller said. She has forged great rela tionships with the commu nity, students and staff. LEESBURG Top candidates for rookie teacher, school worker awards are named

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C4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 19, 2014 A/C Services Auto Service Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Marine Services Cabinetry Services Carpet Repair Services Cleaning Services Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Concrete Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Handyman Services Adult Care Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. Insurance Services Irrigation Services Land Clearing Services Landscaping Services Lawn Services Lawn Services Legal Services Moving Services Painting Services Airport Transportation Enclosure Screening Flooring Services Bathroom Remodeling

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Wednesday, February 19, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C5 Professional Services Psychic Services Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Painting Services Pool Services Pressure Cleaning Plumbing Services Plumbing Services Roofing Services Tile Service Shower Doors Service Tree Service Tree Service Veterinarian Services Window Services All About Appliances repairs and installs all brands of major appliances. We are a small husband/wife company. Eric has over 15 years experience repairing appliances and Lavinia (Vinnie) has over 20 years in business management experience. Together, we strive to offer you prompt, professional, courteous and personal services far beyond your expectations, both by phone and in your home. We respect you and your time and make every effort to be in and out of your home as quickly as possible yet provide a thorough diagnosis and timely repair. We genuinely appreciate all your business. Pals Gals Services, Inc. has been owned and operated by Patti Kauffman and Kellie Kennedy since 1986. They are a multifaceted business offering a wide a variety of services, which include interior and exterior painting, faux painting, wallpaper removal and installation, tile and grout cleaning, tile and grout removal and installation, and grout staining. They also install wood floors and can refinished your old wood floors, to make them look brand new. They can help you with color choices and give advice on what is practical or not! They can help resolve your honeydo list such as minor plumbing, electrical, drywall, cabinets, counter tops for your home or office. They pride themselves on quality womanship, dependability and trust. They know how difficult it is to find someone you trust and actually show up on time. They are a referral based business relying on previous clients to spread the word. They are two very talented ladies that take extreme pride in their work and take each job personally. They know how important making choices about your home or office can be and are more than willing to help with each decision. GIVE THE GALS A CALL, THEY CAN DO IT ALL!!! 352-787-4089 Veterinary Care in the Convenience of your own home! and for you Services include Wellness exams, including vaccines and parasite screening, Blood work, Skin and ear issues, Digestive or Urinary tract issues, Health certificates, Kathie L. Robinson, DVMDr. Robinson has over 16 years experience as a veterinarian.VISITING VETERINARIAN, LLC 352-408-3666 FAX: 352-253-2443VISITINGVETERINARIAN@AOL.COM To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact Michelle in the Classified Department at (352) 365-8233 or by email michelle.fuller@dailycommercial.com

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C6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 19, 2014 Friday, January 10th 7PM FREE Admission Public Invited Love Offering will be taken First Christian 306 College St Carrollton GASheila Raye Charles delivers a heart wrenchi ng story of abuse, crack cocaine and prison through her music and story of her personal journey to salvation. You will be touched and inspired by this daughter of a music le gend as she shares her walk from despair and darkness into the love and forgiveness of the Lord. Spend an Evening and Celebrate Recovery with Sheila Raye Charles at the Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) Community Health FairSaturday, February 22nd from 8am to 11am Total Family Healthcare, 3115 Citrus Tower Blvd., Clermont Come meet Dr. Cruz and the dedicated staff of Total Family Healthcare at this years Community Health Fair. Dr. Cruz strongly believes in preventive care, education and patient centered medical care. He helps the patients to participate, as the most important member of the team, in their healthcare. As a very strong Christian person he understands that health is the balance of body, mind and spirit. He is completely bilingual in English and Spanish, and is always aware of cultural differences, compassionate and very professional.Enter the Best Decorated Bike ContestThis contest is exclusively for children 5 to 8 years old. Bring your decorated bike and helmet and win a prize!Save The Date! Friday March 7th,Dr. Cruzs Interactive Presentation On Clinical Depression With A Biblical Approach.Health Screenings Bouncy HouseFree Food! SUBMITTED PHOTOS The Board of Directors of the Community Foundation of South Lake has announced the hiring of two new staff members, Bryan Williams as executive director and Kathy Smith as director of community investments. Williams and Smith were welcomed at a meet and greet on Jan. 23 at the Foundation ofce, 2150 Oakley Seaver Dr., in Clermont. The mission of the Community Foundation of South Lake is to provide leadership to enhance the quality of life in South Lake County by identifying community needs and seeking philanthropic support as permanent funding to meet those needs. For information, call 352-394-3818. SUBMITTED PHOTO Terric Kids at Cypress Ridge Elementary in Clermont: Kymber Black, Zander Arnold, Parker Trowbridge, Prachi Patel, Ava Pike, Gracie McClain, Gavin Boronat, Jaya Rougas, Will Delaney, Lola Ressler, Addison Ciccotelli, Conlin Sloan, Jake Saunders, Rees Weldon, Hayden Violette, Tyler Mattingly, Khari McElvin, Kaito Powell, Landen Sit, Kaitlyn Altmeyer, Vishal Narine, Mason Pinto, Nick Adams, Aron Quickel, Grace Holt, Owen Degges, Makenzie Merkey, Madai Cuevas, Cassidy Russell, Johanna Abraham, Austin Bunting, Paul Odell, Nora Grogan, Rylee Puglisi and Lucas Nassar. CYPRESS RIDGE TERRIFIC KIDS NEW COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF SOUTH LAKE STAFF MEMBERS

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Wednesday, February 19, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D1 rfntb nftb r t f t t r b n b n r t r f r r trtttff tnbftr rfrrfrfr frfrnb n f t t f t f f t t f r t f f r r t r t n t b t b t r r b t f f t f r t b r f t r f t r f t b f f f t r f f b t r b t b t b t r f r t f t b f r f b t r b r r f n t b n n r t t r n t r b r f b t t r t t r t r n t r b t t r r b r f f t r f t t f f r t r t r b t r r t r b f n t t f f r t n r b b b b fn t r r t r b f n t t f f r t n r b b b b f n f f t t f f r b n r t f r r f r b n f b f r f tb b rtfffrftr ftbtfrtft rfrfbtbrfr fttrb ftrrfrt fbbrr nttrttftrrf ntbtrrfb t t t f t f t b t fb b t r t b n r t n b b r r t t t b n r t f t r b t b t t f b trftftb tnnrfb r r f r f t t r f t f n f r t t r r f t b t r f r r t f r ttrtfttrt rrfrfrfrrb rbbb ftnfttrt fttffrnb ffrtrftr trb trfft rfrrb r r r f t r b f t r b r r f r r r f b f t r t n r f r f b n b b b f f r f b r f r f r t b n r t b t f tffr bb t r t f r r b f tfrtrt rntfrfrr tftnrrt trffrbft ntrf trbftttrff rbtn ttb brtrfbtft rrb r f r b frtfrrrrffr frbtfrftf rrntfn rbftrrfrb t f b t n t f t b r f r r r f n n b t n t f t b f t t r f f n r r f b t r t t b r t f t r t n b r f f n r t f f n f b f r f f t t r f t r t n r b f f r t r n t f r r b r t f r t r t f f f r f b n t f t n n t b f f t f b r n b r f r b f nttrftftb frb ftfffrffrb t f f n t r b r b t n b t t r t t t r b fb rfttr trtrtr ftrtrtbr nfntt nfrrftf rrrrftfrb n r b f b t r t f b f b f tfnrtrf tffrrttfnft ftf trbrrt bfrfrr fttftfnf trtff tfrrrtrr frftbff fttrtffr nftffbrftf rffrfrfr tbtnbtb r f r t r f r f t r t f t r f f n b t b rftrff rffftrtff rrttrt fbtfrfn nftt tbbnbt f f rr r t r f r f r b r b t t r f f f f f f r r t t n t r n r n t r f f r n f t f t f f f f t f r n n t r f f r t r f f t r f t r r f f t f f r t r r b t r f f f f f t t f r r t r r f n r f f r r r f r t f r f f f f t n r t r r f n b f f f r f n r f t f t f r r f r t b b b b r r t t n t f t f t f t t r f t f f t t r f t f r r r f r b f t r t b b r r r r r t t f r b r r t r t r f r f t f f f r t f r f f t f f t r t t t n b t r r f t f b t f r t t t b t f r r r f r f f b f r t n n t t t r r r r b f f n b r n r r t t t f r r b b b b b b f br rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff ntbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrff nrrrrrrrrrrff ttbrrrrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rfntbbt rfrntn nnnftbnbn brfbnrb bnbtn brnnrtnftbn tbrbttb nnnrfrbtb nbb n fbfn tbrbnbbbtn nnnntnbbtr bbbfrf r tfnbtr rrbrfnnnrfnt t rf

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D2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 19, 2014 rfntbt fr rft r b r t t tfrr rrrf ft rf r rfff t trr ft nnf rff tnf rff tnf r r r f r r t rrf t rrf rr rrrf rftnf r r f r rfnnf nt tnf ftrr r rfrrft rrftnft rrfr rrfrfrf rf nt rrnfn t ntb b f rttr tt rfrtf ffr t n f rr fff ft f tt ft f t rt trt f t t n t t r r f t rff rff f t t n r r f t r n r r f r f f r f t f f tr rffrt tt r trt rtrff rrf tftnt r fnf t r b r r f tr rrt rf t t t f rrn r t nf tn n nf nfttt tt f fnf rf t frrr rf t frrr rf fr trt rnt t btr fr bb trrtfrf f tt f fr bb trt rfr rrnf r rrnf r fftrrtr rrrf fftrrtr rrrf r r ffrfr nfr t r r ftt t n rrrt rftrnrr rftrnrr tr rr nf rrn t t r f r rnf r rrt r rrr r n tnf rrftftr rrrf frt fn frt trn ttfrr r t t r f r r f f t f f n f r bbr rf rf r f r r rrrf ftrrtr rf nt rf fn rrtrrrf rr nftrrrf rr ftrrf f r r f r r f r f nftrr rnft rfrf b ft rrrf ftrf rrftrrrf rrttf f rf t ft t ft t rrtt tnrfrr t n f trrnf rrrfnrf rfrrtrr rf t r f rr b ft ft r ftrtrf rntft rr nnt rf r f f r r n f f r f r r f r t t r f t r r f r n r f frr rt f rnrfr nfrfr f rf rf fftf rf b rrft f n rtr rt n r rf nf t rfrt rfftrf bb t n rr rrf ffn

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Wednesday, February 19, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D3 r f rr f nff rf f r f f rfntbn rf rntbftfbbftn rbntftb f n f fbrftf fbfr f b rrb trr ffrtr trnb ntbf ft rrftbrft tbff rrf brtfr ntbf rtntft f nffb frbrf tfbf bf rrf rntfbtb rr r btrftb f tffbb tfbf rtf rrf nrrf f nbbt rrb rrfrrtnrr b f n nn tbt fr b n f f bfftnftfb f fttfbb tftrfrr rf n f f rt n btf b bf tn rrr rrfftb rbrrrt tftrrf rft tfttnttr rrtrr n nn frfbt ff frbbbbrf nn f t f tfftr nntbrtfbr brr rrtfff trftrrt frrftfntf tf f r b f n f t n b b f f f r t t r f nntb fttrtftrtb fttbr trrtf rttrf rrbrtf t f f rtf trr r b r f f f f b ttr r rtrttfbr f tf ffrrtb frr nnf f tf ffrrtb frr nnf f nnntrf f bnrfrb rnfttrft ttb ftrtnfntb rbrff fb f b f n ff f f t r f t t r f f f t f f r tfr fftbrttb tfrrf nfftrnf rbrrb r f b f b r f r n f f nnff f t r n t r b r b f b t f b rttrf rrbrtf t f f rtf trr r b r f f f f b ttr r rtrttfbr f t t f n f t n b b r n b r t t f trf fft f t r n b b b t n r b f t b f r r t r r r frb f t brtbfbbf tfrntrbrrn rbntf f r t tf rttrf rrbrtf t f f rtf trr r b r f f f f b ttr r rtrttfbr f nff r r t f r f r n t n f r f r n t r n nft tbf n b b t t f r t f r f b t b t r r b b r r t r f t b f t t f t f r f t r n f f r b f n f f f r r n r r n f b r t f r r f t f f f f n t f b r r n r n n t f b n n r f b r n n r b r b r f r f r n b n r trrfn t r b t r r b f b f t f rttrf rrbrtf t f f rtf trr r b r f f f f b ttr r rtrttfbr f nft ttbf fff ffrb bntf nftf ftftr rt nf ttbf b r t f r t r t f r r rnb rtr rb r r tbrtbrtrnb rf rttrf rrbrtf t f f rtf trr r b r f f f f b ttr r rtrttfbr f n f ttbf r bnt n f tbf nnff ft tf brtf fnt rtnb bf fr f fn f tfbbtt f rbf frf t f b f n r r r b f b f b b b b r b t f b r r rnfnt rnb ffbtrtf rrtr rbtf bftr f rf rr nbrrrbfrtf nbftrb nbrrrbfrtf nbftrb rtft rrf f tnbb f t n f t f f b bftbftb nrrr rfbttfb frfbt rrrbrnbtn b rrrbrnbtn b frfbt fnbtb ft rbrf r ft frbfbft f tftb f ft nb n brf tbf bf frnbrrr br tft rrbbr bnf fnn rrf trffbfr nbtrr b r t f nft fbbrtbf trf fbfb rtnt tftbfrr ftrnbbbb f fbfbftb f r f b b t f t b b ftfbr rtf ftfbr rtf ffb fnf t f t r f fttf tnb brbbrfnb bb f r t tb tfbbftf rftrr f ft b r r r fnftfttrbf btftbff tffttb ftfbr rft brf f

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D4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 19, 2014 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 7 25 34 47 67 13 18 31 59 74 9 21FREE SPACE53 72 2 16 42 48 63 5 29 39 52 68ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N I B O G BINGO B I N G O SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Malcia Laurence WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! N 39 FREE N 42 N 31 N 34