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LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writer livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com C ounty and Clermont of cials collectively are ex pressing hope for a high er job-to-housing ratio in the Wellness Way Sector Plan. They will have the opportu nity to vet their concerns at an upcoming joint workshop be tween the county and city in April. I would like to see more of a business environment down there to bring in high-paying jobs, Clermont Council Mem ber Tim Bates said. Bates sug gested getting involved with South Lake Hospital to bring some type of medical commu nity to that area. For me, it boils back to businesses. Darren Gray, Clermont city manager, agreed. When the council saw 16,000 homes, that made them a little nervous, he said. The reason we are planning this is for job creation and not for a bunch of rooftops from one end to another. We dont want government to do all this. We want the landowners and in terested stakeholders to real ly plan for this area strategical ly, so we can be competitive in the region. Commissioner Sean Parks, who envisioned the plan, said he agreed the jobs-to-housing ratio should be higher. I hear Clermonts concerns loud and clear, he said It is not a development plan that has houses platted and engi neering plans for streets. This is a plan for the best possibili ties for Lake County. SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | C1 SPORTS: Lakehawks look for improvement WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWSTAND INSIDE CLASSIFIED D1 CROSSWORDS C2 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN C1 SPORTS B1 VOICES A4 WORD ON THE STREE T A2 SO UTH LAKE PRE SS V OLUME 99, NO. 7 5 SECTIO N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reserved www. southlakepress.com PRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: A shopping center is shown in Heathrow. The city has many jobs in nance, information technology, engineering, banking and education. BELOW: The AAA building is pictured in Heathrow. AAA was one of the rst major companies to commit to Heathrows sector plan. The Wellness Plan in Clermont could be similar to the one in Heathrow. THE WELLNESS WAY PLAN, BY THE NUMBERS ACRES: 16,000 HOMES: 16,000 PROPOSED EMPLOYMENT: 24,300 JOBS PER HOUSEHOLD: 1.5 Officials pushing for more jobs, water protection in sector plan CLERMONT MILLARD IVES | Staff Writer millard.ives@dailycommercial.com A forklift opera tor, starting his equip ment where propane gas tanks were being drained, apparently sparked a massive ex plosion that engulfed the Blue Rhino plant in Tavares last July, of cials say. It is clear the explo sion and subsequent re was not caused on purpose, but was the result of an acciden tal ignition, apparent ly caused by a forklift, Ric Ridgway, the chief assistant state attor ney of the 5th Judicial Circuit, stated in a let ter dated Feb. 3 to Neil Zierden, a detective with the State Fire Mar shals Ofce. That ofce initial ly ruled the re an ac cident but forwarded its ndings to the State Attorneys Ofce to see if any culpable negli gence was involved. Culpable negligence is more than a failure to use ordinary care, it is consciously doing an act or following a course of conduct that the defendant must have known, or rea sonably should have known, was likely to cause death or great bodily harm, Ridgway wrote in his letter to Zierden. Under the circumstances of this TAVARES Investigators: Forklift caused Blue Rhino blast MILLARD IVES / DAILY COMMERCIAL Investigators examine the Blue Rhino property in July on County Road 448 in Tavares after an explosion ignited nearly 53,000 propane tanks. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com About 90 percent of the viola tions issued in Clermont since red-light cameras went live on Jan. 3 have not been for motor ists barreling through intersec tions but those turning right on red. This is unacceptable! City Councilman Ray Goodgame said in an email last week. Our cameras are for public safety, not for the nancial benet of the camera company. Council members recently asked City Manager Darren Gray to look into the matter to make sure the red light cameras are catch ing blatant red light run ners as their number one focus. Gray, along with Clermont City Attorney Dan Mantzar is, met with American Trafc Solutions the company that installs and monitors the cam eras in a closed-door meet ing Feb. 4. What came out of those discussions was not im mediately known. Although a state statute says motorists have to come to a complete stop before turning right on red, a separate state statute pertaining to red light cameras says drivers can turn right on red without a camera citation if they do it in a safe and prudent manner at less than 12 mph. Its u p to the cam era company and a police rep resentative reviewing the tape to determine if a violation oc curred. According to information obtained from the city, 1,880 CLERMONT City upset over tickets for right turns on red This is unacceptable. Our cameras are for public safety, not for the financial benefit of the camera company. City Councilman Ray Goodgame SEE PLAN | A2 SEE BLAST | A6 SEE TICKETS | A6

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 12, 2014 MOUNT DORA South Lake Black Achievers awards banquet is Sunday The 22nd annual South Lake Black Achievers banquet will be held at 6 p.m., Sunday, at Lake Receptions, 4425 N. Highway 19-A in Mount Dora. Tickets are on sale for a donation of $40 dollars per person. To purchase tickets, call 352-3487955, or email SLBA1992org.gmail.com. CLERMONT Used books, CDs and DVDs wanted at the library Friends of the Cooper Memorial Library are collecting used books, CDs and DVDs in preparation for the win ter book sale and fundraiser from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Friday and Saturday, in Room 108A-B, 2525 Oakley Seaver Dr. For information, call 352-394-3849. CLERMONT Green Valley Country Club hosts fundraiser The Green Valley Womens Golf Association will host its annual fund raiser golf tournament to bene t Cornerstone Hospice of Lake and Sumter counties on Saturday. Both men and women are welcome to par ticipate in the event at 14601 Green Valley Blvd. The four-man scramble begins at 8:30 a.m. with a shotgun start. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. and the cost is $60 per person and includes golf cart, coffee and donuts, lunch, prizes and a $15 donation to Hospice. For information, call 352-242-9545 or 352-241-8899. CLERMONT Registration deadline is Saturday for 5k Rib Run The Pig on Pond 5k Run/Walk Rib Run for Education hosted by First Green Bank will benet the Pig on the Pond education fund. The run/walk event is for all ages and will be at 8 a.m., March 8 at Waterfront Park. Registration deadline is Saturday and can be done at www.pigon thepond.org or at www.active.com. For information or to be a spon sor, call 407-625-3818 or email pigon thepond@earthlink.net. CLERMONT Participants sought for annual bake-off on March 8 The 16th annual Pig on the Pond Dessert Bake-Off is scheduled for March 8, part of the Pig on the Pond Sanctioned Barbecue Competition and Festival March 7-9. The bakeoff, organized by the Church at South Lake, raises funds for their Buses and Backpacks program, a weekly effort to feed elementary-aged children. Entry forms for the bake-off must be received by March 8, with desserts delivered to the event by 9:30 a.m. The bake-off is for amateur bakers. Go to www.pigonthepond.org or call Tandy Hammond at 352-243-1155. CLERMONT Valentines Date Night set at Cagan Crossings Cagan Crossings Farmers Market will host a Valentines Date Night event from 4 to 8 p.m., Friday, with couples specials on appetizers, en trees, desserts and drinks. Adults who want to participate can take their kids to the South Lake Art Leagues artists boutique where your child can take a one-hour craft class. Email cagancrossingsfarmersmar ket@gmail.com, or call Kathie Camara at 352-241-6407 for details. CLERMONT Aida to be presented at East Ridge High School The musical Aida will be present ed at 7 p.m., on Feb. 19-21, with a matinee on Feb. 22 at 2 p.m., at East Ridge High School auditorium, 13322 Excalibur Road in Clermont. Tickets are $10 and can be reserved by emailing Vince Santo at santov@ lake.k12..us. Area Briefs What South Lake residents are saying about ... VALENTINES DAY What has been your most memorable Valentines Day? My most memorable Valentines, I was in the eighth grade, and we had a little Valentines dance at my middle school, and the girl I kind of liked asked me to the dance with her. That was memorable. STEVE AMANN CLERMONT My husband and I are from New York, and when we were dating we would go often to a little Italian restaurant called The Al pine. He proposed to me there on Valentines Day. Weve been married 26 years. JACKIE KELLY CLERMONT My most memorable would be almost every year because my moth er and dad always gave us valentines and owers sometimes and candies. I like getting valentines from my parents. TRISTA FOUTS CLERMONT One day I was in pre school and my preschool teacher told me and a girl to make a cake, and we made it for our mothers because it was almost Val entines Day. I had to hide it in my home and we had to wait, and then I gave it to my mother. ALEJANDRO RIOS KISSIMMEE Word on the Street Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 The plan to transform 16,000 acres in the south east corner of the coun ty into a hub for hightech health care jobs and other industries, which would attract people who like to bike, walk and en joy an active, healthy life style, is inching closer to reality. Modications to the Sector Plan will require the protection of the roll ing hills of south Lake and protection of water resources, county of cials said this week. For example, the plan will include a policy that water used for irrigat ing landscape cannot come from potable wa ter sources like the upper Floridan aquifer. The plan also will re quire the use of new communication technol ogy that will send large amounts of data faster than conventional Inter net connections. What makes the plan unique to others is its emphasis on protection of topography and wa ter resources, according to Parks. We will have design standards that will pro tect the unique topog raphy we have in south Lake, he said. We need to remain focused that we are trying to diversify our economy while protect ing our water resources. This is a plan that is care fully thought out to pro mote economic prosper ity and help Lake County move away from a hous ing-based economy. County commission ers will vote on whether to advertise the plan for a public hearing in April. The sector plan area, which has multiple land owners, has been called the last big chunk of undeveloped land in the county. The area is bounded by State Road 50 (to the north), U.S. Highway 192 (to the south), U.S. Highway 27 (to the west), and the Or ange County line (to the east). Surrounded by major throughways and with in close proximity to the city of Orlando and the theme parks, it is the prime spot to bring jobs to the region, Parks said Funding for develop ment could come from private or state sources, but the county is not in vesting its own money, county ofcials said. Economists and of cials alike believe the plan will diversify the economy and help re cruit a broad sector of in dustries to the region, primarily healthcare. In 2011, 24 major land owners living within the boundaries of the sec tor plan contributed $175,000 toward funding a study. As the plan comes to gether, portions of it are being modeled after sim ilar developments such as Heathrow, which is 19 miles northeast of Or lando and has more than 10,900 employees that work in high-wage jobs in the elds of nance, shared services, infor mation technology, engi neering, banking and ed ucation. County ofcials said long-term planning for the area will help avoid urban sprawl. JOBS The plan allows for 16,000 residential units, but at the same time, species 1.5 jobs per one household. Currently there is roughly half a job per household in south Lake, according to Brian Sheah an, project manager. The plan at buildout would produce rough ly three times more jobs than exist now, Sheah an said. If the maximum num ber of residential units are built, the minimum number of jobs created would be 24,300, county ofcials said. Robert Chandler, Lakes director of economic de velopment and tourism, previously said health and life sciences, ware house and distribution, business services and nance and light manu facturing will be the tar get industries. Parks said the plan is specically focused on health industries, mak ing it unique from other plans. It goes hand in hand with the National Train ing Center at South Lake Hospital, he said. The NTC serves as a training ground for many profes sional athletes, including 23 who took part in the London 2012 Olympics. Indeed, Greg Beliveau, president of LPG Ur ban & Regional Planners in Mount Dora, said the plans focus on health care industry jobs and its proximity to the NTC is unique. Beliveau is not afliated with the Sector Plan. Commission Chairman Jimmy Conner said the plan is a great idea. The implementation is the hardest part, espe cially when you have so many landowners, he said. But it is much wis er to plan an area togeth er than to do it piece by piece. We are trying to bring more commercial and industrial properties as opposed to rooftops. Challenges Parks said the chal lenge is the misconcep tion that because you are planning long-term you are planning for urban sprawl. This is not a develop ment plan, he said. It is plan for our future. If we did nothing, we would have nothing but ur ban sprawl and piece meal growth. We are not proposing to add more homes. We are trying to measure growth in that area that occurs over the next 30 years in an or derly fashion and doesnt burden public services. Beliveau said urban sprawl can be avoided dependent on how the plan is designed. In its proximity to metro west and Cler mont, it can be an anti urban sprawl design be cause it can be a connec tion to the two, especially with the transportation network they are antici pating, he said, referring to plans for a new Well ness Way corridor to run from U.S. 27 to SR 429, right in the center of the sector plan. PLAN FROM PAGE A1 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millardives@dailycommercial.com The Florida Department of Law Enforcement has taken over an investigation into a combative South Lake Hospital patient who died Jan. 31 after a struggle with law enforcement. Clermont police Capt. Michael McMaster said the department de cided to hand the case to the FDLE after conducting its own prelimi nary investigation. According to police, the patient was being Baker Acted, which al lows for people who may pose a danger to themselves or others to be held for short periods. He was waiting to be transferred to a men tal facility by the Lake County Sher iffs Ofce when he became com bative with the hospital staff and security. Clermont police were called to the scene, and when they arrived about 2 p.m., the man calmed down but became combative again with police and deputies. McMaster added that sometime after being restrained by law en forcement and medical staff, the man died at the hospital. According to a police report, the man at some point stopped breath ing and couldnt be revived. No further details of the incident were released, in cluding the mans name. CLERMONT FDLE takes over investigation in death of man who battled officers at South Lake Hospital THANKS FOR READING THE SOUTH LAKE PRESS

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Wednesday, February 12, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writer austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com The recent fail ure of a farmers mar ket in downtown Eus tis was an abnormality in an area where simi lar markets have been thriving in some cas es for decades. Cagan Crossings, Cl ermont, Leesburg, Lady Lake, Mount Dora (The Village Mar ket and Renningers), the Lake County Fair grounds (north of downtown Eustis), The Villages and Webster all have thriving farmers markets. The Sumter Coun ty Farmers Market in Webster dates back to the late 1930s, while the relatively new Brown wood Farmers Market in The Villages routine ly hosts more than 50 vendors. So what went wrong in downtown Eustis, and what makes a suc cessful farmers market? Eustis ofcials pulled the plug on the market in Palmetto Plaza after only two months be cause staff resources involved in running the market were outweigh ing the public benet, said Lori Barnes, a se nior planner with the city. Not enough peo ple were showing up, which she attributed to bad weather on the days the market was open and not enough signage to let people know its location. City ofcials will be looking at other farm ers markets to see what makes them successful before deciding wheth er to bring the down town market back, but a different location is not an option, Barnes said. The Sumter County Farmers Market made its debut in 1937. The last of its original barns was demolished six years ago, but timbers from that building were saved and are now part of the porch roof on the markets restaurant. The success of the 40acre Webster operation comes from the quali ty of its local produce, according to Marc Har rell, the general manag er for the past 14 years. We probably have some of the best pro duce, home-grown pro duce, you know when its in season, that is still (grown) here local ly by farmers and they market their produce here, Harrell said. To me, thats been the backbone of this mar ket, having a wide vari ety of different types of produce. He added the mar ket has one shed ded icated to just produce and the rest of the mar ket is ea market-type vendors. The Sumter County farmers market is open every Monday from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m., and the restaurant is open daily. Were only open one day a week, which is only on Mondays. Harrell said. Thats the way its always been. One reason for the Monday operation is that vendors sell at oth er farmers markets on the weekends, he add ed. In Mount Dora, The Village Market had its grand reopening in September 2012. Don Stuart, market manag er, said vendors make a market successful. All markets begin and end with the ven dors, he said. The Village Market has nearly 40 vendors, and 75 to 80 percent of them sell food or food-related products, Stuart said, adding his vendors are ercely loyal. They consider it their market, he said. They have a great loy alty to the market; thats extremely difcult to develop. So Im very, very proud of that. The Mount Dora Vil lage Market takes place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Sunday in Eliza beth Evans Park, with a few exceptions because of major events going on in Mount Dora. Cole Scharlau, the program manager for the Lake County Expo Center and Fair grounds, said the Lake County Farmers Mar ket has been around since 1969. During its busy season, its not uncommon to see 250 vendors there. Scharlua said keys to a successful farmers mar ket include community support, longevity, ven dor consistency, loca tion, size of the proper ty and parking. Another really im portant thing for a suc cessful farmers market is obviously good pro duce, fresh produce at good prices, which is what most people come here for, I would say, Scharlua said. Scharlua added loca tion might be the most important aspect. The Lake County farmers market starts at 8 a.m. every Thurs day. Carol Peters is the owner of Slow Turtle Farm outside of Eus tis, and she sells at the Mount Dora Village Market. She also sold her pet food goat dairy products at the down town Eustis market from its beginning to its end. Peters said accessi bility, advertising and quality products are what drives success at farmers markets. Its not like a ea market where youre looking for bargains, she said. Youre look ing for regional items, either fresh (or) organ ic, as far as produce goes. Something that is made locally...They (buyers) want to know who it is that theyre purchasing from. Vendors key for successful farmers markets PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Customers browse the many items that vendors have on display at the Sumter County Farmers Market in Webster. Staff Report Cushman & Wakeeld has bro kered the sale of 157 acres along County Road 466A, west of Buena Vista Boulevard in Wildwood, and will be developing the property with the Barclay Group. The acreage was purchased from the Word Family LLC in Gainesville for $30 million. The Barclay Group will be devel oping the property later this year as a mixed-use project that will in clude retail, residential/senior hous ing, medical ofce, ofce and insti tutional components, according to a press release. The property is bordered on three sides by The Villages, including imme diately on the east by the Sandhill Golf Course. A large tract of vacant land to the west is owned by the Penrose Fam ily and is not part of the sale, accord ing to records at the Sumter County Property Appraisers Ofce. Cushman & Wakeeld is the worlds largest privately held com mercial real estate services rm, while the Barclay Group is a full-ser vice commercial real estate rm that develops, leases and manages an array of commercial retail proper ties, from large power centers to sin gle-tenant buildings. A Cushman & Wakeeld represen tative was contacted but did not get back with specic details about how the property would be developed. 157-acre tract purchased in Wildwood for $30M WHITNEY WILLARD / STAFF GRAPHICLAND SALE Cushman & Wakefield has brokered the sale of 157 acres along County Road 466A, west of Buena Vista Boulevard in Wildwood, and will be developing the property with the Barclay Group. 466A 134 142 462Pinellas Pl.TURTLE MOUND GOLF COURSEBuena Vista Blvd. N Land sale site

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 12, 2014 L ake County Superintendent of Schools Su san Moxley moved swiftly last week to defuse a potential time bomb when she ordered an independent review of student en rollment at area schools. Her announcement comes on the heels of news that six Lake County schools underre ported their enrollments and are actually over the state class size limits. By law, Florida Schools are not permitted to have more than 18 students per class in grades pre-kindergarten through 3; 22 per class in grades 4 through 8; and 25 in grades 9 to 12. These rules were approved by voters as a consti tutional amendment a decade ago, and schools that violate them are subject to state nes. While its not clear whether the state will actu ally impose nes on the district or how heav ily what is clear is that Moxley and the entire school district administration are facing a crisis. It isnt even the possibility of nes that con cerns us. No, whats at stake is a more precious cost the credibility of the school district. Elected school board members were rightly upset about the violations, and at least one be lieves principals intentionally lied about their class sizes in an effort to skirt the law. One teacher, a whistleblower, contends that her as sistant principal wanted her to help falsify the student count in her class. And the head of the local teachers union said some of his members complained that they were asked to sign false class rosters as well. Moxley appears to be taking these allega tions very seriously. On Thursday, she held a rare press conference to announce that she was launching an independent review of enroll ment at all schools. She also atly insisted that her administration has brought no pressure on school principals to fudge their enrollments. We applaud this move. Our public school system, after all, is more than an academic institution. It is a place where our children learn about character and values. While the allegations of lying are largely an ecdotal and unconrmed, this specter looms large over the school system at this point. What lessons are we teaching these children if our administrators cheat and lie their way around the law? And what of the taxpayers? Local govern ments the County Commission, area city councils and the school district have al ready said they will seek voter approval to ex tend the penny sales tax in the coming years. Voters will need to have condence that their elected ofcials are prudent and ethical, and this episode certainly cant help. Yes, an independent and transparent review of schools is warranted indeed essential if the district is going to restore condence in the integrity of the schools and the administration. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD ........................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST O PINION WHATS YOUR OPINION? The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the ed itor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be origi nal, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Letters to the Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711 By fax to: 352-394-8001 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. GUEST COLUMNS If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@dailycom mercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OUR VIEW S OUTH LAKE PRESS Your community newspaper for more than 100 years. 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001 The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Flori da 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region. All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Push forward with review of area schools LETTER of the WEEK I want to personally thank John Mor gan and all who helped get the medical marijuana question on the ballot. I personally know indi viduals who this plant is helping to keep alive. Marijuana is dened in the dic tionary as a tall Asiatic herb and has been used from the remotest of times for its medical properties. John Morgan is correct in his as sertions that most pharmaceutical companies are opposed to med ical marijuana as it will cut into their prots. The DEAs own administrative law judge,, Francis Young, back in the 1980s found that marijuana is one of the safest therapeutic sub stances known to man. After ex tensive hearings he recommend ed that it be placed in Schedule II so it could be prescribed. Back in 1972 also after extensive hearings the Schaffer Commission recom mended that no criminal penal ties attach to its use by adults in their homes. Now, even the president has come out saying it is safer then al cohol. JEFF BROWN | Groveland Medical marijuana helps keep people alive COURTESY PHOTO This photo shows different strains of marijuana displayed during the grand opening of the Seattle location of the Northwest Cannabis Market, for sales of medical marijuana products. Postal unions need to change I was a bit intrigued by an ar ticle that related to the overpaid postal unions efforts to thwart the selling of stamps, etc., at Staples. I can understand the unions wanting to add dues-paying members by trying to have Sta ples hire only postal employees to do the selling in the stores, but patronage only goes so far. My intrigue stems from the fact that I grew up in a sprawl ing city/town of 10,000 souls, and the place had four post al substations where you could buy stamps and mail pack ages, with some limits. These substations were local grocery and convenience stores, and of course, this was when the post man actually walked house to house through wind and rain and snow, etc. I understand the unions right to try and increase its in uence, but times are chang ing and they have to live with it, lest they have more troubles in these changing times. CHARLES WELCOME | Tavares Beware of recycled water Senator Hays, I like and agree with what you had to say about water as reported by Livi Stan ford of the Daily Commercial. Nutrients do have to be prevent ed and removed if practical. On the other hand, be aware that reuse or recycled wastewa ter can contain thousands of chemicals such as mercury, di oxins, nitrates and nitrites which can form nitrosamines, phos phates, pharmaceuticals, etc. Putting these on lawns, golf courses, etc. can be harmful to the water and environment as well. They may also endanger children who play on the lawns treated with recycled wastewa ter, as well as pregnant women, nursing mothers and persons with immune disorders. I am under the belief that there are those in Florida who want the groundwater supply to become depleted so the for tunes can be made on desalina tion, purifying wastewater and using lake and river water. I recall Enron Corp, a Hous ton energy broker, who wanted the privatization of water sup plies and I bet there are others just waiting to make their for tune off Florida Citizens. If I re call, Azurix Corp was also in volved. DR. RON NEY | Leesburg Intolerance has many faces After reading a recent article on GOP intolerance by Rekha Basu, I was very disturbed. As a white Christian, I feel that there are many Afri can-Americans and Hispanics, as well as many other cultures, who share my exact same be liefs, so racism has absolutely no part in this. I oppose abortion because it is the deliberate killing of a child. I believe that the practice of homosexuality is a sin be cause the word of God, the Holy Bible, tells us so. We are taught to love the sinner but not the sin and to teach others to ac cept homosexuality as normal is a sin in itself. As to the right to vote, I be lieve that every person must have proof of identication be fore being allowed to vote. Vot ing is one of Americans most important responsibilities guar anteed by the U.S. Constitution. In todays society, illegal aliens do not have that right, nor should they. They are illegal! As to the cruelty shown by whites against blacks, that is horrendous and should be pun ishable. Unfortunately, racism is alive and well in this coun try but it is a two-way street. Crimes are committed by blacks against whites as well, such as the knock-out game, in which the attacker has at tempted to knock out a man, woman or child with a blow to their head. This has resulted in several deaths and many severe injuries almost all ignored by the mainstream media. So again, I would suggest that before you condemn others and the GOP for intolerance that you look to yourself at your own intolerance to others who do not share your beliefs. DORIS BURGESS | Wildwood YOUR VOICES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

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Wednesday, February 12, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5 Staff Report Volunteers are need ed at the Read to Syd ney organization for projects including de signing and editing a newsletter, volunteer ing at the Clermont Petcos in-store ta ble, collecting dona tions (cash and mone tary) from local stores and businesses, distri bution and collection of donation boxes and planning and setting up special events and book signings. For information, call 407-247-8595 or go to www.readtosydney.org. DEATH NOTICES Richard B. Allen Richard B. Allen, 62 died Friday, January 31, 2014 Eastside Funeral Home, Leesburg, FL Richard Bellavance Richard Bellavance, 68, of Leesburg, died Monday, January 27, 2014. Page-Theus Fu nerals & Cremations. Mary J. Fitch Mary J. Fitch, 67, of Tavares, died Monday, February 3, 2014. Ham lin & Hilbish Funeral Directors. Charles Flory Charles Flory, 81, of Leesburg, died Wednesday, February 5, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations. Joseph Jackson Jr. Joseph Jackson, Jr. 58, Woodridge, VA, (for merly of Webster), died Friday, January 24, 2014. Rocker-Cusack Mortuary, Leesburg. Byron Jack Meyer Byron Jack Mey er, 80, of Eustis, died Wednesday, February 5, 2014. Harden/Pauli Funeral Home William Paxson William Paxson, 94, of Leesburg, FL died Fri, Jan 31, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home. Justin Jermaine Russell Russell, Justin Jer maine, 31, died Fri day, January 31, 2014. Floyds Funeral Home. Agnes D. Sheppard Agnes D. Sheppard, 75, of Tavares passed away on Tuesday, Feb ruary 04, 2014. Stever son, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Crema tions, Tavares, FL. James Webb Jr. James Webb, Jr., 53, of Groveland, died Wednesday, February 5, 2014. Marvin C. Zan ders Funeral Home, Inc. Amelia Yeasley Amelia Yeasley, 98, Mt. Dora, DOD 1/30/2014. Hayes Brothers Funer al Home, Eustis, 28 W. Woodward Ave., Eustis, FL 32726 352-589-4666. Connie B. Zachery Connie B. Zachery, 64, of Mount Dora, died Tuesday, February 4, 2014. Marvin C. Zan ders Funeral Home, Inc. IN MEMORY CLERMONT Read to Sydney organization seeks volunteers ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com Kathy Johnston, a former deputy chief with the Orlando Fire Department and founder of Search and Rescue of Central Flor ida, is Clermonts new assistant re chief. Johnston, who holds two masters de grees, had a distin guished 25-year career in the Orlando Fire Department, where she served as assistant chief. She was named Orlando Employee of the Month multiple times and was award ed the Charles C. Hall Award for emergen cy medical services in Orange County. She has published nu merous articles and been a speaker at the International Asso ciation of Fire Chiefs Conferences. Johnston also served as deputy commander with the Florida 6 Di saster Medical Assis tance team and was deployed to New Orle ans in the wake of Hur ricane Katrina. After her retirement, John ston worked with the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Johnston has served as chair of the Florida Association for Search and Rescue, and pres ident of the National Association for Search and Rescue, in addi tion to being founder and director emeritus of Search and Rescue of Central Florida. CLERMONT City has new assistant fire chief Staff Report About 40 Lake County reghters responded to a fast-moving brush re near Groveland last week and were able to save multiple homes, although one mobile home was de stroyed. A two-man crew responded to a 911 call about a small grass re, but found something different when they arrived, said Lt. Brian Gamble, vice president of the Professional Fireghters of Lake County. Our rst arriving truck report ed a fast-moving brush re, a shed on re and multiple homes in im mediate danger, he said. This crew of only two reghters act ed quickly and protected the resi dence near the shed. The re came within about 50 feet of this house. A neighboring mobile home did not fare as well. Our crews tried stretching lines to the neighboring mobile home, but could not reach it in time. Gamble said. The terrain condi tions prevented our re trucks from being able to get close to the home. The trucks sank in the soft sand conditions around the house. A second alarm was issued that dispatched city and county units from all over, Gamble said. About 20 re units responded with more than 40 reghters from Lake County, Groveland, Leesburg, Fruitland Park and the Florida Di vision of Forestry. We were fortunate enough to make it to the next home and make sure that everyone was out, and set up protection there, Gamble said. The third residence on the street was saved as well. The fast-moving brush re con sumed a shed and the neighboring mobile home before moving into a dry lake bed on one side, and a farm of mature planted pine trees on the other side. Additional re sponding re crews were quickly diverted to Royal Highlands subdi vision to ght the re if it crossed the lake bed, Gamble said. One of the biggest challenges we faced was that our tankers could not make it down Soto Road with out getting stuck in sand, he said. The dirt road was in poor con dition and, if one truck became stuck, that would have prevented all the rest of our trucks from get ting to the re. Every time a brush truck or en gine ran out of water, crews had to travel more than a mile of rough dirt terrain to be relled. This time lost allowed the re to keep mov ing, Gamble said. We did the best with what we were dealt, he said. We had a re truck with only two reghters ar riving to a fast-moving re with multiple homes in danger. These reghters put their lives on the line to make sure everyone was safe and save as much proper ty as they could. While no one ever wants to lose a home to a re, you still have to be satised with the results that no one was injured or killed and that only one home and shed were lost. The blaze took several hours to bring under control and consumed around 20 acres. Gamble said the Florida Division of Forestry determined the re was started by careless burning of trash and issued a citation. GROVELAND About 40 firefighters respond to save homes PHOTO COURTESY OF PROFESSIONAL FIREFIGHTERS OF LAKE COUNTY A Lake County reghter walks over charred ground after a brush re threatened several homes near Groveland last week.

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A6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 12, 2014 LET THE FUN BEGININFLATABLE FUN FOR EVERYONE! INDOOR INFLATABLE FUN CENTER!Best Indoor Playspace/Playplace in Central Florida 200 Hatteras Ave. Clermont, FL 34711352-394-7789WWW.JUMPNJOEYSONLINE.COMFREEWI-FI ZONE $10 OFFRental for first time usersCannot be used with any other offer. Ends March 31, 2014 WE ARE NOW RENTING BOUNCE HOUSES! Arts/CulturalAn individual whose personal or professional talents/activities in the cultural arts have contributed to the enrichment of Lake County.Hall of Fame Business AwardFor career business achievement of 20 years or more.Business AchievementA business leader whose achievements within his or her field have aided the economic business climate of Lake County. Categories: Small Medium (12-39 employees) Large EntrepreneurEducationAn employed, elected or volunteer educator who has shown innovation and dedication to public or private schools in Lake County.HumanitarianAn individual whose volunteer activities have improved the quality of life in Lake County..Public ServiceAn outstanding elected or employed official of state, county or city government; or a volunteer who has made contributions toward improving Lake Countys quality of life.Sports/AthleticsA person who has achieved in sports through performance or in promotion of athletic events in Lake County.Chris Daniels Memorial Public Safety AwardTo recognize an individual in the area of Public Safety who has demonstrated superior performance in their career, and has shown a commitment to better the Lake County through community involvement. This would include those persons in Lake County in the careers of law enforcement, fire, emergency medical services and emergency management.Special Judges AwardAwarded at the discretion of the judges for particularly outstanding contributions to Lake CountyLake County Leadership AwardAn individual whose guidance & leadership has impacted Lake CoNominations must be postmarked by February 21, 2014 Mail to:LAKE COUNTY COMMUNITY SERVICE AWARDS Lake County League of Cities or email to myersj@ci.eustis.fl.us CommunityService Awards NOMINATIONS ARE NOW BEING ACCEPTED!Applications will be Printed in the THURSDAY EDITION of the Daily Commercial Were sure you know a person whose dedication and selflessness have made Lake County a better place. Now its time to give them the recognition they deserve.Nominating someone is easy. Nomination forms will be printed in the Thursday editions of the Daily Commercial, can be picked up at the Chamber of Commerce offices and City Halls throughout Lake County or you can contact Janice Jones (phone: 352-483-5440 or email: JonesJ@ci.eustis.fl.us.com) and have one sent to you. You can also access and submit the nomination form on-line at www.dailycommercial.comIf selected, your nominee will be honored at the 2014 Lake County Community Service Awards Dinner on April 30, 2014.SO SHOW YOUR APPRECIATION. MAKE YOUR NOMINATIONS TODAY! Your First Choice In-Print & On-Line case, I do not think the evidence would prove this level of negligence. Accordingly, this ofce will take no further ac tion in the matter. The night-time blast and subsequent re on County Road 448 ignit ed nearly 53,000 pro pane tanks, shooting many into neighboring buildings and proper ties. The blast lit up the sky with orange ames that could be seen for miles, injured eight workers, prompted hundreds of 911 calls, sparked evacuations and resulted in at least one lawsuit. Immediately follow ing the explosion, a Daily Commercial re porter interviewed third-shift Blue Rhi no maintenance work er Gene Williams, who rescued an injured fel low co-worker. Wil liams said he ran from the lobby to the loading dock area after hearing the rst booms and no ticed forklift operator Allen Kelly had been engulfed by the reball. He had esh hang ing off his hands from third-degree burns, Williams said. His legs were burnt bad and his face was burned, and I to ld him, Come on, Allen, Im going to get you out of here. Wil liams said. The plant refurbish es and rells 20-pound propane tanks, the type normally used for backyard grills, that Blue Rhino sells from displays outside of re tails outlets like con venience stores. Ac cording to a State Fire Marshalls report re leased Wednesday morning, the plants evac-machine, used to properly drain or bleed the tanks, had been down for more than a year when the accident occurred. Employees were bleeding some of the tanks themselves in the rear of the facility, by removing a screw near the neck of the cylin ders, when Kelly drove up in a recently re paired Nissan forklift and asked if they need ed help. The report said employees yelled at Kelly to get away, and when he started up the fork lift, a ame or a spark was seen ju st be fore the rst explosion. After rushing the in jured Kelly to Flori da Hospital Water man, Williams said he was summoned back to the plant because rst responders needed someone who knew the layout. It gave him time to think about wha t caused the explosion. Combination of hu man error and bad practice, possibly, he said at the time. I dont want to speculate any more than that, but that is what the forklift driver was telling me. He just said, I do what they told me to do and then this happens. He was moving the fork lift from one location to another and something must have triggered the gas or something in that area Kelly a four-year production worker who sustained second and third-degree burns to his arms, legs and face said the last thing he remembered was start ing the forklift and then being surrounded by re, the report said. The Occupational Safety and Health Ad ministration, as well as Florida Department of Agriculture and Con sumer Services, an um brella for the Bureau of LP gas, is still investiga tion the blast. The plant recently re opened with add itional safety features includ ing automatic water cannons. BLAST FROM PAGE A1 red-light citations were issued since Jan. 3. Of those violations, 1,703 were for right turns on red, a number that has surprised some city council members. The board previously approved in stalling up to 24 red light cameras at 13 intersections along State Road 50 and U.S. Highway 27, but only six have been installed to date at the most problematic intersections: State Road 50 and East Avenue, one westbound camera; State Road 50 and 5th Street, one eastbound and one westbound camera; State Road 50 and 12th Street, one westbound camera; and State Road 50 and Han cock Road, one eastbound and one westbound camera. According to city records, the monthly cost for operating the cam eras is $4,750 per camera. State law requires that $100 from each ticket goes to the states Gen eral Revenue Fund, $10 goes to the states Department of Health Emer gency Medical Services Trust Fund and $3 goes to a Brain and Spinal Cord Injury Trust Fund. This leaves $45 in revenue per ticket for the city before program costs are deducted. Police Capt. Michael McMas ter said drivers wont have to wor ry about the various state statutes if they do the safe thing and stop on red before turning right. The bottom line is if a driver comes to a complete stop prior to starting their right turn, they will not receive a violation either way, he said. Thats the best and safest thing to do. TICKETS FROM PAGE A1

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B1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 12, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTS SPORTS EDITOR ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE ............................ 365-82683 FAX .......................................... 394-8001 E-MAIL ........ sports@dailycommercial.com S PORTS and LEISURE FRANK JOLLEY / DAILY COMMERCIAL Eustis High Schools Jaylon Graham signs his National Letter of Intent on Wednesday to attend and play football at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Ill., during a signing ceremony in the Eustis Media Center. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Buck Solomon has never been a demon strative football player. Instead, the South Lake High School se nior has spent his high school career quietly showing his teammates how to be a leader. Solomons mantra of leading by exam ple paid off on Feb. 5 when he signed a Na tional Letter of Intent to play football at East ern Kentucky Universi ty during a signing cer emony in the South Lake auditorium lled with teammates, fam ily and friends. He was the only signee for the Eagles following a 7-3 campaign in 2013, but coach Mark Woolum indicated that others could sign before the school year ends in June. I felt very comfort able when I made my visit to Eastern Ken tucky, Solomon said. The coaching staff was wonderful and they talked about tak ing care of their players and making sure they graduate. I also like the way they talked about building something special up there and I want to be part of that process. It seemed like a great t for me. Eastern Kentucky, an NCAA Football Cham pionship Series subdi vision school (former ly Division 1-AA), is in Richmond, Ky. The GROVELAND SLHS Solomon signs with Eastern Kentucky FRANK JOLLEY / DAILY COMMERCIAL South Lake High School senior Buck Solomon looks over his paperwork after signing his National Letter of Intent with Eastern Kentucky University on Wednesday during a signing ceremony at the South Lake High School auditorium. AREA NON-FOOTBALL SIGNEES SARAH MCKINNEY, Leesburg, soccer, Polk State CHELSEA MUDD, Leesburg, soccer, Polk State MORGAN SHAFAR, Leesburg, soccer, Mount Olive EMILY LEDOUX, Mount Dora, volleyball, Lake-Sumter FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com He wasnt forced to, but Jaylon Graham fol lowed family tradition when it came time to pick a college to contin ue his football career. The Eustis High School standout select ed Southern Illinois Uni versity about two weeks ago and stuck with that choice on Feb. 5 when he signed a National Letter of Intent during a cere mony in the Eustis Me dia Center. By opting for the Foot ball Championship Sub division (formerly NCAA Division I-AA), Gra ham will be following in the footsteps of his un cle, Linton Brown, who played defensive tack le for the Salukis. Brown also played for Eustis. Primarily a lineback er at Eustis, Graham is expected to make the switch to defensive line in college. At Southern Illinois, he will be joined by Mount Doras Jeffer son Vea, who also signed Feb. 5. Graham said the deci sion to attend Southern Illinois was easy after he travelled to Carbondale, Ill., which is less than 100 miles from St. Lou is and about 350 miles from Chicago. I loved so much about the school when I made my visit, Graham said. I loved what the coach es and players had to say and I felt I could make an early impact there. Plus, the academic stan dards there are what I was looking for and they can offer me the chance to major in business. Once I got there, I knew that was the right school for me. Graham helped the Panthers rebounded from an 0-3 start in 2013 to nish 4-6 in coach Mike Hays second EUSTIS Panthers Jaylon Graham heading to Southern Illinois SEE PANTHERS | B2 SEE SOUTH LAKE | B3 FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writer frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com Jill Semento knew it would take more than one season to transform the Lake-Sumter State College softball into a regular visitor to the postseason. In her rst season at the helm, Semento coached the Lakehawks to a 14-45 record and a 4-20 mark in the Mid-Florida Conference, regarded as one of the toughest leagues in the state. As the second chapter of the Semento Era begins at LSSC, the coach believes the Lakehawks are on track to surpass last season and has the potential to produce one of the best seasons in school history. Semento believes LSSC can win at least 20 games and, earn a spot in the state tournament. Last year was a learning expe rience for myself and my players, Semento said. It was my rst year as coach and the players didnt know what I expected and how I wanted to play the game. Now, the soph omore have a year under their belt with me and they can help get the freshman on board a lit tle quicker. There were a lot of nerves with last years team, but this years group has a better ballplayer attitude. I like this group. The Lakehawks kicked off their season with three games on Saturday in a kickoff tournament in Clearwa ter. LSSC lost to Eastern Florida State College (formerly LEESBURG Lakehawks look for improvement PHOTOS BY BRETT LEBLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Lake-Sumter State Colleges Kayla Fuller is met by teammates at home plate after hitting a walk-off home run during a softball game at the National Training Center. BELOW: Michelle Breen elds a ground ball. SEE LSSC | B2

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B2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 12, 2014 CLERMONT BLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSAMILYELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time! IRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONTL Many Other Activities each week Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.org LIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLCHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm SOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary); 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.org ST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am 10:00 am Beginning Oct. 6, 2013 5:00 pm Service Sunday School Youth Group Nursery Adult Bible Study Womens Bible Study Mens Prayer Breakfast WOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH GODINCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALE ERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for Children Groveland IRSTBAPTISTCHURCH GROVELAND Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pm MT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! MINNEOLA CONGREGATIONSMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club NEWLPRESBYTERIANCHURCH18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am TLIVINGGOD Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce Rowland MONTVERDE WOODLANDSLUTHERAN15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 am OAKLAND PRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforSouth Lake South LakeGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOMErfn tbt352-394-7121806 W. Minneola Ave.,Clermont,FL Cremation ChoicesDirect Cremation$675Plus Container Ron Becker,Director352-394-8228921 S.US Hwy 27,Minneola,FL N EW R EFORMED P LANT C HURCH We meet our God on Sunday at Superior Residence at 10:30 AM. 1600 Hunt Trace Blvd. (Behind Home Depot)Pastor Harm Biehl 407-325-8663 year at the helm. He selected Southern Illinois from a list of 15 schools. Even though he was con dent that Southern Illinois was going to be his school of choice, Graham wanted to make sure and made an of cial visit to Rhode Island be fore signing. I didnt want to regret my decision and making one more ofcial visit was only way I could know, Graham said. I enjoyed my visit to Rhode Is land and the people there were great, but I came away feeling even stronger about my deci sion to sign with Southern Illi nois. Im happy with my choice and Im relieved the whole process is over. It really was a burden, trying to make sure I made the right choice. Being recruited is not as glamorous as people think. Hay said Graham is the type of student-athlete a coach wants in a program. He said Grahams enthusiasm on the eld is infectious and his team mates were able to feed off him. Graham sports a 3.12 grade point average and also is a standout on the Panthers basketball team, averaging 10 points and four rebounds a game. He will be on the oor Friday when Eustis plays Mount Dora for the Class 5A-District 13 championship. Jaylon is a big kid 6-foot3 and 240 pounds but hes very mobile, Hay said. Of course, you have to be mo bile to play linebacker. When he moves to defensive line and puts on some weight, I think hell keep some of that mobili ty, which will help him. He has the chance to be a very good football player. Hay considers Grahams signing to be a great sign for the football program. He said it shows the underclassmen that hard work will pay off in the long run. One of his goals, Hay said, is to nd at least one school for every senior on his team. He hasnt accomplished that, yet, but Graham is the fourth play er to sign a National Letter of Intent since he took over as coach. I want to provide my play ers with motivation to be the best, so Ive promised them that if they work hard on the eld and in classroom, I will do everything in my power to nd them a college, Hay said. Its not easy, but I believe we can achieve that and when Jaylons teammates can watch him sign a letter to attend col lege, they see that its possible. Its the ultimate motiva tional tool. For now, however, Hay has an equaling daunting task. He has to nd a replacement for Graham, who was an All-Dis trict rst teamer and had nearly 200 tackles in his nal two seasons. In addition, Graham had 16 sacks as a junior and senior, along with eight forced fum bles and three fumble recov eries. Its a pleasure to see good things happen to players like Jaylon because they deserve it, Hay said. It makes things tougher for us, but its a very proud moment for the Eus tis High School football team. One of our play ers is moving on to the next level. PANTHERS FROM PAGE B1 AREA FOOTBALL SIGNEES JAYLON GRAHAM, Eustis ............................................. Southern Illinois LEE BENNETT, Leesburg ........................................................... Mercer JABARI DUNHAM, Leesburg ....................................... Tennessee-Martin JAMES ELDRIDGE, Leesburg ................................................... Air Force STEVEN GONZALEZ, Mount Dora ................................................ Warner JEFFERSON VEA, Mount Dora ....................................... Southern Illinois BUCK SOLOMON, South Lake .................................... Eastern Kentucky ELIJAH ENGLISH, South Sumter ......................................... Georgetown PAUL BROWN, South Sumter .................................................... Warner PRESTON LEONARD, Umatilla ................................................ Ave Maria Brevard Community Col lege) and national power house Indian River State College, but picked up a 7-6 win against Gordon State College. LSSC (2-3) opened its home schedule on Feb. 4 with a doubleheader split against Indian River State College at the Na tional Training Center in Clermont. In the opener, Semen to found out just how far her team has come when the Lakehawks stunned the Pioneers 6-4. Melis sa Webb picked up the win with a six-strikeout performance and Kayla Fuller blasted a two-run walk-off homer. Thats probably one of the biggest wins in school history, Semen to said. Im so proud of these girls. In the nightcap, Indi an River exacted revenge with a 9-1 win. Taylor Douglas hit a home run to account the Lake hawks only run. Semento believes this years team will be more balanced on of fense, with more pow er up and down the line up. The Lakehawks have more depth than in pre vious seasons, making the team less prone to slumps, which often be gat losing streaks. Last year, we had one player who could hit the ball out on any pitch, Semento said. This year, we have at least four players who hit it out. In addition, we have play ers who can start a ral ly with base hits. Were denitely an improved team over last year. Well nd out how much better over the course of the season. Semento, an All-State player while at Umatilla, said she developed a plan to grow the softball pro gram when she accept ed the job with the Lake hawks before the 2013 season. She knew it would take time to learn how to nd the players she felt could help the program and recruit them. I never recruited play ers before I came to LSSC, Semento said. I went through the recruiting process as a player. I had to learn how to sell a pro gram to young players, but I found out that I was one of the selling points for the softball team. A lot of girls wanted to play for a young coach. When I asked players why they came to LSSC, many of them told me that I was the reason. LSSC FROM PAGE B1

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Wednesday, February 12, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B3 Just finished reading "Neighbors" and was thrilled to see something like it.Just finished reading "Neighbors" and was thrilled to see something like it. So many times we who live in Leesburg and have neighbors like Tavares, Eustis, etc. never see anything directed to us just us. Thanks...Im sure it was read by all who got it. ...let someone know what one of us thinks. As a lover of a delivered paper...one you can hold in your hand and read... I have been a reader since 1985. Joanne Garrett LeesburgYour community... Your news... Your newspaper! HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. Colonels were 6-6 in 2013 and are coached by Dean Hood, who has been at the sch ool since 2008. Solomon is one of six players signed by the Colonels from the state of Florida. South Lake coach Mark Woolum is a graduate of Eastern Kentucky. I didnt put any pres sure on him to become a Colonel, Woolum said with a smile. I want Buck to go where he feels comfortable. Fortunately for East ern Kentucky, he real ly enjoyed his ofcial visit and decided to make that his college of choice. I dont think it will take long for Buck to make an impact up there and show every one how good of a stu dent-athlete he is. Solomon produced a solid career at South Lake. He did not play any sport as a fresh man in order to get a solid start in the class room, but has become a multi-sport standout, playing football, bas ketball, baseball and running track. He also proved to be a multi-dimension al player for the Ea gles. Solomon played quarterback as a junior, but voluntarily surren dered the position be fore his senior season and played a variety of positions, primarily wide receiver and de fensive back. Solomon played in the Central Flori da East-West All Star games a senior and was named second team All-State defensive back and was a rst team All-District wide receiver. In addition, he was among the top re ceivers in Central Flor ida, totaling more than 900 receiving yards and was named South Lake Most Valuable Player. Perhaps his high light as a senior oc curred late in the Ea gles game against district rival Leesburg. With South Lake deep in Yellow Jackets terri tory and trailing 24-21, Woolum had decided on fourth down to at tempt a eld goal and play for overtime. Solomon, however, had different plans. Buck talked me out of the eld goal, Woolum said. He told me that if we threw the ball in his direction, he would catch it. Solomon was true to his word and caught the game-winning pass in the corner of the end zone, despite be ing blanketed by a Yel low Jacket defender, to give South Lake a 28-24 victory. Buck has so much condence in him self that he doesnt feel there is anything on a football eld that he cant do, Woolum said. Most of the time, hell back up anything he says he can do. His teammates look up to him because of his work ethic. Hes a suc cess on the eld and in the classroom. Hes been such a joy to coach and Im proud that he will be a Colonel. SOUTH LAKE FROM PAGE B1

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To Apply for Scholarships from the Pig on the Pond Education Fund Vist Our Website: www.pigonthepond.org Come and Join our Family of Proud Sponsorsfor the 16th Annual Pig on the Pond For the KidsTogether We Make a Difference Presenting Sponsors Community Partners Education Partners Scholarship PartnersPig on the Pond Mission Statement Kim Es Flowers Find us on Facebook INN & SUITESSM

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C1 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 12, 2014 www.southlakepress.com C OMMUNITY Proudly serving CLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWS STAFF WRITER ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 E-MAIL .... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com HOMETOWN: Long Island, N.Y. OCCUPATION: Owner of Mil lys, 779 West Montrose St., in downtown Clermont. FAMILY: I have three beautiful children, and ve awesome grand kids. What do you enjoy most about South Lake County? I love how small the community feels and the beauty of the lakes. Especially when its all decorated at Christmastime. 1) If you had to summarize your philosophy of life in one sen tence, what would it be? Its never too late to start again. 2) Name a person or incident youve come across recently thats touched you in some way. Why did this person or incident impress you so much? I met a woman recently who has been down on her luck, but she is turning it all around. Her essence reminds me constantly that noth ing can hold me back and keep me down unless I choose to let it. 3) How does what you do contrib ute to the welfare of the area? Millys is a food donation drop off and all donations are given to the food pantry at Engage Minis try Center in downtown Clermont. Also, 10 percent of prots at the store are given back to the com munity. 4) Name one of your greatest ac complishments so far. I am really excited about catching a vision for the concept of my store incorporating a blend of new and antique items and that I had the courage to chase my dreams, and open my store even though I am approaching by 70th birthday. 5) Whats something youve always wanted to do but Meet Your NEIGHBOR MILLY SARTOR Ann Dupee REMEMBER WHEN A weekly column that reprints some of the more interest ing news stories that have ap peared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press. FROM THE FILES | 25 YEARS AGO 1989 Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press SEE NEIGHBOR | C2 Lake County Parade of Homes. Cherry Knoll, Lake front Adult Town Homes built by Poynter Construction, and a spec home in the new Cres cent West Subdivision, built by Ladd Construction, are the two Clermont entries in the Lake County Parade of Homes. Tracy Moore and the crew of WKCF TV Channel 68 taped a half hour public ser vice program at South Lake Memorial Hospital for Close Up On Clermont. Inter viewed were Administrator Pat Smith, Director of Nurs ing Leslie Longacre, Director of Public Relations Jo Marie Hebeler and In-service Edu cation Director Jan Cobia. Family Practice special ist Dr. John Lurie, 42, joined the staff of South Lake Family Health Center in Groveland, according to Medical Director Dr. George Rust. Jessie Keys, LPN, was hon ored for her 33 years of ser vice to South Lake Memorial Hospital. A gilded plow was used in stead of the usual spade for the groundbreaking of Wood lands Lutheran Church in Montverde. Open for Business. Jack sons TV Stereos Microwaves. 205 S. Hwy. 50, Minneola. Clermont City Coun cil granted First Christian Church on Hooks Street a permit to add six classrooms. For the seventh year, the popular series of lectures and demonstrations known as Sunday Afternoon at the Li brary resumes Feb. 12th, presented by the Friends of Cooper Memorial Library, at the library. THE GOLF LESSON South Lake Scene col umn by Ann Dupee. I met Green Valley Country Clubs teaching pro, Brian Roddy, for a video golf lesson. Bri an rst noticed my grip was wrong so Im now holding the club like Nancy Lopez. Bri an then noticed that my right leg was straight and my feet could use a different posi tion, so I worked on that for a while. My fanny also wasnt just quite right, but it learned its new position. We watched the video, went to the practice range and then played 9 holes of golf. (After this column ran, some other ladies were asking Bri an what he would do for their fannys position.) SCHOOL NEWS Pictured were seven of 19 students in Nancy Hetting ers 2nd grade class at Cler mont Elementary School for SEE HISTORY | C3 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com W hen Lost Lake El ementary admin istrators and par ents learned Lake County Schools could not come up with the money for a new playground, they decid ed to take things into their own hands with their feet. Instead of organizing a bake sale or selling mer chandise to raise the need ed $20,000, they went with a healthier alternative and the Camp High Five Fun Run was born. Its so healthy for the kids, which is awesome, but the really neat part about it is that everyone gets in volved the students, parents, teachers, PTO members, administrators, everyone, Principal Rhon da Hunt said. To pull off the run, Lost Lake Elementary called on the Orlando team as sociated with Booster thon, a company that helps schools raise money by or ganizing fun run events. Supporters make monetary pledges based on the num ber of laps a student com pletes. On Feb. 5, students wear ing T-shirts with a grid on the back ran laps around a designated area on school grounds. Each time a stu dent rounded the starting point, a designated parent or teacher marked off one square on the T-shirt with a permanent marker. Dozens of parents and teachers were on hand, ei ther cheering the students on or with hands extended, offering as many high ves as possible as students ran by them. Boosterthon not only em ceed the event, but sent CLERMONT Students raise thousands for new playground equipment at fun run PHOTOS BY ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Students at Lost Lake Elementary School last week took part in a fun run to raise money for new playground equipment. They earned money from pledges based on the number of laps they ran. Jamison Butts, left, and Caleb Walker, center, pose for a picture with Calebs sister, Taylor Walker, as they prepare to participate in Lost Lake Elementary Schools Camp High Five fun run. SEE RUN | C2

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C2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 12, 2014 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 17th AnnualFEBRUARY 20-23 | 2014 FRI | FEB 21| 7:30 PM MOUNT DORA COMMUNITY BUILDING Lazy Bones, Marie, Aint Misbehavin, Polly Wolly Doodle$35 Adv | $40 Door | $50 Res | $75 VIP SAT | FEB 22 | 7:30 PM MOUNT DORA COMMUNITY BUILDING Summer Song, Yesterdays Gone,Willow Weep for Me $35 Adv | $40 Door | $50 Res | $75 VIPThe Legendary An Evening with B A CH FE S T IV AL C H A M BER C HOIR A ND O RCH E S T R A Central Floridas oldest operating performing arts organization.SUN | FEB 23 | 2 PM | MOUNT DORA COMMUNITY BUILDING | FREE THU | FEB 20 | 7:30 PM Mount Dora Community BuildingTop ten Lake County high school prizes. Special performances by contestant mentors FREE MUSIC IN THE PARK SAT | FEB 22 | 11 AM 5 PM Donnelly Park Stage ORLANDO BRASS QUINTET KOO L VIBES REGGAE B AND SIMPLE CA VEMENTEEN MUSIC TALENT CONTESTNICI HAER TER Harpist FEB 20 | 10 AM | Florida Hospital Waterman JENNIFER REED MUELLER V iolist JEWEL SPEARS BROO KER P oetry Narrator FEB 20 | 1 PM | Congregational Church FREE COMMUNITY CONCERTSLA URE N T BOUK O BZA C lassical P ianist FEB 21 | 12 PM | First Presbyterian Church SUZY P ARK V ocalist WES HAMRICK Pianist FEB 21 | 2 PM | W.T. Bland Public LibraryTICKETS & INFO352.385.1010 / 352.383.2627 / mountdoramusicfest.comCharge tickets online and by phone. Discounts available for groups of 10 or more. Other tickets available at the Chamber of Commerce and Donnelly Euro Footwear. TOIL AND TROUBLE By DICK SHLAKMAN AND JEFF CHEN / Edited by Will ShortzNo. 0202RELEASE DATE: 2/9/2014 ACROSS1 Turns left 5 Ogles offensively 12 One for the money? 16 Actors Ken and Lena 18 Gettable 19 ___ Foods 20 Cash in 22 Tiny tunneler 23 Big gun 24 Ones doing aerobics 26 Popular British band named after the villain in Barbarella 28 Sinister seor 29 Lacoste offering 30 Soul maker 31 Channel showing old Hollywood hits34 Disposables maker 35 Modus operandi 38 Kind of accounting 39 Bistro glassful 40 Sturdy ones 42 Org. using X-rays 45 Equally, say 47 Tangled 50 Legit 52 Words before and after my lads in the United States Merchant Marine anthem 54 ___ acid 55 Sides are often alongside them 56 Entry fee? 57 Dont look now 59 Bell or shell preceder 61 Regarding 62 Super Bowl successes, for short63 Key of Bachs most famous Mass65 Furniture style of Louis XV 67 Dupe 68 ___ the Explorer 70 Thats all folks, for Mel Blanc 72 Batman : Robin :: Green Hornet : ___ 74 Strand, somehow 76 Girls name meaning happiness77 Squirm 80 John Cusacks co-star in Say Anything 82 Dir. of the Missouri between S.D. and Neb. 83 Like leftovers, often 85 Born 86 Actor Richard who played Jaws in Bond films 87 Some A.L. (but not N.L.) players 88 It may be indicated with a ring 89 More than pique 90 Too smooth 92 Dudley Do-Rights love 94 Second place? 95 Part of N.R.A.: Abbr. 96 Email button 98 Erne or tern 102 Baloney, in Bristol 104 Entitle to wear vestments 106 Headstrong 107 East Asian stew 110 Ta-ta! 112 It may be radical 113 Places where polar bears fish 115 They may be sprayed on 116 HBO competitor 117 Bills partner 118 Pro 119 Major, for example120 Poetic rhapsody 121 Soak (up) 122 Summer White House setting: Abbr. 123 Lady of the lea 124 Rocky shout-outs DOWN1 Biblical peak 2 Actress Vega of Spy Kids 3 Expand 4 Mortimer of old radio 5 Contributors to The Paris Review, e.g. 6 First of 12 in South America 7 Muffs 8 Band with the 1994 album Monster9 He and she follower 10 Not perform as expected 11 Dance popularized by Michael Jackson 12 Yep 13 Iraqi P.M. ___ al-Maliki 14 Like one of the arm bones 15 Destined (for) 17 Like vino de Rioja 19 Gobs 21 Compassion, figuratively 23 Start of many jokes25 Dos x tres 27 Latin others 31 Blue-green 32 Part of many an anniversary celebration 33 Tax-free bond, for short 35 Pair of cymbals in a drum kit 36 Ceaselessly 37 Tautological statement of finality 38 Cavs, on a scoreboard 41 Elbow-bender 42 Superstitious thespians name for a work of Shakespeare from which 21-, 23-, 37-, 58and 60-Down all come 43 Take care of 44 Cause of an insurance investigation 46 One of 17 on a Monopoly board: Abbr. 48 What a goner has 49 Army threats? 51 Mendoza Mrs. 53 ___ get it! 55 System prefix 58 A single stroke 60 What the lucky person leads 63 Lively 64 Piqued 65 500 events 66 Equipped to row 69 Have debts 71 The Addams Family nickname 73 ___ Maria 74 Rat 75 Carol 78 Towel designation 79 Elysium 81 Cry before haw 84 Big stretch? 91 Moccasin decorations 93 You might bow your head to receive one 94 Play about Capote 95 Famous Titanic victim 97 Zilch 99 One of The Honeymooners 100 Drippings appropriately positioned under the circled letters 101 Alternatively 103 Lo-o-ovely! 104 Director Preminger 105 You may find a fork in it 108 Prefix with -phile 109 Some reproaches 111 Palindromic cry 114 Intimidate 1234 567891011 12131415 16 17 18 19 20 2122 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31323334 35363738 39 40 41424344 45 46 4748 49 5051 52 5354 55 56 5758 5960 61 62 63 6465 6667 6869 70 71 7273 7475 76 77 7879 80 81 82 8384 85 86 87 88 89 90 9192 93 94 95 9697 9899100101 102103 104105 106 107 108109 110 111 112 113114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124For any three answers, call from a touch-tone phone: 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Solution on page D3 havent yet? I love to travel and although Ive done a fair share of it, I want to see more of the world. Im hoping to see Ireland later this year when UCF beats Penn State. I was promised a trip there if that happens. Go Knights! 6) What advice would you give to people who want to help out in the community? There are so many great causes to get involved with nd out what you are passionate about and give it your all. NEIGHBOR FROM PAGE C1 people to the school for two weeks in ad vance of the even to conduct inspirational rallies with topics fo cusing on character, education and physi cal education. Its really been a fantastic program and the kids have not only learned a lot, but the y are super excited, said Lost Lake Elementary PTO President Theresa Sherman. Hunt said this is the second time the school has worked with Boosterthon for a fun run. Last year, they were able to raise the $20,000 they needed for a new playground for their pre-k and kindergar ten students. This year, the goal again was to raise $20,000 for a new playground for the schools third-, fourthand fth-grade stu dents. So far, the pledges for the fun run have exceeded $27,000 and are still coming in. RUN FROM PAGE C1 SUBMITTED PHOTO The South Lake Junior Womens Club and supporters are pictured at the second annual Holiday of Hopes festival at Waterfront Park. They are Casey Bunton, Amber Madawi, Carla Terrell, Rhonda Barron, Debbie Mixon, Wanda Sparks, Aimee Stanley, Kim McIntyre, Cindy Murphy, Marion DeAnnuntis, Madison Herbst, Dawn Engle, Michelle Snively and Connie Herbst. The festival raised funds and collected more than 220 items that went to less fortunate elementary and middle school children in the south Lake County area. WOMENS CLUB HELPS KIDS FOR CHRISTMAS SUBMITTED PHOTO Members of the South Lake County Historical Society elected the new board of directors for 2014 at the annual meeting on Dec. 9. Pictured are: Larry Rescoe; Connie Harper, treasurer; Bonnie Ray; Ray Goodgame; Joanne Apel; Donna DiGennaro, president; Jim Briggs, recording secretary; and Doloris Walker. Not pictured are Micki Blackburn-Nagle, chairman of the board; Devon Pete Cole, vice-president; Jerri Barstable, corresponding secretary; and Karen Miller, assistant treasurer. SOUTH LAKE COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY 2014 BOARD AND OFFICERS

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Wednesday, February 12, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C3 To Apply for Scholarships from the Pig on the Pond Education Fund Vist Our Website: www.pigonthepond.org Come and Join our Family of Proud Sponsorsfor the 16th Annual Pig on the Pond For the KidsPig on the Pond 5K Run/Walk Pig on the Pond Mission Statement Find us on Facebook Saturday, March 8th Clermont Waterfront ParkCostume ContestPresented by Official Sponsor of the 2014 5K Photo OppEveryone likes to wear a costume. Dress up in your favotite Miss Piggy costume or just a cute pig outfit. Come dressed to impress!!! Register at pigonthepond.org or online at Active.com We will have awards forBest Male Best Female Best Team (3 or more people) Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...Totally UniqueTotally Unique is proud to be Clermonts first ORGANIC hair salon. We care about your beauty, your wellness, the environment and our community, so we use organic and sustainably harvested products whenever possible. We specialize in organic hair color, hair care products, nail and skin care lines. Our salon is one of the oldest salons in Clermont and is located at 786 W Montrose Street in Historic Downtown Clermont. Our stylists are experienced in all phases of hair care including color, straighteners, cuts, texture and styles. Hair stylists are Marjorie Morphet, Tina Foote, Sherie Wolkens and Jamie Rhoades. Our nail techs, Jennifer Vandergrift and Jamie Rhoades, perform pedicures and manicures using Zoya nail products (which are Big 5 free). Shellac manicures, lasting up to three weeks, are also available by Jennifer and Jamie. We have two pedicure chairs in a private room for your relaxation and enjoyment. Relaxing and therapeutic facials are available by Jennifer in our private upstairs facial room. Massage services include chair massage, Swedish and Deep Tissue. Massage services are also done in a private room in our upstairs area. We utilize several massage therapists and provide massage by appointment only. We also offer a small boutique with handcrafted jewelry and hair accessories, Art by Tina Foote and Jamie Rhoades, and other unique items. Salon hours are 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Saturday and open Sundays by appointment only. Evening hours are also available by appointment. We pride ourselves in providing a friendly, relaxing environment for our clients and friends. Stop by and visit or call 352-394-5005 for more information. We are also on Facebook and www.TotallyUniqueSalon.com. LOOKING FOR PARTS? SEE JULIE (352) 394-6111 Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! having all A grades: Emily Bishop, Sean OKeefe, Kristen Pew, Annette White, Terry Jones, Joseph Coleman and Michael Giachetti. George Wood, chairman of South Lake (Breakfast) Kiwanis Clubs Community Services Committee, presented a $500 check to Milda Sandargas, PTO president at Cler mont Elementary School. The funds go towards construction of a new outdoor pavilion at the school. Lake County School Board heard a request from Clermont Junior Highs advisory committee to change the schools name to Clermont Middle School. The Board authorized Superin tendent Dr. Tom Sanders to work with county ofcials to study im pact fees. MASONS CELEBRATE Clermont Masonic Lodge 226 will celebrate its 75th anniversary Feb. 11, according to Worshipful Master Bill Eyerly. Other ofcers are Charles Lovette, senior warden; Daniel Bray, junior warden; Senior Deacon Phil lip Blackwell; Junior Deacon Don ald Simmons; Senior Steward Endel Raulerson; Junior Steward Carl Ar thur Mattson, Jr.; Chaplain Michael Howard; Marshall Robert Eyerly; Ty ler, Carl Stieb. (The Lodge celebrated its 100th anniversary Jan. 25, 2014 with a dinner and ceremony at the Lodge building on DeSoto Street.) YOUTH CONFESSES A 14-year-old Mascotte youth, suspected to be the sniper who red three shots into the Mascotte Ele mentary School yard, injuring third grader Leah Wilbanks, is currently being held at the Marion County Ju venile Detention Center. He confessed to Mascotte Police Chief Don Page on Jan. 13 and again on Jan. 17, saying he wanted to get the incident off his chest. CHAMBER ELECTS The Clermont Chambers new Board of Directors has decided that in lieu of the annual awards ban quet held in the past, quarterly so cials will be offered. Newly elected Board members are Charley Beals, Gene Landers, Keith Mullins, Amy Walker, Ken Felt, Paul Lewis, Bob Patterson, Sharon Wil liams, Marilyn George, Gabby Monroe, Bridgot Robinson and Bruce Yates. New ofcers elected are Bobby Duncan, President; Bruce Yates, Vice President; Amy Walker, Secretary; and Jack Sargent, Treasurer. FOUR GENERATIONS AT BABY PAGEANT Lake Highlands Nursing and Assisted Living Center sponsored its rst annual Baby Pageant. John Breeden and Danielle Franklin were Master and Little Miss Lake Highlands. Two children tied in the catego ry for the participant with the most generations present. Each child had four generations represented. Landon Beaty brought his mother, Laquita Beaty; grandmother, Wyn ona Strickland; and great-grand mother, Dora Mae Strickland. Landons father is pastor of Midway Baptist Church in Mascotte. The other four-generation win ner was Ashley Thompson with her mother, Doris Thompson; grandmother, Laverne Clark and great-grandmother, Annie Mae Hull, cheering her on. All four generations were born and raised in Groveland. HISTORY FROM PAGE C1

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C4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 12, 2014 A/C Services Auto Service Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Marine Services Cabinetry Services Carpet Repair Services Cleaning Services Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Concrete Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Handyman Services Adult Care Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. Insurance Services Irrigation Services Land Clearing Services Landscaping Services Lawn Services Lawn Services Legal Services Moving Services Painting Services Airport Transportation Enclosure Screening Flooring Services Bathroom Remodeling

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Wednesday, February 12, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C5 Professional Services Psychic Services Plants & Florist Service Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Painting Services Pool Services Pressure Cleaning Plumbing Services Plumbing Services Roofing Services Tile Service Shower Doors Service Tree Service Tree Service Veterinarian Services Window Services Steve and Brenda Rizer have owned Blinds 4 Less since 2000. The business is still in its original location in Lady Lake. The company focuses on strong customer service and also selling the best brand names in the industry at very competitive prices. Chris Carnes Landscape has been in business since 2005 along with over 30 yrs experience in everything from hardscapes such as patios, retaining walls, to sod repair and installations, to ripout of old landscapes and design. We also can provide maintainence to your newly installed landscape or even mowing maintainence services to even sprinkler repairs. We serve all projects big or small create landscapes one lawn at a time". Mention this bio ad and receive 15 percent off when you call for your estimate on any of our services. Emerson Street Automotive has been family owned and operated for nearly 30 years. Lori and Michael Farfaglia purchased the business from Loris family in 2010. Loris father, Terrill Davis stayed as the onsite manager. Emerson Street is located at 1406 Emerson Street, right next to the Post Office in Leesburg, Florida. We are opened Monday-Friday 7:30-5:30 and Saturday 7:30-3:00. Phone: 352-326-2400. We do all kinds of automotive repair including light body work. We have state of the art diagnostic equipment that takes the guess out of repairing your car. We service all makes and models including SUVs, ATVs, and RVs. To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact Michelle in the Classified Department at (352) 365-8233 or by email michelle.fuller@dailycommercial.com

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C6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 12, 2014 Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) THURSDAY THE PASTFINDERS GE NEALOGICAL SOCIETY CELEBRATES 25 YEARS: At 4:30 p.m., in the Spe cial Collections/Geneal ogy Room on the second oor of Cooper Memo rial Library, 2525 Oakley Seaver Dr., in Clermont. HAZARDOUS WASTE TO BE COLLECTED: From 9 a.m. to noon, Clermont Convenience Center, 10435 Log House Rd., in Clermont, for residents to dispose of toxic mate rials. For details at www. lakecounty.gov/haz ardouswaste or call the Lake County Solid Waste Division at 352-343-3776. SINGER/SONGWRITER SHEILA RAY CHARLES COMES TO FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH FOR CELEBRATE RECOVERY MEETING: From 7 to 9 p.m., at the church, 950 Seventh St., Clermont. For information, call 352-394-2412 or visit FUMC-Clermont.org. FRIDAY TEEN DIY MUSTACHE CUPS AT THE LIBRARY: At 4:30 p.m., Marion Baysinger Memorial Li brary, 756 W. Broad St., Groveland. Call 352429-5840 for details. FRIENDS OF COOPER MEMORIAL LIBRARY AN NUAL WINTER BOOK SALE: From 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Friday and Saturday, rooms 108 A and B, at the Cooper Memorial Library, 2525 Oakley Seaver Dr., in Clermont. SATURDAY CHOCOLATE FESTI VAL AT THE MARION BAYSINGER MEMORIAL LIBRARY: From 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., with games, treats for the whole fam ily and a baking contest. Baking contest rules will be available at the con test. For information, call the library at 352429-5840. LOW-COST PET VACCI NATION CLINIC: From 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Tractor Supply, 6801 State Road 50 in Grove land. Call 352-429-2502 for details. TUESDAY SOUTH LAKE HIGH SAC MEETING: At 6:30 p.m. in the Culinary Arts Room. Call 352-394-2100 for information. FEB. 18-21 GRAY MIDDLE SCHOOL SCHOLASTIC BOOK FAIR: In the media center. For those who cannot make it to the fair or prefer to shop online, the book fair is available online through Feb. 26. For information, send an email to marshburnb@ lake.k12..us. FEB. 19 COLLEGE DAY WITH FULL SAIL UNIVERSITY AT THE LIBRARY: At 4:30 p.m., Marion Baysinger Memorial Library, 756 W. Broad St., Groveland. Giving teens, parents and adults information for successful gradua tion and career place ment. Call 352-429-5840 for details. FEB. 20 PET FIRST AID AT THE LIBRARY: At 6 p.m., with Dr. Stone of Veterinary Trauma Center in Grov eland, giving Pet First Aid instruction at the Marion Baysinger Me morial County Library, 756 W. Broad St., Grove land. Call 352-429-5840 for details. RSVP DUE TODAY FOR EPICUREAN EVENT AT LAKERIDGE WINERY: From 6 to 8:30 p.m., Feb. 26, in Clermont. Winemaker Jeanne Bur gess, Top Chef contes tant Jennifer Denlinger and Culinary Consul tant Susanne Bukey are the guests. Email Janelle Carutis at JCarutis@ Lakeridgewinery.com for reservations. FEB. 21 FREE SEMINAR AND LUNCH FOR DISABLED PERSONS AT ANOINTED COMMUNITY SERVICES: From 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. A representative from the Agency for Persons with Disability will speak about cerebal palsy, autism and oth ers. Call Anointed Com munity Services to RSVP for the event at 352-4047898. FEB. 26 CAREER DAY WITH THE ARMY AT THE LIBRARY: At 4:30 p.m., giving teens, parents and adults tips about varying military careers, at the library, 756 W. Broad St., Grove land. Call 352-429-5840 for details. To place an item on the calen dar, send an email to pam.fen nimore@dailycommercial.com. COMMUNITY CALENDAR

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Wednesday, February 12, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D1 r f n t b r r r b f n t b r r t r r t f t r t r b r b f b f r b r r r t b r b n r t b n r r rtrrftr tfttttbtr tnrrf t n r r t b t r r t r b n r t r b r r b f r n r t b b t f r b r t n r r t b t r n r r r f t t b r t f n r f t r r b t t b f r t r r b r b t r r n n r t r t f r b t n n t r t b r r b t b r r r n r r r f r f t n n r f t r n r f t t r r n r t b r b n r f t t b r t r t b r t r r r r r f r r r n r rtbbrrbtr ftrtbrfrttb rntbrtrbr rfttbrfrrr rftbrnrb rrtrbrbrtrb tbnrb rbfr rftbbrrbrtr rttr n t r t r f n tnrrttrfrfttbtb rtrtbrb bftrtbfrn trrrbtbbfttb r r r n r n r f t t r r r r r f n t b r b n r f t t b r f t t r t b r r r n r b t b t r t tnrttbtbrr ntrr btrfnttbfttft nrfttrrtrtbfr trbrttbnrftrf tbnrbrrtbbr r r b f r n r f r r r r r b r n t b n t r r n t r f r b b r n t r t t t r r n r ttbtrtbtnr trnttbrrtrb ftbbfr rnbrfrrtrbrrtrf rtbtntrbrt tbftbrbrbbt brttrnr brrfb n t r n r r n t n t t b r t r b r r t rrrtrttb tnrrtrbrftb rbrrtrbrrtrf rrrtrbr r n r r r r t r b r f r b f r n r t f f r b r n n t n rftbrtrrrtbb rbrrtrbtbbf trbtrrttr rrrtrbrbf brfrr n t r n r b n b b b t f r b t t b r t r rfn r b r b t f n r r t r t r n t r t r r t b f t rrtbfttftfrb fntbttrnrrtr ttnrtbrrr bt bfrtbb rtrr brbtbfrt r b f r n r b t b n t b f r t t r b r f t b f t t f t r r t b n r r t b b t t b t t r b r t rrtbfrr tbrfntrbf trtbfbbrr rtrfrrrtbbtb rrtrbrrb tttrf brbrtrtrf r b f r n r n r r t b ttbrrrfttb rttbrrtrbrbrtb nbrnrbrrrtbf nbrnrbrtfr frnrbtrr nbrnrbbffntbttr trtrnb btbnrbrtrtfrtr rtbbfrtbrnfrtb tftbfbntnnbt bbbrt r r t t r t r f r t t r n b n n r b f r t t r r t b r t r n r r r t b f t t b r t b t b t f r r t n t f r n r b b r b t b t b t b r b t b r r r n r r n t f r n r t t r b r t r t r t b t r f r n r b t r r t t r t f r r r b f r t r t f r t t t t b f t b t t b f r t r n r b r r r b t r b r b n r t t r r t r b b r t n r b b r r f t f t b r t n r bt b bfbtftbtrr r b trnr tttbrtttb brrr trrbrtr rbr rrrf rnfntbttbrr trrbrtr rbrfrrrftrnr nnrbrftbrr tttbrttrb tfrffrttr tbrrrtfr bnrbfffrrrb rrrbtrbfrrb rrrbtrbrrrr rftrfrrfrbbfr rbtbtnfrnbftb rfrrfrbrrbnt btrrrbrrfntrrttn ttrffrrr rrftrbtbtn frnbftbfrrfrbrrb ntbtrbrrb rrfntrrttntt rffrrr rfrrtttbtbtr tb rbrrrbtr b r r b r frr tbrfrbtf brrbrrrbtr t b b tbb tbrfrbtf brbnr nr tfnr f r nnrftbrrtb bfntbtnrrrfrftb ttrfr rtrfrbtf nrbfrfrrbtrftbbf rrtrfrr trbfrrbrtbtbt brfrrffrt rnbtf frfrbrnb rrtfnrtfr ttbbftrrttbtr rtrtrrrrtrb tbtbrtnnrftrrrr rtrfrtrrbrrftb rrtrfrnbfrftbrntb bb rr b rr f r r tfrbrbrt tbt r rrbfb b bf btb rrnrbrtb frtrfrtbrbtf tb bfntbtnbtrt r tfrbrbrt tbt r rrbfb btb fnrbrrtbrtbrf nrfrfbtrr trtffrrbf rrbrrtb rtfb rrtbfrtrf rtrtb ftbr rtbbfntbtnrrrfrf tbttrfr trfrbtf nrbfrf b tnrr rtfrrtbbfntbtnbt b fr frbr tr rnb rrbr tnfrfrbrn rbfrntrtrfrbrn brtbt rr b rr f r rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff n tbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrff nrrrrrrrrrrff ttbrrrrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff r fntbbt rfrntn nnnftbnbn brfbnrb bnbtn brnnrtnftbn tbrbttb nnnrfrbtb nbb n fbfn t brbnbbbtn nnnntnbbtr bbbfrf r tfnbtr rrbrfnnnrfnt t rf

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D2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 12, 2014 r f n t b r n t f r rb f rf brttf f b r f r n t b r n t f r rbrt f rbrrtft fffrtbntf r rfrtrrt rrt tf r f r t t n tbr rtbbt rtntnb r r f r t r f t b rrbfrtbtn rfrtrtb ff rttf b ff ffftbtfff nrrtfbtn ffrtbrtrbf t r f f f b nr ffrttnbb rf ntbf r f r t r n t r n n b t r f t r ffrtrrtb f rfntft rn ffrtrntnr tt bbt t ffrtbntnf rr ffbtft r r r t t f n brrtn t f t n t tf ffbtb frff ffbtb f frtrtf b rf rtbtrf b f r t t r nt f bbfbbtfrr rf t fb f rfrttbn bbt f rrtbtb ff rtbbtbfr ffttrfr rrtbtb brrtbbtbfr rfrtbtb ffrttrb rrtbtb t t f r t b t bbt bfrtt f n t r f t f f ff rf ffrtrtrf ffrtft b r r t b t r n ff rtrftr rt tbr rtbbtr frtrt ff b f r t r r t n rrttbr ff ffrttb f r r f f r t f t r r r b f ffrttr rrtrtf rf ntbtf ff rtntb frtftb ffrtrftrr f ffrtt brbrtbt r n n f f r t f t t f t b t t n f t rt f fbtr rfrtrt fr t r trftbfrftf rrtrtn ffrttrr rfn rft t rrttf rftbnf rn rfrttf ffrt rtf tn t rfrtnt f bfftfn rfrtbtr bbt r f r t r f t n n r tf t f f r t n t r r tr rfft b b t r t b r t n t f b b r r t f t f r f t f f f t r t t b r t b t n n b t t f t r t t n b f b b f f r f f n n f n r t b t r f f t r t t t f t r n r t t t t r b b r t t

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Wednesday, February 12, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D3 r f rr f n t fr f r n rfn tbn rfnrbn br rfbr rfbnnrnnb rfbbnr t r fbntbn t t rbrfn r nbn t t rrr fbnrn t t bbr rfbnrtb n t rnr rfbr r trfbnr trrfbr r rr rfrnn nbrfbr n r f n r rrft t rn rfnrn n tbf r brfbtnb bf r rbr rfbnrn nr b fbt nb bn bfrnnn t t r rrfnrbnb t t t rrfnr nnnbn bbr rft b nrrf f nbbt t t r rr fnrnb t t r r f b r t r rfr n t t r t t n b b b n nn tbt n rfnrn t bnrfbnr tn rbn rr rfrbnnbn t rrrf rtnn t nb rr r r fn tbnr n f t b r rr ftn r f b n r n n n f nr rn b fnrtn nbb nbtf b bf t bn rrfn bnbbb r rrfbrt bb r r fnrtn bn b b n r r f r n n nn frfbt nn f t f bbr rtf nnrnn r f n f n r f n r t n n t t r brfbnt n nn rfbrn b b b bb trrrrt r trftnnn t r n t n b fn f f n f f r b f n f f tnn t r n t n b fn f f n f f r b f n f f tnn r brffnr n nnf f nnntrf ft rr rfntb b f rff rrt r r fbrt bnr f rff r r f b n r n t r r r f n n n t t b n r r r r f b r t n b b b n n r b t n r r nf f nnff f b b n n r b t n r r ftt b b n n r b t n r r nnr rfnrbrbr rnbb t r n t n b fn f f n f f r b f n f f tnn t r n t n b fn f f n f f r b f n f f tnn t b b r f b r b r f n r r t n n r t b r n f n r f r f r f b r n n b n r t b r n f n r f r f r f b r n n b n trf fft b n n r b b n b r f r b r b f n n t t r r r tt r n b r r frb f r rrf rnb r r r r r f n r r n n b b r r r r r f n r r n n b b f f brfnrnnnbnn t tf b r r t r f f n r rfr fr rr frfr r r r r b b n n n b n n n b t r n t n b fn f f n f f r b f n f f tnn t r n t n b fn f f n f f r b f n f f tnn n ff rr fbrnnnb nf tf bbrr r rtnb b r r r r r f r b r f r r f r n n n n n b r t r r t t t r t n n b r rfn rrn nft tbf r r b r r f r t b b b t n n r r b b b r b b r n r r r t n b f t b f n r b f n n r f r t n n b b r t t r b b r r f n t n n b n n bfnnr frt nnnb t b f n r r n b n b b r f n r n f n n f n r r n n n n nft ttbft r n t n b fn f f n f f r b f n f f t n n t r n t n b fn f f n f f r b f n f f t n n nft ttbf r t r t n n r nnbt rfnrr r r f r n n n t r n t n b fn f f n f f r b f n f f t n n t r n t n b fn f f n f f r b f n f f t n n n f ttbf nnff ft t t rfrnn t fb tn t brfbr r ftnnbn n rfrnnb n rfrnnb t t rfrtnbbn brb trrfn r rfbrb rbtf rnrr rfr rr fnrtnbn rfnrnn btrrnr frtb fnrtn n t t r r f b n r b n t t r rfnr t t brfrnbn frfbt t r rfr t t t rfnrn nn rfbrnnb frbfbft fnrnbn nbrf tbf bf t t r f n r n n b b t r rfnn nbrf tbf bf r rfrtnn b rfnrtnbb rfn br tft frrtnb t t nbb rfnr rfnrtnn b rtrfrt b fntnb r fbrntnnn b b r f b r n n rnrn rrfbr t rfnr t r f n r n b t t t n rr rfnbb rr rfnbb t r rfbtnnb r rfnrnn nr rfnrnnnbn t t r f b r n n r rfrn rfrt r r f r n b b rr rfrn tr rrfbtnbn b fbr tn t r rfrrn t r r f b r f b r n b t rfnrnnn t r brfbnrnb t r fntnbnn t rfnrn t b r r f r b n t b r r f n r n b r fnrnbb r fbnfnrn r frnn t rbbt rt rfbrtb brf f nb rfnrn t n r f n r nf b t fr nnb t r r f n r n n n t r f n r n n n t r f r rftnb t t rfrn n fbr

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D4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 12, 2014 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 7 25 34 47 67 13 18 31 59 74 9 21FREE SPACE53 72 2 16 42 48 63 5 29 39 52 68ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N I B O G BINGO B I N G O SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Charles Williams WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! B 9 I 21 G 53 O 72 FREE



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LIVI STANFORD | Staff Writerlivi.stanford@dailycommercial.comCounty and Clermont of cials collectively are ex pressing hope for a high er job-to-housing ratio in the Wellness Way Sector Plan. They will have the opportunity to vet their concerns at an upcoming joint workshop between the county and city in April. I would like to see more of a business environment down there to bring in high-paying jobs, Clermont Council Member Tim Bates said. Bates suggested getting involved with South Lake Hospital to bring some type of medical community to that area. For me, it boils back to businesses. Darren Gray, Clermont city manager, agreed. When the council saw 16,000 homes, that made them a little nervous, he said. The reason we are planning this is for job creation and not for a bunch of rooftops from one end to another. We dont want government to do all this. We want the landowners and interested stakeholders to really plan for this area strategically, so we can be competitive in the region. Commissioner Sean Parks, who envisioned the plan, said he agreed the jobs-to-housing ratio should be higher. I hear Clermonts concerns loud and clear, he said It is not a development plan that has houses platted and engineering plans for streets. This is a plan for the best possibilities for Lake County. SEE PAGE B1 REMEMBER WHEN | C1SPORTS:Lakehawks look for improvement WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2014 www.southlakepress.com 50 NEWST AND INSIDECLASSIFIED D1 CROSSWORDS C2 REAL ESTATE E1 REMEMBER WHEN C1 SPORTS B1 VOICES A4WORD ON THE STREE T A2SOUTH LAKE PRESSV OLUME 99, NO. 7 5 SECTIOn N S 2008, Halifax Media Group All rights reservedwww. southlakepress.com PRSRT-STD U.S. Postage Paid Clermont, FL Permit #280 Postal Customer Clermont, FL 34711 presort standard mail Clermont, FL Permit No. 280U.S. POSTAGE PAID BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: A shopping center is shown in Heathrow. The city has many jobs in nance, information technology, engineering, banking and education. BELOW: The AAA building is pictured in Heathrow. AAA was one of the rst major companies to commit to Heathrows sector plan. The Wellness Plan in Clermont could be similar to the one in Heathrow. THE WELLNESS WAY PLAN, BY THE NUMBERS %  enACRES: 16,000 %  enHOMES: 16,000 %  enPROPOSED EMPLOYMENT: 24,300 %  enJOBS PER HOUSEHOLD: 1.5 Officials pushing for more jobs, water protection in sector planCLERMONT MILLARD IVES | Staff Writermillard.ives@dailycommercial.comA forklift operator, starting his equipment where propane gas tanks were being drained, apparently sparked a massive ex plosion that engulfed the Blue Rhino plant in Tavares last July, ofcials say. It is clear the explo sion and subsequent re was not caused on purpose, but was the result of an accidental ignition, apparent ly caused by a forklift, Ric Ridgway, the chief assistant state attor ney of the 5th Judicial Circuit, stated in a let ter dated Feb. 3 to Neil Zierden, a detective with the State Fire Mar shals Ofce. That ofce initially ruled the re an ac cident but forwarded its ndings to the State Attorneys Ofce to see if any culpable negli gence was involved. Culpable negligence is more than a failure to use ordinary care, it is consciously doing an act or following a course of conduct that the defendant must have known, or rea sonably should have known, was likely to cause death or great bodily harm, Ridgway wrote in his letter to Zierden. Under the circumstances of this TAVARESInvestigators: Forklift caused Blue Rhino blastMILLARD IVES / DAILY COMMERCIAL Investigators examine the Blue Rhino property in July on County Road 448 in Tavares after an explosion ignited nearly 53,000 propane tanks. ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comAbout 90 percent of the viola tions issued in Clermont since red-light cameras went live on Jan. 3 have not been for motor ists barreling through intersections but those turning right on red. This is unacceptable! City Councilman Ray Goodgame said in an email last week. Our cameras are for public safety, not for the nancial benet of the camera company. Council members recently asked City Manager Darren Gray to look into the matter to make sure the red light cameras are catching blatant red light run ners as their number one focus. Gray, along with Clermont City Attorney Dan Mantzar is, met with American Trafc Solutions the company that installs and monitors the cam eras in a closed-door meet ing Feb. 4. What came out of those discussions was not im mediately known. Although a state statute says motorists have to come to a complete stop before turning right on red, a separate state statute pertaining to red light cameras says drivers can turn right on red without a camera citation if they do it in a safe and prudent manner at less than 12 mph. Its up to the camera company and a police rep resentative reviewing the tape to determine if a violation occurred. According to information obtained from the city, 1,880 CLERMONTCity upset over tickets for right turns on redThis is unacceptable. Our cameras are for public safety, not for the financial benefit of the camera company.City Councilman Ray GoodgameSEE PLAN | A2SEE BLAST | A6SEE TICKETS | A6

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A2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 12, 2014 MOUNT DORA South Lake Black Achievers awards banquet is SundayThe 22nd annual South Lake Black Achievers banquet will be held at 6 / p.m., Sunday, at Lake Receptions, 4425 N. Highway 19-A in Mount Dora. Tickets are on sale for a donation of $40 dollars per person. To purchase tickets, call 352-3487955, or email SLBA1992org.gmail.com.CLERMONT Used books, CDs and DVDs wanted at the libraryFriends of the Cooper Memorial Library are collecting used books, CDs and DVDs in preparation for the winter book sale and fundraiser from 9 / a.m. to 1 / p.m., Friday and Saturday, in Room 108A-B, 2525 Oakley Seaver Dr. For information, call 352-394-3849.CLERMONT Green Valley Country Club hosts fundraiserThe Green Valley Womens Golf Association will host its annual fundraiser golf tournament to benet Cornerstone Hospice of Lake and Sumter counties on Saturday. Both men and women are welcome to par ticipate in the event at 14601 Green Valley Blvd. The four-man scramble begins at 8:30 / a.m. with a shotgun start. Registration begins at 7:30 / a.m. and the cost is $60 per person and includes golf cart, coffee and donuts, lunch, prizes and a $15 donation to Hospice. For information, call 352-242-9545 or 352-241-8899.CLERMONT Registration deadline is Saturday for 5k Rib RunThe Pig on Pond 5k Run/Walk Rib Run for Education hosted by First Green Bank will benet the Pig on the Pond education fund. The run/walk event is for all ages and will be at 8 / a.m., March 8 at Waterfront Park. Registration deadline is Saturday and can be done at www.pigonthepond.org or at www.active.com. For information or to be a sponsor, call 407-625-3818 or email pigonthepond@earthlink.net.CLERMONT Participants sought for annual bake-off on March 8The 16th annual Pig on the Pond Dessert Bake-Off is scheduled for March 8, part of the Pig on the Pond Sanctioned Barbecue Competition and Festival March 7-9. The bakeoff, organized by the Church at South Lake, raises funds for their Buses and Backpacks program, a weekly effort to feed elementary-aged children. Entry forms for the bake-off must be received by March 8, with desserts delivered to the event by 9:30 / a.m. The bake-off is for amateur bakers. Go to www.pigonthepond.org or call Tandy Hammond at 352-243-1155.CLERMONT Valentines Date Night set at Cagan CrossingsCagan Crossings Farmers Market will host a Valentines Date Night event from 4 to 8 / p.m., Friday, with couples specials on appetizers, entrees, desserts and drinks. Adults who want to participate can take their kids to the South Lake Art Leagues artists boutique where your child can take a one-hour craft class. Email cagancrossingsfarmersmar ket@gmail.com, or call Kathie Camara at 352-241-6407 for details.CLERMONT Aida to be presented at East Ridge High SchoolThe musical Aida will be presented at 7 / p.m., on Feb. 19-21, with a matinee on Feb. 22 at 2 / p.m., at East Ridge High School auditorium, 13322 Excalibur Road in Clermont. Tickets are $10 and can be reserved by emailing Vince Santo at santov@ lake.k12..us. Area Briefs What South Lake residents are saying about ...VALENTINES DAYWhat has been your most memorable Valentines Day?My most memorable Valentines, I was in the eighth grade, and we had a little Valentines dance at my middle school, and the girl I kind of liked asked me to the dance with her. That was memorable. STEVE AMANN CLERMONT My husband and I are from New York, and when we were dating we would go often to a little Italian restaurant called The Al pine. He proposed to me there on Valentines Day. Weve been married 26 years. JACKIE KELLY CLERMONT My most memorable would be almost every year because my moth er and dad always gave us valentines and owers sometimes and candies. I like getting valentines from my parents. TRISTA FOUTS CLERMONT One day I was in preschool and my preschool teacher told me and a girl to make a cake, and we made it for our mothers because it was almost Valentines Day. I had to hide it in my home and we had to wait, and then I gave it to my mother. ALEJANDRO RIOS KISSIMMEE Word on theStreet Missing your South Lake Press? Call us. To request home delivery or to report a missed paper,call 787-0600 or toll-free at 877-702-0600. More information about circulation on Page A4 The plan to transform 16,000 acres in the south east corner of the county into a hub for hightech health care jobs and other industries, which would attract people who like to bike, walk and enjoy an active, healthy lifestyle, is inching closer to reality. Modications to the Sector Plan will require the protection of the rolling hills of south Lake and protection of water resources, county ofcials said this week. For example, the plan will include a policy that water used for irrigating landscape cannot come from potable water sources like the upper Floridan aquifer. The plan also will require the use of new communication technology that will send large amounts of data faster than conventional Inter net connections. What makes the plan unique to others is its emphasis on protection of topography and water resources, according to Parks. We will have design standards that will protect the unique topography we have in south Lake, he said. We need to remain focused that we are trying to diversify our economy while protecting our water resources. This is a plan that is carefully thought out to promote economic prosper ity and help Lake County move away from a housing-based economy. County commissioners will vote on whether to advertise the plan for a public hearing in April. The sector plan area, which has multiple landowners, has been called the last big chunk of undeveloped land in the county. The area is bounded by State Road 50 (to the north), U.S. Highway 192 (to the south), U.S. Highway 27 (to the west), and the Or ange County line (to the east). Surrounded by major throughways and within close proximity to the city of Orlando and the theme parks, it is the prime spot to bring jobs to the region, Parks said Funding for development could come from private or state sources, but the county is not investing its own money, county ofcials said. Economists and ofcials alike believe the plan will diversify the economy and help recruit a broad sector of industries to the region, primarily healthcare. In 2011, 24 major landowners living within the boundaries of the sector plan contributed $175,000 toward funding a study. As the plan comes together, portions of it are being modeled after similar developments such as Heathrow, which is 19 miles northeast of Or lando and has more than 10,900 employees that work in high-wage jobs in the elds of nance, shared services, infor mation technology, engineering, banking and education. County ofcials said long-term planning for the area will help avoid urban sprawl.JOBSThe plan allows for 16,000 residential units, but at the same time, species 1.5 jobs per one household. Currently there is roughly half a job per household in south Lake, according to Brian Sheah an, project manager. The plan at buildout would produce roughly three times more jobs than exist now, Sheahan said. If the maximum number of residential units are built, the minimum number of jobs created would be 24,300, county ofcials said. Robert Chandler, Lakes director of economic development and tourism, previously said health and life sciences, warehouse and distribution, business services and nance and light manufacturing will be the tar get industries. Parks said the plan is specically focused on health industries, making it unique from other plans. It goes hand in hand with the National Training Center at South Lake Hospital, he said. The NTC serves as a training ground for many professional athletes, including 23 who took part in the London 2012 Olympics. Indeed, Greg Beliveau, president of LPG Ur ban & Regional Planners in Mount Dora, said the plans focus on health care industry jobs and its proximity to the NTC is unique. Beliveau is not afliated with the Sector Plan. Commission Chairman Jimmy Conner said the plan is a great idea. The implementation is the hardest part, especially when you have so many landowners, he said. But it is much wiser to plan an area together than to do it piece by piece. We are trying to bring more commercial and industrial properties as opposed to rooftops. Challenges Parks said the challenge is the misconception that because you are planning long-term you are planning for urban sprawl. This is not a development plan, he said. It is plan for our future. If we did nothing, we would have nothing but ur ban sprawl and piecemeal growth. We are not proposing to add more homes. We are trying to measure growth in that area that occurs over the next 30 years in an or derly fashion and doesnt burden public services. Beliveau said urban sprawl can be avoided dependent on how the plan is designed. In its proximity to metro west and Cler mont, it can be an anti urban sprawl design because it can be a connection to the two, especially with the transportation network they are anticipating, he said, referring to plans for a new Wellness Way corridor to run from U.S. 27 to SR 429, right in the center of the sector plan. PLAN FROM PAGE A1 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillardives@dailycommercial.comThe Florida Department of Law Enforcement has taken over an investigation into a combative South Lake Hospital patient who died Jan. 31 after a struggle with law enforcement. Clermont police Capt. Michael McMaster said the department decided to hand the case to the FDLE after conducting its own prelimi nary investigation. According to police, the patient was being Baker Acted, which al lows for people who may pose a danger to themselves or others to be held for short periods. He was waiting to be transferred to a men tal facility by the Lake County Sher iffs Ofce when he became com bative with the hospital staff and security. Clermont police were called to the scene, and when they arrived about 2 / p.m., the man calmed down but became combative again with police and deputies. McMaster added that sometime after being restrained by law enforcement and medical staff, the man died at the hospital. According to a police report, the man at some point stopped breath ing and couldnt be revived. No further details of the incident were released, including the mans name.CLERMONTFDLE takes over investigation in death of man who battled officers at South Lake Hospital THANKS FOR READING THE SOUTH LAKE PRESS

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Wednesday, February 12, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A3 AUSTIN FULLER | Staff Writeraustin.fuller@dailycommercial.comThe recent failure of a farmers mar ket in downtown Eustis was an abnormality in an area where simi lar markets have been thriving in some cas es for decades. Cagan Crossings, Cl ermont, Leesburg, Lady Lake, Mount Dora (The Village Mar ket and Renningers), the Lake County Fair grounds (north of downtown Eustis), The Villages and Webster all have thriving farmers markets. The Sumter Coun ty Farmers Market in Webster dates back to the late 1930s, while the relatively new Brownwood Farmers Market in The Villages routinely hosts more than 50 vendors. So what went wrong in downtown Eustis, and what makes a suc cessful farmers market? Eustis ofcials pulled the plug on the market in Palmetto Plaza after only two months be cause staff resources involved in running the market were outweighing the public benet, said Lori Barnes, a se nior planner with the city. Not enough peo ple were showing up, which she attributed to bad weather on the days the market was open and not enough signage to let people know its location. City ofcials will be looking at other farm ers markets to see what makes them successful before deciding wheth er to bring the down town market back, but a different location is not an option, Barnes said. The Sumter County Farmers Market made its debut in 1937. The last of its original barns was demolished six years ago, but timbers from that building were saved and are now part of the porch roof on the markets restaurant. The success of the 40acre Webster operation comes from the quality of its local produce, according to Marc Har rell, the general manager for the past 14 years. We probably have some of the best pro duce, home-grown pro duce, you know when its in season, that is still (grown) here local ly by farmers and they market their produce here, Harrell said. To me, thats been the backbone of this mar ket, having a wide vari ety of different types of produce. He added the mar ket has one shed ded icated to just produce and the rest of the mar ket is ea market-type vendors. The Sumter County farmers market is open every Monday from 7 / a.m. to 3 / p .m., and the restaurant is open daily. Were only open one day a week, which is only on Mondays. Harrell said. Thats the way its always been. One reason for the Monday operation is that vendors sell at oth er farmers markets on the weekends, he add ed. In Mount Dora, The Village Market had its grand reopening in September 2012. Don Stuart, market manag er, said vendors make a market successful. All markets begin and end with the ven dors, he said. The Village Market has nearly 40 vendors, and 75 to 80 percent of them sell food or food-related products, Stuart said, adding his vendors are ercely loyal. They consider it their market, he said. They have a great loy alty to the market; thats extremely difcult to develop. So Im very, very proud of that. The Mount Dora Vil lage Market takes place from 9 / a.m. to 2 / p .m. every Sunday in Elizabeth Evans Park, with a few exceptions because of major events going on in Mount Dora. Cole Scharlau, the program manager for the Lake County Expo Center and Fair grounds, said the Lake County Farmers Mar ket has been around since 1969. During its busy season, its not uncommon to see 250 vendors there. Scharlua said keys to a successful farmers mar ket include community support, longevity, ven dor consistency, loca tion, size of the proper ty and parking. Another really important thing for a suc cessful farmers market is obviously good pro duce, fresh produce at good prices, which is what most people come here for, I would say, Scharlua said. Scharlua added location might be the most important aspect. The Lake County farmers market starts at 8 / a.m. every Thurs day. Carol Peters is the owner of Slow Turtle Farm outside of Eustis, and she sells at the Mount Dora Village Market. She also sold her pet food goat dairy products at the down town Eustis market from its beginning to its end. Peters said accessibility, advertising and quality products are what drives success at farmers markets. Its not like a ea market where youre looking for bargains, she said. Youre looking for regional items, either fresh (or) organic, as far as produce goes. Something that is made locally...They (buyers) want to know who it is that theyre purchasing from.Vendors key for successful farmers markets PHOTOS BY BRETT LE BLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Customers browse the many items that vendors have on display at the Sumter County Farmers Market in Webster. Staff ReportCushman & Wakeeld has brokered the sale of 157 acres along County Road 466A, west of Buena Vista Boulevard in Wildwood, and will be developing the property with the Barclay Group. The acreage was purchased from the Word Family LLC in Gainesville for $30 million. The Barclay Group will be devel oping the property later this year as a mixed-use project that will in clude retail, residential/senior housing, medical ofce, ofce and insti tutional components, according to a press release. The property is bordered on three sides by The Villages, including immediately on the east by the Sandhill Golf Course. A large tract of vacant land to the west is owned by the Penrose Family and is not part of the sale, accord ing to records at the Sumter County Property Appraisers Ofce. Cushman & Wakeeld is the worlds largest privately held commercial real estate services rm, while the Barclay Group is a full-ser vice commercial real estate rm that develops, leases and manages an array of commercial retail proper ties, from large power centers to sin gle-tenant buildings. A Cushman & Wakeeld representative was contacted but did not get back with specic details about how the property would be developed.157-acre tract purchased in Wildwood for $30M WHITNEY WILLARD / STAFF GRAPHICLAND SALE Cushman & Wakefield has brokered the sale of 157 acres along County Road 466A, west of Buena Vista Boulevard in Wildwood, and will be developing the property with the Barclay Group. 466A 134 142 462Pinellas Pl.TURTLE MOUND GOLF COURSEBuena Vista Blvd. N Land sale site

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A4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 12, 2014Lake County Superintendent of Schools Su san Moxley moved swiftly last week to defuse a potential time bomb when she ordered an independent review of student en rollment at area schools. Her announcement comes on the heels of news that six Lake County schools underreported their enrollments and are actually over the state class size limits. By law, Florida Schools are not permitted to have more than 18 students per class in grades pre-kindergarten through 3; 22 per class in grades 4 through 8; and 25 in grades 9 to 12. These rules were approved by voters as a constitutional amendment a decade ago, and schools that violate them are subject to state nes. While its not clear whether the state will actually impose nes on the district or how heavily what is clear is that Moxley and the entire school district administration are facing a crisis. It isnt even the possibility of nes that concerns us. No, whats at stake is a more precious cost the credibility of the school district. Elected school board members were rightly upset about the violations, and at least one believes principals intentionally lied about their class sizes in an effort to skirt the law. One teacher, a whistleblower, contends that her assistant principal wanted her to help falsify the student count in her class. And the head of the local teachers union said some of his members complained that they were asked to sign false class rosters as well. Moxley appears to be taking these allega tions very seriously. On Thursday, she held a rare press conference to announce that she was launching an independent review of enroll ment at all schools. She also atly insisted that her administration has brought no pressure on school principals to fudge their enrollments. We applaud this move. Our public school system, after all, is more than an academic institution. It is a place where our children learn about character and values. While the allegations of lying are largely anecdotal and unconrmed, this specter looms large over the school system at this point. What lessons are we teaching these children if our administrators cheat and lie their way around the law? And what of the taxpayers? Local governments the County Commission, area city councils and the school district have already said they will seek voter approval to extend the penny sales tax in the coming years. Voters will need to have condence that their elected ofcials are prudent and ethical, and this episode certainly cant help. Yes, an independent and transparent review of schools is warranted indeed essential if the district is going to restore condence in the integrity of the schools and the administration. YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . ........................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ...................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTOPINION WHATS YOUR OPINION?The SOUTH LAKE PRESS invites you to write letters to the editor expressing your original thoughts on topics of public interest. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be origi nal, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length to make room for more letters. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to: slpress@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to: Letters to the Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711By fax to: 352-394-8001EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed.GUEST COLUMNSIf you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to southlakepress@dailycommercial.com, or mail it to Letters to Editor, 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34711. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photograph to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. OURVIEW SOUTH LAKE PRESSYour community newspaper for more than 100 years.732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, FL 34712-0868 352-394-2183 Fax: 352-394-8001The South Lake Press is published weekly by Halifax Media Group at 732 W. Montrose St., Clermont, Florida 34711. Standard mail postage (Permit #280) is paid at the United States Post Ofce, Clermont, FL 34711. The South Lake Press is mailed to subscribers and is also distributed at newsstand locations throughout the region.All material contained in this edition is property of Halifax Media Group, and is protected under the copy right laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Push forward with review of area schools LETTER of the WEEKI want to personally thank John Mor gan and all who helped get the medical marijuana question on the ballot. I personally know individuals who this plant is helping to keep alive. Marijuana is dened in the dictionary as a tall Asiatic herb and has been used from the remotest of times for its medical properties. John Morgan is correct in his assertions that most pharmaceutical companies are opposed to medical marijuana as it will cut into their prots. The DEAs own administrative law judge,, Francis Young, back in the 1980s found that marijuana is one of the safest therapeutic substances known to man. After extensive hearings he recommended that it be placed in Schedule II so it could be prescribed. Back in 1972 also after extensive hearings the Schaffer Commission recommended that no criminal penalties attach to its use by adults in their homes. Now, even the president has come out saying it is safer then alcohol. JEFF BROWN | GrovelandMedical marijuana helps keep people alive COURTESY PHOTO This photo shows different strains of marijuana displayed during the grand opening of the Seattle location of the Northwest Cannabis Market, for sales of medical marijuana products.Postal unions need to changeI was a bit intrigued by an ar ticle that related to the overpaid postal unions efforts to thwart the selling of stamps, etc., at Staples. I can understand the unions wanting to add dues-paying members by trying to have Staples hire only postal employees to do the selling in the stores, but patronage only goes so far. My intrigue stems from the fact that I grew up in a sprawling city/town of 10,000 souls, and the place had four postal substations where you could buy stamps and mail packages, with some limits. These substations were local grocery and convenience stores, and of course, this was when the postman actually walked house to house through wind and rain and snow, etc. I understand the unions right to try and increase its inuence, but times are changing and they have to live with it, lest they have more troubles in these changing times. CHARLES WELCOME | TavaresBeware of recycled waterSenator Hays, I like and agree with what you had to say about water as reported by Livi Stanford of the Daily Commercial. Nutrients do have to be prevented and removed if practical. On the other hand, be aware that reuse or recycled wastewater can contain thousands of chemicals such as mercury, di oxins, nitrates and nitrites which can form nitrosamines, phosphates, pharmaceuticals, etc. Putting these on lawns, golf courses, etc. can be harmful to the water and environment as well. They may also endanger children who play on the lawns treated with recycled wastewater, as well as pregnant women, nursing mothers and persons with immune disorders. I am under the belief that there are those in Florida who want the groundwater supply to become depleted so the for tunes can be made on desalination, purifying wastewater and using lake and river water. I recall Enron Corp, a Houston energy broker, who wanted the privatization of water supplies and I bet there are others just waiting to make their for tune off Florida Citizens. If I recall, Azurix Corp was also involved. DR. RON NEY | LeesburgIntolerance has many facesAfter reading a recent article on GOP intolerance by Rekha Basu, I was very disturbed. As a white Christian, I feel that there are many African-Americans and Hispanics, as well as many other cultures, who share my exact same beliefs, so racism has absolutely no part in this. I oppose abortion because it is the deliberate killing of a child. I believe that the practice of homosexuality is a sin because the word of God, the Holy Bible, tells us so. We are taught to love the sinner but not the sin and to teach others to accept homosexuality as normal is a sin in itself. As to the right to vote, I believe that every person must have proof of identication before being allowed to vote. Voting is one of Americans most important responsibilities guar anteed by the U.S. Constitution. In todays society, illegal aliens do not have that right, nor should they. They are illegal! As to the cruelty shown by whites against blacks, that is horrendous and should be punishable. Unfortunately, racism is alive and well in this country but it is a two-way street. Crimes are committed by blacks against whites as well, such as the knock-out game, in which the attacker has attempted to knock out a man, woman or child with a blow to their head. This has resulted in several deaths and many severe injuries almost all ignored by the mainstream media. So again, I would suggest that before you condemn others and the GOP for intolerance that you look to yourself at your own intolerance to others who do not share your beliefs. DORIS BURGESS | Wildwood YOURVOICESLETTERS TO THE EDITOR

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Wednesday, February 12, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS A5 Staff ReportVolunteers are needed at the Read to Sydney organization for projects including designing and editing a newsletter, volunteer ing at the Clermont Petcos in-store ta ble, collecting donations (cash and monetary) from local stores and businesses, distribution and collection of donation boxes and planning and setting up special events and book signings. For information, call 407-247-8595 or go to www.readtosydney.org. DEATH NOTICESRichard B. AllenRichard B. Allen, 62 died Friday, January 31, 2014 Eastside Funeral Home, Leesburg, FLRichard BellavanceRichard Bellavance, 68, of Leesburg, died Monday, January 27, 2014. Page-Theus Fu nerals & Cremations.Mary J. FitchMary J. Fitch, 67, of Tavares, died Monday, February 3, 2014. Ham lin & Hilbish Funeral Directors.Charles FloryCharles Flory, 81, of Leesburg, died Wednesday, February 5, 2014. Page-Theus Funerals & Cremations.Joseph Jackson Jr.Joseph Jackson, Jr. 58, Woodridge, VA, (for merly of Webster), died Friday, January 24, 2014. Rocker-Cusack Mortuary, Leesburg.Byron Jack MeyerByron Jack Mey er, 80, of Eustis, died Wednesday, February 5, 2014. Harden/Pauli Funeral HomeWilliam PaxsonWilliam Paxson, 94, of Leesburg, FL died Fri, Jan 31, 2014. Beyers Funeral Home.Justin Jermaine RussellRussell, Justin Jer maine, 31, died Fri day, January 31, 2014. Floyds Funeral Home.Agnes D. SheppardAgnes D. Sheppard, 75, of Tavares passed away on Tuesday, Feb ruary 04, 2014. Stever son, Hamlin & Hilbish Funerals and Cremations, Tavares, FL.James Webb Jr.James Webb, Jr., 53, of Groveland, died Wednesday, February 5, 2014. Marvin C. Zan ders Funeral Home, Inc.Amelia YeasleyAmelia Yeasley, 98, Mt. Dora, DOD 1/30/2014. Hayes Brothers Funer al Home, Eustis, 28 W. Woodward Ave., Eustis, FL 32726 352-589-4666.Connie B. ZacheryConnie B. Zachery, 64, of Mount Dora, died Tuesday, February 4, 2014. Marvin C. Zan ders Funeral Home, Inc.IN MEMORY CLERMONTRead to Sydney organization seeks volunteers ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comKathy Johnston, a former deputy chief with the Orlando Fire Department and founder of Search and Rescue of Central Flor ida, is Clermonts new assistant re chief. Johnston, who holds two masters degrees, had a distinguished 25-year career in the Orlando Fire Department, where she served as assistant chief. She was named Orlando Employee of the Month multiple times and was awarded the Charles C. Hall Award for emergen cy medical services in Orange County. She has published nu merous articles and been a speaker at the International Asso ciation of Fire Chiefs Conferences. Johnston also served as deputy commander with the Florida 6 Di saster Medical Assistance team and was deployed to New Orle ans in the wake of Hur ricane Katrina. After her retirement, Johnston worked with the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Johnston has served as chair of the Florida Association for Search and Rescue, and pres ident of the National Association for Search and Rescue, in addi tion to being founder and director emeritus of Search and Rescue of Central Florida.CLERMONTCity has new assistant fire chief Staff ReportAbout 40 Lake County reghters responded to a fast-moving brush re near Groveland last week and were able to save multiple homes, although one mobile home was de stroyed. A two-man crew responded to a 911 call about a small grass re, but found something different when they arrived, said Lt. Brian Gamble, vice president of the Professional Fireghters of Lake County. Our rst arriving truck report ed a fast-moving brush re, a shed on re and multiple homes in im mediate danger, he said. This crew of only two reghters act ed quickly and protected the resi dence near the shed. The re came within about 50 feet of this house. A neighboring mobile home did not fare as well. Our crews tried stretching lines to the neighboring mobile home, but could not reach it in time. Gamble said. The terrain conditions prevented our re trucks from being able to get close to the home. The trucks sank in the soft sand conditions around the house. A second alarm was issued that dispatched city and county units from all over, Gamble said. About 20 re units responded with more than 40 reghters from Lake County, Groveland, Leesburg, Fruitland Park and the Florida Di vision of Forestry. We were fortunate enough to make it to the next home and make sure that everyone was out, and set up protection there, Gamble said. The third residence on the street was saved as well. The fast-moving brush re con sumed a shed and the neighboring mobile home before moving into a dry lake bed on one side, and a farm of mature planted pine trees on the other side. Additional re sponding re crews were quickly diverted to Royal Highlands subdi vision to ght the re if it crossed the lake bed, Gamble said. One of the biggest challenges we faced was that our tankers could not make it down Soto Road with out getting stuck in sand, he said. The dirt road was in poor con dition and, if one truck became stuck, that would have prevented all the rest of our trucks from get ting to the re. Every time a brush truck or engine ran out of water, crews had to travel more than a mile of rough dirt terrain to be relled. This time lost allowed the re to keep mov ing, Gamble said. We did the best with what we were dealt, he said. We had a re truck with only two reghters ar riving to a fast-moving re with multiple homes in danger. These reghters put their lives on the line to make sure everyone was safe and save as much proper ty as they could. While no one ever wants to lose a home to a re, you still have to be satised with the results that no one was injured or killed and that only one home and shed were lost. The blaze took several hours to bring under control and consumed around 20 acres. Gamble said the Florida Division of Forestry determined the re was started by careless burning of trash and issued a citation.GROVELANDAbout 40 firefighters respond to save homes PHOTO COURTESY OF PROFESSIONAL FIREFIGHTERS OF LAKE COUNTY A Lake County reghter walks over charred ground after a brush re threatened several homes near Groveland last week.

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A6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 12, 2014 LET THE FUN BEGININFLATABLE FUN FOR EVERYONE! INDOOR INFLATABLE FUN CENTER!Best Indoor Playspace/Playplace in Central Florida 200 Hatteras Ave. Clermont, FL 34711352-394-7789WWW.JUMPNJOEYSONLINE.COMFREEWI-FI ZONE $10 OFFRental for first time usersCannot be used with any other offer. Ends March 31, 2014 WE ARE NOW RENTING BOUNCE HOUSES! Arts/CulturalAn individual whose personal or professional talents/activities in the cultural arts have contributed to the enrichment of Lake County.Hall of Fame Business AwardFor career business achievement of 20 years or more.Business AchievementA business leader whose achievements within his or her field have aided the economic business climate of Lake County. Categories: Small Medium (12-39 employees) Large EntrepreneurEducationAn employed, elected or volunteer educator who has shown innovation and dedication to public or private schools in Lake County.HumanitarianAn individual whose volunteer activities have improved the quality of life in Lake County..Public ServiceAn outstanding elected or employed official of state, county or city government; or a volunteer who has made contributions toward improving Lake Countys quality of life.Sports/AthleticsA person who has achieved in sports through performance or in promotion of athletic events in Lake County.Chris Daniels Memorial Public Safety AwardTo recognize an individual in the area of Public Safety who has demonstrated superior performance in their career, and has shown a commitment to better the Lake County through community involvement. This would include those persons in Lake County in the careers of law enforcement, fire, emergency medical services and emergency management.Special Judges AwardAwarded at the discretion of the judges for particularly outstanding contributions to Lake CountyLake County Leadership AwardAn individual whose guidance & leadership has impacted Lake CoNominations must be postmarked by February 21, 2014 Mail to:LAKE COUNTY COMMUNITY SERVICE AWARDS Lake County League of Cities or email to myersj@ci.eustis.fl.us CommunityService Awards NOMINATIONS ARE NOW BEING ACCEPTED!Applications will be Printed in the THURSDAY EDITION of the Daily Commercial Were sure you know a person whose dedication and selflessness have made Lake County a better place. Now its time to give them the recognition they deserve.Nominating someone is easy. Nomination forms will be printed in the Thursday editions of the Daily Commercial, can be picked up at the Chamber of Commerce offices and City Halls throughout Lake County or you can contact Janice Jones (phone: 352-483-5440 or email: JonesJ@ci.eustis.fl.us.com) and have one sent to you. You can also access and submit the nomination form on-line at www.dailycommercial.comIf selected, your nominee will be honored at the 2014 Lake County Community Service Awards Dinner on April 30, 2014.SO SHOW YOUR APPRECIATION. MAKE YOUR NOMINATIONS TODAY! Your First Choice In-Print & On-Line case, I do not think the evidence would prove this level of negligence. Accordingly, this ofce will take no further ac tion in the matter. The night-time blast and subsequent re on County Road 448 ignited nearly 53,000 propane tanks, shooting many into neighboring buildings and proper ties. The blast lit up the sky with orange ames that could be seen for miles, injured eight workers, prompted hundreds of 911 calls, sparked evacuations and resulted in at least one lawsuit. Immediately following the explosion, a Daily Commercial re porter interviewed third-shift Blue Rhi no maintenance work er Gene Williams, who rescued an injured fellow co-worker. Williams said he ran from the lobby to the loading dock area after hearing the rst booms and no ticed forklift operator Allen Kelly had been engulfed by the reball. He had esh hanging off his hands from third-degree burns, Williams said. His legs were burnt bad and his face was burned, and I told him, Come on, Allen, Im going to get you out of here. Williams said. The plant refurbishes and rells 20-pound propane tanks, the type normally used for backyard grills, that Blue Rhino sells from displays outside of retails outlets like con venience stores. According to a State Fire Marshalls report released Wednesday morning, the plants evac-machine, used to properly drain or bleed the tanks, had been down for more than a year when the accident occurred. Employees were bleeding some of the tanks themselves in the rear of the facility, by removing a screw near the neck of the cylinders, when Kelly drove up in a recently repaired Nissan forklift and asked if they need ed help. The report said employees yelled at Kelly to get away, and when he started up the fork lift, a ame or a spark was seen just before the rst explosion. After rushing the injured Kelly to Flori da Hospital Water man, Williams said he was summoned back to the plant because rst responders needed someone who knew the layout. It gave him time to think about what caused the explosion. Combination of human error and bad practice, possibly, he said at the time. I dont want to speculate any more than that, but that is what the forklift driver was telling me. He just said, I do what they told me to do and then this happens. He was moving the forklift from one location to another and something must have triggered the gas or something in that area Kelly a four-year production worker who sustained second and third-degree burns to his arms, legs and face said the last thing he remembered was start ing the forklift and then being surrounded by re, the report said. The Occupational Safety and Health Ad ministration, as well as Florida Department of Agriculture and Con sumer Services, an umbrella for the Bureau of LP gas, is still investiga tion the blast. The plant recently re opened with add itional safety features including automatic water cannons. BLAST FROM PAGE A1 red-light citations were issued since Jan. 3. Of those violations, 1,703 were for right turns on red, a number that has surprised some city council members. The board previously approved in stalling up to 24 red light cameras at 13 intersections along State Road 50 and U.S. Highway 27, but only six have been installed to date at the most problematic intersections: State Road 50 and East Avenue, one westbound camera; State Road 50 and 5th Street, one eastbound and one westbound camera; State Road 50 and 12th Street, one westbound camera; and State Road 50 and Han cock Road, one eastbound and one westbound camera. According to city records, the monthly cost for operating the cam eras is $4,750 per camera. State law requires that $100 from each ticket goes to the states Gen eral Revenue Fund, $10 goes to the states Department of Health Emer gency Medical Services Trust Fund and $3 goes to a Brain and Spinal Cord Injury Trust Fund. This leaves $45 in revenue per ticket for the city before program costs are deducted. Police Capt. Michael McMaster said drivers wont have to wor ry about the various state statutes if they do the safe thing and stop on red before turning right. The bottom line is if a driver comes to a complete stop prior to starting their right turn, they will not receive a violation either way, he said. Thats the best and safest thing to do. TICKETS FROM PAGE A1

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B1SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 12, 2014 www.southlakepress.com YOUR CONTACT FOR SPORTSSPORTS EDITOR . ................. FRANK JOLLEY TELEPHONE . ............................ 365-82683 FAX . .......................................... 394-8001 E-MAIL . ........ sports@dailycommercial.comSPORTSandLEISURE FRANK JOLLEY / DAILY COMMERCIAL Eustis High Schools Jaylon Graham signs his National Letter of Intent on Wednesday to attend and play football at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Ill., during a signing ceremony in the Eustis Media Center. FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comBuck Solomon has never been a demon strative football player. Instead, the South Lake High School senior has spent his high school career quietly showing his teammates how to be a leader. Solomons mantra of leading by example paid off on Feb. 5 when he signed a National Letter of Intent to play football at Eastern Kentucky University during a signing cer emony in the South Lake auditorium lled with teammates, fam ily and friends. He was the only signee for the Eagles following a 7-3 campaign in 2013, but coach Mark Woolum indicated that others could sign before the school year ends in June. I felt very comfortable when I made my visit to Eastern Kentucky, Solomon said. The coaching staff was wonderful and they talked about tak ing care of their players and making sure they graduate. I also like the way they talked about building something special up there and I want to be part of that process. It seemed like a great t for me. Eastern Kentucky, an NCAA Football Championship Series subdi vision school (former ly Division 1-AA), is in Richmond, Ky. The GROVELANDSLHS Solomon signs with Eastern KentuckyFRANK JOLLEY / DAILY COMMERCIALSouth Lake High School senior Buck Solomon looks over his paperwork after signing his National Letter of Intent with Eastern Kentucky University on Wednesday during a signing ceremony at the South Lake High School auditorium. AREA NON-FOOTBALL SIGNEESSARAH MCKINNEY, Leesburg, soccer, Polk State CHELSEA MUDD, Leesburg, soccer, Polk State MORGAN SHAFAR, Leesburg, soccer, Mount Olive EMILY LEDOUX, Mount Dora, volleyball, Lake-Sumter FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comHe wasnt forced to, but Jaylon Graham followed family tradition when it came time to pick a college to continue his football career. The Eustis High School standout selected Southern Illinois University about two weeks ago and stuck with that choice on Feb. 5 when he signed a National Letter of Intent during a cere mony in the Eustis Me dia Center. By opting for the Foot ball Championship Sub division (formerly NCAA Division I-AA), Gra ham will be following in the footsteps of his uncle, Linton Brown, who played defensive tackle for the Salukis. Brown also played for Eustis. Primarily a lineback er at Eustis, Graham is expected to make the switch to defensive line in college. At Southern Illinois, he will be joined by Mount Doras Jeffer son Vea, who also signed Feb. 5. Graham said the deci sion to attend Southern Illinois was easy after he travelled to Carbondale, Ill., which is less than 100 miles from St. Lou is and about 350 miles from Chicago. I loved so much about the school when I made my visit, Graham said. I loved what the coaches and players had to say and I felt I could make an early impact there. Plus, the academic stan dards there are what I was looking for and they can offer me the chance to major in business. Once I got there, I knew that was the right school for me. Graham helped the Panthers rebounded from an 0-3 start in 2013 to nish 4-6 in coach Mike Hays second EUSTISPanthers Jaylon Graham heading to Southern IllinoisSEE PANTHERS | B2SEE SOUTH LAKE | B3 FRANK JOLLEY | Staff Writerfrank.jolley@dailycommercial.comJill Semento knew it would take more than one season to transform the Lake-Sumter State College softball into a regular visitor to the postseason. In her rst season at the helm, Semento coached the Lakehawks to a 14-45 record and a 4-20 mark in the Mid-Florida Conference, regarded as one of the toughest leagues in the state. As the second chapter of the Semento Era begins at LSSC, the coach believes the Lakehawks are on track to surpass last season and has the potential to produce one of the best seasons in school history. Semento believes LSSC can win at least 20 games and, earn a spot in the state tournament. Last year was a learning expe rience for myself and my players, Semento said. It was my rst year as coach and the players didnt know what I expected and how I wanted to play the game. Now, the soph omore have a year under their belt with me and they can help get the freshman on board a lit tle quicker. There were a lot of nerves with last years team, but this years group has a better ballplayer attitude. I like this group. The Lakehawks kicked off their season with three games on Saturday in a kickoff tournament in Clearwa ter. LSSC lost to Eastern Florida State College (formerly LEESBURGLakehawks look for improvement PHOTOS BY BRETT LEBLANC / DAILY COMMERCIAL ABOVE: Lake-Sumter State Colleges Kayla Fuller is met by teammates at home plate after hitting a walk-off home run during a softball game at the National Training Center. BELOW: Michelle Breen elds a ground ball. SEE LSSC | B2

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B2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 12, 2014 CLERMONT BLESSEDSACRAMENTCATHOLICCHURCH English: 4 pm and Spanish: 7 pm 8 am, 10 am, 12 noon (Contemporary Mass) 5 pm (Contemporary Mass) 3:00 pm 3:45 pm (Eng.) 6:15 pm 6:45 pm (Sp.) Corner of Hwy 50 & 12th St. (Rt 561) CROSSROADSAMILYELLOWSHIPChristian Non-Denominational Where our priority is God, Families & Community 15701 S.R. 50, #106 Clermont, FL 34711 At Greater Hills and Hwy 50 Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Children classes both services Men and womens monthly meetings Open prayer Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sr. Pastors Jim and Linda Watson Assoc. Pastors Lee and Vanessa Dobson www.crossroadsfamilyfellowship.org crossroadsfamilyfellowship@gmail.com Phone: (352)242-1144 God is good...all the time! IRSTUNITEDMETHODISTCHURCHMaking Disciples Sunday 8 & 11am (Traditional) Sunday 9:30am (Contemporary) Thursday 7pm (Celebrate Recovery) Reverend Doug Kokx, Senior Pastor Reverend Dawn Fryman, Pastor of Congregational Care GRACECOMMUNITYCHURCHCLERMONTL Many Other Activities each week Jon Bekemeyer, Senior Pastor 407-877-4048 www.communitychurchclermont.org LIBERTYBAPTISTCHURCH Bible Fellowship Groups 9:30 am Worship Service 10:40 am Family Prayer Service 6:00 pm Bible Study 7:00 pm Groups for adults, teens, and children Chris Johnson, Senior Pastor For directions and more information, visit: 11043 True Life Way Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.0708 NEWACOBSCHAPELMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCH Pastor: Rev. Rex Anderson Assistant Pastor: Rev. Darryl Church Youth Pastor: Rev. Tone Lundy Church Clerk: Mrs. Lucressie D. Mcgriff Church Motto: Equipping Changed People for A Changing World! Schedule of Worship Services Sunday Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Youth/Adult Bible Study Thursdays 6:45 p.m. e-mail addresses: newjacobschapel3@aol.com (Pastor Anderson) thechapel2013@gmail.com (Church Clerk) Contact: Lucressie Mcgriff 352-348-7955 REALLCHRISTIANCHURCHHelping Real People Find Real Faith Saturday 6:00pm Sunday 9:30am, 11:15am & 6:00pm Vida Real (en espaol), Domingos a las 6:00pm Family Night is every Wednesday! Lil Life Groups (Nursery 5th grade) 6:30-7:30pm The Way (Middle School) 6:30-7:30pm Catalyst (High School) 7:30-8:30pm Real Parenting 6:30-7:30pm SOUTHLAKEPRESBYTERIANCHURCH 131 Chestnut St., Clermont 352-394-2753 East Ave 1 block south of SR 50 Worship Times: Sunday 9 AM (Contemporary); 11 AM (Traditional) Church school for all ages 10:00 AM Childcare provided Youth Group Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 PM www.southlakepresbyterian.org ST. MATTHIASEPISCOPALCHURCH574 West Montrose Street Clermont, FL 34711 352.394.3855 www.stmatthiasfl.com 8:00 am 10:00 am Beginning Oct. 6, 2013 5:00 pm Service Sunday School Youth Group Nursery Adult Bible Study Womens Bible Study Mens Prayer Breakfast WOOTSONTEMPLECHURCH GODINCHRISTElder T.L. Wootson 836 Scott St. Clermont, FL 34711 394-1396 or 394-3004 Sunday 11:00 am & 7:30 pm Thursday 7:30 pm FERNDALE ERNDALEBAPTISTCHURCHat CR455 & CR561A 407-469-3888 Pastor: Gordon (Bird) Sanders Sunday School: 9:15 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Evening Worship & Discipleship Study: 6:00 pm TeamKid: Sunday 6:30 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Prayer Service, Youth Activities, Mission Kids for Children Groveland IRSTBAPTISTCHURCH GROVELAND Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Services 10:50 am & 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 6:30 pm MT. OLIVEMISSIONARYBAPTISTCHURCHSunday Worship Service 11:00 AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Youth Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 PM Come As You Are. All Are Welcome! MINNEOLA CONGREGATIONSMINNEOLAA Progressive Jewish Congregation Shabbat services are conducted every Friday at 7:30 pm Services are held at the synagogue located at: 303A North US Highway 27, Minneola Religious School, Mens Club & Womens Club NEWLPRESBYTERIANCHURCH18237 E. Apshawa Rd. Minneola, FL 34715 Music Ministries 407-920-0378 Sunday School 9:30 am Worship 10:45 am TLIVINGGOD Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship & Childrens Church 11:00 am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 pm Wed Worship & Youth Service 7:00 pm Rev. Loyce Rowland MONTVERDE WOODLANDSLUTHERAN15333 CR 455, Montverde, FL 34756 407-469-2525 www.woodlandschurch.com Pastor Rev. Dr. Brian Kneser Sunday Service 8:30 am & 11 am Sunday School 9:45 am OAKLAND PRESBYTERIANCHURCH218 E. Oakland Ave. (1/2 mile N. Hwy 50 at Tubb St./ West Orange Lumber) 8:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School For All Ages 11:00 am Traditional Worship Nursery Provided All Services 407-656-4452 Dr. Robert P. Hines, Jr. www.oaklandpres.org Gathering PlacesSpiritual WorshipforSouth Lake South LakeGathering PlacesSpiritual Worshipfor BECKERFUNERALHOMErfn tbt352-394-7121806 W. Minneola Ave.,Clermont,FL Cremation ChoicesDirect Cremation$675Plus Container Ron Becker,Director352-394-8228921 S.US Hwy 27,Minneola,FL N EW R EFORMED P LANT C HURCH We meet our God on Sunday at Superior Residence at 10:30 AM. 1600 Hunt Trace Blvd. (Behind Home Depot)Pastor Harm Biehl 407-325-8663 year at the helm. He selected Southern Illinois from a list of 15 schools. Even though he was con dent that Southern Illinois was going to be his school of choice, Graham wanted to make sure and made an of cial visit to Rhode Island be fore signing. I didnt want to regret my decision and making one more ofcial visit was only way I could know, Graham said. I enjoyed my visit to Rhode Is land and the people there were great, but I came away feeling even stronger about my deci sion to sign with Southern Illi nois. Im happy with my choice and Im relieved the whole process is over. It really was a burden, trying to make sure I made the right choice. Being recruited is not as glamorous as people think. Hay said Graham is the type of student-athlete a coach wants in a program. He said Grahams enthusiasm on the eld is infectious and his team mates were able to feed off him. Graham sports a 3.12 grade point average and also is a standout on the Panthers basketball team, averaging 10 points and four rebounds a game. He will be on the oor Friday when Eustis plays Mount Dora for the Class 5A-District 13 championship. Jaylon is a big kid 6-foot3 and 240 pounds but hes very mobile, Hay said. Of course, you have to be mo bile to play linebacker. When he moves to defensive line and puts on some weight, I think hell keep some of that mobili ty, which will help him. He has the chance to be a very good football player. Hay considers Grahams signing to be a great sign for the football program. He said it shows the underclassmen that hard work will pay off in the long run. One of his goals, Hay said, is to nd at least one school for every senior on his team. He hasnt accomplished that, yet, but Graham is the fourth play er to sign a National Letter of Intent since he took over as coach. I want to provide my play ers with motivation to be the best, so Ive promised them that if they work hard on the eld and in classroom, I will do everything in my power to nd them a college, Hay said. Its not easy, but I believe we can achieve that and when Jaylons teammates can watch him sign a letter to attend col lege, they see that its possible. Its the ultimate motivational tool. For now, however, Hay has an equaling daunting task. He has to nd a replacement for Graham, who was an All-District rst teamer and had nearly 200 tackles in his nal two seasons. In addition, Graham had 16 sacks as a junior and senior, along with eight forced fum bles and three fumble recoveries. Its a pleasure to see good things happen to players like Jaylon because they deserve it, Hay said. It makes things tougher for us, but its a very proud moment for the Eus tis High School football team. One of our play ers is moving on to the next level. PANTHERS FROM PAGE B1 AREA FOOTBALL SIGNEESJAYLON GRAHAM, Eustis . ............................................. Southern Illinois LEE BENNETT, Leesburg . ........................................................... Mercer JABARI DUNHAM, Leesburg . ....................................... Tennessee-Martin JAMES ELDRIDGE, Leesburg . ................................................... Air Force STEVEN GONZALEZ, Mount Dora . ................................................ Warner JEFFERSON VEA, Mount Dora . ....................................... Southern Illinois BUCK SOLOMON, South Lake . .................................... Eastern Kentucky ELIJAH ENGLISH, South Sumter . ......................................... Georgetown PAUL BROWN, South Sumter . .................................................... Warner PRESTON LEONARD, Umatilla . ................................................ Ave Maria Brevard Community Col lege) and national power house Indian River State College, but picked up a 7-6 win against Gordon State College. LSSC (2-3) opened its home schedule on Feb. 4 with a doubleheader split against Indian River State College at the National Training Center in Clermont. In the opener, Semento found out just how far her team has come when the Lakehawks stunned the Pioneers 6-4. Melissa Webb picked up the win with a six-strikeout performance and Kayla Fuller blasted a two-run walk-off homer. Thats probably one of the biggest wins in school history, Semen to said. Im so proud of these girls. In the nightcap, Indi an River exacted revenge with a 9-1 win. Taylor Douglas hit a home run to account the Lake hawks only run. Semento believes this years team will be more balanced on offense, with more pow er up and down the lineup. The Lakehawks have more depth than in pre vious seasons, making the team less prone to slumps, which often be gat losing streaks. Last year, we had one player who could hit the ball out on any pitch, Semento said. This year, we have at least four players who hit it out. In addition, we have play ers who can start a rally with base hits. Were denitely an improved team over last year. Well nd out how much better over the course of the season. Semento, an All-State player while at Umatilla, said she developed a plan to grow the softball program when she accept ed the job with the Lake hawks before the 2013 season. She knew it would take time to learn how to nd the players she felt could help the program and recruit them. I never recruited play ers before I came to LSSC, Semento said. I went through the recruiting process as a player. I had to learn how to sell a pro gram to young players, but I found out that I was one of the selling points for the softball team. A lot of girls wanted to play for a young coach. When I asked players why they came to LSSC, many of them told me that I was the reason. LSSC FROM PAGE B1

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Wednesday, February 12, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS B3 Just finished reading "Neighbors" and was thrilled to see something like it.Just finished reading "Neighbors" and was thrilled to see something like it. So many times we who live in Leesburg and have neighbors like Tavares, Eustis, etc. never see anything directed to us just us. Thanks...Im sure it was read by all who got it. ...let someone know what one of us thinks. As a lover of a delivered paper...one you can hold in your hand and read... I have been a reader since 1985. Joanne Garrett LeesburgYour community... Your news... Your newspaper! HWY 27/441 2 miles from Hwy 27 787-4440 $300OFFREMANUFACTURED CARTSCash or check. Must present ad on purchase. Limited Time Offer See store for details. Colonels were 6-6 in 2013 and are coached by Dean Hood, who has been at the sch ool since 2008. Solomon is one of six players signed by the Colonels from the state of Florida. South Lake coach Mark Woolum is a graduate of Eastern Kentucky. I didnt put any pressure on him to become a Colonel, Woolum said with a smile. I want Buck to go where he feels comfortable. Fortunately for Eastern Kentucky, he real ly enjoyed his ofcial visit and decided to make that his college of choice. I dont think it will take long for Buck to make an impact up there and show every one how good of a stu dent-athlete he is. Solomon produced a solid career at South Lake. He did not play any sport as a freshman in order to get a solid start in the class room, but has become a multi-sport standout, playing football, basketball, baseball and running track. He also proved to be a multi-dimensional player for the Ea gles. Solomon played quarterback as a junior, but voluntarily surren dered the position be fore his senior season and played a variety of positions, primarily wide receiver and de fensive back. Solomon played in the Central Florida East-West All Star games a senior and was named second team All-State defensive back and was a rst team All-District wide receiver. In addition, he was among the top re ceivers in Central Flor ida, totaling more than 900 receiving yards and was named South Lake Most Valuable Player. Perhaps his high light as a senior oc curred late in the Ea gles game against district rival Leesburg. With South Lake deep in Yellow Jackets terri tory and trailing 24-21, Woolum had decided on fourth down to at tempt a eld goal and play for overtime. Solomon, however, had different plans. Buck talked me out of the eld goal, Woolum said. He told me that if we threw the ball in his direction, he would catch it. Solomon was true to his word and caught the game-winning pass in the corner of the end zone, despite be ing blanketed by a Yellow Jacket defender, to give South Lake a 28-24 victory. Buck has so much condence in him self that he doesnt feel there is anything on a football eld that he cant do, Woolum said. Most of the time, hell back up anything he says he can do. His teammates look up to him because of his work ethic. Hes a success on the eld and in the classroom. Hes been such a joy to coach and Im proud that he will be a Colonel. SOUTH LAKE FROM PAGE B1

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To Apply for Scholarships from the Pig on the Pond Education Fund Vist Our Website: www.pigonthepond.org Come and Join our Family of Proud Sponsorsfor the 16th Annual Pig on the Pond For the KidsTogether We Make a Difference Presenting Sponsors Community Partners Education Partners Scholarship PartnersPig on the Pond Mission Statement Kim Es Flowers Find us on Facebook INN & SUITESSM

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C1SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 12, 2014 www.southlakepress.comCOMMUNITYProudly servingCLERMONT, MINNEOLA, GROVELAND, MASCOTTE and MONTVERDE YOUR CONTACT FOR LOCAL NEWSSTAFF WRITER . ...................... ROXANNE BROWN TELEPHONE . .................................... 394 FAX .................................................. 394-8001 E-MAIL . .... roxannebrown@dailycommercial.com %  en HOMETOWN: Long Island, N.Y. %  en OCCUPATION: Owner of Millys, 779 West Montrose St., in downtown Clermont. %  en FAMILY: I have three beautiful children, and ve awesome grandkids. What do you enjoy most about South Lake County? I love how small the community feels and the beauty of the lakes. Especially when its all decorated at Christmastime. 1) If you had to summarize your philosophy of life in one sentence, what would it be? Its never too late to start again. 2) Name a person or incident youve come across recently thats touched you in some way. Why did this person or incident impress you so much? I met a woman recently who has been down on her luck, but she is turning it all around. Her essence reminds me constantly that nothing can hold me back and keep me down unless I choose to let it. 3) How does what you do contribute to the welfare of the area? Millys is a food donation drop off and all donations are given to the food pantry at Engage Ministry Center in downtown Clermont. Also, 10 percent of prots at the store are given back to the community. 4) Name one of your greatest accomplishments so far. I am really excited about catching a vision for the concept of my store incorporating a blend of new and antique items and that I had the courage to chase my dreams, and open my store even though I am approaching by 70th birthday. 5) Whats something youve always wanted to do but Meet YourNEIGHBORMILLY SARTOR Ann DupeeREMEMBER WHENA weekly column that reprints some of the more interesting news stories that have appeared over the years in the pages of the South Lake Press.FROM THE FILES | 25 YEARS AGO 1989Reliving history through pages of the South Lake Press SEE NEIGHBOR | C2Lake County Parade of Homes. Cherry Knoll, Lakefront Adult Town Homes built by Poynter Construction, and a spec home in the new Crescent West Subdivision, built by Ladd Construction, are the two Clermont entries in the Lake County Parade of Homes. Tracy Moore and the crew of WKCF TV Channel 68 taped a half hour public ser vice program at South Lake Memorial Hospital for Close Up On Clermont. Inter viewed were Administrator Pat Smith, Director of Nursing Leslie Longacre, Director of Public Relations Jo Marie Hebeler and In-service Education Director Jan Cobia. Family Practice specialist Dr. John Lurie, 42, joined the staff of South Lake Family Health Center in Groveland, according to Medical Director Dr. George Rust. Jessie Keys, LPN, was honored for her 33 years of ser vice to South Lake Memorial Hospital. A gilded plow was used instead of the usual spade for the groundbreaking of Woodlands Lutheran Church in Montverde. Open for Business. Jacksons TV Stereos Microwaves. 205 S. Hwy. 50, Minneola. Clermont City Council granted First Christian Church on Hooks Street a permit to add six classrooms. For the seventh year, the popular series of lectures and demonstrations known as Sunday Afternoon at the Library resumes Feb. 12th, presented by the Friends of Cooper Memorial Library, at the library.THE GOLF LESSONSouth Lake Scene column by Ann Dupee. I met Green Valley Country Clubs teaching pro, Brian Roddy, for a video golf lesson. Brian rst noticed my grip was wrong so Im now holding the club like Nancy Lopez. Brian then noticed that my right leg was straight and my feet could use a different position, so I worked on that for a while. My fanny also wasnt just quite right, but it learned its new position. We watched the video, went to the practice range and then played 9 holes of golf. (After this column ran, some other ladies were asking Brian what he would do for their fannys position.)SCHOOL NEWSPictured were seven of 19 students in Nancy Hettingers 2nd grade class at Cler mont Elementary School for SEE HISTORY | C3 ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comWhen Lost Lake El ementary admin istrators and par ents learned Lake County Schools could not come up with the money for a new playground, they decid ed to take things into their own hands with their feet. Instead of organizing a bake sale or selling mer chandise to raise the needed $20,000, they went with a healthier alternative and the Camp High Five Fun Run was born. Its so healthy for the kids, which is awesome, but the really neat part about it is that everyone gets involved the students, parents, teachers, PTO members, administrators, everyone, Principal Rhonda Hunt said. To pull off the run, Lost Lake Elementary called on the Orlando team associated with Booster thon, a company that helps schools raise money by or ganizing fun run events. Supporters make monetary pledges based on the number of laps a student completes. On Feb. 5, students wear ing T-shirts with a grid on the back ran laps around a designated area on school grounds. Each time a student rounded the starting point, a designated parent or teacher marked off one square on the T-shirt with a permanent marker. Dozens of parents and teachers were on hand, either cheering the students on or with hands extended, offering as many high ves as possible as students ran by them. Boosterthon not only emceed the event, but sent CLERMONTStudents raise thousands for new playground equipment at fun run PHOTOS BY ROXANNE BROWN / DAILY COMMERCIAL Students at Lost Lake Elementary School last week took part in a fun run to raise money for new playground equipment. They earned money from pledges based on the number of laps they ran. Jamison Butts, left, and Caleb Walker, center, pose for a picture with Calebs sister, Taylor Walker, as they prepare to participate in Lost Lake Elementary Schools Camp High Five fun run.SEE RUN | C2

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C2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 12, 2014 352-394-8228Ron Becker, Director $675 17th AnnualFEBRUARY 20-23 | 2014 FRI | FEB 21| 7:30 PM MOUNT DORA COMMUNITY BUILDING Lazy Bones, Marie, Aint Misbehavin, Polly Wolly Doodle$35 Adv | $40 Door | $50 Res | $75 VIP SAT | FEB 22 | 7:30 PM MOUNT DORA COMMUNITY BUILDING Summer Song, Yesterdays Gone,Willow Weep for Me $35 Adv | $40 Door | $50 Res | $75 VIPThe Legendary An Evening with BA CH FEST IVAL CHAM BER C HOIR A ND O RCH ESTRA Central Floridas oldest operating performing arts organization.SUN | FEB 23 | 2 PM | MOUNT DORA COMMUNITY BUILDING | FREE THU | FEB 20 | 7:30 PM Mount Dora Community BuildingTop ten Lake County high school prizes. Special performances by contestant mentors FREE MUSIC IN THE PARK SAT | FEB 22 | 11 AM 5 PM Donnelly Park Stage ORLANDO BRASS QUINTET KOO L VIBES REGGAE BAND SIMPLE CAVEMENTEEN MUSIC TALENT CONTESTNICI HAERTER Harpist FEB 20 | 10 AM | Florida Hospital Waterman JENNIFER REED MUELLER Violist JEWEL SPEARS BROO KER Poetry Narrator FEB 20 | 1 PM | Congregational Church FREE COMMUNITY CONCERTSLAUREN T BOUKO BZA C lassical P ianist FEB 21 | 12 PM | First Presbyterian Church SUZY PARK Vocalist WES HAMRICK Pianist FEB 21 | 2 PM | W.T. Bland Public LibraryTICKETS & INFO352.385.1010 / 352.383.2627 / mountdoramusicfest.comCharge tickets online and by phone. Discounts available for groups of 10 or more. Other tickets available at the Chamber of Commerce and Donnelly Euro Footwear. TOIL AND TROUBLE By DICK SHLAKMAN AND JEFF CHEN / Edited by Will ShortzNo. 0202RELEASE DATE: 2/9/2014 ACROSS1 Turns left 5 Ogles offensively 12 One for the money? 16 Actors Ken and Lena 18 Gettable 19 ___ Foods 20 Cash in 22 Tiny tunneler 23 Big gun 24 Ones doing aerobics 26 Popular British band named after the villain in Barbarella 28 Sinister seor 29 Lacoste offering 30 Soul maker 31 Channel showing old Hollywood hits34 Disposables maker 35 Modus operandi 38 Kind of accounting 39 Bistro glassful 40 Sturdy ones 42 Org. using X-rays 45 Equally, say 47 Tangled 50 Legit 52 Words before and after my lads in the United States Merchant Marine anthem 54 ___ acid 55 Sides are often alongside them 56 Entry fee? 57 Dont look now 59 Bell or shell preceder 61 Regarding 62 Super Bowl successes, for short63 Key of Bachs most famous Mass65 Furniture style of Louis XV 67 Dupe 68 ___ the Explorer 70 Thats all folks, for Mel Blanc 72 Batman : Robin :: Green Hornet : ___ 74 Strand, somehow 76 Girls name meaning happiness77 Squirm 80 John Cusacks co-star in Say Anything 82 Dir. of the Missouri between S.D. and Neb. 83 Like leftovers, often 85 Born 86 Actor Richard who played Jaws in Bond films 87 Some A.L. (but not N.L.) players 88 It may be indicated with a ring 89 More than pique 90 Too smooth 92 Dudley Do-Rights love 94 Second place? 95 Part of N.R.A.: Abbr. 96 Email button 98 Erne or tern 102 Baloney, in Bristol 104 Entitle to wear vestments 106 Headstrong 107 East Asian stew 110 Ta-ta! 112 It may be radical 113 Places where polar bears fish 115 They may be sprayed on 116 HBO competitor 117 Bills partner 118 Pro 119 Major, for example120 Poetic rhapsody 121 Soak (up) 122 Summer White House setting: Abbr. 123 Lady of the lea 124 Rocky shout-outs DOWN1 Biblical peak 2 Actress Vega of Spy Kids 3 Expand 4 Mortimer of old radio 5 Contributors to The Paris Review, e.g. 6 First of 12 in South America 7 Muffs 8 Band with the 1994 album Monster9 He and she follower 10 Not perform as expected 11 Dance popularized by Michael Jackson 12 Yep 13 Iraqi P.M. ___ al-Maliki 14 Like one of the arm bones 15 Destined (for) 17 Like vino de Rioja 19 Gobs 21 Compassion, figuratively 23 Start of many jokes25 Dos x tres 27 Latin others 31 Blue-green 32 Part of many an anniversary celebration 33 Tax-free bond, for short 35 Pair of cymbals in a drum kit 36 Ceaselessly 37 Tautological statement of finality 38 Cavs, on a scoreboard 41 Elbow-bender 42 Superstitious thespians name for a work of Shakespeare from which 21-, 23-, 37-, 58and 60-Down all come 43 Take care of 44 Cause of an insurance investigation 46 One of 17 on a Monopoly board: Abbr. 48 What a goner has 49 Army threats? 51 Mendoza Mrs. 53 ___ get it! 55 System prefix 58 A single stroke 60 What the lucky person leads 63 Lively 64 Piqued 65 500 events 66 Equipped to row 69 Have debts 71 The Addams Family nickname 73 ___ Maria 74 Rat 75 Carol 78 Towel designation 79 Elysium 81 Cry before haw 84 Big stretch? 91 Moccasin decorations 93 You might bow your head to receive one 94 Play about Capote 95 Famous Titanic victim 97 Zilch 99 One of The Honeymooners 100 Drippings appropriately positioned under the circled letters 101 Alternatively 103 Lo-o-ovely! 104 Director Preminger 105 You may find a fork in it 108 Prefix with -phile 109 Some reproaches 111 Palindromic cry 114 Intimidate 1234 567891011 12131415 16 17 18 19 20 2122 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31323334 35363738 39 40 41424344 45 46 4748 49 5051 52 5354 55 56 5758 5960 61 62 63 6465 6667 6869 70 71 7273 7475 76 77 7879 80 81 82 8384 85 86 87 88 89 90 9192 93 94 95 9697 9899100101 102103 104105 106 107 108109 110 111 112 113114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124For any three answers, call from a touch-tone phone: 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Solution on page D3 havent yet? I love to travel and although Ive done a fair share of it, I want to see more of the world. Im hoping to see Ireland later this year when UCF beats Penn State. I was promised a trip there if that happens. Go Knights! 6) What advice would you give to people who want to help out in the community? There are so many great causes to get involved with nd out what you are passionate about and give it your all. NEIGHBORFROM PAGE C1 people to the school for two weeks in advance of the even to conduct inspirational rallies with topics focusing on character, education and physical education. Its really been a fantastic program and the kids have not only learned a lot, but they are super excited, said Lost Lake Elementary PTO President Theresa Sherman. Hunt said this is the second time the school has worked with Boosterthon for a fun run. Last year, they were able to raise the $20,000 they needed for a new playground for their pre-k and kindergar ten students. This year, the goal again was to raise $20,000 for a new playground for the schools third-, fourthand fth-grade students. So far, the pledges for the fun run have exceeded $27,000 and are still coming in. RUN FROM PAGE C1 SUBMITTED PHOTO The South Lake Junior Womens Club and supporters are pictured at the second annual Holiday of Hopes festival at Waterfront Park. They are Casey Bunton, Amber Madawi, Carla Terrell, Rhonda Barron, Debbie Mixon, Wanda Sparks, Aimee Stanley, Kim McIntyre, Cindy Murphy, Marion DeAnnuntis, Madison Herbst, Dawn Engle, Michelle Snively and Connie Herbst. The festival raised funds and collected more than 220 items that went to less fortunate elementary and middle school children in the south Lake County area.WOMENS CLUB HELPS KIDS FOR CHRISTMAS SUBMITTED PHOTO Members of the South Lake County Historical Society elected the new board of directors for 2014 at the annual meeting on Dec. 9. Pictured are: Larry Rescoe; Connie Harper, treasurer; Bonnie Ray; Ray Goodgame; Joanne Apel; Donna DiGennaro, president; Jim Briggs, recording secretary; and Doloris Walker. Not pictured are Micki Blackburn-Nagle, chairman of the board; Devon Pete Cole, vice-president; Jerri Barstable, corresponding secretary; and Karen Miller, assistant treasurer.SOUTH LAKE COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY 2014 BOARD AND OFFICERS

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Wednesday, February 12, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C3 To Apply for Scholarships from the Pig on the Pond Education Fund Vist Our Website: www.pigonthepond.org Come and Join our Family of Proud Sponsorsfor the 16th Annual Pig on the Pond For the KidsPig on the Pond 5K Run/Walk Pig on the Pond Mission Statement Find us on Facebook Saturday, March 8th Clermont Waterfront ParkCostume ContestPresented by Official Sponsor of the 2014 5K Photo OppEveryone likes to wear a costume. Dress up in your favotite Miss Piggy costume or just a cute pig outfit. Come dressed to impress!!! Register at pigonthepond.org or online at Active.com We will have awards forBest Male Best Female Best Team (3 or more people) Selected from Historic Downtown Clermont's 80-plus members, we're pleased to present the CDP Featured Business of the Month...Totally UniqueTotally Unique is proud to be Clermonts first ORGANIC hair salon. We care about your beauty, your wellness, the environment and our community, so we use organic and sustainably harvested products whenever possible. We specialize in organic hair color, hair care products, nail and skin care lines. Our salon is one of the oldest salons in Clermont and is located at 786 W Montrose Street in Historic Downtown Clermont. Our stylists are experienced in all phases of hair care including color, straighteners, cuts, texture and styles. Hair stylists are Marjorie Morphet, Tina Foote, Sherie Wolkens and Jamie Rhoades. Our nail techs, Jennifer Vandergrift and Jamie Rhoades, perform pedicures and manicures using Zoya nail products (which are Big 5 free). Shellac manicures, lasting up to three weeks, are also available by Jennifer and Jamie. We have two pedicure chairs in a private room for your relaxation and enjoyment. Relaxing and therapeutic facials are available by Jennifer in our private upstairs facial room. Massage services include chair massage, Swedish and Deep Tissue. Massage services are also done in a private room in our upstairs area. We utilize several massage therapists and provide massage by appointment only. We also offer a small boutique with handcrafted jewelry and hair accessories, Art by Tina Foote and Jamie Rhoades, and other unique items. Salon hours are 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Saturday and open Sundays by appointment only. Evening hours are also available by appointment. We pride ourselves in providing a friendly, relaxing environment for our clients and friends. Stop by and visit or call 352-394-5005 for more information. We are also on Facebook and www.TotallyUniqueSalon.com. LOOKING FOR PARTS? SEE JULIE (352) 394-6111 Montrose St. mida 3I have parts for all major appliances and air conditioning and authorized repair service too! having all A grades: Emily Bishop, Sean OKeefe, Kristen Pew, Annette White, Terry Jones, Joseph Coleman and Michael Giachetti. George Wood, chairman of South Lake (Breakfast) Kiwanis Clubs Community Services Committee, presented a $500 check to Milda Sandargas, PTO president at Cler mont Elementary School. The funds go towards construction of a new outdoor pavilion at the school. Lake County School Board heard a request from Clermont Junior Highs advisory committee to change the schools name to Clermont Middle School. The Board authorized Superintendent Dr. Tom Sanders to work with county ofcials to study impact fees.MASONS CELEBRATEClermont Masonic Lodge 226 will celebrate its 75th anniversary Feb. 11, according to Worshipful Master Bill Eyerly. Other ofcers are Charles Lovette, senior warden; Daniel Bray, junior warden; Senior Deacon Phillip Blackwell; Junior Deacon Donald Simmons; Senior Steward Endel Raulerson; Junior Steward Carl Ar thur Mattson, Jr.; Chaplain Michael Howard; Marshall Robert Eyerly; Ty ler, Carl Stieb. (The Lodge celebrated its 100th anniversary Jan. 25, 2014 with a dinner and ceremony at the Lodge building on DeSoto Street.)YOUTH CONFESSESA 14-year-old Mascotte youth, suspected to be the sniper who red three shots into the Mascotte Elementary School yard, injuring third grader Leah Wilbanks, is currently being held at the Marion County Juvenile Detention Center. He confessed to Mascotte Police Chief Don Page on Jan. 13 and again on Jan. 17, saying he wanted to get the incident off his chest.CHAMBER ELECTSThe Clermont Chambers new Board of Directors has decided that in lieu of the annual awards banquet held in the past, quarterly socials will be offered. Newly elected Board members are Charley Beals, Gene Landers, Keith Mullins, Amy Walker, Ken Felt, Paul Lewis, Bob Patterson, Sharon Williams, Marilyn George, Gabby Monroe, Bridgot Robinson and Bruce Yates. New ofcers elected are Bobby Duncan, President; Bruce Yates, Vice President; Amy Walker, Secretary; and Jack Sargent, Treasurer.FOUR GENERATIONS AT BABY PAGEANTLake Highlands Nursing and Assisted Living Center sponsored its rst annual Baby Pageant. John Breeden and Danielle Franklin were Master and Little Miss Lake Highlands. Two children tied in the category for the participant with the most generations present. Each child had four generations represented. Landon Beaty brought his mother, Laquita Beaty; grandmother, Wynona Strickland; and great-grandmother, Dora Mae Strickland. Landons father is pastor of Midway Baptist Church in Mascotte. The other four-generation winner was Ashley Thompson with her mother, Doris Thompson; grandmother, Laverne Clark and great-grandmother, Annie Mae Hull, cheering her on. All four generations were born and raised in Groveland. HISTORY FROM PAGE C1

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C4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 12, 2014 A/C Services Auto Service Blinds Svcs. Bathtub Refinishing Marine Services Cabinetry Services Carpet Repair Services Cleaning Services Contractor Services Door & Lock Services Concrete Services Appliance Repair Garage Door Services Handyman Services Adult Care Services Hauling Services Home Improvement Home Restoration Svcs. Insurance Services Irrigation Services Land Clearing Services Landscaping Services Lawn Services Lawn Services Legal Services Moving Services Painting Services Airport Transportation Enclosure Screening Flooring Services Bathroom Remodeling

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Wednesday, February 12, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS C5 Professional Services Psychic Services Plants & Florist Service Pest Control Services Pet Grooming Services Painting Services Pool Services Pressure Cleaning Plumbing Services Plumbing Services Roofing Services Tile Service Shower Doors Service Tree Service Tree Service Veterinarian Services Window Services Steve and Brenda Rizer have owned Blinds 4 Less since 2000. The business is still in its original location in Lady Lake. The company focuses on strong customer service and also selling the best brand names in the industry at very competitive prices. Chris Carnes Landscape has been in business since 2005 along with over 30 yrs experience in everything from hardscapes such as patios, retaining walls, to sod repair and installations, to ripout of old landscapes and design. We also can provide maintainence to your newly installed landscape or even mowing maintainence services to even sprinkler repairs. We serve all projects big or small create landscapes one lawn at a time". Mention this bio ad and receive 15 percent off when you call for your estimate on any of our services. Emerson Street Automotive has been family owned and operated for nearly 30 years. Lori and Michael Farfaglia purchased the business from Loris family in 2010. Loris father, Terrill Davis stayed as the onsite manager. Emerson Street is located at 1406 Emerson Street, right next to the Post Office in Leesburg, Florida. We are opened Monday-Friday 7:30-5:30 and Saturday 7:30-3:00. Phone: 352-326-2400. We do all kinds of automotive repair including light body work. We have state of the art diagnostic equipment that takes the guess out of repairing your car. We service all makes and models including SUVs, ATVs, and RVs. To have your Professional Service listed here, please contact Michelle in the Classified Department at (352) 365-8233 or by email michelle.fuller@dailycommercial.com

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C6 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 12, 2014 Mon. Fri. 9am to 4pm, Sat. by appointmentLAKE COUNTYS MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING AIDS www.lakemedicalhearing.com Alan Boone, HAS, BC-HIS President & Wife Linda221 N. US Hwy 27, Suite H(Across from the Citrus Tower)CLERMONT243-HEAR ( 4327 )2755 S. Bay St. Suite F (Across from Tractor Supply Company)EUSTIS483-HEAR ( 4327 ) THURSDAYTHE PASTFINDERS GE -NEALOGICAL SOCIETY CELEBRATES 25 YEARS: At 4:30 p.m., in the Spe -cial Collections/Geneal ogy Room on the second oor of Cooper Memo -rial Library, 2525 Oakley Seaver Dr., in Clermont. HAZARDOUS WASTE TO BE COLLECTED: From 9 a.m. to noon, Clermont Convenience Center, 10435 Log House Rd., in Clermont, for residents to dispose of toxic materials. For details at www. lakecounty.gov/haz-ardouswaste or call the Lake County Solid Waste Division at 352-343-3776.SINGER/SONGWRITER SHEILA RAY CHARLES COMES TO FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH FOR CELEBRATE RECOVERY MEETING: From 7 to 9 p.m., at the church, 950 Seventh St., Clermont. For information, call 352-394-2412 or visit FUMC-Clermont.org. FRIDAYTEEN DIY MUSTACHE CUPS AT THE LIBRARY: At 4:30 p.m., Marion Baysinger Memorial Li -brary, 756 W. Broad St., Groveland. Call 352-429-5840 for details.FRIENDS OF COOPER MEMORIAL LIBRARY AN -NUAL WINTER BOOK SALE: From 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Friday and Saturday, rooms 108 A and B, at the Cooper Memorial Library, 2525 Oakley Seaver Dr., in Clermont.SATURDAYCHOCOLATE FESTI VAL AT THE MARION BAYSINGER MEMORIAL LIBRARY: From 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., with games, treats for the whole fam -ily and a baking contest. Baking contest rules will be available at the con-test. For information, call the library at 352-429-5840.LOW-COST PET VACCI -NATION CLINIC: From 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Tractor Supply, 6801 State Road 50 in Groveland. Call 352-429-2502 for details. TUESDAY SOUTH LAKE HIGH SAC MEETING: At 6:30 p.m. in the Culinary Arts Room. Call 352-394-2100 for information. FEB. 18-21GRAY MIDDLE SCHOOL SCHOLASTIC BOOK FAIR: In the media center. For those who cannot make it to the fair or prefer to shop online, the book fair is available online through Feb. 26. For information, send an email to marshburnb@lake.k12..us. FEB. 19COLLEGE DAY WITH FULL SAIL UNIVERSITY AT THE LIBRARY: At 4:30 p.m., Marion Baysinger Memorial Library, 756 W. Broad St., Groveland. Giving teens, parents and adults information for successful gradua tion and career place -ment. Call 352-429-5840 for details. FEB. 20PET FIRST AID AT THE LIBRARY: At 6 p.m., with Dr. Stone of Veterinary Trauma Center in Grov -eland, giving Pet First Aid instruction at the Marion Baysinger Me -morial County Library, 756 W. Broad St., Groveland. Call 352-429-5840 for details. RSVP DUE TODAY FOR EPICUREAN EVENT AT LAKERIDGE WINERY: From 6 to 8:30 p.m., Feb. 26, in Clermont. Winemaker Jeanne Bur -gess, Top Chef contes -tant Jennifer Denlinger and Culinary Consul -tant Susanne Bukey are the guests. Email Janelle Carutis at JCarutis@Lakeridgewinery.com for reservations. FEB. 21 FREE SEMINAR AND LUNCH FOR DISABLED PERSONS AT ANOINTED COMMUNITY SERVICES: From 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. A representative from the Agency for Persons with Disability will speak about cerebal palsy, autism and oth -ers. Call Anointed Com -munity Services to RSVP for the event at 352-404-7898. FEB. 26CAREER DAY WITH THE ARMY AT THE LIBRARY: At 4:30 p.m., giving teens, parents and adults tips about varying military careers, at the library, 756 W. Broad St., Groveland. Call 352-429-5840 for details.To place an item on the calendar, send an email to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com.COMMUNITY CALENDAR

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Wednesday, February 12, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D1 r f n t b r r r b f n t b r r t r r t f t r t r b r b f b f r b r r r t b r b n r t b n r r rtrrftr tfttttbtr tnrrf t n r r t b t r r t r b n r t r b r r b f r n r t b b t f r b r t n r r t b t r n r r r f t t b r t f n r f t r r b t t b f r t r r b r b t r r n n r t r t f r b t n n t r t b r r b t b r r r n r r r f r f t n n r f t r n r f t t r r n r t b r b n r f t t b r t r t b r t r r r r r f r r r n r rtbbrrbtr ftrtbrfrttb rntbrtrbr rfttbrfrrr rftbrnrb rrtrbrbrtrb tbnrb rbfr rftbbrrbrtr rttr n t r t r f n tnrrttrfrfttbtb rtrtbrb bftrtbfrn trrrbtbbfttb r r r n r n r f t t r r r r r f n t b r b n r f t t b r f t t r t b r r r n r b t b t r t tnrttbtbrr ntrr btrfnttbfttft nrfttrrtrtbfr trbrttbnrftrf tbnrbrrtbbr r r b f r n r f r r r r r b r n t b n t r r n t r f r b b r n t r t t t r r n r ttbtrtbtnr trnttbrrtrb ftbbfr rnbrfrrtrbrrtrf rtbtntrbrt tbftbrbrbbt brttrnr brrfb n t r n r r n t n t t b r t r b r r t rrrtrttb tnrrtrbrftb rbrrtrbrrtrf rrrtrbr r n r r r r t r b r f r b f r n r t f f r b r n n t n rftbrtrrrtbb rbrrtrbtbbf trbtrrttr rrrtrbrbf brfrr n t r n r b n b b b t f r b t t b r t r rfn r b r b t f n r r t r t r n t r t r r t b f t rrtbfttftfrb fntbttrnrrtr ttnrtbrrr bt bfrtbb rtrr brbtbfrt r b f r n r b t b n t b f r t t r b r f t b f t t f t r r t b n r r t b b t t b t t r b r t rrtbfrr tbrfntrbf trtbfbbrr rtrfrrrtbbtb rrtrbrrb tttrf brbrtrtrf r b f r n r n r r t b ttbrrrfttb rttbrrtrbrbrtb nbrnrbrrrtbf nbrnrbrtfr frnrbtrr nbrnrbbffntbttr trtrnb btbnrbrtrtfrtr rtbbfrtbrnfrtb tftbfbntnnbt bbbrt r r t t r t r f r t t r n b n n r b f r t t r r t b r t r n r r r t b f t t b r t b t b t f r r t n t f r n r b b r b t b t b t b r b t b r r r n r r n t f r n r t t r b r t r t r t b t r f r n r b t r r t t r t f r r r b f r t r t f r t t t t b f t b t t b f r t r n r b r r r b t r b r b n r t t r r t r b b r t n r b b r r f t f t b r t n r bt b bfbtftbtrr r b trnr tttbrtttb brrr trrbrtr rbr rrrf rnfntbttbrr trrbrtr rbrfrrrftrnr nnrbrftbrr tttbrttrb tfrffrttr tbrrrtfr bnrbfffrrrb rrrbtrbfrrb rrrbtrbrrrr rftrfrrfrbbfr rbtbtnfrnbftb rfrrfrbrrbnt btrrrbrrfntrrttn ttrffrrr rrftrbtbtn frnbftbfrrfrbrrb ntbtrbrrb rrfntrrttntt rffrrr rfrrtttbtbtr tb rbrrrbtr b r r b r frr tbrfrbtf brrbrrrbtr t b b tbb tbrfrbtf brbnr nr tfnr f r nnrftbrrtb bfntbtnrrrfrftb ttrfr rtrfrbtf nrbfrfrrbtrftbbf rrtrfrr trbfrrbrtbtbt brfrrffrt rnbtf frfrbrnb rrtfnrtfr ttbbftrrttbtr rtrtrrrrtrb tbtbrtnnrftrrrr rtrfrtrrbrrftb rrtrfrnbfrftbrntb bb rr b rr f r r tfrbrbrt tbt r rrbfb b bf btb rrnrbrtb frtrfrtbrbtf tb bfntbtnbtrt r tfrbrbrt tbt r rrbfb btb fnrbrrtbrtbrf nrfrfbtrr trtffrrbf rrbrrtb rtfb rrtbfrtrf rtrtb ftbr rtbbfntbtnrrrfrf tbttrfr trfrbtf nrbfrf b tnrr rtfrrtbbfntbtnbt b fr frbr tr rnb rrbr tnfrfrbrn rbfrntrtrfrbrn brtbt rr b rr f r rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff n tbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff ntrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff bbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff nbrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrff nrrrrrrrrrrff ttbrrrrrrfff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrff r fntbbt rfrntn nnnftbnbn brfbnrb bnbtn brnnrtnftbn tbrbttb nnnrfrbtb nbb n fbfn t brbnbbbtn nnnntnbbtr bbbfrf r tfnbtr rrbrfnnnrfnt t rf

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D2 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 12, 2014 r f n t b r n t f r rb f rf brttf f b r f r n t b r n t f r rbrt f rbrrtft fffrtbntf r rfrtrrt rrt tf r f r t t n tbr rtbbt rtntnb r r f r t r f t b rrbfrtbtn rfrtrtb ff rttf b ff ffftbtfff nrrtfbtn ffrtbrtrbf t r f f f b nr ffrttnbb rf ntbf r f r t r n t r n n b t r f t r ffrtrrtb f rfntft rn ffrtrntnr tt bbt t ffrtbntnf rr ffbtft r r r t t f n brrtn t f t n t tf ffbtb frff ffbtb f frtrtf b rf rtbtrf b f r t t r nt f bbfbbtfrr rf t fb f rfrttbn bbt f rrtbtb ff rtbbtbfr ffttrfr rrtbtb brrtbbtbfr rfrtbtb ffrttrb rrtbtb t t f r t b t bbt bfrtt f n t r f t f f ff rf ffrtrtrf ffrtft b r r t b t r n ff rtrftr rt tbr rtbbtr frtrt ff b f r t r r t n rrttbr ff ffrttb f r r f f r t f t r r r b f ffrttr rrtrtf rf ntbtf ff rtntb frtftb ffrtrftrr f ffrtt brbrtbt r n n f f r t f t t f t b t t n f t rt f fbtr rfrtrt fr t r trftbfrftf rrtrtn ffrttrr rfn rft t rrttf rftbnf rn rfrttf ffrt rtf tn t rfrtnt f bfftfn rfrtbtr bbt r f r t r f t n n r tf t f f r t n t r r tr rfft b b t r t b r t n t f b b r r t f t f r f t f f f t r t t b r t b t n n b t t f t r t t n b f b b f f r f f n n f n r t b t r f f t r t t t f t r n r t t t t r b b r t t

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Wednesday, February 12, 2014 SOUTH LAKE PRESS D3 r f rr f n t fr f r n rfn tbn rfnrbn br rfbr rfbnnrnnb rfbbnr t r fbntbn t t rbrfn r nbn t t rrr fbnrn t t bbr rfbnrtb n t rnr rfbr r trfbnr trrfbr r rr rfrnn nbrfbr n r f n r rrft t rn rfnrn ntbf r brfbtnb bf r rbr rfbnrn nr b fbt nb bn bfrnnn t t r rrfnrbnb t t t rrfnr nnnbn bbr rft b nrrf f nbbt t t r rr fnrnb t t r r f b r t r rfr n t t r t t n b b b n nn tbt n rfnrn t bnrfbnr tn rbn rr rfrbnnbn t rrrf rtnn t nb rr r r fn tbnr n f t b r rr ftn r f b n r n n n f nr rn b fnrtn nbb nbtf b bf t bn rrfn bnbbb r rrfbrt bb r r fnrtn bn b b n r r f r n n nn frfbt nn f t f bbr rtf nnrnn r f n f n r f n r t n n t t r brfbnt n nn rfbrn b b b bb trrrrt r trftnnn t r n t n b fn f f n f f r b f n f f tnn t r n t n b fn f f n f f r b f n f f tnn r brffnr n nnf f nnntrf ft rr rfntb b f rff rrt r r fbrt bnr f rff r r f b n r n t r r r f n n n t t b n r r r r f b r t n b b b n n r b t n r r nf f nnff f b b n n r b t n r r ftt b b n n r b t n r r nnr rfnrbrbr rnbb t r n t n b fn f f n f f r b f n f f tnn t r n t n b fn f f n f f r b f n f f tnn t b b r f b r b r f n r r t n n r t b r n f n r f r f r f b r n n b n r t b r n f n r f r f r f b r n n b n trf fft b n n r b b n b r f r b r b f n n t t r r r tt r n b r r frb f r rrf rnb r r r r r f n r r n n b b r r r r r f n r r n n b b f f brfnrnnnbnn t tf b r r t r f f n r rfr fr rr frfr r r r r b b n n n b n n n b t r n t n b fn f f n f f r b f n f f tnn t r n t n b fn f f n f f r b f n f f tnn nff rr fbrnnnb nf tf bbrr r rtnb b r r r r r f r b r f r r f r n n n n n b r t r r t t t r t n n b r rfn rrn nft tbf r r b r r f r t b b b t n n r r b b b r b b r n r r r t n b f t b f n r b f n n r f r t n n b b r t t r b b r r f n t n n b n n bfnnr frt nnnb t b f n r r n b n b b r f n r n f n n f n r r n n n n nft ttbft r n t n b fn f f n f f r b f n f f t n n t r n t n b fn f f n f f r b f n f f t n n nft ttbf r t r t n n r nnbt rfnrr r r f r n n n t r n t n b fn f f n f f r b f n f f t n n t r n t n b fn f f n f f r b f n f f t n n nf ttbf nnff ft t t rfrnn t fb tn t brfbr r ftnnbn n rfrnnb n rfrnnb t t rfrtnbbn brb trrfn r rfbrb rbtf rnrr rfr rr fnrtnbn rfnrnn btrrnr frtb fnrtn n t t r r f b n r b n t t r rfnr t t brfrnbn frfbt t r rfr t t t rfnrn nn rfbrnnb frbfbft fnrnbn nbrf tbf bf t t r f n r n n b b t r rfnn nbrf tbf bf r rfrtnn b rfnrtnbb rfn br tft frrtnb t t nbb rfnr rfnrtnn b rtrfrt b fntnb r fbrntnnn b b r f b r n n rnrn rrfbr t rfnr t r f n r n b t t t n rr rfnbb rr rfnbb t r rfbtnnb r rfnrnn nr rfnrnnnbn t t r f b r n n r rfrn rfrt r r f r n b b rr rfrn tr rrfbtnbn b fbr tn t r rfrrn t r r f b r f b r n b t rfnrnnn t r brfbnrnb t r fntnbnn t rfnrn t b r r f r b n t b r r f n r n b r fnrnbb r fbnfnrn r frnn t rbbt rt rfbrtb brf f nb rfnrn t n r f n r nf b t fr nnb t r r f n r n n n t r f n r n n n t r f r rftnb t t rfrn n fbr

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D4 SOUTH LAKE PRESS Wednesday, February 12, 2014 NEW GAME EVERY WEDNESDAY 725344767 1318315974 921FREE SPACE5372 216424863 529395268ENTRY FORM HOW TO PLAY1. Find the hidden Bingo chips within the advertisements in this section that spell Bingo 2. Mark an X on the matching numbers on your entry form. 3. Fill out your name, address, daytime phone & home phone numbers and mail the entry form and Bingo card to: South Lake Press c/o Bingo 732 W. Montrose St Clermont, FL 34711CONTEST RULES1. Any resident of any area within South Lake Presss circulation area may enter. Participants must be 21 years of age or older. Employees of South Lake Press, their immediate families, independent contractors and carriers of South Lake Press are ineligible. Drawing will be held each Tuesday. Entry forms must be received by Monday at noon following the Wednesday publication. South Lake Press retains the right to publish the winners name in the following weeks newspaper. 2. Official entry form: Limit one entry per person per week. Entries must be made on the official entry blank published in South Lake Press. All entries become property of South Lake Press. 3. Winners will be notified via the phone the week following the drawing. If unable to reach winner, the prize will be given away the upcoming week. 4. Claiming a prize: Winner must present proof of age with a drivers license or Social Security card. Alteration of these documents will lead to immediate disqualification. Each Wednesday the readers of South Lake Press will receive a Bingo. By correctly identifying Bingo chips in several advertisers ads, youll qualify for the drawing to be held each week. Entries may be mailed or delivered to South Lake Press. South Lake Presss Bingo are available each week at: 732 W. Montrose St, Clermont, Fl 34711. No purchase necessary. Please print legible, we are not held responsible for misspelled names. N IB O G BINGO B I N G O SOUTH LAKE PRESSServing Clermont, Minneola, Groveland, Mascotte, Montverde B OIN GLast Weeks Winner:Charles Williams WIN$25CASH!WIN$25CASH! B 9 I 21 G 53 O 72 FREE