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The Clewiston news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028415/00024
 Material Information
Title: The Clewiston news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Louis A. Morgan
Place of Publication: Clewiston Fla
Creation Date: June 16, 2005
Publication Date: 1928-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Clewiston (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hendry County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hendry -- Clewiston
Coordinates: 26.753399 x -80.9336 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 2, no. 6 (Feb. 3, 1928)-
General Note: Tom Smith, editor.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000366793
oclc - 33429955
notis - ACA5652
lccn - sn 95047264
System ID: UF00028415:00024
 Related Items
Preceded by: Clewiston progress

Table of Contents
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        Page 19
    Main: Classifieds
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        Page 24
Full Text





Loalwrsle t a tion als*


MA UF IfIBRARY OF F.( :RIDA HIS'


:VsI


1B C)


Serving America's Sweetest Town since 19
), Number 55 Thursday,


280
June 16, 2005


At a Glance
Fireworks show
planned soon
The city of Clewiston is hav-
ing its annual birthday party
Sfor the good old U.S.A., and
wants to invite you to join us at
the Sugarland Park, 1300
South W.C. Owen Avenue,
Monday, July 4. The action
starts at dark when the skies
light up with a huge pyrotech-
nic extravaganza. For informa-
tion, call Public Works Direc-
tor Sean Scheffler at 983-1471.
Museum closed
for the summer
The Clewiston Museum
will be closed for the summer.
It will re-open after moving
into their new building.
Vacation
Bible School
Monday, June 13 through
SFriday, June 17, from 6-8 p.m.,
there will be a vacation Bible
School Adventure at First Unit-
ed Methodist Church of
i Clewiston. The theme is A
Serengeti Adventure and will
include a lot of fun learning
activities, crafts, and games.
There will be a light supper
served each night beginning at
S5:45 p.m. Call 983-5269, for
more information or to pre-
register.
Tetanus Shots
for 7th graders
Hendry County Health
Department, located at 1100 S.
Olympia Street, Clewiston, will
provide tetanus-diphtheria
vaccinations to students enter-
ing 7th grade. This vaccine is
required by law for 7ih grade
Sefitrance, along with the com-
pletion of three Hepatitis B
shots and a 2nd dose of MMR.
Most children have already
completed their 2nd MMR and
Hepatitis B series. The TD shot
will be provided free of charge
on Tuesday, June 21st from
I 8:30 a.rn. until 11:30 a.m. and
from 1 p.m. until 4 pm. and Fri-
day, June 24, from 8:30 a.m.
until 11:30 a.m., and 1 p.m.
until 4 p.m. Parents must
accompany students-I and
bring current immunization
records. For more informa-
tion, contact Beth Fabian at
983-1408 ext 522, or Crystal
McCray at 983-1408 ext 507.
Sugar Dolls hold
summer classes
The Clewiston Sugar Dolls
will be having summer class-
es, starting on June 8, classes
are held at Central Elementary
Seyery Wednesday. Beginner
ages are 4-12, class is at 3 p.m.,
ages'13 and up, class is at 4
p.m.
Sugar Dolls classes consist
of baton twirling, dance pom-
poms, and new this year, flag
and flag corp, color guard. You
may take one class or all class-
es. Classes are $25 per month.
Registration fee is $12, which
includes your insurance. For
more information, please call
" Judy at (863) 677-0025.

Lake Level

15.27


above sea
Level


Index


Classifieds .......20-23
Opinion ............. 4
School ........... ..9
:Sports ... .... 11
See Page 4for information about
howto contactthe newspaper.



Online news & information


II 1 1 0, Ill00 II
8 a 1 6 51 0, 000 20 7


Hospital suit is rescheduled


By Bill Fabian
CLEWISTON Despite a
lull in legal maneuvers and pub-
licity between U.S. Sugar and
the Hendry Regional Medical
Center, the hospital remains
under question by members of
the blue ribbon panel of com-
munity interest in the hospital's
financial struggles.
An extension was given for
the original April 15 deadline for
handing over documents and
information pertaining to hpspi-


tal activities that may explain
the continued loss of net assets
and profits over the last year..
The current date for a hearing
by the 20th Circuit Court is set
for 2 p.m. on June 27 at the
Hendry County Courthouse in
Labelle, at which time, briefs
will be read by legal counsel
from both sides of .the public
information suit.
As before, the hospital main-
tains its position that all infor-
mation they are obligated to


provide has been relinquished,
according to the hospital's
Chief Executive Officer Craig
Cudworth, adding that the hos-
pital hired an attorney to exam-
ine over 10 years of hospital-
records to determine exactly
what was-eligible to be handed
over, according to the public
information suit.
For the past year, the hospital
has been the subject of intense
scrutiny by the blue-ribbon
panel after a sharp increase in


taxes was implemented, which
apparently was required to
bridge the deficit suffered by
uninsured patients and costs of
recovery from last year's bar-
rage of hurricanes. According
to Mr. Cudworth, the hospital
suffers from the highest per--
centage uninsured patient base
in the state, which drains the
hospital's revenues drastically.
The blue ribbon panel
sought to find answers as to
why the revenues continually


failed. A privately contracted
state audit reported on March 3
that despite allegations of mis-
management and questionable
financial practices, there were
no illegal procedures commit-
ted by the hospital staff.
While no new activity has
occurred since the deadline,
there are still questions that
remain concerning the hospital
records, which have been the
See Hospital-- Page 12


Health



Department



holds fair


By Bill Fabian
CLEWISTON The
Hendry County Health Depart-
ment hosted a health fair June
7, at the Health Department
office in Clewiston, located at
1100 South Olympia Street.
Free health screenings were
available and provided to all
Clewiston residents. The
screenings included choles-
terol profiles, body fat analy-
ses, blood pressure measure-
ments, hemoglobin levels,
blood sugar' levels, and
screening exams for prostate
cancer.
The Hendry County Health
Department programs
include: Heart to Heart,


School Health, Opening
Doors, Healthy Families,
Healthy Start, WIC, and dis-
ease control; Hendry Regional
Medical Center; Hendry
Glades Mental Health; United
Way; Lake Okeechobee Rural
Health. Network; REACT;
Hope Hospice; American Can-
cer Society; Lee Parkinson's;
Senior Connections; Florida
Community Health Center;
and Emergency Management,
all of whom are among the
providers that will provide
information on personal
health, injury prevention, and
emergency preparedness.
See Fair-Page 12


Marina to host



third annual



raft race


Rows of hundred dollar .bills, cocaine and marijuana
filled the table, as part of what will find its way into evi-
dence following a drug raid early this month by the
Clewiston Police Department.


tinue throughout the commu-
nity.
Clewiston's Chief of Police
Don Gutshall said, "We have
been focusing in narcotics for
about a year, now, through
control buys. I am pleased that


Sour officers are really focused
on narcotics and have made
several successful arrests. I am
also disappointed that we are
having too many arrests we.
prefer not to have any of this
nature," he added.


By Bill Fabian -
Is the city of Clewiston des-
tined to become another racing
sports mecca, such as Daytona
or Indianapolis? Go ahead, ask
any random individual on the
street about the future of water
sports in this town, and if he or
she does not insist that home-
made raft racing is the hottest
rising sport this side of the Ama-
zon, well, then at least you'll
have a chance to invite that per-
son to Roland and MaryAnn


Martin's Marina and Resort,
which will present its Third
Annual Great American Raft
Race June 25 at2 p.m.
The race will be held at the
beautiful Industrial Canal Inter-
national Speedway other-
wise known as the Tiki Bar at
Roland Martin's Marina, where
the pre-race introductions and
winner's circle presentations
will be held. At a time of the year
See Race Page 12


CLEWISTON During the
first week of June, the Clewis-
ton Police Department's Nar-
cotics Unit and Traffic Crimes
Unit conducted a number of
operations throughout the city.
As a result, four successful
buy/bust served up six arrests
for the Narcolics Unir Theses
six were arrested for crimes
including sale of cocaine, pos-
session of drug paraphernalia
and resisting arrest. Some indi-
viduals also had outstanding
warrants for their arrest.
The T.A.C. Unit had a suc-
cessful detail, which resulted
in the arrest of two suspects
for trafficking in cocaine and
marijuana. One of the sus-
pects carried more than
$11,000 in cash.
For the weekend operation,
a total of eight people were
arrested on drug related
charges. The Clewiston Police
Department seized 94 grams
of cocaine and 74 grams of
marijuana. A total of $13,834
was confiscated for forfeiture.
Similar operations will con-


Just for Mutts dog show


By Mark Young
CLEWISTON The first
afinual "Just for Mutts" dog show,
sponsored by the Clewiston Ani-
mal Control brought children
ranging in ages from 5 years old
to 17 years old to Bond Street May
14.
While participation in this
inaugural event was somewhat
"low", participating children had
a unique opportunity show off
the looks and skills of their
beloved dogs, while bringing
home a ribbon for their efforts.
The competition was broken
down into. several categories,
which included Best Costume,
Best Tricks, Best Appearance,
and Best in Show.
Young Ian Holden would
claim the top honor after show-
casing his Boxer Patches graphi-
cally showcasing American pride,
while Ian himself was draped in
-red, white, and blue to enhance
the patriotic theme.
See Mutts -Page 12


t,. 'I


Jessica Radcliffe dressed
up Buttons in a hula outfit
and the creative idea
earned the pair a runner-
up award in Best Cos-
tumes.


Sara Burcher presented
her dog Chloe who put on
an impressive display of
tricks to earn the -runner-
up spot in the Best Tricks
category.


Courtesy photos
lan Holden and Patchesexpress their American pride. Nothing
says it better than the American child draped in the stars and
stripes with is faithful, and equally patriotic companion at his
side.


Volume 8(


Blood money: Cash and drugs seized by police


Cuounesy inoios
Cocaine, marijuana, and cash were all seized during a recent drug raid by the Clewis-
ton Police Department.

CPD Narcotic Unit in action


'711"*. 1- r


r"/









2 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee Thursday, June 16,200


Graduates


Summer Lyn Miller
Summer Lyn- Miller graduated
from Florida State University, on
April 29, 2005.
Her degree was in English
with an emphasis in creative
writing. Summer is a 2001 grad-
uate of Glades Day School. She
is the daughter of Allen and
Shelly Miller of Belle Glade. Her
maternal grandmother is Ruby
Miller of South Bay. Summer is
currently employed at Smith
Barney in Belle Glade.


4
I'


Jyles Lee Beck


Leeann Murae Lamb
Leeann Lamb, a student at
Med Vance Institute in
Cookeville, Tenn. recently was
recognized for her 4.0 grade
point average. She was listed on
the President's list of students
for the term. Leeann is enrolled
as a Surgical Technician with
emphasis on Trauma Nursing in
the Bariatric field.
Leeann was in the class of
1993 at Clewiston High School.


She is married to Howard Lamb.
They have a daughter, Samara
and a son Marc.
The Med Vance Surgical Tech-
nology class, which Leeann is a
student recently traveled to
Nashville, Tenn. to put a bill in
place for higher wages in the
medical field. They experienced
the many steps of an initial bill
before it is signed into law. It
was a rewarding experience in
so much the bill was passed the
.same day.
Dwayne Ryan Brown
The parents, family, and
friends of Mr. Dwayne "Ryan"
Brown would like to say how
proud we are of this young man
who on June of 2005 was nomi-
nated and inducted into Delta
Epsilon Iota Honor Society at
DeVry University.
Mr. Brown received a letter
from the President of DeVry Uni-
versity, Central Florida ., (Steve
Brown) congratulating Ryan on
his achievement. Mr. Brown
went on to say in his correspon-
dence that your achievement
represents an extraordinary,
level of commitment to your uni-
versity, your studies, your career,


Birth


Beck birth
Laune and Joey Beck of Moore
Haven are proud to announce the'
birth of their son, Jyles Lee Beck.
He was born June 6, 2005 at
Heartland Hospital in Sebring. He
weighed eight pounds, three
ounces and was 21 inches long at
birth.
Jyles was welcomed home by


Heather, Amanda and Dustin.
Maternal grandparents are
Susan James and George Purks of
New Jersey and Ohio.
Paternal grandparents are
Wanda Faye and Teddy Beck of
Moore Haven. Great-grandpar-
ents are Loraine and Alan Gary of
Columbus, N.J. and Ruth Borland
of Florence, N.J.


Obituaries


Clark Hull Wilkinson
Clark Hull Wilkinson passed
away on Saturday, June 11,
2005. She was born on Sept. 18,
1922 in Plant City, Florida. Her
parents are the late Walter G.
and Lois Clark Hull. Clark came
to Pahokee in the 1930s; her
family were some of the early
pioneers.
She is a graduate of Pahokee
High School with the class of
1939. After :high school, -she
attended Florida Southern Col'-'
lege and Webb School of Bu.si-'
ness. -
She returned to Pahokee and
went to work for her father as a
bookkeeper for Hull Packing
Co., Inc. In 1946, she married
Ellis Floyd Wilkinson of Paho-
kee. Together, they founded Red
Devon Ranch, Inc. where they
raised cattle and grew vegeta-
bles.
Clark was very active in her
lifetime in civic, social and
church groups. She was a mem-
ber of Xi Beta Tau, the Pahokee
Women's Club, PEO, and the
First United Methodist Church of
Pahokee. She was part of a pro-
gram in WWII that knitted
wraps for soldiers, for which she
received a nice citation from the
President of the United States.
She was also one of the
founders of-Glades Day School,
the first private school in the
Glades area.
One of her greatest'accom-
plishments was becoming the
first female mayor for the city ,of
Pahokee. She served'from 1987
to 1992. She took great pride in
her community and always
strived to make it a better place
to live.
She was preceded in death by
her former husband Ellis Floyd
Wilkinson, her son Walter Ellis
Wilkinson, and her sister Ginny
Wilkinson. She is survived by
her daughter Anne W. Hatton
and her husband Travis of Okee-
chobee, and by her grandchil-
dren Cameron Hatton of Okee-
chobee and Kristin Hatton of
Cape Coral, Brad Wilkinson of
Wellington and Michelle
Hollingsworth of Wellington,
sisters Kathryn Barnes of Paho-
kee, Hilda Wilkinson of Paho-


kee, and Tinky Nason of Vero
Beach, and four great grandchil-
dren.
Funeral services will be held
at the First United Methodist
Church of Pahokee on Wednes-
day at 3 p.m. There will be visita-
tion held one hour prior to the
service at the First United
Methodist Church of Pahokee.
Donations may be made to
the following: Florida United
Methodist Children's House,
Hospice of Palm Beach County.
-or .the:-First Linited Methodist
Church of Pahokee.

Gladolia "Bunny"
Marie Hunter
Gladolia "Bunny" Marie
Hunter, 84, of Lakeport, died
Wednesday, June 8, 2005, at
Raulerson Hospital in Okee-
chobee. Born April 16, 1920 in
Des Monies, Iowa, Mrs. Hunter
had been a resident of Lakeport
since 1980. ,,
She\ as preceded in death by
her husband, Ben Hunler.
Survivors include two daugh-
ters, Debbie Bresk! of Sebastian
and Audre (Bill) Sturtevant of
.Cleveland, Arkansas; brother-in-
law, Glen (Lou) Hunter of Lake-
port; four grandchildren; and six
great grandchildren.
There will be no visitation or
services. .
In lieu of flok ers, memorial
contributions may be madeto
Hospice of Okeechobee, P.O.
Box 1548, Okeechobee, FL
34973.
All arrangements were under
the direction and care of the
Buxton Funeral Home and Cre-.
matory..

Joe T. Maxwell
Joe T. Maxwell, 85, of Moore
Haven, died from a stroke on Fri-
day, June 3, 2005 at Bay Pines VA
Medical Center in St. Petersburg.
Born in Carroll County, Indiana,
on Aug. 14, 1919, Mr. Maxwell
came to Moore Haven from
Lakeland 15 years ago. He was a
partner of Pickard Maxwell Real-
tor in Lakeland for 15 years. He
was a WWII Army veteran. He
was a lifetime member of Real-
tors, and the Florida Association


of Realtors. He was of the
Methodist faith.
Mr. Maxwell is survived by his
son, Kevin Alderman, of Tampa;
daughter, Marilyn Dehne, of
Lafayette, Indiana; seven grand-
children; four great-grandchil-
dren..
Visitations was from 11 a.m.
to noon, Saturday, June 11, 2005
at Gentry-Morrison Southside
Chapel. Funeral Service fol-
lowed at noon at the funeral
home chapel.
In Lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to the Elk's Chil-
dren Therapy Service & Elk's
youth camp. Checks may be
made payable to the Elk's Asso-
ciation, P.O. Box 49, 24175 E.
HWY 450, Umatilla, FL 32784-
049.

James Paul Carroll,
James Paul Carroll, 88, of
Moore Haven, died Wednesday,
June 8, 2005 at Hendry Regional
Medical Center in Clewislon.
Born Nov. 27, 1916 in Anderson,
Indiana, Mr. Carroll had been a
resident of.Moore Haven since
1986. He served in the Army Air
Corps during WWII and was a
lifetime member of the Ameri-
can Legion..
He was preceded in death by
his nephew, Charles Johnson. by
Survivors include his beloved
wile of 59 years, Thelma J. Car-
roll of Moore Haven; nephews,
James R. Johnson, Joe Lakey of
Anderson, Indiana, Ralph Wil-
son of Pierston, Indiana, Jerry
Spaulding of Anderson, Indiana;
nieces, Diane BanBuskirk, of
Anderson, Indiana, Linda Ball of
Crossville, Tennessee and Karen
Richardson of Fort Lauderdale;
and a host of other nieces and
nephews.
Funeral services were held on
Monday, June 13, 2005 at 11
a.m. at Buxton Funeral Home.
Rev. John Booher, Pastor of First
Christian Church in Moore
Haven officiated and interment
followed at Ortona Cemetery.
All arrangements were under
the direction and care of Bux-
ton's West Lake Funeral Home
and Crematory.


Serving The Lake Area Since 1980


I


~w
~ .'it




~'jLA7':.< I. ..~. ~,


Dwayne Ryan Brown
and your community. We want-
ed to, as a family and a commu-
nity, let Ryan know how proud
we are of him. Ryan you have
been working so hard to stay on
track with you academics and it
has not gone unnoticed. We saw
great potential in you as a young
child and it has shadowed you
until this very day. Keep up the
good work and most of all; Keep
God first he will exalt you in due
time. We love you "Boo".


Happy
Anniversary


Owens anniversary
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Owens
celebrated their first year of mar-
riage, we wish them many more
years of. love and happiness -
they were married June 10, 2004.
Happy anniversary.

Summer

safety tips


Summertime is approaching.
Would your child know what to
do if he/she got lost at a shop-
ping mall? A nice, friendly
stranger offered him/her a ride
home? A babysitter wanted to
play a secret game that no one
would know about? A friend
dared him/her to hitchhike?
Start With The Basics
Rehearse with your child his
or her full name, address, and
phone number, including area
code, and how to make emer-
gency phone calls from home and
public phones. Try practicing on
an unplugged phone.
Teach your child to go to a
store clerk, security guard, or life-
guard and ask for help if you
become separated in a store,
shopping mall, or the beach. Tell
them never to go into the parking
lot alone. In addition, when possi-
ble, accompany your child to the
restrOom.-


44 Glades Ford *Lincoln-Mercury
WE RE-ENTLY RECEI'.ED A LARGE SHIPMENT OF
lNEW rAD PREOWNED VEHICLES AND .'UST DON'T
-iAT. rIME ru -OlUNT .ALL OF THEM.
S WE%. ..RE PASSING THE SA'INC. ON "O IICLU


" A A


i


Memorial Tribute
Remember a loved one !
who has departed nith a special :
Memorial Tribute in this newspaper.


Your tribute can be published following the memorial services, or to
commemorate an anniversary ofyour loved one's birth or passing. You
can add a photograph of your loved one, lines from a poem or'
scripture, and special art or borders -- and we'll make sure it all comes
together attractively and tastefully.

Visit www2.newszap.com/memorials for sample ads
and an online order form, or call 1-866-379-6397 toll free.


HIP & KNEE SURGEON
NOW SEEING PATIENTS
AT HENDRY REGIONAL

Dr. Ed Humbert is a fellowship
trained hip and knee surgeon
specializing in joint replacement
and arthroscopn of the hip and knee.

CALL TODAY FOR AN APPOINTMENT


Dr. Ed Humbert
Next to Hendry Regional
in Suite B
530 IV. Sagamore Avenue
Clewiston, FL 33440
http://wwiv.jointimplanLcom

(863) 983-2896


.. ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .


JOINT
IMPLANT
SURGEONS



OF FLORIDA


Do You HAVE ASTHMA?

Are you 25 64?
Have you ever been told by your healthcare provider that you have asthma?
Do you require daily long-term control medicine?
Do you have questions about how asthma affects your breathing, how asthma
medicines help to control your asthma, or what to do in an emergency?

The American Lung Association has a new program for you!

Breathe Well Live Well / Learn how to be free of symptoms

V/ Learn how to manage your asthma
S" and reduce your chances of letting
your asthma get out of control

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that a person without asthma can
do!


Control your asthma; don't let your asthma control you!
The American Lung Association Breathe Well, Live Well program will be held at

GLAPES GENERAL HOSPITAL

GLADES 1201 South Main Street
GENERAL
HOSPITAL


Orientation: Tuesday, June 21, 2005 from 5:15 pm 6:15 pm
Education Program: Saturday, June 25, 2005 from 8:00 am 12:30 pm :
(Light breakfast available)
Space is limited, so register today by calling (561) 993-3632.

For participating and providing feedback on the new program, you will also
receive:


4 ,-Ofentation: Asthma Control InformaqIo q,pj o,
'^Education Program: Allergy Controt Pillo'Ri
S.. and Peak Flow Meter. '..
Three-Month Follow-up: -$25 Gift C t'cat

t AMERICAN
LUNG
ASSOCIATIONe
1OOYEARS 1904-2004


800-726-8514


DeVaughn(@gladesmnotors.com


uxton's West La
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- I .. ... I ll, [J I Z 2 Z2/ illl~ ll/ : .. ..... .I ... 2:1 : $2[r [ :I .


2


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 16,200


Anmi wa s


I












Flooded ditches bring health hazards to children


The first few days of summer
break brought torrential rainfall to
South Florida. While it may be
impossible to keep kids out of the
mud and puddles, there are some
health concerns to keep in mind.
Never leave children unsuper-
vised, even when they are playing
in their own yard. Small children
can drown in a small amount of
water. An overflowing drainage
ditch can be tempting to a child,
and may be deeper than it looks.
Flooded pastures can make it
difficult to see exactly where a


A
Healthier
Life


with Katrina Elsken


pond starts and ends. Children
playing or riding ATVs in a flooded
area may find themselves falling


into a deep pond.
Floodwaters may also contain
bacteria and toxins. Rainwater
draining across backyards, pas-
tures and roadways may contain
animal feces, insecticides, herbi-
cides, fertilizers and fuel residue.
It will also pick up natural bacte-
ria, which is in the soil.
Children often see any water
as a place to play or swim, but
storm drainage is not clean water.
Swallowing any of the drainage
water could make them sick. If
they have any cuts or scrapes, it


could also lead to infection. If
despite your efforts to keep them
safe, you find your children have
been playing in the storm water,
make sure they shower well with
an anti-bacterial soap, and check
for any cuts or scrapes that might
be infected.
Another health hazard associ-
ated with flooding comes from
insects that breed in standing
water. Mosquitoes can carry dis-
eases such as West Nile Virus. If
you have standing water in your
yard, take precautions to protect


your family against mosquito
bites. Drain water from contain-
ers such as flowerpots and wad-
ing pools. If it is not possible to
drain the standing water, there are
some chemical treatments avail-
able that will kill insect larvae.
Another option for ponds is to
add more fish. Fish eat insect lar-
vae and help control the mosqui-
to population.
Keep children indoors at peak


mosquito-biting times, such as
the hour before and after sunset.
Outdoors, wear long sleeves and
use insect repellant.
Before making any change in
your diet or exercise plan, consult
your doctor. This is especially
important if you are on any pre-
scription medications. Some
drugs interact badly with foods
that would otherwise be consid-
ered "healthy".


Wi^ h Gdes Ford- Licoln-Mercury

9C- ^& Eft I r -4L r-i U .-
COiFAf Imr A x-i
0LET ^ VW 'oI10K- O-^r-
A C GREA ](^ T- 1k tL


I D A ... Save A


New, Used &, Leased Car Sales
800-726-8514
jon@gladesmotors.com
,,.. _--*__*u.Z


Staff photo/Jose Zaragoza
Libby Moya is the newest addition to ad services within the
South Lake Group, serving Clewiston,' Glades County and
the Glades area.


Moya joins South Lake's ad

services department


The Belle Glade Sun, Clewis-
ton News and Glades County
Democrat office in Clewiston wel-
comes Libby Moya, its newest
staff addition..
Twenty-two-year-old Libby is
on her third week on the job,
hired in late May to help out in the
ad services department.
A native of the Glades, born in
Pahokee, and a resident of
Clewiston, Libby is growing
accustomed to her new job duties


and looks forward to taking on
more responsibilities. She. is
preparing for the transition into
sales.
"I like it, it's something differ-
ent," said Libby about her job.
Supervisor Melissa Agee is
happy with how good of a worker
Libby has proven to be. "She's
very energetic and very motivat-
ed," Melissa said. "I know she is
going to do a good job."


Stant pnoto/laeyois uonzalez
Bill Fabian, a Clewiston native, has joined the editorial
staff, for the South Lake Group, serving Clewiston,
Glades County, and the Glades area.


Fabian joins South


Lake editorial staff


Bill Fabian is a new addition
to the editorial staff. His duties
include reporting for the Clewis-
ton News and Glades County
Democrat.
Bill feels right at home in his
new profession. After finishing
up at Florida State in April 2005,
Bill moved back home to Clewis-
ton. Bill's family has lived in
Clewiston for 13 years. He defi-
nitely enjoys his new job and
responsibilities.
"I love what I've been doing
because you get the chance to
work hard on something and
then see the results, which is
very fun and rewarding," he
said. "Most importantly, it's great
to have the opportunity to serve
the town of Clewiston," he
added.


South Lake News Editor Mark
Young said that Bill has been a
nice surprise to the South Lake
staff.
"We basically struggled
through a month short on staff
waiting for Bill to graduate and
join the staff," he said. "All I can
really say is that it was worth the
wait. He is already writing stories
with a seasoned understanding
of what is important. I look for-
ward to watching him grow as a
journalist and am confident that
he has a very successful career
aheadof him."
If you would like to contact
Bill directly concerning a news
story, you may call him at (863)
228-3129, or send an e-mail to
bfabian@newszap.com.


Green Thumbs Garden Club Minutes


Lovely day, ji6\el' selling! Eigl-
teen members o: Green Thumbs
Garden Club filet'on May 17 at the
Clewiston Country Club for a
delightful luncheon, concluding
their 2004-2005 year.
Using Genesis 2:8 as her devo-
tional reference, Kathy Hicks
reminded us that Eden was God's
.Garden Masterpiece and that gar-
dens have always been a part of
His plan. Each garden has a pur-
pose in God's heart and in ours.
Dot Stacy reported a treasury
balance of $1,107.05.
Sue Phelps, Emily Drake and
Janet Summerlin excitedly report-
ed a fantastic District X meeting.
SWinged Treasures was the theme
for the day. Dr. Ron Cave, from the
. Indian River Research and Educa-
tion Center in Ft. Pierce, stressed
the importance of using insects to
save certain varieties of Bromili-
ads. Ken Gioeli, a Natural
Resource agent from the St. Lucie
County Extension Service spoke
about Bats; Florida's Winged
Treasures. The women learned a
lot and thoroughly enjoyed their
presentations. Janet had a lucky
streak and walked away with sev-
eral prizes, including a large Bon-
zaitree.
The Habitat house was dis-


cussed, briefly, noting that ve still
have landscaping work to do.
.Ther_ \\'ill be a Museum open
house in the fall and the Green
Thumbs Garden Club is working
with the Clewiston Garden Club,
the Museum Board and the City
on the landscaping for the new
building.
The National Garden Club
Convention will be held in Orland
next year, May 24-28, 2006. All
clubs are asked to save tuna fish
cans. \aish them and spray them,
wtih fla black pain. to be used in
the able decorations.
Our club \\ill observe the cele-
bration of National Garden Club
week, June 5-11, by placing an
arrangement in a prominent
place.
The Gardening and Design
Seminar will be held June 1-3 at
the University of Florida Confer-
ence Center.
We are sponsoring two girls
and two boys to Camp Wekiva at
Orlando.
.Ninette Aker presented Ace
Hardware prizes to: Janet 'Sum-
merlin. Elizabeth Johnstone,
Sri le\ Perry, Marci Propes, Pat
mason, Vicki Austin and Dot
Stacy.
Officers for the new year are:


President, Linda Parker; First Vice-
President, Kathy Hicks; Sc',:on'd
Vice-President, Vicky Austiin;
Recording Secretary, Mary Lenz;
Corresponding Secretary, Betty
Lebo and Sharon Coots; Treasur-
er, Dot Stacy; Chaplain, Sandy
*Stitt; Historian, Emma Jane
Helvey.
President Sue Phelps passed
the gavel to Linda Parker, wishing


her a successful term as our new
president. A round of applause
%% as' the response of club mem-
'bers as they thanked Sue for the
superb job she did during her
term.
Next meeting will be at Sandy
Stitt's home, U.S. 27, for the new
'05-'06 year. Meeting is scheduled
for September and guests inter-
ested in gardening are welcome.


City of Pahokee


The city of Pahokee will issue
Requests for Proposals (RFP's) for
roofing work on a variety of city-
owned properties. The bid.
requires contractors to visit the
sites and determine the extent of
repair and/or replacement.
There are approximately 11
buildings at seven locations that
need to be brought up to current
building code and inspection stan-
dards. The bidder will provide cer-
tification that the company is not
suspended, debarred, or other-
wise ineligible to receive govern-
ment contracts. I
This process' is to ensure the
safety and welfare of the city and
the citizens inf the communities.


The city of Pahokee has the right
to reject all proposals submitted, if
needed. It is the intention of the
city to invite local and minority
owned businesses to apply. Any
contract awarded will be given to
the city commissioners at the rec-
ommendation of the city manag-
er.
Because of the extent of work
and the condensed timeline, any
contract may be terminated for
failure to perform as contracted.
This is a continuous step to help
improve the appearance of the'
community in the city of Pahokee.
Questions should be directed to
the Pahokee .City Clerk at (562)
924-5534 Ext. 28.


FThWky Seaft SenacJrTAoaitznD








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VSginia Ave. 3bd/lba, I .ar caport
going@ $79K
. 13 Brand New Homes to bh-
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Virginia Ave. 3bd/lba home going
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Harlem Academy Ave. 3bd/lba,
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For Rent DISWPl nifl1 2bj @
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on 2.5 acj^ y ..f'urnished
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For Rentind New
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each Brann lwAwC striction!
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pond, jacuzzi, partially fenced Call
for more Information.
r 2V2
$2


6 '1:Glenn
SSmith

863-983-3508



Back onflieMaket Another chance at
this 4 bedroom/3 bath Mobile Home.
15x64' screenporchBrick BBQ.
See pictures at www.realtor.com
MLS# 205053592
Montura owners Don't sell for less. Call
me for a free Market Analysis
New Listing!! 3/2/2 CBS home on
almost % acre. Great location-across
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See pictures and more at -
www.realtor.com. MLS#205058832
New listing 3 Bedroom/31/2 bath
mobile home. Double Lot. Fenced. 20 x
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overlooks a man made lake. Listed at
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Pictures available at www.realtor.com
MI.S#205059162

I can market your home on
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over 4000 visitors per month. I can
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Ten
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863-228-1142


Fun, Food. & a Good Time!!
Restauranr, Bar, & FFE. Great
Location on Hi-l 27 -.209.9A
New Lis t2 MH on
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got the land 125K
New LiJsn.3/2 M 905 Great
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schools. l-ot"), VA. to move
in. $84.9K
NewL --', 100K
Near
MonrumLotsl1.25 to 2.5 Acres. Get
them while you can! Callto inqum
1.2 SALE PENDLING-k
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New Listing! The most
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Clewiston with a new home
on a corner lot. Over 2600
sq.ft. 3bd/2ba CBS. Call To
Inquire!
"My Priorities are Simple,


aCharmaine
Montgomery
t H1 iEnumlot
863-697-0189

Monlra
Nu Listing! 3 2 inge wide on i.25
acre-. %84,9q00.00
3/2 DBLWIDE, 8x10 Shed, fenced.
Only $95,000.00


Pioneer Plantation
CoQpSA~fBNDIN
5 Heavily Wooded Acres. @ $125K

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Giving Your Property the
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DE
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Gra

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ng Your turaRancd
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m Moving! Over 1/2 acre lake-
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www.sugarrealty.com for photos.
Monua lots 1-2.5 acres Call for
Information
Bu-'w" y. '" ia]
prL yIjeen
$11 ,i .. or i Rw t. cn. L L
FOR INFORMATION!
New Listing! 2/1 Single
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Lakeport! Start in the 480'
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3


Thursday, June 16,2005


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee








Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee Thursday, June 16,200'


Speak Out

Speak Out is our free 24-hour opinion line. Call 983-9140
to express your opinion or ask a question about public
issues. You are not required to give your name. While we
want you to speak freely, the newspaper reserves the right to
edit calls for clarity, brevity, relevance and fairness.


This is the Clewiston curmudgeon calling. I'm wondering
what department off engineering designed the drainage on Sugar-
land Highway. Was it somebody national, state, county, or city
engineers that designed that questionable drainage system? I
guess the upside is that you get a free wash job for the undercar-
riage of your automobile when you drive through, following mod-
erate to heavy rains.


Letter to the Editor


Thanks to
the community
Dear Editor
We like to thank God for all of
your assistance in our time of
need. The family wishes to thank
everyone in the Harlem commu-
nity and surrounding areas, Glori-
ous community Holiness Church
and their Ministerial staff for their
prayers and acts of kindness, love
and contributions during the
home going services for mother


Roberta Johnson.
I want to thank Elder Robert
Troupe and the mothers of the
Church for their generous acts of
kindness. A special thanks goes
out to Bishop Granville, who
unselfishly shortened his vacation
to come and eulogize our love
one. We also like to thank Red-
dicks Funeral Home for their pro-
fessional action in their perform-,
ance.
From Deloris and Regina
Nealy, and the Johnson family.


Actions that are worth thousands


The Reverend Samuel S.
Thomas, Ph. D.+
Saint Martin's Church, Clewiston
I entered graduate school
about a year after my daughter
was born and for her first few
years I was a full-time student.
There was a chair in our living
room where I studied, and there
were also her playthings and
toys, as well as "her chair".,
That was a small, child-sized
chair made like a bear, with eyes
and ears that stood up, furry
brown covering and paws at the
feet.
One day while I was studying,
I noted that my daughter too was
sitting in her chair looking at a
book. I was a bit amused her
book was upside down. She had
no idea about reading then, but
there she was, intently staring at
this upside-down book. I
watched this go on and suddenly
was stunned.
"What have I taught?" I said to
myself. This was amazing a
child about age three sitting still
for a long period of time, looking
at a book upside down and star-
ing at a printed page that could
not mean anything to her. I was


really taken aback that moment:
I .had seen her copy what I was
doing day after day, hour after
hour, and she had obviously
learned that
grown-ups J
stared at
books while ., '
sitting in their s
chairs.
I began to
wonder what
else I had
taught her to
do at age Rev. Samuel
three. We did- Samuel
n't smoke. She S.Thomas
didn't learn
that from her parents. We made
sure we went to Church, that
was important and a part of each
week. We noticed that the play
doctor's kit she had said on the
certificate that "HE was entitled
to practice play medicine" and
the play nurses' kit said that "SHE
was entitled to practice play
nursing."
We didn't watch the football
games or sports activities on TV
and she didn't watch them either.
I began to think about what we
really taught our daughter and
how she learned it and how this


would affect her throughout her
life.
There is a Biblical account of
a man with two sons (Matthew
21:28ff) where a father has two
sons and asks one to work in his
vineyard. The son says, "I will
not" but late goes. When he asks
the other one to go and work, he
says that he will, but does not.
The parable is about actions, not
words; the first son is counted as
having done the will of his father.
The children do what they see;
the act speaks much louder than
the-word. We are admonished in
James; epistle to be 'doers of the
word and not hearers only,
deceiving yourselves (Chapter 1,
verse 22)."
With the recent violence on
television, the number of report-
ed assaults, the murders and
crimes against people, I wonder
about the homes where such
people grow up. I have never
heard of anyone saying, "go out
and attack someone" or "you
should shoot the people that
aggravate you." Where do such
things come from? I am con-
vinced that people are deeply
affected by what goes on around
them and what is shown to be


"normal" in their homes.
believe watching what goes on iri
their homes and neighborhoods.
When there is a difference
between what people say anc
what they do, those around their
will always put the actions before:
the words as signs of what they
really believe, what they really
think is important, what is really.
the "right way" to act. One of my
professors wrote a book that hl
called "Doing the Truth" because
he realized that our character is
shaped by our acts so much
more than by our words. i
My daughter grew up likin-
books and reading and I amr
grateful for having shared tha
with her even when I.didn't ieal-
ize what I was doing. When I see
young people accused of com-
mitting acts of violence against
people or senselessly taking
lives, I wonder what exaniples
were set or who was a model'
that they followed. I think the}
missed something. I am my
brother's keeper and my chil-
dren's keeper too. I am responsi-
ble because they will lea-in i mc'rn
me even when I dn i'l think
about it.


How to help save a drowning man


Q; Dear Doc Savvy. Hello, my
name is Sean Bishop. I am doing
a project on eyesight for my fifth
grade class. Can you tell me why
dogs do not see in color. Thank
you.
A: Well hey there Sean!
Thanks for writing to me. I
always love helping with school
projects. Ok, here is your
answer: Eyesight boils down to
two things, rods and cones. Rods
are responsible for black and
white vision and the cones are
responsible for color vision.
Dogs have 99 percent rods,
and only roughly one percent
cones. This is primarily why they
do not see in color. I hope that
answers your question. Hope
you make an "A"! Best wishes,
Doc Savvy.
Q: Dear Doc Savvy. Help Doc,
I am having an algae problem in
our fish tank! It is getting greener
and greener. Yuk! It looks like
nasty swamp water. What do I
do? I'm ashamed to give my real-
name, so just call me "Swamp
Thing."
A: Well alrighty then, heilli'-
looooo Swamp Thing! Huh,
okay, first we need to figure out
why you are having a problem
with algae. Is your tank getting
too much sunlight? Also, check
the content and ph of the water. I
guess you could start out fresh
and cull out the fish and totally
re-do the tank? Not! Just kidding!


Bl^-~~ *


Okay, there are many anti-
algae products on the market.
The one I have the most success
is called "Algae Destroyer". Just
follow the directions and you
should be okay in about four or
five days. Also, you must take the
filter out of the cartridge daily
and rince it out. If that doesn't
help you Swampy, I don't know
what will. Take. care and I hope
you don't have too many barna-
cles growing on-your hull' Doc
Sa^'vv .


E-mail your, pet questions to
DOCSAVVY@aol.com and check
out your pet answers weekly in
the "Pet Corner"! Be sure to tune
into "The Savvy Pet Show" each
and every Thursday, at 10:30
a.m. on 95.5's The Big Dawg.


Community Event

Foster parents needed
HENDRY/GLADES The Children's Network of Southwest
Florida, the community based care division of Camelot Com-
munity Care, Inc. is holding an orientation on "How to become
a Foster Parent/Adoptive Parent" on Tuesday, June 21 at the
Department of Children and Families, 485 East Cowboy Way,
LaBelle at 6 p.m.
Camelot Community Care, Inc. serves as the lead agency to
transition child-welfare services to the private sector in Collier,
Lee, Charlotte, Hendry and Glades Counties. Camelot Commu-
nity Care, Inc. has partnered with Family Preservation Services,
Lutheran Services of Florida, Ruth Cooper Center for Behavioral,
Health Care and the Florida Baptist Children's Home to recruit
more foster families in our five county regions. For those inter-
ested in becoming a foster/adoptive family, please call (800) 89
FAMILY.


Clewiston News


Our Purpose...
The Clewiston News is published by Independent Newspapers of Florida.
Independent is owned by a uruque trust that enables this newspaper to
pursue a mission of journalistic service to the citizens of the community.
Since no dividends are paid, the company is able to thrive on profit
margins below industry standards. All after-tax surpluses are reinvested in
Independent's mission of journalistic service, commitment to the ideals of
the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, and support of the
commmuruty's deliberation of public issues.


We Pledp...
To operate tlis n pperi mS al public trust
' To help our community become a better
p ace to liwv and % ork, ifhroid, our dedica
tir [oc ,,:ecienonu' ].urntllrn
* ) pTinde the lmfIruridn.-,n I wt:n n-need to
m.k'.e their own itellienr de,:io.i' .boita
p iblt, i~llti
' T r n r iepT e re.w witi hinorety, acouracery.
obljeorory, I'rearlnriei and, '.mp'irAin
' T':O sA OUe Ofiniln pageS I,) tWllldal&
c'rrar.unil d bilE, not Lo dominate it with
our ...ur n"pilrd., i
* 7' po nirtal corilll,: i'.' iv ur read rl
'* '- e. I,ei' t eni. d ri : i. i -,', c- i ...
reaction to the prominence it deserves,
' To provide a right to reply to those we write
about.
* To treat people with courtesy, respect and
compassion.


Editorial:
News Ediror Mark Young
Reporter Jose Zroapu
Reporu-r Bll Febiar,
News Clerk Idrybh Gorale:


emakSon welatmiassiidump.,
AMerwdsing Director Judy Kaster
Nanonal Accounts Joy Pamrih
A.u-tmsing Seri- Mietlsi AAge
L.urer, A'irm
ovia W-0,,a
ir.',&pEr et irie, Ianc i
Cliti,,iur 1.: Smth
President Ed Dl.r.
V. Pre.lerI .:1 Fk.ndato 0tiraj.n] Ttn B,Trd
E\ecun e Eda-ir IKtnn. Elkr,



Florida Press
Assocmailon


Pastor John Hicks
First United Methodist Church
What would you do if you
saw someone drowning? A
number of years ago I was driv-
ing over a causeway when I saw
a bike rider suddenly drop his
bike and jump over the edge of
the bridge. Alarmed, I pulled
over to the side to check it out.
Others drove on. Even though
it's been over 20 years, the
events of that day still remain
with me.
.A young boy was paddling
across the river when the boat
he was in capsized. Away from
the boat, he was struggling in
the water. It was his struggling
and the cries for help, which
inspired the bicyclist to drop his
bike and jump in to help. I
arrived on the scene just as sev-.
eral people were helping them
out of the water. While all of this
was going on, there were a num-
ber of fishermen out there who
never put their rods down or
even made a motion to help.
The boy was drowning and they
did nothing. I couldn't believe it.
The reality is that there are a
lot of people around us who are


struggling to keep their head
above water for one reason or
another. There are a lot of peo-
ple who could use a helping
hand to keep them from going
under. And
unfortunately,
there are a lot
of people just
going about
their business
doing nothing
to help. Again
the question,
"What would
you do if you Pastor
saw someone John Hicks
drowning?"
A story is
told about a man who was on a
luxury liner and suddenly fell
overboard. He couldn't swim,
and in desperation began calling
for help. Hearing the cries for
help, one man reached into his
briefcase and pulled out a book
on swimming techniques. He
tossed it to the man in the water
and he yelled: "Now brother,
you read :hal and iust follow the
instructions and you \%ill be
alright."
. Another man on deck saw
the man fall overboard.- and


immediately started making
swimming motions with his
arms. He yelled, "Brother, watch
my motions. Do as I do and you
will be fine."
A third man looked upon the
drowning man's plight with
deep concern, and yelled out,
"Just hold on friend. Help is on
the way. We are going to estab-
lish a committee and discuss
your problem. And then, if we
can come up with the proper
financing, we will resolve your
dilemma."
By this time the drowning
man was going down for the
third, time and desperately start-
ed waving his hand. Caught up
in the excitement of the
moment, another man yelled
out, "Yes, brother, I see that
hand, is there another?" Finally,
someone on deck plunged into
the water at the risk of their own
life and pulled the victim to safe-
ty.
The moral of this little tail is
that if we are to be effecti, e iIn
helping people "%hr, are si_ ugp
gling to keep their heads aLb e
water in this world, our evangel-
ism and mission outreach must


be pro-active, relational ih
nature, and must meet people at
the point of their need.
Francis of Assisi, the kindly
13th century monk, informed
his brethren one day that he
planned to go into the nearby vil-,
lage on a preaching mission. As !
legend tells it, he invited a young
monk to go with him.
On their way, they passed an
injured man and Francis
promptly stopped, saw to the
man's needs and arranged med-
ical care for him. They went on
and soon passed a homeless,
man who was near starvation.:
Again, Francis stopped and min-
istered to the man. All through
the day, as. they encountered
people in need, Francis cared for
them the best he could.
As the sun went down, Fran-
cis said it was time to return to
the monastery for evening
prayers. Confused, the young
:monk inquired. "Father, you said
we .were coming to town to
preach-to the people Francis
smiled and replied, "My Iriend,
that's what we've been doing all
day."


Harlem Highlights


Prayer breakfast
You are invited to share a spiri-
tual morning with the Mt. Cal-
vary Missionary Baptist Church
Choir #1 and church family, as
they gather for prayer breakfast
Saturday morning, June 25 at
7:30 a.m. The theme for morning,
program will be "Christians,
Standing Firm in the Holy Spirit."
Sis. Barbara Henry, chairperson.
Rev. Dwayne E. Brown, Pastor.

Glades Choir Union
New Bethel A.M.E. Church,
Clewiston will host the Glades
Choir Union Sunday, June 26 at
3:30 p.m. The public is welcome
to attend. Rev. Jenkins, Pastor.
Democratic"
Banquet a success
Many were in attendance last
Friday, June 10 for the Democrat-
ic Banquet, which was held in
Labelle. Lots of door prizes were
given away. The guest speaker
was Florida State Senator, Dave
Aronberg, 27th District. The Flori-
da Senate's main office is located
at: 404 South Monroe Street, Tal-
lahassee, Florida 32399.

Democrat meeting
The HeHdry County Democra-
tic Meeting is held every thud
Tuesday in each month at 6:30
p.m. June 21 meeting will be
held at the Sub-station in Clewis-
ton. All democrats are asked to
attend. Mr. Granville Williams,
chairperson.
Fathers Day Banquet
The members of Mt. Zion
A.M.E. Church in Belle Glade, is
inviting all men to attend their
Fathers Day Banquet Sunday,
June 19 at 4 p.m. The banquet is
free for all men, if accompanied
by their family. Rev. Melvin Hines,
pastor.

Graham
honored guest
Mrs. Jeanette Small Graham
was honored with a birthday din-
ner at her home Sunday, June 12,
given by her children. Many fami-
ly and friends were present to
help Mrs. Graham celebrate. Her
birthday is June 13. She is a
retired nurse, who has worked in
the community for many years.
We wish Mrs. Graham a love
filled birthday and God bless.


Happy birthday
greetings
Birthday wishes goes out to:
Jeanette Small Graham, Titus
Dixon Sr., Arthur Thomas Sr.,
Walter Holmes Sr., Deborah
Castleberry, Carlos Williams,
Shep Harris Sr., Shirley A. Harris,
Fredricka Busby, Justin Newman,
Jarmyle Newman, Darricka Gib-
son, Felisia Foster, Jalasia Watts,
David Thomas Sr. and all born
this week of June 13. God bless
each of you.

Anniversary wish
Congratulations to Queenie
and Freddie Moore. The couple
celebrated their fifth wedding
anniversary last week. The com-
munity wishes you many more
years of love and happiness. God
bless you.

Sick and shut-ins
Remember to pray for the sick
and shut-ins and visit them in the
hospitals, health care centers,
and their homes. A visit will help
make their day. Pray for the
bereaved families in the commu-
nity and surrounding areas.
Remember those incarcerated.
Prayers change all things.

Thought for the week
"All things are possible,
through Christ who strengthens
us."

2005 Tigers
Football Schedule
Varsity
August 19-(Home) Pahokee
Blue Devils (Pre-Season)
August 26-(Home) American
Heritage Patriots
September 2-Labelle Cow-
boys
September 9-Glades Day
Gators
September 16-open
September 23-Glades Central
Raiders
30 (Home) -Cardinal New-
man Crusaders
October 7-Bishop Verot
-a


Vikings
October 14-Pope John Paul II
Eagles
October 21-Inlet Grove Hurri-
canes
October 28-(Home) St.
Andrews Scots
November 4-(Home) Okee-
chobee Brahmans

Varsity games began at 7:30
p.m.

Junior Varsity
September 1-Immokalee Indi-
ans
September 8-(Home)-Okee-
chobee Brahmans
September 15-Labelle Cow-
boys
September 22-(Home)-
Glades Day Gators
September 29-(Home)-
Glades Central Raiders




' .:


October
Cowboys


6-(Home)-Labelle


October (Wed.) 12-Naples
Golden Eagles
October 20-American Her-
itage Patriots
All JV games began at 7 p.m.

East Recreational
Department of Harlem
Participants are still needed to
participate in the summer activi-
ties planned for t-ball, softball,
and flag football. If you are inter-
ested, please contact Johnny
Jackson at 983-6969, Tim
Thomas, or contact the Recre-
ational Department at the
Harlem Gym. Also volunteers
are very much needed. Remem-
ber, these are your children and
our community.


Clewiston News
Published by Independent Newspaper, Inc.
Serving Eastern Hendry County Since 1923


To Reach Us
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626 W. Sugarland Highway,
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V
I


Pet Corner


Thursday, June 16,200'


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee








Thursday, June 16, 2005 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee 5


Hall shooting considered to be justifiable


Staff photos/ Ideybis Gonzalez
Hendry County Sheriff investigators look over evidence,
which was found during a recent drug bust in Montura


--7
S1W.
A Hendry County Sheriff's deputy, along with a sheriff inves-
tigator, attempt to gain information from one of the person's
taken into custody following a recent drug bust.


- euty Sancnez


Drug bust
By Ideybis Gonzalez
, MONTURA On \V\dritsda\,
* June 8, at around 4:36 p.m. Hendry
County Sheriff Criminal Investiga-
tions Division, serving a search
warrant, arrived at a residence
located at 212 Avenida Del Club in
MonturaRanch.
During the search of the resi-
dence, investigators found an
.excess of 10 grams of powder
cocaine, as well as paraphernalia
and packaging materials, which
were taken into evidence.
Following the execution of the
search warrant and an, on scene
investigation, sheriff investigators
arrested two individuals, one of
which was a Hispanic male identi-
fied as Doberti Sanchez. The sec-


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Doberti Sanchez


State Attorney Steve Russell has
announced that the Hendry Coun-
ty Grand Jury has cleared six
Hendry County Sheriff's deputies
in the Sept. 22, 2004 shooting of
Deana K. Hall after a traffic pursuit
in LaBelle.
Ms. Hall survived her gunshot
wounds.
The Grand Jury issued a report
on May 31, which sets forth its fac-
tual findings in the case and the
conclusion that the actions of the
deputies were legally justified. The
report had been sealed under Flori-
da law until the Grand Jury's find-
ings were released on June 3. State
Attorney Steve Russell thanked the
Grand Jury for their diligent and
lengthy review of the facts.
"We believe through this
process this matter has been thor-
oughly reviewed," Mr. Russell said.
The Grand Jury also issued an
eight-count indictment charging
Ms. Hall, 28, which includes: Three
counts of aggravated assault on a
law enforcement officer and-one
count each of aggravated fleeing to
elude, resisting an officer with vio-
lence, leaving the scene of a crash,
DUI causing properly damage and
driving while license suspended.
Ms. Hall was taken into custody by
the Florida Department of Law
Enforcement (FDLE), which inves-
tigated the case. Ms. Hall is being
held at the Hendry County Jail
without bond pending arraign-
ment scheduled for July 11.


The following information
about the incident is taken from the
Grand Jury's statement of findings.
The allegations against Ms. Hall
stem from a Sept. 22, 2004, inci-.
dent in which a GMC Yukon SUV
driven by Ms. Hall reportedly
rammed into the rear of a vehicle
driven by Delma Gonzales, at a red
light at the intersection of SR 80
and Bridge Street. Ms. Hall report-
edly got out and talked to Ms. Gon-
zales, then drove away as Ms. Gon-
zales reported the crash to the
Hendry County Sheriff's Office via
cell phone.
When the Yukon reappeared
and headed west onto SR 80,
deputies followed with lights and
sirens activated. A video camera
mounted in Sgt. Jamie Thorpe's
patrol car captured the pursuit.
By the time it was over eight
officers were involved in the pur-
suit: Deputy Perry Short, Sgt. Thor-
pe, Lt. Chad Schipansky, Sgt.
Andrew Drew, Deputy David Galle-
gos, Investigator Steven Maldona-
do, Deputy Martin Meyer and Sgt.
Curtis Clay. The Yukon continued
westbound for several miles then
made a U-turn across the grass
median, heading' east toward
'LaBelle.
According to the Grand Jury's
findings, three attempts to deploy
"stop sticks," designed to deflate
tires, were unsuccessful in stop-
ping the vehicle. Two of the driver's
side tires did go flat, but the Yukon


Crimestoppers

Crimestoppers of Palm Beach
County is seeking the public's assis-
tance in locating the whereabouts
of Sheneka Byrd, a.k.a. Nickie Byrd.
Born on Aug. 8, 1977, Byrd is
described as a black female with
black hair and brown eyes. She is ...
listed as being 5'6" tall and weighs
101 pounds.
Her last known address was 715
MHP, in Belle Glade. She is wanted
on one count of felony forgery.
If you have information on the
whereabouts of Byrd, please call
(800) 458-TIPS (8477). You may
remain anonymous and could be Courtesy Photo
eligible for a cash reward. Shenka Byrd
". Glades Ford. LncoLn-ercury

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ond suspect taken into custody
was a Hispanic female identified as
Betty Sanchez.
Both were charged with posses-
sion of cocaine, possession of
cocaine with intent to sell, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia and for
the sale of cocaine. Theywere both
booked into Hendry County Jail
and are awaiting bond.


-l 3D
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continued to ride on the wheel
rims.
At one point, the left front of Sgt.
Clay's vehicle got stuck in the right
front side of the Yukon, dragging
the sheriff's unit along with it. After
almost striking a west-bound pick-
up truck head-on, the Yukon
approached the Shell gas station at
Martin Luther King Blvd., forcing a
PT Cruiser driven by Patricia Nixon
to back up on SR 80 and around
the corner onto MLK, then forcing
her off the road. On MLK, Deputy
Meyer got in front of the Yukon,
where his vehicle was struck in the
rear, spinning it to the left with the
driver's side facing the front of the
Yukon. The Yukon stopped, but
struck the driver's door of Deputy
Meyer's vehicle, pinning it shut.
The other deputies got out of their
vehicles and approached, but
Deputy Meyer could not exit
through the passenger's door
because the computer console
blocked his way. The Yukon
lurched backwards, apparently
going over the door of one of the
sheriff's vehicles.
The Grand Jury reasoned that
Deputy Meyer may have thought


he was going to be rammed when
he felt his vehicle move and shot
one time from his .40 caliber Glock
pistol. At almost the same time, Lt.
Schipansky fired four times, Sgt.
Drew fired twice, Deputy Gallegos
fired four times and Inv. Maldona-
do fired five times, all using their
Glocks. Sgt. Clay fired twice with a
12-gauge shotgun.
Deputies then secured the
scene and Hall was taken into cus-
tody. She had been struck several
times by bullet fragments, shotgun
pellets and broken glass. Off-duty
medics on-scene began medical
attention and she was then trans-
ported to Lee Memorial Hospital.
According to the Grand Jury
report, Ms. Hall's blood alcohol
content tested at .139. She also
reportedly tested positive for
cocaine, opiates and benzodi-
azephine. Hall's driver's license
was suspended at the time of the
incident.
The Florida Department of Law
Enforcement began investigating
the incident that evening.
Editors note: Post your. com-
ment on this issue at http://news-
blog.info/0801/


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Resident watched Clewiston grow from beginning


By Frances Nall
As told to MaryAnn Morris
I was born in Nashville Ten-
nessee in June, 1913. We moved to
Chicago for six years, then to Jack-
sonville and then to Orlando, but
when I was 16 years old, my father
moved us here to Clewiston. Oh, I
cried! I thought my father had done
the worst thing in the world to us.
There was nothing! Not even a road!
Now I wouldn't live anywhere else.
Clewiston is, I think, a very
unique small town, in that many of
the people who settled and formed
the town were important people in
other areas. One gentleman was
on the Board of Directors of Gener-
al Motors.
My father had the Western
Union office in town. Your com-
munications then were either let-
ters or telegrams. Everybody
would gather outside there at the
Western Union office and talk.
I'm a cat lover. We had a
Siamese cat here in 1936. People
heard about it and no one had ever
seen one. Someone came to see
"the twins" one time, not realizing
that we weren't talking about
Siamese twins.
Dr. Wells was the first real vet in
town. He had been vet for one of
the silent movie stars (it might have
been Norma Talmadge) when she
wintered in Florida. She had a
female Siamese cat who became
pregnant, but when the -kittens
were born, one wasn't pure
Siamese. She didn't want that one,
so Dr. Wells asked us if we wanted
it. My mother was a great cat lover
and had a Persian cat named
Sweetheart at that time, so she
took the kitten and named him
"Doc" after Doctor Wells. But Doc-
tor Wells never really liked that cat.
He said that Doc always looked at
him as if he (Doc the cat) knew
more than he (Doc thevet) did!
Those were the days of the Big
Band Era. Everyone, young and old
alike, listened to the same music.
There wasn't the difference there is
now. When I say old, I mean the
young married people. They were
old to us. Every other week a band
would come to town to the old
Clewiston Inn and the Inn would


Recollections
A series about Florida's
pioneers and history


have a dance. In the weeks the
band didn't come to Clewiston Inn,
we went to Belle Glade to dance.
Two men got into a fight one night.
A fight usually ended the dance for
that night.
One night two of the band
members who were staying at the
Inn got in a fight in their room. Two
oftthem were sharing a room. One
punched the other one so hard it
knocked him right through the wall
onto Mr. Plunkett's desk where he
was sitting in the next room in the
room next door! Mr. Plunkett was
an employee for the sugar compa-
ny who lived at the Inn, as did
many of the young people. Rentals
were scarce then, as they are.now!
I remember one night that I was
sitting with my husband in the
lounge of the old Clewiston Inn,
the one that burned down. All of a
sudden, a live raccoon came
bounding across the room. People
screamed and climbed up on the
chair seats and tables! Dr. Shoop
was there that night with a mem-
ber of the Board of General Motors.
What a scene! As it turned out, two
of the hotel guests had been out
hunting and thought it would be a
good joke to let the raccoon go in
the lounge that night!
The old Clewiston Inn burned
down in 1937. You see, they didn't
plant sugar cane for the sugar at
first, but from the Celotex they
could make from the canes and
use to make building materials.
But, Celotex burned very easily,
and the Inn was built with Celotex.
There's a mural in the cocktail
lounge of the new Inn painted byJ.
Clinton Shepherd in the 1940s. The
mural covers all four walls of the
lounge. There is a raccoon shown
in the mural. When his daughter


S. 41


This photo of the Clewiston School was taken in the 1940s.


had her 50th wedding anniversary,
she came out here to celebrate at
the Inn.
The original school building
was built from red brick and it's still
standing after all the hurricanes.
One of the first houses is still stand-
ing, too. It stands at the end of
Royal Palm Avenue and it was built
in 1928 by Clewiston's first mayor,
F. Dean Duff, who was mayor for
10 years. Dean Duff Avenue was
named after him.
The original office of the sugar
company was so friendly to every-
one here in town. They did so much
for this town. Anything they could
help with, they did. We had an 18-
hole golf course, a good library,
swimming pools and an auditori-
um. It's named John Boy Auditori-
um for Mr. John Boy who was a
president of U.S. Sugar. Clewiston
wouldn't be as nice as it is if they
hadn't been so nice to Clewiston.
I've lived this long and seen so
many changes that I've come to
realize all the different things I'm
familiar with now. I'm so lucky. My
life has been so interesting.


Courtesy photo/Florida Archives
This photo from the 1920s shows Louise Groody with B.G. Dahlberg. Ms. Groody was the
star of "No, No, Nannette." Mr. Dahlberg was the president of Celotex Company and was
showing Ms. Groody plans for the Celotex bungalow.


Orchid popularity still growing in United States


DELRAY BEACH According California and Florida lead the
to the United States Department of nation and are nearly tied in pro-
Agriculture (USDA) Floriculture duction, accounting for 38.1 and
Crops Survey"f'r the year 2004," '37.6 percent of the country's
compiled by' the National Agricul- ,-orchids, respeci,:felv Together;'
tural Statistics Suri e, orchidsare -these "io states account for more
growing in popularity in the United than 75 percent of the country's
States. orchids.
Currently second in potted flow- "Orchids are the largest group of
ering plant sales with a wholesale flowering plants in nature. There
value of $128 million, orchid sales are more than 25,000 identified
increased by five percent this past species, with the total number
year. This is the second highest per- probably reaching 30,000, and new
centage increase of all the potted species are being discovered each
flowering plants in the category. year," said Dr. Rob Griesbacfi,
Orchids are second in sales behind genetic researcher of floral plants
poinsettias, which experienced a for the U.S. National Arboretum,
one percent increase with $248 mil- and past president of the American
lion in sales, and they are signifi- Orchid Society (AOS). "In addition
cantly ahead of third-ranked to that, there are more than 120,000
chrysanthemums, which increased hybrids registered with the Royal
eight percent to $75 million in sales. Horticultural Society. With so many
There were more than 17.2 mil- choices, there's an orchid for every
lion orchids sold in the United person's taste."
States in 2004, an increase of 13 Long known as a flower of dis-
percent from the previous year. tinction, orchids have an undeni-
"This reflects the growth of the able mystique. Orchids are includ-
flowers popularity. People are ed as backdrops in many cinema
increasingly learning that orchids and television scenes, and are fea-
are not the delicate plants that they tured in countless advertisements
were once perceived to be, but are for everything from clothing and
hardy, easy-to-maintain plants that furniture to architecture and
have the ability to bloom all year design. Because of their beauty, rel-
long,", said Lee Cooke, executive active low cost and heartiness,
director of the American Orchid orchids are also increasingly
Society. becoming a central aesthetic touch
Orchids have been included as a to the home lifestyle. Exceptional
separate entry in the annual USDA plants are produced at low cost by
Floriculture Crops Summary nurseries throughout the United
Report since 1995, when they were States, but the huge volume of
first submitted by the nonprofit quality plants grown and marketed
AOS. Floriculture refers to plants in by large 'commercial growers in
the categories of bedding, cut culti- Florida and California contributed
vated greens, cut flowers, flowering to most of the sales boom.
potted plants and foliage plants. For information concerning


membership, orchid-related topics
such as orchid education, research
and conservation, orchid shows
and events, iI nt-.:.i u ,, -.r.
an'd more, visit th.. '-.iAi,:, a,
0 , ? n:' -, "-


Orchid Society's Web site at
www.aos.org or call. the AOS Visi
tors Center and Botanical Garden in
'Deay' Beacli, Florida, ,-i'
200o1 ^1 '' *i *- **


, First Tim ff ering atP lic
AUCTIO
^^HV'T^ S MI


*:


Ig I


1 ,,Curtesy pho to
Hendry County executive Committee Pauline New Born
presents certificates of appreciation to Sen. Dave Aron-
berg and LaBelle Mayor Sherri Craichy.

Senator promises fellow

dems hope for the future


. Sen. Dave Aronberg, who rep-
resents constituents in parts of
Lee, Glades, Palm Beach, Char-
lotte and Hendry Counties, spoke
at the annual Jefferson/Jackson
Day dinner the LaBelle Civic Cen-
ter Friday, June 11.
'Although I represent only a
triangle of Lake Okeechobee in
Hendry County," he said, "' still


represent you so you have two
Democrats representing Hendry
County. With Democrats on one
coast and Republicans on the
other, Hendry County is in
between.
"We can win. if we don't give
up the fight. It's up to all of us. It is
not too early to start," he conclude


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Thursday, June 16, 2005


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


ILc--t's







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Thursday, June 16,2005 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Reading helps connect children to their fathers
Years ago, the roles of father something fun with your kids, Bones, the very man that lay dead on the edge of their seat through aloud: Age four and older Read another kind of fishing feed
and mother were narrowly then make the day complete with in his parents' inn. all 95 pages. yourself: ages 7-8 and older Today the-fish fishing!
defined. That's not true anymore. a couple of good books. With the recent death of his Librarian's Choice was going to be an exciting day This warm father-and-sor


Today, fathers and mothers wear
interchangeable hats, performing
many of the same functions.
Throughout, the goal is the same:
To love, care and provide for their
children.
Reading books with children is
as much a father's job as it is a
mother's, and many dads love
those special moments together.
Dads, make extra time on Father's
Day to snuggle with your kids and
read to them. Read more than
you typically do a couple of
good books instead of one, or
extra chapters. After all, if it
weren't for your kids, you would-
n't be celebrating Father's Day at
all. So celebrate together. Go do


Books to Borrow
The following book is avail-
able at many public libraries.
*"Treasure Island" by-Robert
Louis Stevenson, adapted by Lisa
Norby, illustrated in black-and-
white by Paul Wenzel, Bullseye
Step into Classics/Random
House, 95 pages Read aloud: age
8 and older Read yourself: age 9
and older Flint and his fellow
pirates buried gold on an island
many years ago. They made a
map to remember where they hid
the treasure. Now, through
strange circumstances, young Jim
Hawkins has found the map in
the sea-hest of the pirate Billy


father, Jim seeks the advice of the
trusted Dr. Livesey and the town's
wealthiest man, Squire
Trelawney. Together they encour-
age Jim to mount an expedition
to recover the buried treasure. In
agreeing to do so, Jim Hawkins
has no idea what a deadly game
he is about to play as they set sail
for Treasure Island.
In this marvelous adaptation
of Robert Louis Stevenson's clas-
sic novel, Lisa Norby has captured
all the suspense, adventure and
excitement of the full novel for
younger children. Pirates, buried
gold, adventure on the high seas -
it's all here in this fast-paced book
that is guaranteed to keep readers


Library: Chester Public
Library, 1784 Kings Highway,
Chester
Library director: Lynn Cop-
pers; children's librarian: Mau-
reen Jagos
Choices this week: "Brother
Eagle, Sister Sky" by Chief Seattle;
"The Empty Pot" by Demi; "The
Wide Mouthed Frog" by Keith
Faulkner.
Books to Buy
The following books are avail-
able at favorite bookstores.
*Piggy and Dad Go Fishing" by
David Martin, illustrated by Frank
Remkiewicz, Candlewick, 2005,
28 pages, $14.99 hardcover Read


because Piggy was going finsning
with his dad for the very first time.
After packing a lunch and digging
up worms for bait, the two set off.
When it came time for Piggy to
bait his hook; he didn't like the
idea of putting a hook into the
smiling worm. So Piggy uses
bread balls for bait instead.
Fishing takes patience,- and
after a long time of waiting and
recasting, Piggy felt a tug on his
line and he reeled in a beautiful
fish! But when Piggy took a look
at the fish, he thought it looked
sad and asked his dad if he could
throw it back into the water.
"Sure," said Dad. And from that
moment, Piggy and Dad did


story will have young and old
alike thinking about this sport in a
very different way.
"Daddy Hugs 1*2*3," written
and illustrated by Karen Katz,
McElderry Books, 2005, 28 pages,
$12.95 hardcover Read aloud:
ages 1-3 Read yourself: Age seven
and older.
How many daddy hugs does it
take to say I love you? Beginning
with "one 'I'm so glad you're my
baby' hug" to "two teeny, tiny fin-
ger hugs" and all the way to 10
good-night hugs, this warm and
loving story about the love a
daddy has for his baby is just right
for Father's Day or any day of the
year.


The impact of the Bioterrorism threat | WECHiLPREBUnM


By Douglas L Archer and
Fred H. Degnan
The events of September 11,
2001 and the aftermath anthrax
incidents have refocused the food
safety concerns and priorities of
regulatory agencies. The threat of
terrorism aimed at the food supply
and assuring biosecurity have
become nightly news stories. Can
biosecurity be supplied by the reg-
ulatory agencies, or will responsi-
bility largely fall on the growers,
packers, shippers, and processors
of our food? The question almost
answers itself: the burden falls on
the regulated industry to assure the
safety of its products.
What would such an attack on
the food supply accomplish? It is
difficult to envision that wide-
spread serious harm and death,
would result, at least no more so
than we experience in large out-
breaks of food-borne disease. Nev-
ertheless, even if relatively little
harm to human health resulted-
economic consequences could be
great, and consumer confidence in
the food supply and the regulatory
agencies, shaken.
The Tylenol(r) tampering
episodes of the early 1980s provide
a good model of the types of con-
siderations and prophylactic steps
the industry should be considering.
The episodes energized FDA-regu-
lated industries to implement
meaningful anti-tampering plans,
including new or modified drug
forms, :and tamper-resistant pack-
iaging. FDA and the -regulated
industry developed a cooperative
relationship as never before-and


industry did the creative problem
solving. In the current situation,
FDA likely has its hands full in gen-
erally improving its state of pre-
paredness and ability to respond to
a bioterrorism emergency.
Increased inspection of imported
foods alone will stress FDA's exist-'
ing work force, and its program pri-
orities will shift dramatically.
Recognizing that the level of
sophistication in the response to
potential bioterrorism will vary
with the size of a given company,
among other factors, there seem to
be some common points for food
growers, packers, shippers, and
processors to consider in light of
the current circumstances.
In the absence of better,
knowledge about the nature and
seriousness of a threat, the distinc-
tion between under-reaction and
over-reaction is blurred. .
A strong focus on facility and
personnel security is a must.
Where possible, background
checks for ALL personnel should
be required. NO ONE who is not so
authorized should have access to
the finished food product
Do you know who is deliver-
ing raw material to your facility,
and who is transporting finished
product out? What security precau-
tions are those entities taking?
Anti-tampering plans, if they
exist, should be re-evaluated. If'
they don't exist, they should be
developed, adopted, and imple-
mented.
GAPs; GMPs, and HACCP
plans should be re-evaluated. Are
they sufficient to protect from pur--


poseful acts of food contamina-
tion? Do they cover the following
points? ,
1. raw material integrity
2. packaging integrity
3. air flow systems
4. end-line activities
5. storage and transportation
Consumer complaint han-
dling practices should be checked
and fine tuned.
Recall procedures should. be
checked and fine tuned. Know
who you would contact at your
local FDA office arid how to reach
them.
Know who could provide
quick access to analytical methods
or microbiological or chemical
analyses of your products on an
emergency basis. Have those con-
tact numbers readily available.
Improve preparedness
among all employees through reg-
ular training or drills. Develop a
heightened understanding of the
problem, its consequences, and
that increased awareness on the
part of all is an-important compo-
nent of prevention.
Know that procedural
changes in handling a "possible
problem" are called for in the face
of a possible biolerrorism'event.
The balance of internal (company)
investigation and FDA notification
favors early agency notification.
False alarms will be one price of
vigilance.
Be aware that FDA, CDC, and
state agriculture and health agen-
cies will likely be in a "help mode"
as previously seen in product tam-
pering incidents. Everyone recog-


nizes that terrorism is the fault of
the terrorists, not of a farm or a
food company.
The above list is certainly not
intended to be all-inclusive of pos-
sible preventive steps. Large com-
panies will likely have the
resources to take a risk-analysis
approach to their operation, and
use a team of experts to devise pre-
vention strategies, intervention
strategies, containment strategies,
and educational strategies-all
aimed at dealing with ,possible
bioterrorism. The sharing of strate-
gies and experience among com-
panies with similar attributes, or
sharing facilitated by trade organi-
zations, will strengthen the whole
of the effort, and should be encour-
aged by government. At all costs,
complacency needs to be avoided
for, as time passes, the specter of
possibly more and more sophisti-
cated terrorist acts looms.


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Growth affects all Floridians


From traffic, taxes and tourism
to pollution, housing and jobs -
all are impacted by the rate of
growth and development occur-
ring in local communities across
the state of Florida.
More than 1,000 people a day
arrive in Florida, as new residents
of the state. Each requires water,
roads, landfills, police protection,.
emergency care and a host of
other publicly funded services.
Local communities struggle daily
with. how to meet the needs of
existing populations in addition to
those newly locating to the Sun-
shine State.
Lawmakers tackled parts of
the problem in their recent Leg-
islative Session, passing major
legislation that will soon become
state law. The legislation has'
drawn a mix of reactions, from
those who will play a role in car-
,rying it out and from others con-
cerned about Florida's growing
needs and quality of life.
Leading experts are analyzing
;the new policy, and the state's
evolving needs, and will report on,
their findings beginning June 15.
That is the start date for an inno-
vative and timely "virtual confer-
ence" on growth policy, issues,


impacts and solutions., "Growth
In Florida" is the theme for the
"event", an eight-week tele-semi-
nar series where both speakers
and participants will take part by
telephone. The program is set for
June 15 through August 3. Weekly
sessions will be held on an array
of growth topics and will feature a
faculty of over 40 experts on. the
subjects.
Urban sprawl, housing
demands, water supplies, devel-
opment patterns, land conserva-
tion, citizen rights .and an assort-
ment of other concerns affecting
everyday Floridians will be the
focus of the series. Local officials,
civic leaders, planners, develop-
ers, environmentalists and others
- anyone concerned about the
future of Florida will have an
interest in the series. Participants
will gain insights into Florida's
current standing and how to do
better in the future.
Participation in the event has
been-made easy by organizers
since it will all be conducted by
phone, so anyone can call in from
virtually any area of the state or
country. The live sessions will also
be recorded and made available
through a playback line for those


who miss a call or want to hear a
session again. The approach is
unique in Florida and a new spe-
cialty of the sponsor, for public
awareness and involvement as
well as problem solving and
meeting the needs of Floridians.

In addition to informing Florid-
ians and helping improve the way
growth is addressed, the tele-
series is also a fundraising effort
for the sponsoring organization,
the Florida Public Interest Foun-
dation. The group is a nonprofit
that provides educational pro-
grams on major issues of concern
to Florida's future. Its Non-Profit
Institute also sponsors profession-
al development training services
for nonprofit groups to aid in their
effectiveness and success. Pro-
ceeds will enable the Foundation
to provide more such programs
throughout the state.

The Foundation has assem-
bled experts from diverse back-
grounds and professions and is
encouraging broad participation
in the calls. Registration fees have
been substantially discounted for
charitable and civic groups as
well as students.


LTreasure Coast Dermatology
Specializing in the Treatment of Skin Cancer
Mohs Surgery Diseases of Skin, Hair & Nails *

Tim loannides, M.D. and Rick Romagosa, M.D.
are pleased to welcome

Robert S. Kirsner, M.D., PhD
Aeto Treasure Coast Dermatology,

and announce the opening of their new office: 0
hoMd Cefied FewM
AffwunB Okeechobee d=
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863-46/-y555
1924 US Highway 441, N.
in addition to
Stuart Fort Pierce St. Lucie West Vero Beach
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Thursday, June 16,2005


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


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Thursday, June 16,2005


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


School Happenings


Eastside Elementary
Honor Roll
Fourth- Nine weeks 2004-2005
Kindergarten
All E's
Lynette Almanza, Joan Arellano,
Daliyah Cartagena, Bryce Corley,
David Corley, Sydnee Cypress,
Rodrigo Cortes, Skylar Duckstein,
Wyatt Dyess, Jaquan Forde, Joshua
Johnson, Alkashia Keys, Aubrey
Lee, Jocob Martin, Wilford McLeod,
McKenzie Miller, Savannah Naranjo,
Johnathan Navarro, Juan Padilla,
Richard Perez, Pedro Perez, Jorge
Perez,Guadalupe Ruiz, Brenda Sal-
divar, Victoria Silva, Keinanna Sum-
mers, DeAndre Tarver, Nancy Vega,
Angelica Velasquez, Savanna Zip-
perer.
First Grade
All A's
Dylan Barrow, LaQuira Brown,
Jose"Chance"Canales, Leyda Car-
denas, Michael Carrigan, Micah
Cavanaugh, Xavier Contreras,
Kelsey Delgado, Kacie Durance,
Jose Euceda-Perez, Micaela
Franklin, Ruben Gonzalez, .Tyler
Hall, Tierra Hanks, Gavin Hua,
Raven Jackson, Alkeria Jackson,
Kendra Johnson, Karissa Knowles,
Erika Lamura; Bryce Lawson, Ross
Mack, Julia McGee, Alyssa Miller,
De'Vontae Moore, Alee Perry, Kaci
Pittman, Myles Polhill, Trevor Pruitt,
Weston Rayburn, Stefanie Sawyers,
Cheyenne Seller, Cassandra Sta-
ples, Lacie Steadley, Keah Stevens,
Angelo Tolbert, lana Torres, Cole
Upthegrove, Clay Upthegrove, Laice
Varnum, Matthew Vary, Nigeria War-
J ren, Amber Whitehall, Megan
Wright.
A/B/s
Taniya Banks, Esteban Candelario,
Lilibeth Carrera, Jeremy Delgado,
Adriana Diaz, Sa'Quan Ellison,
Marissa Espino, Logan Fletcher,
Colt Flynn, Breanna Henry, Angelica
Herrera, Colton Irey, Isaiah Jackson,
Jared Lallo, Oscar Matamoros,
Michael Mclntyre, Cosme Mendoza,
Mason Miller, Rudy Navarro, Aligail


Nunez, Jaquez Pugh, Carlos Reyes,
Crystal Reyna, Christobel
Rodriguez, Jose Ruis, Fermin
Sanchez, Jose Saravia, Richard
Summers, Patricia Tellez, Cristian
Valtierra, Naomi Woodson, Cem-
merria Yarbrough.
Second Grade
All A's
Erika Benitez, Courtney Brown,
Roshon Bryant, Alex Caballero,
Malik Carrigan, Dailah Cypress,
Jameria Davis, Leidy Fernandez,
Mary Gibson, Kale Gibson,
Guadalupe Gracia, Joe Hernandez,
Rebecca Herrington, Brenda
Jaimes, Rebecca Manning, Kyree
Marshall, Karina Martinez, Ashley
Matamoros, Sidney Mesa, Jennifer
Monge, Johnny Navarro, Amanda
Ortiz, Kaley Pagan, Samantha
Purdy, Victoria Rice, Margarita Sali-
nas, Lisa Vargas, Jasmin Vega,
Nubia Zeledon, Cheyenne Zimmer-
man.
A/B's
Luke Bradford, Alexander Brait-
waite, Carlos Bryant, Angelica Caril-
lo, Lynette Concepcion, Beth Corley,
Cinthia Delgaldo, Zachary Dykes,
Zenaida Escoto, Sheila Fleming,
Hunter, Fletcher, Ronald Fletcher,
Wilmer Flores, Ja'kerra Gadson,
Nataly Gonzales, Diona Grant,
Ernesto Hurtado, Kyndale Jones,
Tamara Jones, Tyrone Joseph,
Melvin Lawson, Keyla Mederos,
Cristian Montes, Nasif Nuruzzaman,
Victoria Ortiz, Natachalie Ortiz,
Charity Patrick, Stefano Pena, Kevin
Perez, Joshua Perry, Juan Ramos,
Guadalupe Reyna, .Frankie Reyna,
Mario Rodriguez, Brandon Torres,
Katelyn Wright.
EASTSIDE CONTINUED
Third Grade
All A's
Diana Acuna, Matthew Duncan,
Myleigh Entwistle, Ashley Harper,
Katie Hughes, Cassidy Lee, Alexis
Ortiz, Victor Ramos.
A/B's
Mohammad Ali, Jasmine Baxter,
Zonobia Brown, Aisha Calkins,
Johntavious Cooks, Paige Corley,
Marco Cruz, Malanie DeLas Salas,


Jamone Forde, Stephanie Hernan-
dez, Megan Kling, Jayla Lawson,
Erik Morales, Yonovan Oliva,
Manuel Ortiz, Demetrius Richard-
son, Trystin Swaford, Tyler Sweet,
Jamoree Thomas, Tianna Thomas,
Moses Velasquez, William Vereen,
Anabelle Williams, Jacob Wilson.
Fourth Grade
All A's
Breann Benitez, Cari Chinea, Court-
ney Crawford, Sydney Duckstein,
Lorena Espinoza, Brooke Flynn,
Karreron Giese,Caitlin Jarvis,
Patrick Johnson, Maegan Miller,
Sara Perez, Mandi Perry, Kavren
Robinson, Rosa Roman, Luis Ros-
quete, Chelsea Steadley, Jazmine
Thompson, Qwantasha Williams,
Julia Woods.
A/B's
Julio Alvarez, Ashleigh Andrews,
Savannah Bowers, Jose DeLeon,
Jenine Hannam, Nicholas Herring-
ton, Daniel Holligan, Leslie Kilgore,
Rhonda Ortiz, Maria Paniagua,
Lubertha Payne, Sonia Perez, Adri-
anna Perez, De'Marcus Perry, Justin
Pike, Page Purvis, Joshua Rector,
Lauren Rice, Shavon'te Richardson
Maureen Richette, Travis Robert-
son, Rowel Ronquillo, Madison
Rudd, Enrique Salinas, Alise Stoker,
Michael Thomas, Zachary Thomas,
Tyler Westberry, Rachel Zipperer.
Fifth Grade
All A's
Eli Fedele, Evan Ghidella, Jeanette
Gonzalez, Joanna Herrera, Mic'Ke-
rious Holligan, Raymond Hua, Whit-
ney Irey, Morgan Jones, Breana
Long, Landon McDuffie, Jan-
Michael Ortiz, Grant Polhill, Trey
Pruitt, Victor Resendiz, Donchet
Ross, Whitley Rousseau, Jessica
Torres, Robbrianna Weekley,
Roshard Williams, Will Zipperer.
A/B's
Joel Abelo, Alex Abreu, Courtney
Bain, Chelsea Barrineau, Sasha
Caraballo, Thomas Carniglia,
Joshua Colicchio, Russell Day,
Jacob Delgado, Titus Dixon, Bradley
Ezell, Fabiola Fernandez, Kelly Fer-
nandez, Angela Fountain, Mary
Gamble, Ezequiel Garcia, Mitchell
Guzman, Danny Hernandez,
Jeanette Herrera, Valeria Hurtado,
Johnny Jackson, Marvin Jaimes,


Anna Jasso, Dallas Kellogg,
Jonathan MendOz, Matt Parham,
Zoyla Reyna, Marion Ricketts,
Guadalupe Rico, Yanira Rivera,
Carina Sanchez, Ana Siu-Govin,
Kaytriana Straker, Curt Thompson,
Erin Wright.

Westside Elementary
Honor Roll
Fourth-Nine weeks 2004-2005
Kindergarten
All E's Hayley Acevedo, David
Adams, Mohammed Alam, Brianna
Alanis, Issabella Allen, Kelsey Alli-
son, Antonio Anderson, Mayra Ave-
lar, Bradly Bellew, Rebeca Benitez,
Courtney Blanset, Adrian Bushelle,
Anthony Calderon, Sean Camarat-
ta, Bahzeak Clarke, Jasmine Con-
ner, Selena Corvo, Keyonte Curry,
Jonathan Deese, Javier DelRosario,
Darla brake, Tessa Dunham,
Guadalupe Duran-Almaras,
Jonathan Etzweiler, Brittany Fun-
derburk, Shannon Garrett, Isabella
Guzman, Jordan Jackson, Ambria
Johnson, Dekisha Lane, Leonardo
Leiva, Jazzmyn Lumpkin, Rocky
Marcano, Tavarius McCray, Alanna
Mickler, Alexa Mickler, Alyssa Mick-
ler, Kayla O'Neal, Jose Orozco,
Alexx Pate, Martin Perez, Tammy
Daisy Perez, Kaylee Pilon, Jose
Quinones, Katy Reyes, Luz Rossy,
Nathalie Sanchez, 'Enrique San-,
doval, Fabiana Santiago, Shane
Serrott, Alexcia Taylor, Garrett Ted-
der, Ramon Vazquez, Brittany
Williams, Clayton Wisema, .Harley
Yates.
First Grade
All A's Deondre Bailey, Alyssa
Colson, Jocelyn Chavez, Cassidy
Cohran, Diana Cruz, Scarlett Fer-
nandez-Perez, Krystal Giraldo,.
Perla Guillermo, Christopher Harris,
Crystal Holligan, Darius Jackson,
Sha'Quana James, Daniel Jansen,
Angel Lopez, Sinead McManus,
Maria Mejia, Robert Miller, Imani
Nedd, Dayanna Paloblanco, Alyssa
Rawlings, Jessica Rios, Tyrin Sum-
mers, Mayra Trejo, Abigail Villarreal,
Joshua Wiggins, EverardoYanes.
A/B Johnny Abercrombie, Debe-
nair Bradford, Delaney Reyes,


In honor of

Flag Day

The Clewiston Recreation
Department Summer Day
Camp children, volunteers
and staff were joined by the
Clewiston Police Department
Honor Guards and Chief Gut-
shaw, Capt. Peterson, City
Manager Johnson and Coun-
ty Commissioner Bo Pelham
to sing the National Anthem
and recite the Pledge Tues-
day June 14 in the City Park..


School days along the Kissimmee


Water managers preserve history of old Florida schoolhouse


Lacey Cotton, Jacob Cotton, Syd-
ney Findley, Devon Friesen, Yunis-
leydis Garcia, Sadie Gomez,
Analiss Gonzalez, John Goodman,
Javonta Hart, Aaron Johnson, Tahi-
rah Landrum, Dustin Loper, Joel
Marcano, Alyssa Ortiz, Brittney Har-
rell, Angel Osorio,
Claudia Pereyra, Danyelle Reyes,
Delaney Reyes, Inai Rojas, Marilyn
Romero, Rashawn Sanders, Von-
quesha Scott, Sam'Quavious
Slaughter, Ryan Wyatt.
Second Grade
All A's Melanie Allen, Kayla
Andrews, Megan Blount, Nestor
Cabana, Rachel Creagh, Damian
Ramirez, Carolina Garcia, Anessa
Leyva, Alexandra Padron, Jessica
Rawlings, Alan Smith.
A/B Luls Arellano, Jesus Benitez,
Tyler Clemons, Alexis Cole, Brett,
Cortez, Vianca Gallegos, Adrian
Garcia, Sydney Garrett, Zachary
Hunter, Francheska Landrum,
Fredrick Landrum, David Lara,
Micah Murphy, Breanna Nealy, Ryan
Nesbit, Jusue Orduna, Nicholas
Pacheco, Jordan Pencarinha,
Alyssa Penton, Janaria Powell,
Janet Reyes, Gabriela Rico, Micah
Rivera, Sebastian Sanchez, Sergio
Sanchez, Darryon Skinner, Ker-Nigil
Thicklin, Edgar Villagomez, Brandon
Villalobos, De'Vontae Weekley,
Gavin Williams, KimberYates.
Third Grade
All A's Amanda Blue, Sydney
Connell, Dustin Egusquiza, Janai
Gonzalez; Derrick Jackson, Nancy
Morales, Maria Orozco, Jose
Romero, Ariana Rosas, Chyna Tuck-
er, Leonel Ramirez, Colman Strick-
land.
A/B Jennifer Benitez, Meaghan
Brothers, Joshua Cottiers, Hailey
Cotton, Reagan Cox, Dakodah
Davis, Lanetris Davis, Destiny
Durance, Jhander Garcia, Esmeral-
da Guillermo, Shanay Lindsay,
Amber Mason, Edwmary Montalvo,
Juan Ortega, Jessica Radcliffe,


Brock Ramer, Elizabeth Rico, Juan
Sandoval, Amos Shirey, Wayde
Strickland, De'Anthony Thicklin,
LisetteVillagomez.
Fourth Grade
All A's Kevonte Bailey, Alyssa
Baldonado, Felipe Carrillo, Casey
Crawford, Samantha Jansen, Jak-
enya Johnson, Kelsie Moore,
Shamarria Morrison, Olivia Rivera,
Roger Schultz, Susana Tamez,
Jessie Wiggins.
A/B Priscila Barravechia, Darius
Cohen, Tamika Cooke, Davis Dal-
ton, Zachary Gacula, Julian Garcia,
Ryan Garcia, Leonardo Garcia,
Chibria Gary, Michelle Giraldo,
Andrea Harrell, Rachel Kelley, Clay-
ton Kline, Welfredo Lazo, Jasmine
Leiva, Jyotis Marcano, Heather
Massie, Rachel Mendoza, Destiny
Murphy, Miguel Perera, Gerardo
Rangel, Rosana Rivera, Pedro
Segura, Jamequa Stephens,
Danielle Stremus, Vernon Sullivan,
Heather Thomas, Arelys Valles,
Maria Villarreal, Jacob Wilkinson.
Fifth Grade
All A's-- Leslie Almanza, Michonae
Brown, Shanice Cooke, Anaruth
Cruz, Luis Dieguez, Breanna Giral-
do, Erica Hegley, Kinisha IHolligan,
Shantoria Johnson, Ra'vin Lee,
Stephen Lee, Robby McCarthy,
Ro'eissa Moore, Noe Perez, Adri-
ana Rangel, Francisco Reyes,,
Esmeralda Rodriguez, Clarissa
Sanchez,. Ileana Sanchez-Riveros,
Fanya Sanchez-Riveros, Jessica
Schultz, Samkerria Slaughter,
Kenisha Smith, Dennis Torres.
A/B Nicole Agee, Matthew
Andrews, Ryan Bushelle, Victoria
Esposito, Crystal Garcia, Brian Hes-
ter, Adam Olivarez, Amber Pacheco,
Jorge Perez, Adalberto Rojas,
Genaro Romero, Yaritza Sanchez,
Miguel Santana, Co'Bryant Skinner,
Stephanie Trevino, Katherine
Valdes, Daniel Whitehead.


I Family Law Ctiminal Law Divorces
Child Support. Paternity Adoption
Criminal Defense Probate
Civil Litigation Evictions
Foreclosures Corporations
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Before you decide. ask us to send you free written information about our qua3fitions and experience


I


A few missing slats on the
faded white clapboard build-
ing's facade allow bright sun-
beams to streak inside and shed
light on a disheveled interior,
with its exposed beams, wasp
nests, spiderwebs and debris-
covered'wooden floor. But first
appearances can be deceiving,
and historical experts are con-
vinced this old schoolhouse still
holds some lessons for us all.
The Fort Basinger school-
house, built in Highlands County
in the early 1900s, was recently
evaluated for historical signifi-
cance and deemed worthy of
preservation. Until a few weeks
ago it sat out of sight along US.
98, separated from the road -
and the 21st century, it seems -
by a row of trees, a fence line
and an old pasture now dotted
with young pines.
The property where it stood is
owned and managed by the
South Florida Water Manage-
ment District, part of land
acquired for the Kissimmee
River environmental restoration
project. This plot sits above the
100-year floodplain and is not
needed for the project, accord-
ing to Marjorie Moore, senior
supervising planner in the Dis-
trict's land stewardship division.
However, the property may be
sold as surplus, and District offi-
cials could not bear to let the


schoolhouse become lost histo-
ry.
Neither could Florida's Divi-
sion of Historical Resources.
After the District commissioned
Janus Research, a Florida firm
specializing in historical preser-
vation, to conduct an assess-
ment, the two agencies agreed
with Janus' recommendation,
that the humble building's archi-
tectural character, historical
value and social relevance to its
era make it worth saving. Based
on these .findings, the rural
schoolhouse may even qualify
for inclusion in the National Reg-
ister of Historic Places.
Arrangements were made to
relocate the schoolhouse to
another parcel of District land-
the nearby historic Edna Pearce
Lockett Estate, former home-
stead of a long-time ranching
family. By consolidating histori-
cal structures at this location,
the District can efficiently man-
age their preservation. Eventual-
ly the buildings .may be restored
and opened to the public-and
the entire riverfront estate used
as an educational or recreational
site.
"Moving the schoolhouse
was the right thing to do,"
Moore said. "We're protecting
this resource rather than allow-
ing it to be demolished. It has
historic value, and we recognize


that."
After the paperwork was in
place, the next step was to
secure the building and prepare
it for the precarious move. Fortu-
nately, it's a short trip. The
Pearce Lockett Estate is just
across US 98, less than half a
mile frqm where the school
stood for almost a century. Also
near the school were two out-
houses, found tipped over in the
woods. These were deemed
quaint but not genuinely historic
and so would not be making the
trip.
The building was in capable
hands for the move. Brownie
Moving has something of leg-
endary reputation for transport-
ing big buildings in the region,
having moved everything from
old houses down city streets to
historic Palm Beach mansions
down the Intracoastal Water-
way.
In early November, the
movers arrived with their heavy
equipment: hydraulic lifts, trac-
tors, winches, and I-beams.
They secured the beams under
the schoolhouse and raised it off
the foundation pilings. Then
they literally slid the building
slowly across the field toward
US 98. Thanks to a work crew
from the Okeechobee Correc-
tional Institution, a wide swath
of vegetation was cleared to


smooth the way. At roadside, a
big diesel truck slowly pulled the
school, now mounted on a trail-
er, onto the blacktop. Traveling
at about 3 mph, the Ft. Basinger
schoolhouse eased on down the
road, attentive movers walking
alongside to watch for trouble.
The school was taken flaw-
lessly to a shady part of the Lock-
ett Estate grounds, not far from
the ranch house and barns, a
small family cemetery and the
Kissimmee River. It rests tem-
porarily on I-beams while new
foundation pilings are prepared.
Then it will be sealed up and
properly "mothballed," as
preservation experts recom-
mend, until decisions: are made
about restoration.
Although the Lockett Estate
lost a few big trees in the hurri-
canes, this -site is still a shady
one. And'it's not so far from the
road that passersby can't see the
newly-placed schoolhouse. In
fact, if they slow on the curve of
US 98 next to the river in High-
lands County and look to the
south, the schoolhouse is in
view under the spreading oaks.
It's a peek into Florida's history,
brought carefully into the pres-
ent by those who recognize that
inevitable change can some-
times provide opportunities to
preserve something of the past.


AMERICAN HOME CARE
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visit our website at www.americanhomecare.org
for more information.


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Smith heads to national wrestling tourney History Of Father's Day,


By Mark Young
CLEWISTON It's only his sec-
ond full year of ever competing in
wrestling, but Kris Smith, an
incoming Clewiston High School
junior, is making a big name for
himself in the sport.
Coming off a highly successful
sophomore season, Smith con-
cluded last year's high school com-
petition with a 25-10 overall record,
took third at the district tourna-
ment, was regional runner-up, and
made the top 12 during the state
finals while wrestling in the 140-
pound division.
Smith has been working hard
over the off season, staying active,
and successful in tournament
competition. Smith has picked up
a pair of gold medals this summer
already, qualifying him for the
National Open Wrestling Champi-
onships, to be held in Virginia
Beach, Virginia.
The tournament is scheduled to
i kick off June 26 and will run
through June 29. In all, the.trip will
be a seven-day event for the young
Tiger wrestler who already has
Cumberland University, in
J Williamsburg, KY, eying him as a
potential scholarship prospect.
Cumberland and Clewiston
High School have a strong connec-
tion with head coach Jess Alford;


Michael Irving, a former national
champion, and Ryan Alfal all hail-
ing from Cumberland.
What Smith lacks in overall
experience, he more than makes
up for in natural talent and the
national tournament will be a
means to gain the experience he
needs to emerge as a state threat
next year. He will be moving up to
the 152-pound division for this
tournament, but the move up in
weight is of little consequence to
this focused young grappler.
"I'm going into this tournament
with one thing on my mind," said
Smith. "Just don't lose."
Smith loves the challenges of
single combat action that wrestling
provides, but recognizes that his
new love can also provide a means-
to further his education. He's
focused on succeeding in the sport
and wants the opportunity to
advance his education as well.
Smith concluded his sopho-
more year with a 3.2 grade point
average, was nominated as a
Who's Who in student athletes.
The family is looking to the com-
munity for help in making this trip
possible and will be holding a
fundraising carwash Saturday,
June 18 at Clewiston Middle
School, beginning at 8 a.m.


It would be interesting to
know how this holiday came
into practice. Therefore here is a
short history on the holiday, and
meaning of the different colors
of roses to be worn that day.
Father's Day is celebrated on
the third Sunday in June. The
idea for creating a day for chil-
dren to honor their fathers
began in Spokane, Washington.
A woman by the name of Sonora
Smart Dodd thought of the idea
for Father's Day while listening
to a Mother's Day sermon in
1909.
Having been raised by her
father, Henry Jackson Smart,
after her mother died, Sonora


Slaff pholo/Lauren Adams
Kris Smith, an incoming CHS junior and Tiger wrestler, will
be take the national spotlight while competing in the Nation-
al Open Wrestling Championships beginning June 26.


wanted her father to know how
special he was to her. It was her
father that made all the parental
sacrifices and was, in the eyes of
his daughter, a courageous, self-
less, and Loving man. Sonora's
father was born in June, so she
chose to hold the first Father's
Day celebration in Spokane,
Washington on the 19th of June,
1910.
In 1924 President Calvin
Coolidge proclaimed the third
Sunday in June as Father's Day.
'Roses are the Father's Day flow-
ers: Red to be worn for a living
father and white if the father has
died.


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Sports Briefs


Tournament
registration
Registration for the Get Kids
Hooked on Fishing, not Drugs fish-
ing tournament will take place at 8
a.m. June 18, on the morning of the
tournament. Registration will take
place at the Clewiston boat ramp.
Contact the Clewiston Police
Department for more information.
Golf Tournament
The Boys and Girls Club is host-
ing a golf tournament June, 18.at
the Belle Glade Golf Course, start-
ing at 8:30 a.m. They are seeking
foursomes to play in the tourna-
ment. It is $50 per individual to play.


Prizes for first, second, and third
place teams, as well as for the
longest drive, closest to the pin, and
a car for making a hole-in-one at
the designated hole will be award-
ed. You can also purchase Ball
Drop tickets for $5 each for a
chance to win $500. Contact Kathy
Miller at (561) 992-5399 for more
information.

Fishing Tournament
Horizons Fishing Tournament
benefiting Hospice of Palm Beach
County's (HPBC) Horizons Chil-
dren's Bereavement Program will
be taking place soon. Horizons
Fishing Tournament (Kingfish,
Wahoo, Dolphin) is presented by


the brokerage firm of Robert W.
Baird & Company, Inc.
A Captain's Meeting is planned
for Thursday, July 14, at 5 p.m. to
8:30 pm at the Newcomb Hall -
Riviera Beach Marina.

Fishing Tournament
Saturday, July 16, lines in at 7
a.m. lines out by 3; p.m. and an
awards ceremony from 5-6 p.m.
can be expected. Departing from
any inlet; weigh in at Riviera Beach
Marina, 1950 E 13th Street, Riviera
Beach, $175 per boat until June 15;
$200 per boat until July 10; $250
per boat until July 14. For more
information contact Beth Charbon-
neau at (561) 227-5157, Special


Events Coordinator Hospice of
Palm Beach County or Willie's Bait
and Tackle (561) 848-4484.

Summer
Tumbling Camp
Clewiston Performing Arts Cen-
ter with Mrs. Mammen and Ms.
Escobar, June 6-16 Monday- Thurs-
day, $45 plus $15 registration, if
new to CPAC, ages five and up.
Beginning 2:15-3:15 p.m., Interme-
'diate 3:15- 4:15 p.m., Advance 4:15-
5:15 p.m. Registration will be
Thursday, April 28 and Thursday,
May 5, from 6-7 p.m. at 725 Central
Avenue, in Clewiston. For more
information call (239) 564-3473.


Boat ramp opens northernmost Everglades to public


Pay no mind to that hulking
gator floating on the water's sur-
face offshore from the new boat
ramp at the northern end of the
Loxahatchee National W.ildlife
Refuge
The leathery eight-footer is cer-
tainly no "Freddy," the affable ani-
mated alligator mascot of the South
Florida Water Management District.
,It's just that this neck of the Ever-
glades has been closed to the pub-
lic for several years.
But maybe this cold-blooded
Jurassic throwback will eventually
become the unofficial greeter to
the northernmost boat access to
the Everglades. The District ramp is
expected to generate a lot of traffic
from anglers, sightseers, birders
and other outdoor lovers when it


opens in September. The facility
includes an adjacent fishing dock, a
covered kiosk and environmentally
friendly, composting restrooms.
There is a paved parking lot and the
ramp can accommodate two boats
at once.
The facility is an: improved
replacement to the previous District
boat ramp that served this end of
the Refuge, which also encompass-
es the District's Water Conservation
Area 1 (WCA 1). The old facility,
which closed in 1997, attracted a
"conservative estimate" of 200
boaters a week, said Serena Rinker,
an interpretive specialist with the
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service,
which oversees the Refuge.
"We put an announcement in.
our newsletter and right off the bat


we got half a dozen calls," Rinker
said. "They all want to know when
it's going to open."
Public boat ramps on District
property are nothing new. There'
are more than 160 ramps open to
the public throughout the 16-coun-
ty District, from the Everglades in
the south to Lake Tohopekaliga in
the north. But this is the first "major
new ramp we've done in many
years," said Fred Davis, the District's
land stewardship director. Its con-
struction is being handled by the
District, but the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife service will operate it.
"After the old boat ramp was
lost, people had to drive all the way
to (the refuge's main entrance)
west of Boynton Beach," Davis
said. "This will reconnect people in


western Palm Beach County to the
refuge. It's certainly the northern-
most boat access to the Everglades
system."
Erftrance to the facilitywill be
monitored b\ a gate near 20-mile
Bend off of Southern Boulevard.
Admission will cost $5 per vehicle
and it will be open from sunrise to
sunset. A law enforcement official
will be on patrol or on call at all
times. And be sure to look for the
gator.
"Oh, yeah this is his home," a
construction worker at the boat
ramp said one recent afternoon.
For directions or additional
information, visit
loxahatchee.fws.gov or call (561)
734-8303.


Tune In on the Web! It's "Everglades Radio Network"


South Florida's famous wetland
now has its own 24-hour-a-day radio
broadcast. Everglades Radio Net-
work has hit the airwaves and the
Internet to keep listeners enter-
tained and informed with facts, sto-
ries and even music about the
unique Everglades environment.
Travelers along Alligator Alley
(1-75) in Collier County can tune in
on FM 98.7 and FM 107.9. But any-
one in Florida or even around the
world can listen in by clicking onto
the radio network's Web site at
www.dep.state.fl.us/ern.
The idea for Everglades radio
programming was proposed five
years ago by Senator Bob Graham.
In a letter to the secretary of Flori-
da's Department of Environmental
Protection (DEP), Sen. Graham
suggested the idea of an auto tour,
of sorts. Travelers could listen to an
informative and entertaining broad-
cast while looking out the window
and watching the Everglades envi-
ronment pass by. It was an idea that
drew a lot of interest and support.
John Outland, DEP staff mem-
ber and project coordinator,
described the collective efforts of
numerous state organizations that
made ENR a reality. "Several agen-
cies contributed their expertise,"
he said. "DEP paid for program-
ming. The Department of Trans-
portation, which issues highway
radio advisories across the state,
contributed hardware plus expert-


ise on radio broadcasting and
licensing. The Division of Emer-
gency Management added funding
so the station could be a source for
weather advisories, accident
reports along the interstate and
evacuation notices during storms."
Many other organizations par-
ticipated in launching ERN by con-
tributing material for original pro-
gramming, including the South
Florida Water Management Dis-
trict. The District is partnered with
the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
to carry out a 30-year plan for Ever-
glades restoration. Several -pro-
gram segments describe this mon-
umental effort.'
The Web site was an outgrowth
'of the broadcast plan. It was creat-
ed by DEP staffer Krista Callen,
who updates it with a "Critter of the
Month" and other appealing items.
The site receives more than 10,000
hits every month. ERN is linked at
WGCU radio's Web site and at a
few environmental sites, but over-
all it is not widely promoted. That
may change if the word gets out to
educators. Outland would like to
see the site become a classroom
resource. "We're hoping that
teachers will start to tune in for
environmental education curricu-
lum," Outland said.
ERN is broadcast from the cam-
pus of Florida Gulf Coast University
in Ft. Myers, in the studio of WGCU.
There, Gene Craven, associate gen-


eral manager, supervises the auto-
mated system that broadcasts the
three hours of programming in a
continuous loop. A link on ERN's
Web site allows computer users to
tune in to the actual radio broad-
cast. Other links connect to each of
ERN's current programs.
Program topics include Ever-
glades animals, such as Florida
panthers, alligators and various
birds, as well as interesting plants-
both natives and unwanted exotics
that are invading the ecosystem.
Personality profiles include photog-
rapher Clyde Butcher and author
Marjory Stoneman Douglas,,who
coined the famous phrase "River of
Grass" to describe the Everglades
landscape. A historical segment
describes President Harry Tru-
man's dedication of Everglades
National .Park in 1947. Nature
sounds, music and lively interviews
round out the broadcast.
An immediate goal of Ever-
glades Radio Network is to add
more programming. There are cur-
rently six 30-minute segments,
repeated several times in the
. course of a 24-hour period. Addi-
tional segments will add variety,
new information and freshness to
the network.
"The start-up budget for ERN
does not include additional dollars
for expanded programming," Out-
land said. "That's where we hope
community sponsors will step in


with their support."
Like National Public Radio and
other noncommercial networks,
ERN does not sell advertising. But
sponsors can be recognized on air
for the programs they underwrite.
"We would like to get annual spon-
sors at $20,000 or quarterly at
$7,500," said Outland. "However,
we will certainly consider other
proposals." Two 30-second under-
writing messages are available
every hour.
The network has submitted a
request for federal funding as well.
"While government funds would
be beneficial," said Outland, "it
would be great for ERN to have
local, regional and even national
sponsors that support- the Ever-
glades and its restoration."
For roadway travelers on 1-75 -
or armchair travelers on the Inter-
net-you don't need to be actually
standing among the cypress trees
or researching stories on South
Florida's history or listening to
herons calling from the reeds to
-experience the famed River of
Grass. Everglades- Radio Network
can take you there.
Everglades Radio Network is on
the Internet at
www.dep.state.fl.us/ern. You can
listen to the broadcast or click on
links to hear any of the current pro-
grams. -


STouchilng the

.7hW Glades oneijnnily
G at a lime.
C l i, R C.J 1C-I --


Attend Church this

Sunday

10:00 AM

Nursery provided
370 Holiday Isle Blvd


www.newharvest.net Pastors Chuck &


m reen


Cone .Join rOur Tearm, ZNevw Rates
MVfake the Drive TVorth TVhile
$$$ RN's Earn Between $27 and $30 Per Hour $$$
$$$ LPN's earn between $23 and $25 per hour $$$

8mmMm Mm NRa m;M\8m1




ContactTina Couemn, DON for a cotideltial


interview orfax you resume to 8398698

Palm Terrace
301 South Gloria Street, Clewiston, FL 33440
(863) 983-5123


U' i -. 2


Dad's best ift sinee you


Dish Depot
You Local Stellite Profeesormlon
LaBelle (863) 674-4728 Clewiston (863) 983-3086


Happy Father's Day












William Marcus Sutton Jr.
March 18, 1936 May 31, 1998


I'm awaiting the day when I see you again,


Your Daughter Cathy


I -.- i Lt-... A&


iL


FREE
lr,!S IAU ATIC)N


m


- I I


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee 1


ThursdayJune 162005


I


m








12


Community Events


Free youth concert.
Join the fun June 24 and be
part of TGIF The Concert. It will
be held at World Mission
Church, 217 E. Aztec Avenue in
Clewiston. For questions, please
call 983-1070. Te invitamos este
24 de Junio a que seas parte de
TGIF The Concert. Lugar Iglesia
Misionera Mundial, 217 E. Aztec
Avenue, en Clewiston, para pre-
guntas llamar a 983-1070).

Flea Market
re-Opening
Moore Haven flea market will
re-open and will be offering
their spaces for free to sell your
stuff. For more information, call
(863) 227-6173 or (863) 946-
0037 and ask for Ricardo.

Flea market
The next Trash to Treasures
indoor Flea Market will be held
June 24 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at
the L.J. Nobles Senior Center,
475 E. Cowboy Way, in Labelle.
.For more information or to
make a donation, call Barbara at
(863) 675-1446. All proceeds to
benefit the Faith in Action in
LaBelle program. Come in out of
the heat and soak up some bar-
gains!


Hospital
Continued From Page 1
source of argument for issues
over the right to public access,
as well as doubt that the litigious
information even exists.
The hospital defended its
right to withhold any additional
information in direct accor-
dance with the Open Meetings
Act.
"This hospital will not publi-
cize any information that would
be considered private, personal
health information about private


Race
Continued From Page 1
during which the heat can be
unbearable, this race is a great
opportunity to find some shade to
watch from or even join in the raft
racing.
Racers of all ages are allowed
to participate. The adult division
(rafters over 18) will compete for
first, second, and third place prizes
of $1,000, $500, and $250.
A youth division is also avail-
able for entry, in which each raft
may include up to three youth par-
ticipants, with at least one adull
required on each raft. The youth


Family Caregiver
Support Groups
June topic is Social Security
Medication Program Informa-
tion and Answer Session. Come
to a free information sessions
given by a Social Security
Administration representative
with real facts about the upcom-
ing Medicare prescription drug
program.
Wednesday, June 22,at 4 p.m.
at the Clewiston Senior Center
(863) 983-7088 (Clewiston).
Wednesday, June 29 at 4 p.m.
at the Moore Haven Senior Cen-
ter (863) 946-1821 (Moore
Haven).

Alcoholics
Anonymous
Alcoholics Anonymous
meets every Tuesday, and Friday,
at 8 p.m. at the Community Pres-
byterian Church 407 Royal
Palm Ave.

Italian
night dinners
The Ladies Auxiliary VFW.
4185 will be serving Italian Night
Dinners starting at 6 p.m. every
Wednesday. The cost is $6. Eat in
or take out. The VFW is located at
501 S. Francisco St. You can call


citizens if that information is
protected," said Mr. Cudworth.
The hospital was ordered by
the 20th Circuit Court to show
cause as to why the medical cen-
ter refused to submit informa-
tion detailing the hospital's
financial operations. The hospi-
tal did not directly reject or
refuse the court order, but
explained that their position was
different from that of the court
and they were not accountable
for any other information than
that which had already. been
given.
Financial reports from the
hospital's Chief Financial Offi-


division includes first, second, and
third place prizes of $300, $200,
and$100.
A potential racer must con-
struct a homemade, human-pow-
ered raft cornisting of a non-com-
mercially manufactured hull. Each
raft has to be self-propelled, mean-
ing the crew may use any combi-
nation of oars, poles, paddle-
wheels, or sails. Most importantly,
.all of the racers are absolutely
required to wear a personal flota-
tion device (PFD). The deadline for
entry is Monday, June 20, at the
marina, followed by a mandatory
captain's meeting on the 22nd.
According to the marina's man-
ager, Ramon Iglesias, the festivities


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 16,2005


983-9748 to place an order to go. Class of '85


Bingo night
will change
Clewiston Elks Lodge #1853
is proud to announce that they
will be playing bingo on Thurs-
day-nights beginning May 12 as
opposed to Monday nights. All
are welcome to come and play,
cash prizes awarded. Proceeds
also go to helping local students
obtain scholarship opportuni-
ties. Early birds start at 6:30 p.m.
with regular games starting at
7:30 p.m. Help us to help others
because "Elks care-Elks share."

Friday
Nights Lights
Evangel Church Assembly of
God Outreach Center is open
from 7-10 p.m. every Friday to all
7-12 grade students in our com-
munity. Activities available
include basketball, three play
station 2 units, music, and
games. Snack bar with great
prizes is open each night.

Servicio en
Espanol
First Methodist Church of
Clewiston is starting a Hispanic
Worship Service Sunday
evenings at 7 p.m. Son todos
bienvenidos. Everyone is wel-
come! Call Rev. Perez at 677-
3190 with questions.


cer, Nick Braccino, reported an
operating gain of $19,000 for the
month of April 2005, compared
to a budgeted gain qf $33,000.
This figure was given at the
Hendry County Hospital Author-
ity Board meeting. Thursday,
June 9, and was provided along
with reference to the previous
month's report of an operating
gain of $56,000 compared to a
budgeted loss of $13,000 for the
month of March.
The remaining issues tod be
considered by the hospital
include selection of a consultant
for advising about options for
the hospital,, which has received


will feature live music from Miami
sensation Limerock, and addition-
al refreshments will be provided
by the Budweiser "Bud Girls". The
date of the event is set before the
approaching end of fishing sea-
son, which comes to an end on
Memorial Day.
Last year's winning raft was
called "The Old Farts," which was
crewed by Bobby Sutton, Ron
Stevens, Walter Duke, and Bob
Stevens, who were awarded
$1,000 in prize money.
The event was originally held to
raise money for the CHS Lady
Tigers softball team through entry
fees, which are $20 per raft, and
accompanying sales made by the


reunion
The Clewiston High School
Class of ',85 is beginning plans
for the big 20th class reunion
and are looking for help in the
planning of and contacting of
former classmates. The reunion
is scheduled for July 29-30. For
more information, contact Chris
Wellslager at 983-8778 or 983-
5121 or Missy Walker at 983-
3169 or 228-2890.

RAF reunion
planned
Cadets from the 5 British Fly-
ing Training School (5BFTS),
who trained at Riddle Field, in
Clewiston, during WWII, is hav-
ing a reunion in Bedford, Eng-
land, Sept. 16-18. Contact
Harold Kosola at (229) 435-
4119, or fax at (229) 888-5766, or
contact him by e-mail at
koslo@att.net.

Cub Scout
meetings
Cub Scout Pack 667 meets
every Thursday in the Clewiston
Youth Center at 6:30 p.m., and
has room for more members.
Come check us out. Currently,
we are building go-carts. Parents
are invited and encouraged to I
.come. Call Angie at the Youth t
Center for more information.


proposals from multiple compa-
nies expressing interest in buy-
ing the "Clewiston facility. Miller
Couse, chairman of the Hendry
County Hospital Authority
Board, informed the board that
three potential consultants have
submitted packages, and that
hopefully a consultant will be
selected in June to discuss with
and advise the board concerning
buying, leasing, joint partner-
ship, etc.
Pending a June hiring and the
hearing at the end of the month,
the hospital remains under
question as to its plans for the
future.


team members, who will be sell-
. ing fruit smoothies and other
refreshments the day of the race.
Other rules for participation
include minimum crew sizes of
two, and a maximum of four. The
homemade rafts will be inspected
and approved before the race, All
sheet metal raw edges must be
turned over and taped to avoid
sharp, dangerous edges, and all
protruding long bolts are to be
sawed off, filed and taped.
Race rules and regulations, raft
specifications and applications
can be picked up at the marina at
920 E. Del Monte Avenue. Addi-
tional questions may be answered
by calling 983-3151.


Debbie Radcliffe with "Rudy" :
1st Place for Tricks
Runner Up for Best of Show


ueDDie Raacilite ana Huay snowcasea their talents at the
Just for Mutts dog show held May 14 in Clewiston. Debbie
and Rudy grabbed top honors in the Best Tricks division and
were also named runner-up Best in Show.


Mutts
Continued From Page 1
American pride exuded from
both Patches and lan and it was
more than enough to draw the
attention from the judges to not
only-secure the coveted Best in
Show title, but also earned young
lan first place in Best Appearance
and Best Costume.
Jessica Radcliffe wasn't far off
the winning track, dressing up her
pooch in a hula outfit. Her dog But-
tons swished his hula skirt enough
to sway the judges into giving Jessi-
ca and Buttons the runner-up spot
in the Best Costume division.
Debbie Radcliffe brought her
Rudy to the stage to perform a vari-
ety of tricks for the judges and it
would be Rudy's talents and Deb-
bie's apparent training skills that
would earn them both top honors
n the Best Tricks category.
impressed enough were the judges
hat they also named Rudy as run-
ner-up in Best in Show.
Equally impressive on the judg-
ng floor during the Best Tricks
competition was Chloe, owned
and operated, by young Sara
Burcher. The pair made enough of
in impression to gain the runner-


lan Holden, along with his dog
Patches, wowed the judges
during the first annual Just for .
Mutts dog show. Ian and
Patches would walk away with
the Best Costume title for his
Americana theme and would
also claim Best in Show.
up spot for the competition.
This first annual event is in the
books and the winners will forever
hold the honor of claiming the
inaugural prizes. Congratulations
are in order to those who dared to
take the stage and the parents who
supported their endeavors.
Sponsors of this year's first
event included: Pedigree, Purina,
Wal-Mart, U-Save, Corbins, MCM
Paints, and U.S. Sugar. Please help
to support your local animal con-
trol. A second showing is already in
the scheduling and is expected to
run sometime in October. Call ani- -
mal control at 983:-1457 for more
information.


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cross From the Airport

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Staff Photos/Bill Fabian
Melissa Thomley (left) takes a sample of blood from CHS
Nurse Carol Rushing for testing for blood sugar and hemoglo-
bin levels. The health fair also featured cholesterol profiles,
prostate cancer exams, and body composition assessments.


Fair
Continued From Page 1
The. purpose of the free
health .fair was to raise aware-
ness of the steps people can take
to improve their health. The
focus was on the importance of
incorporating simple preventive
and positive health behaviors
into everyday life. In today's
modern world, people often are





Landowners
Ranchers a


so busy they do not take the time
to focus on their health needs,
according the health providers
on hand.
When people take even the
simplest steps to improve their
healthth, the results can be signifi-
cant. Practicing prevention
everyday is the key to staying
healthy. Examples of some easy
steps are: Eating healthier,
adding more physical activity,
being smoke free, getting regular


Body composition assessments were taken using calcula-
tion of a Body Mass Index (BMI), which was administered by
LaSheba Travis (right).


exams and screenings, and
benihg safe and protecting one's
self. Important steps toward bet-
'ter health include getting regular
checkups and ask one's health,
care provider about screenings
for heart disease, diabetes, and
cancer.
This year's fair offered com-
puter access to information and
short quizzes on health topics
such as body mass index (BMI),
emotional IQ, finding ideal


weight, and checking calories,
especially the ones we get
through drinks. Many of the lead-
ing causes of death, namely
heart disease, cancer, and dia-
betes, can be successfully pre-
vented or treated if detected
early.
Exhibits, screenings, snacks,
giveaways, and door prize draw-
ings were part of the fun and-
informative evening, with lots of
helpful information available.


Family Eye Care

Randall T. Parrish, Jr., O.D.
L. Lamar Youmans, O.D.
Board Certified Primary Eyecare Physicians
Optical Services Available "Take Care of
100 N. Main St. LaBelle, FL 33935 The World Is
863-675-0761 Fullof
e-mail: familyeyecare@earthlink.net Wonderful
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Thursday, June 16,2005


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


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This is a special announcement to area residents! This is your

chance to go straight to the wholesaler! You will not pay retail!

Cars starting as low as $2,995!




Fleet Liquidators One of the nation's largest automobile whole-

salers, is announcing a one of a kind event being held at

Clewiston Old Kmart Parking Lot in Clewiston FL.




Due to our overwhelming success, major corporations all over

the country contract Fleet Liquidators to liquidate their excess

inventory. Due to the downward trend of travel, 2 major car com-

panies have excessive inventory that must be sold! Fleet

Liquidators has been ordered to conduct a final close-out of mil-

lions of dollars worth of inventory- Regardless of Loss of Profit!





#3G TERM CENTRIX NRSCRR NEXTEL CUP


SERIES CRR WILL BE RT THIS EVENT


WEDNESDAY FRIDAY


JUNE 15TH JUNE 17

.,AM- 7 P10 AM -7 P


JUE 8M__PM


- 955; WEST- SUGARLAND. HWY .STi ,.


T.-.. OTLD K-MART PA,_KI.N Lg,



q-gad'oteo 9'sd LiticTll aFJIHte .0i05's




wwgladesmotorscm Toll Free Hotline: 1 (8OO)51


1f00


-vehtcles


must be


sold


during this


event


Over 250O


ve hftces


to choose


from


BUICK 01
BUICK 91
CHEVROLET 98
CHEVROLET 04
CHEVROLET 02
CHEVROLET 01
CHEVROLET 02.
CHRYSLER 01
CHRYSLER 01
CHRYSLER 02
DODGE 03
DODGE 02
DODGE 02
FORD 02
FORD 02
FORD 03
FORD 04
FORD 02
FORD 01
FORD 05
FORD 04
FORD 02
FORD 01
FORD 97
FORD 02
FORD 02
FORD 03
FORD 02
FORD 02
FORD 01
FORD 92
FORD 93
FORD 03
FORD 04
FORD 02
FORD 04
FORD 01
FORD 01
FORD 00
FORD 03
FORD 99
FORD 01
FORD 01
FORD 03
FORD 02
FORD 02
FORD 02
FORD 02
FORD 04
FORD 04
FORD 03
FORD 02
FORD 01
FORD 02
FORD 04
FORD 02
FORD 04
FORD 03


CENTURY
LESABRE
ASTRO
IMPALA
MALIBU
PRIZM
SILVERADO 1500
CARAVAN
CONCORDE LX
PT CRUISER
DURANGO
DURANGO
NEON
E350 XLT
ECONOLINE E 150
ECONOLINE E350
ESCAPE
ESCAPE
ESCAPE
EXCURSION
EXCURSION
EXCURSION
EXPEDITION
EXPEDITION
EXPEDITION
EXPEDITION
EXPEDITION
EXPEDITION
EXPEDITION
EXPL SPORT TRAC
EXPLORER
EXPLORER
EXPLORER
EXPLORER
EXPLORER SPORT
EXPLORER SPORT
EXPRDITION 4X2
F150
F150
F150
FISO
F150
FIO5
F150
F150
F150
FI50
F250
F250
F250
F250
F250
F250
F250
F250
F250
F250
F25


BLUE
BLACK
SILVER
BLUE
WHITE

BLUE
GRAY
BLUE
RED
WHITE
WHITE
TAN
SILVER
GREEN
BLACK
WHITE



BLUE

WHITE
BLACK
GOLD
RED
BLUE
RED
WHITE
GREY

GOLD
WHITE
BLACK
WHITE
BLACK
WHITE



GREEN
GRAY
WHITE
WHITE
BLACK



BLUE
BLACK

WHITE
WHITE
BROWN
WHITE
RED


FORD 04
FORD 01
FORD 04
FORD 93
FORD 04
FORD 04
FORD 03
FORD 03
FORD 02
FORD 03
FORD 02
FORD 02
FORD 05
FORD 02
FORD 03
FORD 02
FORD 01
FORD 03
FORD 03
FORD 96
FORD 03
FORD 96
FORD 04
FORD 02
FORD 02
FORD 03
FORD 03
FORD 00
FORD 02
FORD 03
FORD 03
FORD 01
FORD 04
FORD 04
FORD 04
FORD 04
FORD 05
FORD 05
FORD 05
FORD 0O
FORD 05
FORD 05
FORD 05
FORD 05
FORD 05
FORD 05
FORD 99
FORD 98
GMC 93
GMC 00
HONDA 99
HONDA 98
HONDA 01
HONDA 98
HONDA 02
HYUNDAIO4
HYUNDAI03
HYUNDAI04


F250
F250 EXT LARIAT
F350
F350
F350
F350
F350
F-350
F-450
FOCUS
FOCUS
FOCUS
FOCUS
FOCUS
FOCUS
FOCUS
FOCUS
FOCUS
FOCUS
MUSTANG
MUSTANG
MUSTANG
MUSTANG
MUSTANG
RANGER
RANGER
RANGER
RANGER
RANGER
SPORTTRACK
TAURUS
TAURUS
TAURUS
TAURUS
TAURUS
TAURUS
TAURUS
TAURUS
TAURUS
TAURUS
TAURUS
TAURUS
TAURUS
TAURUS MERLOT
TAURUS
TAURUS
WINDSTAR
WINDSTAR
SUBURBAN 2500
YUKON
ACCORD
CIVIC
CIVIC
CIVIC.
CIVIC
ELANTRA
TIBURON GT
XG350


WHITE
RED


BLACK
SILVER
BLUE
BLACK
WHITE
GREY
WHITE
SILVER
WHITE
SILVER
WHITE
RED
SILVER
RED


GREY




BLUE
RED
WHITE
SILVER



GOLD
BLUE
CHAMP
SILVER
WHITE
GRAY
BEIGE
BEIGE
GOLD
SILVER
BEIGE

GOLD
GOLD



WHITE
GOLD


GREEN
BLACK
WHITE
RED


INFINITI
JEEP
JEEP
KIA
LINCOLN
LINCOLN
LINCOLN
LINCOLN
LINCOLN
LINCOLN
LINCOLN
LINCOLN
LINCOLN
LINCOLN
LINCOLN
LINCOLN
LINCOLN
LINCOLN
MAZDA
MAZDA
MAZDA
MERCURY
MERCURY
MERCURY
MERCURY
MERCURY
MERCURY
MERCURY
MERCURY
MERCURY
MERCURY
MERCURY
MITSUBISHI
MITSUBISHI
NAVISTAR INTL T
NISSAN
NISSAN
NISSAN
NISSAN
NISSAN
NISSAN
OLDSMOBILE
PLYMOUTH
PLYMOUTH
PONTIAC
PONTIAC
PONTIAC
SATURN
SUZUKI
TOYOTA
TOYOTA
TOYOTA
TOYOTA
TOYOTA
TOYOTA
VOLKSWAGEN


01
02
99
01
04
99
01
02
03
02
97
03
04
03
95
01
96
03
02
02
01
02
03
02
03
04
04
99
03
03
97
01
03
01
02
02
00
89
00
01
03
00
87
00
02
03
01
96
03
01
00
03
04
00
01
01


G20 GOLD
CHEROKEE GRAY
GRAND CHEROKEE
SPORTAGE GRAY
AVIATOR
CONTINENTAL GRAY
CONTINENTAL WHITE
LS WHITE
LS SILVER
LS SILVER
MARK VIII GREEN
NAVIGATOR MAROON
NAVIGATOR
NAVIGATOR 4X4 SILVER
TOWN CAR BEIGE
TOWN CAR GREEN
TOWN CAR WHITE
TOWNCAR
MAZDA MPV ES SILVER
MELLENIUM
MPV
GRAND MARQUIS
MOUNTAINEER WHITE
MOUNTAINEER SILVER
MOUNTAINEER SILVER
MOUNTAINEER SILVER
MOUNTAINEER GREEN
MYSTIQUE
SABLE WHITE
SABLE WHITE
TRACER WHITE
VILLAGER WHITE
GALANT BLACK
MONTERO
WHITE
ALTIMA
ALTIMA GLE
MAXIMA
PATHFINDER RED
PATHFINDER WHITE
SENTRA GXE BLUE
ALERO GLS BLACK
RELIANT
VOYAGER SE FWD L/GREEN
FIREBIRD SILVER
GRAND PRIX GREY
GRAND PRIX GREEN
SC WHITE
AERIO BLACK
RUNNER SILVER
CAMRY LE BLUE
HIGHLANDER LTBLUE
RAV4
SIENNA BLUE
SOLARA SILVER
PASSAT WHITE


Down payments may vary for lender approval or including buy here, pay here. Limited quanity first come first served. With approved credit. Cehicle purchased, credit history and term determines down pay-
.ment needed to reach $89 per month for first 3 months. Vehicles subject to prior sale. With beacon score of 750 or greater and monthly car noted may not exceed 15% of gross monthly income, 24 months
max term on select vehicles. All offers cannot be combined. All financed sales and leases subject to final lender approval
.' ' ,., .. I


13


SUNDAY

JUE17-









Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee Thursday, June 16,2005


Senior happenings


Volunteer training
and opportunities
Faith in Action new volunteer
orientation will take place in
LaBelle June 28 at 2 p.m., and in
Clewiston at the Clewiston
Senior Center June 30 at 2 p.m.
Bring a friend. Faith in Action
program in Clewiston is still col-
lecting blankets to equip the Per-
sons with Special Needs Shelter
at John Boy auditorium. To help,
bring a new twin-sized blanket
to our Clewiston Senior Center
next to the auditorium between
8-5, M-F. Call Liz at (863) 983-
7088 for more information.

Flea market
The next Trash and Treasures
Flea Market will take place June


24, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the
L.J. Nobles Senior Center in
Labelle. For more information or
to make a donation, call (863)
675-1446. All proceeds to benefit
the Faith in Action in Labelle
program.

Upcoming meetings
and events
Family Caregiver Support
Groups in June will feature the
new Social Security Medication
Program information. Join us to
learn about the new medication
program and get assistance fill-
ing out the paperwork properly.
The next meeting will take place
in Labelle June 15, at 4 p.m. at
the L.J. Nobles Senior (enter,
(863) 675-1446; in Cleviston


June 22, at 4 p.m. at the Clewis-
ton Senior Center, (863) 983-
7088; inMoore Haven June 29 at
4 p.m. at the Moore Haven
Senior Center, (863) 946-1821.

Exercise classes
Exercise classes are every M-
W-F at LJ Nobles Senior Center
from 9-10 a.m. All are welcome.

Free services
to help elders
Insurance counseling with a
trained SHINE (Seniors Helping
with Insurance Needs of Elders)
counselor is available every
Wednesday morning free of
charge at Nobles Center and in
Moore Haven at Senior Connec-
tions offices.

Legal help
Legal help from Florida Rural


Legal Services is available at the
Nobles Senior Center in LaBelle
on the second Wednesday of
each month from 9:30-11:30
a.m. (Must call 675-1446 to
make appointment)

Post disaster
help for older adults
Disaster funds are still avail-
able to help older adults living in
Hendry and Glades Counties
who continue to need assistance
with such issues as roof repair,
debris removal, insurance
deductibles, appliance repair or
replacement, chore work, etc.
Elders in need of help due to the
hurricanes .of last summer can
speak with a specially trained
outreach worker in Clewiston
on Monday and Tuesdays, (983-
7088) and LaBelle Wednesday
through Friday (675-1446.)


Beat the rush for required immunizations


TALLAHASSEE Officials
for the Florida Department of
Health urged parents to make
sure their children receive the
required immunizations before
the next academic school year.
Immunizations are vital to the
health and welfare of all Floridi-
ans especially children.
"Our children's health should
be our number one priority,"
said DOH Secretary John 0.
Agwunobi, M.D., M.B.A., M.P.H.
"Ensuring your child's health
through proper immunizations,
is the best start you can give him
or her for a successful school
year."
Before children can. register


for school, parents must provide
documentation (Department of
Health Form 680, Certification of
Immunization) showing proof
of vaccination against diphthe-
ria, tetanus, pertussis, measles,
mumps, rubella, varicella
(chickenpox), hepatitis B, and
polio diseases.
Florida's effort to increase-the
number of fully immunized chil-
dren continues to show positive
results. The recent goal of
.immunizing 85 percent of two-
year old children this year was
exceeded, and new goals are
being established. ,
State officials point to Florida
SHOTS (State Health Online


Tracking System), the statewide
immunization registry, as a valu-
able tool in helping the state
reach immunization goals. The
mission of Florida SHOTS is to
develop public and private part-
nerships between health care
providers to share electronic
immunization data. This infor-

mation will be used as a tool to
increase and. maintain child-
hood immunization levels, and
to help eliminate vaccine-pre-
ventable diseases.
Not only does Florida SHOTS
house immunization data, it also
helps health care providers iden-
tify children who are due or past
due for vaccinations, and facili-


states providers quick access
to a child's vaccination history to
determine the vaccines needed
on a particular visit.
For more information on all
back-to-school immunization
requirements, visit the Depart-
ment of Health's Web site at
www.doh.state.fl.us, -and click
the immunization services link.
For additional information on
how to obtain required vaccina-
tions, contact your health care
provider or your, local health
department. For more informa-
tion on Florida SHOTS,. visit
www.flshots.com.


Senator Bullard's


staff to meet with


area constituents

Legislative session and future

economic development on agenda


Miami Senator Larcenia
J. Bullard (Dem.), District 39
will have staff in attendance at
the Belle Glade City Hall Com-
mission Chambers Monday,
June 13, at 5:30 p.m. for a post
2005 legislative session town
meeting. The senator's staff
will discuss highlights of the
recently completed legislative
session that affect Belle Glade,
South Bay and Pahokee.
Additionally, the Tri-Cities
Area has been designated a
rural area of economic con-
cern by Governor Jeb Bush.
This designation makes avail-
able funds, through the Rural
Economic Development Initia-
tive (REDI). Invited to partici-


pate in a discussion of the
areas future and how residents
can benefit are Mary Helen
Blakeslee, executive director
of REDI; Maurice Brazier of the
Small Business Association,
and Ted Kramer of the Small
Business Development Center
of Florida Atlantic University's
(FAU) School of Business. The
city hall is located at 110 Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.,
West Belle Glade, FL. Resi-
dents of South Bay, Pahokee,
Belle Glade and neighboring
areas are welcome to attend.
You may contact the office of
Senator Bullard at (305) 668-
7344 for additional informa-
tion.


CCCS provides the keys to home ownership


WEST PALM BEACH -
Home is where the heart is, and
the path to home ownership
should include realistic goals,
sound advice, careful planning,
and a clear understanding of the
costs involved. The time you
spend preparing for home own-
ership is as important an invest-
ment as the home you purchase,
and will help ensure that you
make the best choices for you
and your family.
To help you on your path,
Consumer Credit Counseling
Service of Palm Beach County &
the Treasure Coast is offering
free workshops for prospective
homeowners. During the six-
hour workshop, you will assess
your readiness for homeowner-
ship, take a realistic view of the
costs involved in purchasing and
maintaining a home and evalu-
ate your credit and financial situ-
ation to determine how much
house you can really afford.
You will also learn about the
various mortgage options and
what to look for in a lender, and
explore the tremendous benefits
of home ownership, from stabi-
lized housing costs and appreci-
ation to the many tax benefits.
Workshops scheduled
through September include:-
June 29 and 30: 6-9 p.m.
Community Foundation (700 S.
Dixie Hwy., WPB)


July 16: 10 a'm.-4 p.m. Com-
munity Foundation (700 S. Dixie
Hwy., WPB)
July 25 and 26: 6-9 p.m. Boyn-
ton Beach Community Dev.
Corp. (2191 North Seacrest, BB)
August 20: 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Community Foundation (700 S.
Dixie Hwy., WPB)
September 10: 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Community Foundation (700 S.
Dixie Hwy., WPB)
September 24: 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Community Foundation (700 S.
Dixie Hwy., WPB) IN SPAN-
ISH.. ;.-
, 'To register, call (866) ,616-
3720. En espa-ol, (866) 616-
3719 .
CCCS also offers free individ-
ual housing counseling sessions
by appointment;.call (800) 330-
CCCS (2227).

About CCCS
Since 1975, families have
turned to Consumer Credit
Counseling Service (CCCS) of
Palm Beach County & the Trea-
sure Coast for help with money
problems. CCCS is a nonprofit,
community service agency dedi-
cated to empowering con-
sumers to achieve a lifetime of
economic freedom. A United
Way partner, CCCS provides
free, confidential budget coun-
seling, community and personal
money management education,


debt management programs,
and comprehensive housing
counseling.
CCCS is accredited by the
Council on Accreditation of Ser-
vices for Families and Children
and is a memberof the Better
Business Bureau and the Nation-
al Foundation for Credit Coun-
seling (NFCC). Governed by a
community-based board of
directors, CCCS is funded by
creditors, clients, contributors
and grants from foundations,
business and government agen-
cies. Service is .available in Eng-
lish, and Spanish. CCCS has
offices in West Palm Beach and
Boca Raton, with satellite serv-


ice in Stuart and Port St. Lucie,
and offers around the-clock help
by phone at (800) 330-CCCS or
at www.cccsinc.org.

CCCS of Palm Beach County
& the Treasure Coast is a mem-
ber of the CredAbility Network, a
family of agencies serving con-
sumers in south Florida, north
Georgia, middle Mississippi and
east Tennessee. Florida head-
quarters is in the Community
Foundation Building in West
Palm Beach. Please contact us
any time our virtual office is
always open at
www.cccsinc.org or (800) 330-
CCCS.


Build your dream home on this prime location in LaBelle. .50+/-
acre on CR78 across from waterfront park and the


Farm Bureau, Tobacco

Growers Association offer


seminar on buyout options


Florida Farm Bureau Federa-
tion is partnering with the Flori-
da Farm Bureau Insurance com-
panies, the Florida Tobacco
Growers Association and Farm
Bureau Bank to inform tobacco
growers and quota holders
about buyout options at a semi-
nar Thursday, June 23. The semi-
nar will begin at 6 p.m. at
Cheryl's Restaurant in Live Oak.
"Florida Farm Bureau is
proud of its role in achieving a
tobacco quota buyout," said
Kevin Morgan, director of the
Agricultural Policy Division.
"The buyout is now a reality and
will benefit our growers and the
communities where they live
and work."
Now that the buyout is a reali-
ty, Florida Farm Bureau is con-
centrating on providing growers
and quota owners with informa-
tion about options that will max-
imize profitability and minimize.
tax burdens. At the June 23 sem-
inar, Larry Lanie, president of
Farm Bureau Bank, will discuss
options, including lump-sum
settlements.
The financial service is being
made available to all tobacco
growers and allotment holders.
The Farm Bureau Bank settle-
ment plan will allow buyout
recipients to be paid for the full
amount of their buyout pro-
ceeds through a single transac-
tion, less the cost to the bank of
financing the upfront payment.
Also at the seminar, a tax spe-
cialist will be available to answer
questions.
There is no registration
charge for the seminar, but reg-


istration is required by June 10.
Seating is limited. To register,
growers and quota holders
should contact Patti Brothers at
(352) 374-1544. Each registrant
should provide his/her name,
mailing address, phone and e-
mail address if available, and
indicate the total number of indi-
viduals attending from his/her
operation.
Farm Bureau is offering the
financial settlement through
Farm Bureau Bank -as a service
to tobacco growers and allot-
ment holders. The Florida Farm
Bureau Federation will not
receive any compensation from
the plan.
"'We are working to ensure
that, as a result of competition in
the marketplace, farmers will
receive the highest return possi-
ble for their buyout payments,"
Morgan said.
The Florida Farm Bureau Fed-
eration is the state's largest gen-
eral-interest agricultural associa-
tion with more than 150,000
member-families statewide.
There are Farm Bureaus repre-
senting 64 counties in Florida,
where agriculture comprises a
stable,.vital leg of Florida's econ-
omy, rivaling the tourism indus-
try in economic importance.
Headquartered in Gainesville,
the Federation is an independ-
ent, non-profit agricultural
organization and is not associat-
ed with any arm of the govern-
ment. More information about
Florida Farm Bureau is available
on the organization's Web site,
http://FloridaFarmBureau.org.


Call anytime to anywhere in the nation.


Uther monthly charges apply.


4-SprinL


When you subscribe to a qualifying Sprint Solutionss Standard plan, you can call
your friends and family just because. In the middle of the day. A weekday. Talk
about everything. Talk about nothing. With Sprint, you get unlimited nationwide
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Call 1-877-Sprint-2. Click sprint.com/local.


**Price excludes taxes and surcharges (including a carrier universal service charge of 11.1%, which may vary by month, carrier-cost-recovery surcharge of $0.99 and certain in-state surcharges).
Surcharges are not taxes or government-required charges. Offer: Must subscribe to a Sprint Solutions" Standard plan. If Sprint Solutions Standard plan is cancelled, the standard monthly fee for
unlimited long distance will apply and varies by state. Offer subject to change or cancel without notice. Additional restrictions may apply. Unlimited Nationwide Long Distance: For residential
voice service usage only. State-to-state and international long-distance services are governed by Sprint Terms & Conditions of Service. Local and in-state long-distance (including local toll) services
are governed by the applicable state tariffs and/or state terms and conditions of service. Monthly fee does not include usage for Directory Assistance, foncard" service or operator services. Service
not intended for commercial use, Intemet, data or facsimile service. If Sprint determines that usage is not consistent with residential voice conversation, the service may be assessed a data usage
fee or disconnected. US residents only. Dial-1 service only. Calls to 900, 986, 555 and 700 NPAs are not considered unlimited interstate and intrastate Dial-1 calling. Monthly fee includes one phone
line. Customer's first invoice will include a partial monthly fee and the first month billed in advance. International rates vary, and surcharges may apply, including surcharges on residential calls made to
foreign mobile phones. Call 1-888-255-2099 for international rates. Additional in-state and universal service charges will apply. Operator-assisted calls and toll-free/calling card calls made from pay
phones in the US will be assessed a surcharge. All rates subject to change. Additional requirements and restrictions may apply. Some services included in previous calling plans may not be included
when converting to new unlimited long-distance plan. Contact Sprint for details. 2005 Sprint. All rights reserved. Sprint and the diamond logo are trademarks of Sprint Communications Company L.P.


V


/
t


BEAUTIFUL RIVERVIEW HOMESITE

.

I, *


I.


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 16,2005






Thursday, June 16, 2005


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


3 5
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238dN.!Bradel Lauren or,, FLli3s3

a86 98 9148 6-4-51 or56863-995-8868


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Call Lauren or Melissa at

863-983-9148, 863-946-

0511 or 561-996-4404


NO ONE WILL WORK HARDER FOR YOU THEN
JAMIE NAVARRO GIVE I4IM A CALL ON HIS
CELL AT (239) 822-9272
IivREALTr C. BAGANS FIRST
..WOR.LD 30 Colorado Rd, Lehigh Acres, FL 33936


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VISIT US ON THE WEB AT WWW.OAKREALTYINC.COM PROPERTY MANAGEMENT RENTALS SALES
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Dwjiii


SLIC. REAL ESTATE BROKER
ASSOCIATES EDITHMILLER
AND TIM SPENCER
675-0500


REALTY
I N ID NEW LOCATION
S233 N, BRIOGEST
'. i ON THE CORNER OF
BRIDGE ST *s &I
?, jr ^-T WASHINlON


tNsTAIL'S COMING AVAt'ULI details
LARGE 3/2/1 IN PORT LABE I.E $800!M. ,., i '
NO PETS A MUST ,ll" I l i,, l., _11,1I ianufac-
f'tifoiii.O e' riured home with carport on 3+- acrs.
NEW LISTING IN PORIT IABEL.I This Inch I 1. '. II .. breakfast nook retreat off'
lkdroom2at-idar Cgari qrga home sits on a master bedroom, mront and btc': o,'r'h
bIautifly Winlstaped l..i re tt ntde ri Poeriy also has 2,100 sq. ft barn. ( 11 t.
i ,.i. l of" oLaBle 11c. ine is w lt main- z'>rrr .jipni'tirrnt 'i-H 9,900.
S.' updated I Askitg I\ .i '11 I Oi iilRu\' 01)l LANE 101
$135,01)0. Atems witIh wood fiane house Being sold
3BEDROOM/2BATH/I CAR GA.RAGE sirs 'As Is Call or more details.
on a beaitiful cornet 1.. I r11 I: .Ik'1 CO"IMMA,
and jusL a block awaw Iromn the ; I course, i 'il\ll Xi u 1 I ,i .. .... d
Home ha3 s lareE kitchen witlh brafklast. ,i 1 i .l I r 411:.4L Ill.
i $18,90. 0 0IoS FOR SA"'.I
'Il 'I. i 1111 L cl'S 'ho 'e Si1 s i l l 1'' .I" '- i i '[1 1 l ldso e Ave tuev ll.-lI
I 1" Ii. i rom r m oui-Ih i ll I lil u0. ,,l.'' i ,- .0 lll, l1,il
S .1 I asis" Reducdi to$600,00: I P \\ \!Il i I 11 IIICII.I \\ S
i ,-,. ,I I i, r. !,1 '1 i \1I 1\ k \ 1' 1 | 1 t \i \ i \h. i F ii.i
H I I. .k 1 i i ii I|1 \I i 1' 1l0 i
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*Reatvg r:p. InC. 23 Nt.soihidgestiloridareatBlgroiFp.Lm
ii ~ ~ SF HaJ Sl~f EspiLoim


* in I tnC'tr ** i
* $249,<00 aI I a|I hi Ii
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* 1'-900 "I ll3lD24 iob cinu2aome na hoBelait

* iu2. fl.. i ', I ,, ,+ I. i li. i-ji,
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* lhJ' ii i ',', i.. i u ,. h ,'l i. I' I *.i i ii.


I m i 'l r( i I i .iil 'i.. 'n. I I n I I ,,i i !Ii ;i


ouI onl this tuitque acreage!
O 300,000 19,83+/- anms with nmmem prisibil-
ies. Adoining 19.82+/. r- also iavkallable.
* $119,000- ,.94+/- acres priopuLty fcaatus htiInc or
ittotlc home pad 5iX.i MWth sepki tank. ,
* ;$5,000 1119+/- acre woodd lot on piwil iid
in heart of(lUmt) ,

* $38,000 1.25+1- re woi lot (onI dLrailnagc

l l i i .




* 0000. i ', i i .i

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OMMERLlla
*' 3 Q -i :i ..
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,,, .a..,.o_ -',-.,. 1,1,
ilfl ilEkiL I'LI'I1L h.lIl


),. Home

S'" Builders

Port LaBelle
Exciting New Plans
Homes from Mid $100S
Spec Homes Available Now















Lots Available, Seller Financing
Visit Our Model Center
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I. $224,M).
r'. .. nF n RlR usift'-InI ri ,,


orie g.k '.a ,'j .. :.-,.n j ;... d roJd ,rI
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* 1 lr t n I-', 1 .- ,4L [ $l.1,lll

* 2 I.i.hi A-it Ir T: :.- .1 J I,- .hi h. f ,.
I tr. ,.-it lri-xltI \' iOnh. -67.000 cath
* 2 b...u I N,'i tir't ii' l [ t. It, ,'.. M liinno ., I
Il'.in.t lour IJ ili I o i '.N htoI i l I i.:;',.-f -I.
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s*L .. Li[lr L|. limi s e.l l .i
fi>nt..gi' .'n MR lld I'.fl r.ii 4 .,.-i I ii I..
0.rc i. L",klnm2 $40,tH'1n


East Fort Myers!
Extraordinary 3 Bedroom/2 Bath custom
intracoaslal home located in a progres-
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a S t c :> -~.A i


Thuliaibjultumkfilled tnesile inOrtloa, Magnificent Towering Oaksi commercial Potential
Stdiviieill /* O'Aei 3BER I ZBAI ON B3 +/- ACRES Located In Alva on 5 -/ acra'
S*:.37;" ,0 $289,900 $1 ,900,000


i "


This Hoe if ed for a Grin family Bta llfiil Piverfron Home kilm Dock In Deed Rest icted Area
.gV.2- ki,- nd 37'1 CRId m eBeil 71 Aa3




""26i, .2 _, ir r r.--





Alva ($12 901SQ 3.38 Acre Business Lot Aiva (S1 ,,. )024 00 Acre Business Lot
Located 21251 Palm Beach Blvd Located S3R 80 S & Joltl Blud
$1.,900,000 r-.:0 .,00


Alva RIVER/CREEKFRONT HOME!
ONE-OF-A-KINDI 3Bedroom / 2.
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me Beauty You Long I-o development -otentiall jtiuia r-or Your f-uture
Located in LaBHe on 2 184 Acres Located In LaBlla rlon 11 *I' Acresi Located I n LaBld oni 2 5 *. Acre
$-4B '5,000 $1 ,895.000 $7-4.,000
*- .' f at idJ lllllialip


Sherri Denning
Licensed-Real Estate Broker since 1985


Associates


- Wayne Mcquaig
- Lisa Cleghorn
- Bonnie Denning, CPA
- Tracey Williams
- Joyce Gerstman
i m .


- Lisa Herrero
- Paul Meador
- Art Fry
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- Yvonne Hallman


i.gl o,
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15


If you are thinking of tbtuying or selling, give us a call! !


PIWI177


IV-qv


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16 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee Thursday, June 16,2005


Self defense against mosquitoes


Unless you just arrived from
another planet, you have proba-
bly noticed that summer rains
have begun to fill up our local
ditches canals and the chronic
wet spots in our Florida Yards.
Summertime has arrived, and
with it comes the "enjoyment" of
seeing and feeling the effects of
one of our unofficial state ani-
mals the mosquito.
Homeowners can play a role
in managing these pest popula-
tions, and today's column will
give you some tips on what you
can do in self-defense. Much of
this information comes to us from
Extension Specialist Dr. Roxanne
Rutledge of the University of Flori-
da's Medical Entomology Labora-
tory, which is located in Vero
Beach.
Dump Standing Water
Most but not all of our
pesky mosquitoes breed in
standing water. Even a small
amount of still water can provide
a place to a female mosquito to
lay a clutch of eggs and turn it
into a writhing mass of wrigglers.
Depending on the species, it may
only take a few days after a good
rainfall for the next generation to
emerge and look for bare flesh.
There are many water-holding
containers found in landscapes..
Can you get rid of them? Or, if you
do not want to remove them,
flush them out and replace the
water every 2-3 days. This will
remove mosquito larvae that are
in the container; larva will not
live long out of water and will not
develop to the adult stage'.
Here is a short list assembled
by Osceola County Master Gard-
ner Nancy Pfister and some ides
on how to deal with breeding


mosquitoes:
Potted plants with pans -
Don't over water you plants, and
remove or turn the drip pan
upside down so it won't hold
water.
Drainage ditches Remove
vegetation and obstructions to
water flow mosquitoes don't
like moving water.
Low spots that hold water
- Fill and re-grade to move
standing water off your property.
Plugged roof gutters If they
haven't been blown away by the
storms, be sure to check them
and clean gutters clear of sticks,
leaves and other obstructions.
Pet dishes Change water
frequently.
* Trash piles Remove or
cover them, but be sure that cov-
ers don't hold water in small
pockets.
Old tires Remove, dispose
of or cover tires, which are one of
the best places to grow mosqui-
toes.
Water holding containers -
Remove or cover pails, barrels,
grills, or even some kinds of plas-
tic play ground equipment.
Poorly maintained pools or
spas Follow recommended
maintenance and keep up with
the pool chemical levels, which
kill mosquito larva.
Bromeliads Flush the hol-
low centers of these plants out
with a hose.
Tree holes Fill with sand
or concrete to keep water from
pooling inside or better yet,.
remove these trees that will have
weakened trunks.
Debris on roofs Remove
debris; ripped and compromised
blue roof tarps can hold puddles


Summer rains likely to continue, forecast says


GAINESVILLE Recent rains
came just in time for Southeast-
ern cotton and peanut crops,
and'farmers can look forward to
adequate rainfall throughout the
summer.
That's the word from the
Southeast Climate Consortium,
or SECC, which issues quarterly
forecasts to help farmers in
Alabama, Florida and Georgia
manage their crops.
"We had a wet start earlier in
the spring, but May was dry in
some peanut and cotton areas,"
said Clyde Fraisse, an extension
specialist and SECC researcher
at the University of Florida's
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences in Gainesville.
"Peanut and cotton fields
were showing stress that could
have retarded plant develop-
ment," Fraisse said.
The rest of the summer
should be hot, humid and hazy,
according to the SECC's summer
climate outlook, issued today.
"That's good news for agri-
culture throughout the South-
east," Fraisse said.
Florida State University's Cen-
ter for Ocean-Atmospheric Pre-
diction Studies, or COAPS, pro-


duces the SECC climate fore-
casts. At the Tallahassee center,
researchers monitor surface
water temperatures in the Pacific
Ocean near the equator to pre-
dict potential weather effects in
the Southeastern United States.
Periodic warming or cooling
in those surface temperatures,
known respectively as El Ni-o
and La Ni-a, can affect U.S.
weather patterns. El Ni-os are
associated with increased winter
rainfall, while La Ni-as have the
opposite effect.
Currently, Pacific Ocean sur-
face temperatures are near nor-
mal, a situation exi-erts call a
neutral phase, according to the
SECC. As with El ,inos fand La
Ninas, neutral phases affect
global weather, including condi-
tions in the Southeast.
"For the past two years, the
Southeast has been in a neutral
phase," said COAPS Director Jim
O'Brien. "People often assume
that a neutral phase will bring
average weather."
But, O'Brien said, that's not
necessarily true.
"Weather can be all over the
place from dry to wet or aver-
age in a neutral phase. Still,


there's currently no indication of
drought this summer, so
chances are good that crops will
have adequate moisture," he
said.
Rainfall in Jackson County,
Fla., averages 4.5 inches in May
of neutral-phase years. This year,
cotton plots monitored by the
Jackson County Extension Ser-
vice received only 1.7 inches of
rain during May, but received 2.2
inches in the first week of June
alone.
The SECC forecast of typical
summer conditions should help
peanut farmers use their
resources effectively, said John
Beasley, a University of Georgia
extension agronomist in Tifton.
"They know if there is a high-
er probability of rainfall they can
irrigate less, which saves
money," Beasley said. "On the
other hand, it's important for
them to keep up their fungicide
applications, since most dis-
eases thrive in wet conditions.
"We were in a neutral phase
last summer as well," he said.
"Peanut and cotton growers did
very well, and they're hoping for
another good year."
The forecast also indicates lit-


tie chance of wildfires this sum-
mer, due to three factors -
recent heavy rains, the likelihood
of a wet summer and the end of
the Southeast's traditional wild-
fire season, which runs from
January through early June.
SECC's fall outlook, due in
early September, will indicate
whether the neutral phase is
continuing, said David Zierden,
an SECC researcher at the Talla-
hassee center.
The consortium's Web site,
http://agclimate.org, is available
to the public and provides
monthly forecasts of rainfall and
temperature for all counties in
Alabama, Florida and. Georgia.
Member institutions of SECC
are the University of Florida,
Florida State University, Universi-
ty of Miami, University of Geor-
gia, Auburn University and Uni-
versity of Alabama at Huntsville.
SECC is funded by the Nation-
al Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration, the USDA Coop-
erative States Research, Educa-
tion and Extension Service and
the USDA's Risk Management
Agency.


"Freddy" to help hone hurricane preparedness


While the South Florida
Water Management District is
done monitoring tropical storm
Arlene, the first named storm of
the 2005 hurricane season, it is
also getting ready to hold its
yearly'hurricane exercise to test
the District's preparedness. Next
Wednesday, June 15, Hurricane
Freddy will "strike" the District
with full force.
The annual "Hurricane Fred-
dy" exercise is scheduled from
8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., when Dis-
trict officials will rehearse
response and recovery plans.
The exercise will encompass the
District's 16-county jurisdiction
involving participation from
regional service centers and field


operations. Other agencies rep-
resented include the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers, Florida
Department of Environmental
Protection and Florida Power
and Light Co.
While Freddy is only an inter-
nal exercise for training purpos-
es, the storm will be a realistic
test for water managers. It is
designed to test district staff to
resolve complex issues under
crises conditions with district
resources arid capabilities
stretched to the limit. Also partic-
ipating will be some of the agen-
cies who partner with the Dis-
trict in a real emergency, such as
Florida Power and Light, the U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers and the


Florida Department of Environ-
mental Protection.
The South Florida Water Man-
agement District is a regional,
governmental agency that over-
sees the water resources in the
southern half of the state 16
counties from Orlando to the
Keys. It is the oldest and largest


of the state's five water manage-
ment districts. The agency mis-
sion is to manage and protect
water resources of the region by
balancing and improving water
quality, flood control, natural
systems and water supply. A key
initiative is cleanup and restora-
tion of the Everglades.


I1


I


OKEECHOBEE Louis E.
(Red) Larson, of Okeechobee, is
the Lancaster/Sunbelt Expo Flori-
da Farmer of the Year and will rep-
resent Florida in the competition
that will name the Southeastern
Farmer of the Year. Larson owns
and operates a large dairy farm in
Okeechobee.
Larson and his family were
selected as Florida Farm Bureau's
first Farm Family of the Year in
1977. In 1979 he was elected to
the Dairy Hall of Fame and two
years later was inducted into the
Florida Agricultural Hall of Fame.
The FFA Foundation presented
Larson with its Distinguished Ser-
vice Award in 1990 and the Palm
Beach Post named him the Dairy-
man of the Century in 1999.
Larson was nominated for the
Farmer of the Year award by Flori-
da Farm Bureau Assistant Director
of Field Services Tom Hill.
"It has been my privilege to.


bring recognition to people such
as Red, who have done an out-
standing job for Florida agricul-
ture," said Hill. "Florida will have
a very strong candidate in the
Southeastern competition."
Larson will receive a cash
award of $2,500 for winning the
Florida competition. The South-
eastern winner will .be
announced on Oct. 18 at the Sun-
belt Agricultural Exposition in
Moultrie, Ga. and will receive a
$14,000 cash award. The state
and Southeastern winners will
also receive additional prizes
from participating sponsors.
Sunbelt Agricultural Exposi-
tion, "North America's Premier
Farm Show," will run from Oct.
18-20. The show emphasizes
information, education and
implementation of the latest agri-
cultural technology. Information
about Sunbelt is available online
at http://www.sunbeltexpo.com.


1-4 INTERCHANGE PROPERTY
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ON SITE PREVIEW IOAM-2P.M. Salt JunI 11 CR 557 (Old Grade Rd) & I14, LakeAlfred. FL
AUCTION, IAt., SatJanewe I- Fantesvy o Flt h 1400 Broa(,ws aBd S. Polk City. Pt.


0 i


of water.
Ponds Keep them clear of
excessive aquatic vegetation, and
stock with minnows or tadpoles
to feed on the wrigglers.
Boats Cover or turn
upside down so the hulls don't
hold rainwater.
Birdbaths Flush at least
once per week.
. If you must rely on chemical
control of breeding areas, or
insist on using pesticides to
reduce adult mosquitoes, please
check with us for the UF bulletin
on recommended, legal pesti-
cides.
Buying a Zapper?
Carefully evaluate the pur-
chase of mosquito control
devices. Dr. Rutledge has pio-
neered the evaluation of many of
the devices that are now on the
market to "eliminate" mosqui-
toes from your Florida Yard. Many
are not effective.
Some of these devices expel
carbon dioxide gas that attracts
these pests into a collection bag.
Research has not shown that they
actually eliminate local mosquito
populations. Other devices emit a
timed spray of insecticide. These
fail to consider differences in
mosquitoes and environmental
effects, and as a result will often
be too little, too late or kill a lot of
non-target organisms like birds,
pets and wildlife. They can also
lead to an increase pesticide
resistance among those mosqui-
toes that survive.
There are even devices being
sold that supposedly repel mos-
quitoes by emitting ultrasonic
waves; The Federal Trade Com-
mission has issued an order stop-
ping their sale because they sim-


ply do not work to repel mosqui-
toes.
* Got Mosquitoes? Get DEET!
If you can avoid exposing
yourself to mosquitoes, do so.
Limit your outdoor activities
around dusk and dawn, when
mosquitoes are most likely to be
active. If you must be outside,
wear light colored loose fitting
long pants and long sleeved
shirts, complete with hats, and
use an effective mosquito repel-
lent.
Repellants containing
"DEET", an abbreviation for the
chemical name of the active
ingredient, work the best when
properly applied. Other "natural"
repellants such as citronella,
eucalyptus or picaridin (i.e. Skin-
so-SoftTM) will work for 20 min-
utes or so; some forms of DEET
can last for upwards of five hours.
Knowing how to apply and reap-
ply these repellents can make all
the difference in the world. Ask
for the recently revised UF bul-
letin, Mosquito Repellants if you
want the details.
A great place for mosquito
information is Dr. Rutledge's Web
page; I've placed a link to it and
more information on our Okee-
chobee Web page,'http://okee-
chobee.ifas.ufl.edu chobee.ifas.ufl.edu/> If you
need additional information on
homeowner mosquito control,
email us at
okeechobee@ifas.ufl.edu or call
us at (862) 763-6469. Local resi-
dents can stop by our office at
.458 Hwy 98 North in Okee-
chobee, and visit our County
Master Gardeners from 1 to 5
p.m. on Tuesday afternoons.


Healthcare Services Include:
*Specialized Wound Care *Resident & Family Council Groups
*Full Time Medical Director Specialized HIV Care
*Dialysis Support *Physical, 0,::.:.:'., & Speech Therapy
*Alzheimer's Support Groups '24 hour Registered Nurse Staffing
* Intravenous Therapy Therapeutic Activities
230 South Barfield Highway
Pahokee, Florida 33476-1834
PHONE: 561-924-5561
FAX: 561-924-9466
Other facilities in Gainesville & Bradenton Visit our website at www.floridacare.net


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Red Larson named

Lancaster/Sunbelt Expo

Florida Farmer of the year


I


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Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 16,2005


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'00 FORD MUSTANG *7 990
LOW MILES. STK#54678A ,9


'02 DODGE NEON
18K MILES. STK#54606A


.7,990


'98 VOLVO S70 A7,990n
WHITE. LOADED. STK#54426A .... ............ ,


'04 KIA SPECTRA
STK050697A ..


AUlD, A/C, LOW MIlES. STK#5OG88A


$9,990


'03 PONTIAC GRAND AM 10,790
W HITE. STKt5-3845A .................................


'04 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
14K MILES. STK46044A


10,990


'02 CHRYSLER SEBRING CONV. $11,990
GOLD, LOW MILES. STK#53870A ............. 1 ,9
'02 DODGE STRATUS ES $11 990
SUNROOF LEATHER, 20K MILES. STK#53895A .
'01 MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE SPYDER GS $ 1 ,9
SILVER. STK#54285A.........................................,9 9 0


'99 LEXUS GS300
WHITE. STK*6064A. ...


I 2.990


'03 PONTIAC.AZTEK $ f
BURGUNDY, LOW MILES STK#50594A..... 12,990
'03 HONDA CIVIC $13.990
STK#54316A .................................... 1 3...9 9 0
'02 VW JETTA GLS TURBO $1 3990
RED. SUNROOF. STK#53467A. 13.990
'02 VW BEETLE GLS 113,990
SUNROOF, WHITE. STK#52924A
'05 HONDA ACCORD EX Sl 7.790
STK#5664A .... ....................... ...... .....
'04 LINCOLN LS 22990
LOADED, 10K MILES. STK#6078A.. ..
'05 DODGE MAGNUM R/T HEMI 27 990
SILVER. STK#54478A ........ ................ ,
'02 MERCEDES BENZ E320 28990
GOLD. 29K MILES. STK#53334A ........... ....28990


"01 PONTIAC

AZTEK


40K MIlES, BLACK. STK#52844B


So I n


jfTI


'01 MAZDA MPV
SILVER. STK#52033A


'02 CHRYSLER VOYAGER LX
SILVER. 31K MILES STKs5961A
'03 FORD WINDSTAR
SILVER. STK#5-3986A
'02 CHEVROLET BLAZER
STK#5926A
'02 JEEP LIBERTY
WHITE, AUTO STK#54325B
'03 DODGE DURANGO SLT
STK#53483A
'02 DODGE DURANGO SLT
33K MILES. STK#59016A
'03 DODGE 1500 CARGO VAN
STK#52321AA .
'02 FORD ESCAPE XLT
LEATHER. STK#54015A


. 9,990


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'03 HONDA ELEMENT
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'03 JEEP 'WRANGLER
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'03 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY
LOADED. STK#54185A
'05 FORD E-150 CARGO VAN
STK#PL6594
'02 HONDA ODYSSEY
40K MILES. STK#54132A
'05 FORD SPORT TRAC
STK#52833A
'03 CHEVROLET SUBURBAN LT
STKf53167B
'03 GMC YUKON
WHITE. 27K MILES. STK#54175A


"02 TOYOTA


~ULJ-~ WL. r' t__-


'01 DODGE RAM 1500
LOW MILES. STK#53253B..


$g,990


'04 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB SLT
BLUE. STKk5-1617A


'01 FORD F-150 KING RANCH
STK#53387A


'04 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 2500 SUPERCREW
13K MILES STRK52560A


'03 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB
BLUE. STK5-36C02A


I 2,99


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'03 FORD F-150 SUPERCAB LARIAT
BLACK. STK.53270A


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STK#51651A .. .


'05 DODGE 2500 HEMI
5K MILES STK54103A .


'04 FORD F-150 SUPERCREW XLT
BLUE STK#P-6589


'01 DODGE RAM 2500 4X4
DIESEL, 40K MILES. STK*52573A


$9? qtV


23 3.-9h


$24 q90


'03 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500
STK#508859A


1S.90


'05 DODGE 2500 QUAD CAB LONGBED
2K MILES. WHITE STK#5-4065A .


S5?5 9 .9 1


'04 F-250 4X4 LONGBED


WHITE STKnr53556A


'03 TOYOTA TUNDRA
TAN LOW MILES SF,-?5-432,.


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186990


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'02 FORD F-150 XLT SUPER CREW 4X4 .1 6 9 )
STK#52688A


'02 FORD F-350 SUPER DUTY
DIESEL DUALLY. LOW MILES STK#53546A .


$32.990


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Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee Thursday, June 16,200


Five arrested in $2 million international seam


TALLAHASSEE Attorney
General Charlie Crist announced
the arrest of five individuals for their
involvement in an investment
scam that may have netted almost
$2 million from investors. The
defendants, who will be prosecut-
ed by the Attorney General's Office
of Statewide Prosecution, were
taken into custody on charges of
racketeering, conspiracy to com-
mit racketeering, 70 counts of
investment fraud, grand theft and
money laundering.
They are accused of operating
an investment scam that fraudu-
lently offered futures options on
the foreign exchange market but
never actually spent investors'
money for that purpose.
Victims of the scam would
receive unsolicited phone calls urg-
ing them to invest in futures
options on the foreign currency
exchange market. The victims
were promised lucrative returns on
their investments, and risk of loss


was minimized or glossed over by
the sellers. In addition, the callers
emphasized that time was of the
essence and the prospective
investors should immediately wire
money or send checks to a compa-
ny, which was actually operated by
those running the scam.
"Scams such as this one serve
to remind us that when something
seems too good to be true, it usual-
ly is," said Crist. "Investors should
always exercise the utmost caution
when choosing options that carry
such great financial weight,
because they can also carry great
financial risk."
Arrested were John Taddeo, 36,
of Lighthouse Point; Frank Desan-
tis, aka Josh Anthony, 38, of Light-
house Point; Erin Rose Desantis,
aka Erin Valko, 31, of Lighthouse
Point; Doreen Valko, 56, of
Coconut Creek, and Christopher
Boutchie, 36, of Coral Springs. The
Broward County Sheriff's
Office is still seeking Gavin Liv-


oti, 32, of Highland Beach, and
Daniel Ledoux, 40, of Richmond,
Virginia.
The five individuals were run-
ning the scam through a group of
four related companies: World
Banks Foreign Currency Traders,
Inc., International Investors Trad-
ing Group, Inc., and Compliance
and Customer Care, Inc., all based
in Florida, and International Invest-
ments Holding Corporation, an off-
shore company formed under
Bahamian laws. These companies
were established as part of the
criminal endeavor to defraud
investors.
Some of the victims did receive
transaction statements from .
International Investments Hold-
ing Corporation informing them
about the "options" that had been
purchased in their name. However,
all of the victims eventually were
told that due to "unexpected mar-
ket conditions," they had lost all or
nearly all of their investment. The


losses typically ranged from $5,000
to $10,000, but in some cases were
much more. An investigation by
the Broward County Sheriff's
Office produced records that
revealed no money was trans-
ferred from the brokerage firms,
where the investors sent their
money, to the "clearing" bank,
where the purchases were sup
posed to occur.
No options were purchased
and the money was going directly
to the defendants. Affidavits and
bank records were obtained show-
ing almost $2 million was sent to
the companies with little more
than $100,000 returned to
investors, a return of five cents on
the dollar.
If convicted of all charges, the
defendants could face maximum
prison terms ranging from 100 to-
300 years, depending on each indi-
vidual's level of involvement in the
scam.


Free banners for boaters to help protect manatees


They're being used more and
more on the waterways by con-
cerned citizens bright yellow
banners from Save the Manatee
Club, designed to make it quick
and easy to communicate with
approaching boaters whenever
manatees are spotted in the area.
The free waterproof banner
which reads, "Please Slow: Mana-
tees Below," alerts boaters to the
presence of manatees with the
intent to slow boaters down to
help prevent manatee injuries and
deaths.
"The 4th of July weekend is one
of the busiest holiday weekends of
the year, and the waterways will be
very active," said Judith Vallee,
Save the Manatee Club's Executive
Director. "Manatees face ever-
increasing threats mostly from
human activities, and the. largest


known cause of manatee mortality
is from collisions with boats. Hope-
fully, people will watch out for
manatees, and those who have the
banners will use them to help slow
down boat traffic if manatees are
spotted."
Those who plan to be out on
the waterways this 4th of July
weekend should follow some gen-
eral guidelines to help protect
these fascinating, endangered ani-
mals. Wear polarized sunglasses,
as they can help eliminate the glare
of the sun and 'can help you see
below the water's surface. Stay in.
deep water channels and follow all
posted boat speed regulations.
Avoid boating over shallow vegeta-
tion beds where manatees might
be feeding. Look for the manatee's
snout, back, tail, or flipper breaking
the surface of the water a swirl


?,~ i.'~;
'1,.,~~,~
-I.,
.
* ...'

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or a flat spot on the water signals a
manatee may be swimming
below. And if you see a manatee
when operating a powerboat,
remain a safe distance away -
about 50 feet. If you want to
observe the manatee, cut the
motor, but don't drift over the ani-
mal.
Also, if you spot an injured,
dead, tagged or orphaned mana-
tee, or if you see a manatee who is
being harassed, call (888) 404-
FWCC (3922) or #FWC or *FWC
on your cellular phone, or use VHF
Channel 16 on your marine radio.
Florida boaters can request a
free "Please Slow: Manatees
Below" banner by contacting Save
the Manatee Club via e-mail at edu-
cation@savethemanatee.org, by
regular mail at 500 N. Maitland
Ave., Maitland, FL 32751, or by call-


ing toll free at (800) 432-JOIN
(5646). Just include your name,
mailing and e-mail addresses, and
the area where you boat in Florida.
Also, if you are-a Florida shoreline
property owner, you can get a free
aluminum sign for your dock
which reads, "Please Watch for
Manatees: Operate With Care." Be
sure to include your name and
mailing address and the address
where the sign will be posted, if dif-
ferent.
Manatee protection tips are
available on the Club's Web site at
www.savethemanatee.org/boater-
tips.htm. For more information on
manatees, the Adopt-A-Manatee
program, or Save the Manatee Club
programs and activities, visit the
Club's Web site at www.savethem-
anatee.org, call the toll free num-
ber listed above, or send a request
via regular mail.


Restitution comes to

thousands defrauded

by TRG Marketing


TALLAHASSEE Attorney
General Charlie Crist
announced that the principals
of TRG Marketing, LLC -
Carmelo Zanfei and William
Paul Crouse have pled
guilty to charges relating to the
sale of an unauthorized health
plan to more than 7,000
Floridians, which resulted in
millions of dollars of unpaid
claims.
Asserting that the self-
insured plan was exempt to
the licensing and certification
requirements of state law,
Zanfei and Crouse marketed
the health plan to citizens of
Florida, and 43 other states,
without seeking a certificate of
authority to sell the plan.
Investigators determined
the health plan was insuffi-
ciently funded and the group
failed to pay millions of dollars
of claims.
"TRG Marketing duped
thousands of trusting con-
sumers and left them with mil-
lions of dollars in unpaid med-
ical expenses," said Crist.
"Scams like this drive up the
cost of legitimate health insur-
ance, and consumers are, left
to carry the burden. We will.
work to ensure that justice is
served and restitution is made
to these victims."
Zanfei pled guilty to con-
spiracy to commit racketeer-
-ing and four counts of unlaw-
ful transaction of insurance,
and will be sentenced to two
years in prison. Crouse pled


guilty to racketeering and four
counts of unlawful transaction
of insurance, and will be sen-
tenced to four years in prison.
After they are released from
prison, both defendants will
also be sentenced to 20 years
of supervised probation with
special conditions that they
make full and complete resti-
tution to more than 7,000
Floridians. The restitution is
expected to total $2.5 million
and could be substantially
more.
Formal sentencing of both
defendants will. be held in
approximately 120 days
before Ninth Judicial Circuit
Judge Julie H. O'Kane in
Orlando.
Although the health plan
was illegally marketed in 43
other states, Florida was the
only state to pursue criminal
charges. The case was prose-
cuted by the Attorney Gener-
al's Office of Statewide Prose-
cution and investigated by the
Department of Financial Ser-
vices.
Any citizen who believes he
or she has been a victim
should call the Attorney Gen-
eral's Fraud Hotline toll free at
(866) 9-NO-SCAM (866-966-
7226).
A copy of the arrest affidavit
is available at: http://myflori-
dalegal.com/webfiles.nsf/WF/
'MRAY-6D8LVM
file/TRG_Affidavit.pdf.


."When you need a service, call pr

Only $10.00 per week, per block.

Call 863-983-9148 or email us at

southiakeads@newszap.com to place your ad!


Statewide
Palms, Inc.

863

675"

4844


J U ~l H ~I'1


SUNRISE APPLIANCE
New, Used, Scratch & Dent

401 US Hwy 27
Moore Haven
863-946-2666,


GLENN J.
SNEIDER, LLC
Criminal Law
Bankruptcy Law
Immigration Law
200 S.W. 91i Street
Okeechobee, FL 34974
(863) 467-6570


-~ 11141 ~'


Reich &
Mancini

1-888-784-6724
.rirk.'- f im nesalion 'ern wi,. IIiun
1t.sul 5fe.. ril [Diajhl 'Il I'rnilul Dcjh
I'aim Cinh Iorn Pi'i-t
Pori Si. I .ink
tt'1'4 l'&Il l'ada lut-j Klio.ii


M5 Ml1714E


Law Office of
Robert L. Vaughn. PA.
Bani rupicv Wtongiul Dtbwh
Personal Irnjury, F.nily La' Divorc
112 WC. Owen. Clcwiston
863-902-9211
530 Main St, LaBelle
863-675-7719
2080 CcIlher Ave.. Ft. Myers
239-936-9393
, '


IUHIEF'S
AuTO
CARE
From Strut Cars to Racm Cars
We do it ail.
390 E Cowboy Way 674-1010


1-,00-DODGE NOW
1-561-683-1511
65010 Okeec4't'ee Blvd.
West Okeechobee & The Turnpike
w w a r rig dcj c rn



*

330 . Sugarland Clewiston
863.983.036
216 S. Main St., LaBelle

301 N. 15th St
239-657-1600
I


LABOR < FINDERS


DALY DALY PAY
ALL TYPES OF WORK AVAILABLE
202 E. S and wy. (kross frm Ciristi nn)
(863) 902-9494



~~jes Gladesuth
Care Center
230 S. Barfield Hwy.
Pahokee, FL 33476-1834
Phone: (561) 924-5561
Fax: (561) 924-9466
Email:
GladesCare4'FloridaCare.net


525 NW An i, BitLE GIADE

800-573-79s83
www.gladesmotors.com


Brian SullivanI
(lass A General Conlrddor (G-O'618 I

863-441-4202

863-465-1371
Se Habla Espahol
w m.hriasllivMemtraciore.m |


James Fencing
Lice n se d & In sured
We Can.
D Kill lu ml-oi ari n al l ilr id".firni!
"11111"71 uJ d f i ,'l A;Ill qua l hl I 'q "
R I.hif ,il I 'prI 1.i1 Irn i.
CALL FOR [vMl'- INFORMATiON
863-697-8462


NENDRY REGIONAL

MEDICAi CENTER

51 R umaNlr, clImTn


HIMPMOC ,}HISMlMeRJE

J ATOi ^ v
IW m -lf 'ITAR -H| --

iliW, hgtarli Hw!,, Clfi itoi
8ii.983. !6 !!, 8 )S.10.It3


Pilair gomeDvfflopers, lnl,
2501 W. 80th St. Suite 9

Hialeah, FL

1-800-901 2192






C(West Cake-
FUNERAL HOME AND CREMATORY
805 N. Hwy. 27
Moore Haven
(863) 946-1233
a ,,.mm m


GLADES BACKHOE SERVICE
24 YEARS IN BUSINESS
DITCH CLEANING & DIGGING
ROCK EXCAVATION
OER BRENDA N PEACOCK

HOME 561-924-7123
CELL 561-261-0053
PAHOKEE. FL 33476


SI L I I

370 Holiday Isle Blvd.
Clewiston
863-983-3181


Connections
I \ \IN SI'. IAIlII.l
INI | fl' Kl KI I.L's I.01KI,')
CALL
(863) 612-0237
x cingular-
| OLa-


brn~4Yj.]WiyW


DR. MERCER' S DENTURE CLINIC

'BEST PRICES SAME DAY

US 41 SOUTH *FT. MYERS



1-866-226-9400


LAurlitrs
FURNITURE
CLEARANCE CENTER
The B lockei.r Fam, ly ha.s Lturnrild
thkIr LlB,'I1,o 51-tal,' ro l'l II"1I,,, I
[:II il u'll C iL'L I',Ii .' ClIo 'nt r.
359 W Hi'kp, ... t,, Ave
LaBtlh'. FL
863-675-2132

sI J aJ '


STrLsurc Coast DermatoloV.

Tim louannides. M.D.
Rick Romagosa, M.).
Robert S. Kirsncr. M.D. PhD

1924 US Hwy. 441 N.
Okeechobee
863-467-9555



Royal's

FURNITURE
IAPM e-I %L [, I d" BfD wl .
C i atsetii, f 6 r1 c I.entlnjik :
Cfate B~i'? Glii 'Ol h lOy


i 1 I T tll I'I;


BLUEWATER BOBCAT Sl LawI Servie Lisbetkh area


CULVERTS DRIVEWAYS
LAND CLEARING PADS
ETC,

OFFICE 863.902.0477
CELL 863-228-2622


Free Estimates on Request




3.7228 12


Lie, mortgage Broker



(5 O1l)9 93.2 3 is
Se hala Ispaiel
llI arlat h onestartidle J.itt


Clewiston
(866) 549-2830
OkechobM (W83) 467.67
FL Pierc: (772) 5954Se
Pot S Luci (772) MM 545
ft1 (772)21"M2.77
Palb Bomeb Oawlsmn (561) 4944W


- ii ;j jij ~


S


GROCERY STOKE & MEAT PROCESSING
863-946-2333
1205 EAST SR 78 1Lakeport
NURSI HOME


I
~


~hG~tit SL, mn*M~I4fl~


(


* '7


m -, ;~'m


.I jl. i. .I .i=


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.... 7 *-f".-."


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 16,200Q


1, AUTO SALE


I- H Ll R


ME14mrL i prUTn; I II t;i(4-0


'f;


:Wrlil i D] ['1 ,'1:] '4 N -W8 .


. I 'ATT RNEii


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Thursday, June 16,2005 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Important tips for homebuyers


FELTON, DE Home inspec-
tions are now considered so rou-
tine that an estimated 77 percent
of all homebuyers invest in one.
HGTV even devotes an entire
program to the service, called
"House Detectives." But televi-
sion does not always paint a true
portrait of the home inspection
process, Suggests Cliff Grohe, Fel-
ton-area director of HouseMas-
ter(r).
"Watching 'House Detectives'
is a terrific way to educate home
buyers on the value of a home
inspection. But many of those
inspectors don't follow standard
industry protocol," says Grohe,
who notes that it is as important
to understand what a home
inspection is NOT, as well as
what a buyer should expect from
their inspection, in order to make
an informed home purchase
decision.
What a Home Inspection is
NOT: It is not a to-do list for the
seller. Over the past quarter-cen-
tury, two of the most common
questions asked of HouseMaster
inspectors are "Who should
make the repairs?" and "Should I
buy this house?"
The role of the home inspec-
tor is to provide the buyer with


their opinion of the home's con-
dition at the time of inspection.
Because each real estate sales
contract and transaction is differ-
ent, a buyer's real estate sales
professional or lawyer is better
qualified to answer these types of
questions.
A home inspection is not a
pass/fail test. "It is up to the
buyer to determine whether or
not the home passes his own
test," says Grohe. "A couple look-
ing to totally renovate a home
may realize that the need for lots
of repairs to the mechanical sys-
tems doesn't matter to them.
Conversely, a young couple
buying a 'starter home' in which
they plan to live only a few years
may find a home with many
problems is just not for them."
It does not make a home
Purchase risk-free. Most home
inspection companies follow
HouseMaster's lead and utilize
an inspection contract that out-
lines the specifics of the home
inspection, as well as its limita-
tions. But it's important to
remember that while a home
inspection is designed to reduce
the risk in buying a home, it can-
not eliminate that risk.
What to Look for in a Home


Inspection:
Choose wisely when it
comes to selecting a home
inspector. Even in areas where
there is mandatory licensing, cre-
dentials among inspectors can
vary dramatically. Price should
not be the reason to select a
home inspector. It is also impor-
tant to make sure that an inspec-
tor provides a written inspection
report that includes pertinent
details on the condition of major
elements of the home.
Look for a home inspector
that encourages you to go along
on the inspection. "The inspec-,
tion is a terrific introduction to a
home. A professional inspector
can answer questions, demon-
strate how to operate various sys-
tems in the home, and provide
helpful maintenance sugges-
tions," says Grohe.
Heed the inspector's advice.
Deficiencies found on an inspec-
tion will continue to deteriorate
through usage and age. Plan on
addressing any outstanding con-
cerns as soon as possible.
A professional home inspec-
tion is the best investment a
homebuyer can make.


ALICO, INC. announces elections, meetings


LABELLE Alico, Inc.,
(NASDAQ:ALCO) one of the
South's best-known agribusi-
ness companies operating in
Central and Southwest Florida,
and with approximately 141,000
acres in real estate holdings,
announced that at its annual
stockholders meeting held Fri-
day June 10, John R. Alexander,
Robert E. Lee Caswell, Evelyn
D'An, Phillip S. Dingle, Gregory
T. Mutz, Charles Palmer, Baxter
G. Troutman, and Dr. Gordon
Walker were. elected by the
stockholders to serve as direc-
tors of the Corporation. Addi-
tionally, the stockholders
approved the Alico, Inc. Director
Stock Compensation Plan.
At the.annual meeting of the
Board of Directors following the
Stockholders meeting, the Board
re-elected Mr. Alexander as
Chairman and Mr. Gregory T.
.Mutz as Lead -Director. The
Board also elected the following
officers:
President & Chief Executive


Officer: John R. Alexander
Vice President Administrative
Division, Chief Financial Officer,
Treasurer and Assistant Secre-
tary: Patrick W Murphy
Vice President, Ranch Divi-
sion: B. Wade Grigsby
Vice President, Heavy Equip-
ment and Facilities Maintenance
Division: Robert P. Miley
Vice President, Sugarcane
and Sod Division: Dwight Rock-
ers
Vice President, Citrus Divi-
sion: Steven M. Smith
Controller and Assistant Trea-
surer: Dennis J. Garbo
Corporate Secretary: Denise
Plair
The Board also declared a
special dividend of $1 per share
payable to stockholders of
record as of June 30, 2005, with
-payment expected on or about
July 15, 2005. Chairman Alexan-
der stated that the Company's
2004 fiscal year results were the
best in the tCornpary''s hiisor
and the Board ,ianied the share.


holders to share in these results.
Chairman Alexander also
announced that the Board had
decided to begin paying regular
quarterly dividends beginning
with the end of the Company's
fourth quarter on August 31,
2005. The first such dividend in
the amount of $.25 will be paid
to shareholders of record as of
Sept. 30, 2005 with payment
expected on or about Oct. 15,
2005.
Chairman Alexander and Mr.
Greg Mutz, the company's lead
director, stated that they were
excited about working with the
new Board to continue the
process of enhancing the Com-
pany's business in the coming
year. They noted that "Alico is a
very different company than it
was two years ago. It has new
management and a new focus
and we are all dedicated to its
continuing success."


Your
'ot-.


I


%',".. wcomelfter ^p
U~'~ epI
'IANv


We pledge to operate our newspaper as a public trust.

We believe journalists are nothing more than guardians of every citizen's
right to a free press. We have no authority to compromise, bargain away
or dishonor the principles underlying the First Amendment.

We don't play loose with the fats. We give notice to your opinions, riot
ours. We encourage vigorous discussion of public issues, but try to keep
everybody's comments within the bounds of fair play.

How are we doing?

Let us know by mailing feedback@newszap.com or calling your editor.



ClewisLton News

4 OLAD ES COUNTY


DEMMOCRAT


The Sun


I'll'
I-


m you need a service, call a profssio

Only $10.00 per week, per block.

Call 863-983-9148 or email us at

southlakeads@newszap.com to place your ad!


THE
OPTICAL CENTER
located in
FAMILY EYE CARE
100 N. Main St.
LaBelle, FL 33935
863-675-0761


M( 1S163)98137881
Your Cofl teo ambi~g pe d


1dfit 4 Y641 0eflg e
fa 1 se se Iflattm
to paif t885616 .66
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"The Sweetest ( 5



10 S, Br eit R (a on firog WillI )
m,ii.[ifilt;,tom


CLEWSTON ANIMALCLINIC


90 W, entui Ave, CNIistn FL 331

863-983-9145


cvs/pharmay
Expett something extra:.
1-800-SHOP CVS
or Visit CVS.com

OPEN 8am-lOpm
OR LONGER!
7 Days A Week


VICKER S
CHIROPRACTIC &
REHABILITATION CLINIC
(Cal for an Appointment Today)
DR, EDWARD VICKERS SR,,
Chiropractor
(863) 983-8391
905 w. 1'n? R A \'.
Cl EWISTO


I min V.-V 4


ADVERTISE YOURT
BUSINESS HERE

$10.00Fft.IWE
CALL 863-983-9148

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EARNEST H RAWLS
LIC. REAL ESTATE EROER'




wulrawlsrdelestateocom


420 L"Srgadge-Hwy,



yelssralestatece i


mgMBNFM-


Dr. Ed Humbert
HIP & KNEE SURGEON
NOW SEEING PATIENTS AT
HENRY GENERAL
CALL TODAY FRANAPPONTMMENT
530 W. Sagamore Avenue
Suite B
Clewiston, Florida 33440
(863) 983-2896
http://wwwjointiimplant.com


Carolyn
(homas
~ealty, Inc.

Carolyn Thomas 946-2005
MaryLee van Wijck 946-0505
CAS,~ fi!


COUNTRY HOMES &
LAND REAL ESTATE
Kathy Hutchins
Lic. Real Estate Broker
Office: 863-612-0551
Fax: 863-612-0553
Visit Our Website at:
CentralFloridaLandSales.com


__ew
Horizons
Real Estate Corp.
580 S. Main St. LaBelle, FL
863-675-1973
e-mail: newlorious-re@eatdlimuk.net
If you are thinking of buying
-. or selling, give
I- aIns us a call!


ogepfs Home Reimodeing
Hf




oi .3w wf
p s


Southern
land
Investments & Real Estate, Inc.
700 South Main Sitrci
P0O Buo 1680 o LaBelle Fonda 33975
863-o754-1500 Fa. 863-675-6575
w.~,mland.nom
TOLL FREE: 877-314-3048


ADVERTISE You.
BUSINESS HERE

$10.00PAM WEN
CALL863-983-9141
0oora
southlikedi@ewizamp.lco


$~ P3 *i ~t'~ ~ -


AK
REALTY
INC.
233 N. BRIDGE ST
ON THE CORNER OF BRIDGE ST & WASHINGTON
VISIT US ON THE WEB AT
WWW.OAKREALTYINC.COM
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
A MLS RENTALS SALES






9&38-S004

509'W. oia ma
C ei, v rO i/


NO ONE WILL
WORK HARD-
ER FOR YOU
THEN JAMIE
NAVARRO
GIVE HIM A
CALL ON HIS
CELL AT (239) 822-9272
REALTY

C. BAGANS FIRST
30 Colorado Rd. Lehigh Acres, FL 33936


DISH
DI EP0,1 T'j

Y.OUR OCAL SA.LHEROFESSIONIA S

LABELLE 8HM-i7i728
ClEHISTON86S-831-5


I Your Realtor
for the
Western Communitie!

Teresa Sullivan
561-795-8533
561-996-5623 -


I


82 W. HICKPOOCHEE. IABELLE
(ACROSS FROM BURGER KING)
CALL
(863) 675-TANU(8268)
So. Hab Espanol


n M6 9 W) ;tj (H ll


SERVICES


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 16,2005


0
* 1


UnTw
ay w


ow. 437-1TTTINM


I


A''
V







Thursday, June 16, 2005


20 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


18775..77
u ^4W'^


Allnnouncemenits

IrI=


-II


...s '" ...ie







4dUI.ARBSOLUTEI
for any personal items for sale under $2,500

More Papers Mean More Readers!

Reach more readers when you run
... ^ fl,__.?- i I . "_


2I0 -.


Employment Agriculture | Recreation I


your ad in several papers in


' oe"'"ape net or


Our newspaper network
consists of eight papers one
daily and seven weeklies. An ad'run in all these newspapers will
reach more than 164,000 readers*!


Financial


I,


I


Automobiles

.. -


Services Real Estate Public Notices

r~~~r IIi TBi [111 1kiiiin


Announcements


lT ..:,, t n| I|r.f,:.rm tlion.
Please read your ad carefully
the first day it appears. In
case of an inadvertent error,
please notify us prior to the
deadline listed. We will not
be responsible for more than
1 incorrect insertion, or for
more than the extent of the
ad rendered valueless by
such errors. Advertiser
assumes responsibility for all
statements, names and con-
tent of an ad, and assumes
responsibility for any claims
against Independent
Newspapers. All advertising
is subjd'ct to publisher's
approval. The publisher
reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all copy, and
to insert above the copy the
word "advertisement'. All
ads accepted are subject to
credit approval. All ads.must
conform to .Independent
Newspapers' style and are
. restricted to their proper
c I . ,.f,:,,r..- Some classi-
fied categories require
advance payment. These
classifications are denoted
with an asterisk *.
Auctions 105
Car Pool 110
Share a ride 115
Card of Thanks 120
In Memoriam 125
Found 130
Lost 135
Give Away 140
Garage..Yard Sale 145
Personals 150
Special Notices 155
900 Numbers 160


- IRS auction sale of prime Or-
lando area residence!! 3/3,
3600+ ft, pool on 1 acre.,
1745 Markham Woods Rd,
Longwood, FL 6/30 at 10
AM. Visit www.ustre-
as.gov/auctions/irs or call
Gary at (850)942-8990 x
249forinfo.
LAND AUCTION Calhoun
County, SC. June 23,
6:00PM. 960+/- acres of-
fered in 14 tracts. Located
near 1-26 between Columbia
and Charleston, near Lake
Marion. Timberland, Crop-
land, Hunting, Homesites.
Previews: June 18 &'22
from 11:00AM-2:OOPM. Call
(800)551-3588 for more in-
ormation or visit
www.woltz.com. Woltz &
Associates, Inc., Brokers &
Auctioneers (SC#3663R).



Large Sale in LaBelle
Sat., June 25th @ 11 am
Antiques, Tractors,
Trucks, Cars, Old Lures,
Loads of Hand Tools &
Power Tools.
See next weeks paper for: '
Address & Complete List!!!
On line: auctionzip.com
#1 Liquidators Auction
JimTate AU2266
Liquidators AB1855
.239-878-0621

READING A
NEWSPAPER...
A leds you
tothe
LW _J ._ J.._. j.,


Soest produmcs
and sevikes.


BURIAL PLOTS (2)- In old
section of Evergreen Ceme-
tery. $1100 for both..
(954)340-4475.


m 1 I


Imp oymenI
kili~


-mploymen
rnyFul1HTme 0:205


BLACK LAB MIX- large, male,
vicinity'of Hwy 70 West
i,63169-.2513
CD CASE- black, with CD's,
found on Wolff Rd. Call
(863)763-3134 to claim.
Young Female Cat Recently
Spayed. Okeetantie Area.
Call to identify.
(863)697-2265


BILLFOLDS (2) lost out of
purse, medical papers, pre-
scriptions, insurance cards,
driver license. Very impor-
lani. vic of Labelle Antique
Srop (863)675-2384 or
(863)675-3990.
LOST DOG- Pit/Cur Mix
bik w/ wht Vic of Dark Ham-
nock Rd Buiman Rd & 441
7721260-6567 Reward
PIT/CUR MIX, 5yrs old, aprox
701bs, missing on 6/4, vic of
Old Fort Denaud, reward
l863675-2310


ADULT CATS 1 Blue Russian
female w/ 7 toes, 1 blk Tom,
good mouser, both free to
good home. (863)763-8892
BOBTAIL KITTENS (2)
Free to. good homes.
(863)467-2139
CUR, 7 yrs. & Red Nosed Pit-
bull, 4 yrs. Neutered males.
Great w/kids. Housebroken,
updated shots. 863)447-0965,

German Shepherd/Sharpei
mix puppies, 1 male, 1 fe-
male, 6 weeks old, to good
home. (863)675-4211
HOT TUB- you must move,
(863)357-2494.





BELLE GLADE-Sat,
June 18th, 7:30am-?,
1.505 NWAve G,
Miscellaneous Yard Sale



EARN DEGREE online from
home. *Business, *Parale-
gal, *Computers. Job Place-
ment Assistance. Computer
& Financial aid if qualify.
(866)858-2121 www.tide-
watertechonline.com.
FREE LESSON. Saturday,
6/25. Experience the power!
Diesel Semis, Heavy Equip-
ment. Employers onsite, free
hotdogs, fun for all. National
Truck & Heavy Equipment
Operator School.
(800)488-7364.

-I
Is Stress Ruining Your Life?
Read DIANETICS by Ron L
Hubbard Call
(813)872-0722 or send
7.99 to Dianetics, 3102 N.
Habana Ave., Tampa FL
33607.


Auto Transport, The Waggon-
ers Trucking: Hiring Exp &
Non-Experienced drivers for
Auto Transportin South East
Rcqion3' Must have valid
Class A CGDL and verniable 2
yrs OR 200K miles OTR.
Need stable work history
and clean MVR. High Earn-
ing Potential, Great Benefits
and matching 401K. CON-
TACT Susan at
(866)413-3074 EOE.
BRANCH MANAGER
GLADES AREA
American Red Cross- chapter
seeks f/t professional to run
the Glades Area Branch.
The position will provide
leadership in developing, im-
plementing and managing all
American Red Cross service
delivery to the communities
within the Branch's assigned
geographical area. Ideal
candidate will possess de-
gree and/or experience in
noi-lor-pfoit management
and knowledge oIt re local
communities. Excellent
benefits package. Please
e-mail cover letter
and resume to
bootheL(redcross-pbc.org
orfax (561)650-9147.
EOE/DFWP
Carpenter Wanted
must haye tools &
transportation, steady
work. 1-800-345-0060
CARPENTERS, CONCRETE
RESTORATION &
LABORERS
Must have own tools
& transportation.
(561)637-2222
CFI HIRING RECENT STU-
DENT GRADS! Starting $.26,
increases to $.35 in 1 year.
Class A CDL Required. Local
ORIENTATION! (800)CFI-
DRIVE (800-234-3748) or
www.cfidrive.com.
COURT RECORDS CONTRAC-
TOR: Nationwide company
seeks experienced Indepen-
dent Contractors to collect
and research public records
in Florida courts. Laptop pre-
ferred. Pay based on pro-
duction. Fax resume to
Kassie (866)322-8246 or
Email: Kassie.Mill -
er@choicepoint.com.
DATA ENTRY Work ON YOUR
OWN. Flexible Hours!
$$$Great Pay!$$$ Personal
Computer required.
(800)873-0345 ext #300.
Find t faster. Sel it sooner
in the classifleds
i smpoyen
FullTime I02W


Call Today For Details!
* Sources: Pulse Research Market Survey; Simmons Market Research; INI Market Research Center


Rules for placing FREE ads!
To qualify, your ad
* Must be for a personal item. (No commercial items, pets or animals)
Must fit into 1 2 Inch
(that's 4 lines, approximately 23 characters per line)
Must include only one item and its price
(remember it must be S2,500 or less)


Call us!
No Fee, No Catch, No Problem!


CUSTODIAN
Opening in Hendry County
Commissioners. Must be
able to work evenings. Full
time with benefits. Applica-
tions and copy of job de-
scription maybe obtained
from Human Resource in the
LaBelle Courthouse or sub-
office in Clewiston. Deadline
for submission is May 25,
2005. Vet Pret EEO. Drug
Free. Applicants needing as-
sistance in the application
process should contact HR.
Driver- COVENANT TRANS-
PORT. Excellent Pay &
Benefits for Experienced
Drivers, 0/0, Solos, Teams
& Graduate Students. Bo-
nuses Paid Weekly. Equal
Opportunity Employer.
(888)MORE PAY
888-667-3729).
HIGH SCHOOL EXCHANGE
STUDENTS arriving August
need Host Families. Has
own insurance and spending
money. Promotes World
Peace! American Intercultu-
ral Student Exchange.
(800)SIBLING
www.aise.com.
LAB TECHNICIAN:
Will train.
Apply @ Casa Flora,
13140 Hartman Plant Rd.,
Palmdale, FL 33944.
(863)675-0170
*MOVIE EXTRAS* Earn
$150-$300/Day All
Looks/Types Needed. No ex-
perience Necessary TV, Mu-
sic Videos, Commercials,
Film, Print. Call Toll Free 7
days! (800)260-3949 Ext
3023.
**SALES REPS**, SALES
MANAGERS $7,000 per
week is what our Top Sales
People earn! Highly suc-
cessful national co. expand-
ing. Will train. Call Jay
(800)685-8004.
S/E & 3-State Run: T/T Driv-
ers. HOME WEEKENDS.
Mileage Pay, Benefits, 401K.
Trainees Welcome/ Miami
area- exp. req. 21 min
age/Class-A CDL Cypress
Truck Lines (800)545-1351.


CARE GIVER/COMPANION-
needs wo,. Will do ligni
housekeeping and live in,
references (863)675-4239.

Financial



Business
Opportunities 305
Money Lenders 310
Tax Preparation 315



#1 CASH COW! 90 Vending
Machine units/You OK Loca-
tions Entire Business
$10,670 Hurry!
(800)836-3464 #B02428.

Fullim


MAINTENANCE ASSISTANT
Join our maintenance team! General maintenance
of a 120 bed nursing home & 40 unit
apartment complex. Knowledge of electrical,
plumbing, carpentry and A/C. Must be "on call"
every third week. Prior experience in similar
position. HS diploma or GED required. Excellent
salary and benefits. Mileage paid to and from
work for out-of-town employees.
Glades Health Care Center
Pahokee, Florida
Call 561-924-5561, ext. 110O
.or fax resume to 561-924-9466
EXCELLENT WORKING ENVIRONMENT
Equal Opportunity Employer


FuTll TfimeI^^
i'ny^ ^


IEmploymen
FulTm e 020


CARPENTERS

The Seminole Tribe of Florida Housing
Dept. is now hiring Carpenters for Big
Cypress & Brighton Reservations, 3-5
yrs. exp. in carpentry. HS Diploma/GED
req. Valid FL Driver's license req.

Resumes to galtmanc(semtribe.com or
fax to 954-967-3477. Application online
@ www.seminoletribe.com. HR, 6300
Stirling Road, Hollywood, FL 33024


CHILD DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATE I
(Preschoolers, South Bay Head Start)
$11.04/hr.

Plans indoor and outdoor program activities for
'preschoolers; observes work of assistants and
guides them in performance of their tasks. As-
soc. Degree in Early Childhood Ed./Child
Dev./other ECE Degree (or 60-sem./90-qtr. hrs;
related college); 1 yr. exp. working directly with
care and development of young children (ages
0-5--i.e., preschoolers-must specify on appl.);
equiv. Prefer 40 hrs. DCF Child Care Training..
Visit www.pbcgov.com for detailed position de-
scription & employment appl. Submit appl./re-
sume with any Vet. Pref. doc. for receipt by 5
p.m. 6/24/05 to Palm Beach County Human Re-
sources, 50 S. Military Trail #210, WPB, FL
33415 Fax 561-616-6893 EO/AA M/F/D,V
(DFWP)



HEALTHCARE DISTRICT
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
HCAP Health Care Navigator
Grant Position
Glades Area
Position #163-2125
This position is to provide tailored care coordination services
to clients of Western Palm Beach County. Employee inter-
views clients in need of services and assists them in navi-
gating the eligibility process of medically and culturally
appropriate healthcare and social services. Employee must
provide high quality customer service with atntion to spe-
cial needs of diverse client base. Employee participates in
outreach activities.guiding clients to'program services. As-
sociate's degree with course work emphasis in social work,
human services or related; supplemented by three (3) years
previous experience or training that provides excellent
knowledge of eligibility criteria for alternative government
supported health care programs and benefits including Flori-
da KidCare, Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security Disability
CHAMPUS, Veteran's Administration benefits, etc. and the
ability to perform interviews and advanced administrative
support functions; or an equivalent combination of educa-
tion, training, and experience. Position requires that the can-
didate possess moderate computer skills and possess and
maintain a current Florida Drivers License. Bi-lingual strongly
preferred. Pay Grade 7: $26,376. All applications & resumes
must be received by 5 PM 6/24/05. Resumes can be faxed
to (561)671-4670, send to: HCDPBC, 324 Datura Street,
Suite 401, West Palm Beach, FL 33401 or e-mail to:
Employment(hcdpbc.orm.
The Health Care District is a Drug Free Work Place


JOIN A WINNING TEAM!
RNs & LPNs
12 Hr. Shifts 3 days on/4 off one week
4 on/3 off the next week
Days 7 am 7 pm
Nights 7 pm-7 am
RNs $24-$28/hour
LPNs $18-$22/hour
+ $2/hour night differential
RN SUPERVISORS
12 Hr. Shifts-3 days on/4 off one week
4 on/3 off the next week
Nights 7pm-7am
$27-$31/hour
LTC & Management experience desirable
GLADES HEALTH CARE CENTER
Pahokee, Florida
Excellent Benefits
Mileage paid to and from work for
out-of-town employees
EXCELLENT WORKING ENVIRONMENT
Call: 561-924-5561 Fax: 561-924-9466
Equal Opportunity Employer


\Mv~fRII^


-Employmnt
FlTimS e .0205


CITY OF SOUTH BAY
POSITION AVAILABLE
WITHIN
SOUTH BAY POLICE
DEPARTMENT


RECORDS CLERK
$9.50 Hourly
Full-Time Position
Benefits
The City of South Bay is accepting applications for the position
of Records Clerk. This position requires excellent adminis-
trative organizational and filing skills; ability to follow de-
tailed written and verbal instructions; great communication
and telephone skills; knowledge of modem office equipment,
practices and procedures. This position also requires an in-
dividual to maintain records that are confidential. Must be
able to type 45 wpm. Must have high school diploma or
G.E.D., an AA degree in Business Administration or 1-3
years progressively responsible secretarial experience or
equivalent. Applications will be accepted until June 24,
2005 at 5:00 pm. Sent i ATTN: Human Resources Direc-
tor, City of South Bay, 335 SW 2nd Avenue, South Bay, FL.
33493. Resumes may also be emailed to parchmen-
taOsouthbaycity.com: Please Note: NO FAXES ACCEPTED.
EOE/AA/ADA/VETPREF


P/T Home Delivered Meal Driver Needed at La-
Belle agency serving seniors. If you have a
cheerful manner, valid FL license & clean driving
record, H.S. diploma or GED, we want to talk to
you. Great place to work, training provided-per-
fect for moms of school-aged kids or active old-
er adults. Stop by L.J. Nobles Senior Center,
475 E. Cowboy Way, 8-5, M-F to fill out an ap-
plication.
Home care workers needed to assist frail elderly
in their own homes in Hendry & Glades Co.
Must have CNA cert., H.S. diploma or GED,
clean FL driver license. Background chks done
on all new hires. We pay mileage, offer health
and other benefits. Great place to work helping
others, so cometalk to us! F/T case aide posi-
tion with full benefits available in our Clewiston
office. On-call home delivered meal driver need-
ed in Buckhead Ridge. Call the office nearest.
you for more info about job openings in your
area. LaBelle: 675-1446, Clewiston: 963-7088,
Moore Haven: 946-1821. We are an EOE.


MANAGEMENT


Immediate restaurant management
openings in Lake Placid, Moore
Haven, LaBelle, Clewiston and
Okeechobee. We are a franchise with
27 restaurants throughout South
Florida and are hiring energetic,
honest, and responsible individuals.
We offer:


-Excellent Salaries
-Medical and Life Insurance
-Dental Insurance
-401K Savings Plan
-Paid Vacations
-Advancement Opportunities
-Training Program


For an interview please call:
863-983-4224


or mail your resume in confidence to:
Pauline Alvarez
Southern Management Corporation
1014 W. Sugarland Hwy.


Clewiston, FL 33440


$50,000 FREE CASH
GRANTS*****- 20051 Nev-
er Repay! For personal bills,
school, new business. $49
BILLION Left unclaimed from
2004. Live Operators!
(800)856-9591 Ext #113.
ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do
you earn $800/day? 30 Ma-
chines, Free Candy All for
$9,995. (888)629-9968
B02000033. CALL US: We
will not be undersold!


AUTHENTIC $150k-$200k 1st
Yr. Potential 24/7 Msg
(888)783-7182 Or
www.freedomroad.biz "Only
Serious Inquires Only".
eBay OPPORTUNITY.
100,000 people are earning
a full-time income at home
with eBay. Are you ready? If
so contact Eric at
(866)932-2924.
Shop here first!
The classified ads


HELP WANTED Earn Extra in-
come asserrmbling CD cases
Irom any location
No Experience Necessary.
(800j405-7619 evi 90
www easywork-greal-
pay.com inol valid in SD,
ND, WI or MD)
Professional. Vending Route
and Equipmenl. Brand name
products, all sizes Financing
available wi,$7.500 Down.
(877)843-8726
(B02002-37). .
Profitable online business for
sale. Home-based Family
owned 6 years online. Com-
plete Internet marKeling &
site training included. $48K
Ca3ll Ricnard after 2:
14070322.4242. '


$50,000 'FREE CASH-
GRAinS-..- 2005' Nev-
er Repay' For personal bills,
school, new business. $49
BILLION Left unclaimed from
2004. Live Operators'
(8001785-6360 E',i #75
IMMEDIATE CASH!!! US Pen-
sion Funding pays cash now
for 8 years- of your future
pension payments. Call
(800)586-1325 for a FREE,
no-obligation estimate
wvw uspensioniund-
ing.com.

Services



Babysitting 405
Child Care Needed410
Child Care Offered415
Instruction" 4^D:
Serves Offe;ed425
Insurance 430
Medical Services435
II oWAoI I

Apartments


/9446s





,324~S *ma~ ~


U..
|improvement


SCREEN & PATIO
ENCLOSURES
Rescreening & repair.
lic. #2001-19849 &
insured. (561)784-5568
or (561)358-2456

Need a few more bucks
to purchase something
deer? Pick up some
extra bucks when you
seit your used items in
the classifelds.


DIVORCE$275-$350*COV-
ERS children, etc. Only one
signature required! *Ex-
cludes govt. fees! Call week-
days (800)462-2000,
ext.600. (8am-7pm) Divorce
Tech. Established 1977.


NEW SELF STORAGE
46 units 7x15, 8x15,10x15,
10x30,12x30,15x25. Full
electric, secure on Commereio
St. 350 ft. from Clewiston
Police Dept. 863-983-6663,
863-983-2808, after hrs.
863-983-8979

Earn some extra cash.
Sell your used items In
the classified


FIND T FAS DIRETO*Y


I


I


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


20


FundB^


4


PEmB


I








Thursday, June 16, 2005 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


mplomn
Ful Time -00


Join the most exciting attraction in SW Florida

JOB OPPORTUNITIES


Server $5.50 per hour plus gr
Maintenance $9 to $12 per hour
Housekeeping $8 to $9 per hour
Cashier $9.50 to $13.00 per ho
Players Club Rep. $10.00 per hour
(Customer Service)
Revenue Clerk $11.00 per hour

Benefits available for all employees
www.theserhinolecasino.com
Apply in person at 506 S. 1 Street
Immokalee, FL 1-800-218-0001
e-mail resume to mramos@semtribe.com


Looking for a career

with a company You

can grow withP

Are you self motivated?
Do you like meeting new people?
Are you computer literate?
If so, this could be the opportunity
you have been looking for.
Full and/or part time
Positions available.

The Caloosa Belle and Immokalee
Bulletin are looking for bright, self-
starters with computer skills and
reliable transportation who are will-
ing to learn newspaper advertising
sales from the ground up.
If you have what it takes, you
could be the outside salesperson
in these fast growing markets.

Our company offers:
a unique work environment
potential for advancement
competitive pay and benefits
life and disability insurance
4Q01 '(K) plan -
generous time off program

Email your resume to:
jkasten@strato.net
An equal opportunity employer


Service Technician I
$8.37 pint.
(Valid CDL"C")
Administrative Assistant
$23,707 Ann.
(Must pass C.S. Exam, type 45 cwpm)
Weed & Seed Coordinator
$35,700 Ann.
(BS degree)
Closing: June 20, 2005
Accounting Specialist (P-T/Temp)
$10.40 p/hr.
(Must pass C.S. Exam)
Police Lieutenant
$48,,672 Ann.
(Must pass C.S. Exam)
Closing June 29, 2005
Police Sergeant
$40, 250 Ann.
(Must pass C.S. Exam)
Closing: June 29, 2005
Police Officer
$14.68 p/hr.
(Must pass C.S. Exam)
Closing: June 29, 2005
Utility Systems Coordinator
$35,700 Ann.
Closing: June 29, 2005

Unless stated All positions open until filled.

Positions noted CS -
must pas exam to complete eligibility.

Complete Valid Employment Applications
must be submitted to:
City of Belle Glade
Human Resources Department
110 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., W.
Belle Glade, FL 33430-3900
Business Hours: 8:00 to 5:00
Posted: 06-06-05


HELP WANTED

DIRECTOR OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

Applications are being accepted by the Hendry
County BOCC. This is a highly responsible posi-
tion coordinating and directing the development
of programs that protect the public's health and
safety from large-scale natural and technological
hazards. Requirements are BS degree and four
years of responsible experience in public safety
or emergency management or comparable
amount of experience. Applications can be ob-
tained at sub-office in Clewiston & at Court-
house in LaBelle. Deadline for submission is
June 16, 2005 at 5:00 RP.M.

Vet pref., drug free, EEO, applicants with
disabilities needing assistance contact HR.


rats


our


Merchandise



Air Conditioners 505
Antiques 510
Appliances 515
Appliance Parts 520
Beauty Supplies 525
Bicycles 530
Books & Magazines 535
Building Materials540
Business Equipment 5415
Carpets/Rugs 550
Children's Items 555
China, Glassware, Etc. 560
Clothing 565
Coins/Stamps 570
Collectibles 575
Computer/Video 580
Crafts/Supplies 585
Cruises 590
Drapes, Linens & Fabrics 595
Fireplace Fixture 600
Firewood 605
Furniture 610
Furs 615
Health & Reducing
Equipment 620
Heating Equipment,
Supplies 625
Household Items 630
Jewelry 635
Lamps/Lights 6140
Luggage 645
Medical Items 650
Miscellaneous 655
Musical Instruments 660
Office Supplies,'
Equipment 665
Pets/Supplies/,
Services 70
Photography 675
Plumbing Supplies 680
Pools 9 Supplies 685
Restaurant
Equipment 690
Satellite 695
Sewing Machines 700
Sporting Goods 705
Stereo equipment 710
Television; Radio 715
Tickets 720
Tools 725
Toys & Games 730
VCRs 735
Wanted to Buy 740


Air i


AIR CONDITIONER -'05 York
3.5 ton package unit w/ heat
$1375 (954)309-8659
AIR CONDITIONER
20K BTU Reverse Cycle,
window unit, $275 or best
offer (863)674-0467.
AIR CONDITIONER
New, 21k BTU, electric $350
(863)357-8788
AIR CONDITIONERS (2) 5
Ton, For DW. Includes 6 yr.
warrantee. Like brand new,
$1200 (863)697-1894
AIR HANDLER, Trane, 2.5 ton,
220 volt, with heat, $150-.
(863)675-5929 .'


CHINA CABINET- antique,
asking $30. (863)675-4912.


DRYER- apartment size,
works nice, $100.
(863)675-7694.
ELECTRIC STOVE- GE, 3 top.
burners working, $15.
(863)467-0987.
MICROWAVE OVEN, excellent
condition, $20.
(863)675-2596
RANGE ( Roper) REFRIGERA-
TOR (Frigidaire 17 cu63 ft)
white, $300 for both.,
(863)467-3645.
REFRIGERATOR- 19 cu. ft.,
Frostfree, asking $75.
(863)675-0104.,
REFRIGERATOR, Whirlpool,
Ig., beige, frost free, x-lg.
freezer, exc. cond., $150.
(863)675-2596
STOVE & HOOD FAN- Elec-
tric,Brand new. Never used.
$250. (863)763-7950
STOVE, Electric, Stainless
Steel. $50. (863)697-6464
STOVE, Gas, Frigidaire. White.
$400 or best offer.
(863)357-3639
WASHER & DRYER- Ken-
more, matching set, excel-
lent condition, $220 for both
(863)675-5089.
WASHER & DRYER- Ken-
more, white, both work well.
$100 (321)593-2739.
WASHING MACHINE
Kelvinator, old but works very
well. $25 (863)467-2557


Fll Time02
1i ii~iiin B B
^Ijj~mII


II
Emplfoyment
FSull ime


SURVEY PARTY CHIEF

Experience needed in construction stake-out,
boundary and topo surveys. Pay is based on
experience. Apply in person at:

Johnson Engineering
251 W. Hickpochee (S.R. 80)
LaBelle,FL
or visit web site
www.johnsonengineering. corn
and download application.
recruiting(johnsoneng.com
DFWP


The GEO Group. Inc.


The GEO Group, Inc.
a worldwide leader in privatized corrections


OFFERS CHALLENGING AND EXCITING
OPPORTUNITIES. EXCELLENT BENEFITS


Current openings for:
CORRECTIONAL OFFICERS
DENTAL ASSISTANT
MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN
LIBRARY CONSULTANT (P/T 8 HRS. PER MO)


MOORE HAVEN
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
1990 East SR 78NW
Moore Haven FL 33471


Phone 868-946-2420
Fax 863-946-2487
EOE, M/F/V/H


The Paige Law Firm, RA.
Seeking experienced secretary, legal secretary experience
preferred but not necessary. Must be organized,
professional person willing to learn & work.
Salary is based upon experience. Fax resume to
(561)996-9337 or mail to 349 Northwest 16th St, Suite 108
Belle Glade, FL 33430 No Phone Calls Please.


EIIMplo ent
MeiatHft~tl^B


Employment
Medial Ill


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GOLF CART EZ GO, 2000
$1800 (863)763-7252
GOLF CART, Electric, 4 Seater
w/box bed. Work or Pleas-
ure. 36 V charger. $950.
(863)697-2033
Love the. earth Recycle
your used items by
selling them in the
classified.


55Empoyen
Mdcl 0210^^


COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT DIRECTOR -
HEALTH (Medical & Health Services Manager L-1) (#64029893)
The Department of Health has an opening for a
County Health Department Director for Hendry and Glades Counties.
Annual Salary range is $120,000 $140,000.
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
A physician licensed in Florida pursuant to Chapter 458 or Chapter 459
of the Florida Statutes who is trained in public health administration.
Five years progressively responsible experience in public health practice,
with management responsibilities in two or more areas of public health desired;
Five or more years of supervisory experience. Experience in grant writing,
public speaking, working With elected officials and the media.
Experience inequality improvement techniques, dire ring pijnrning, organizing,
developing, monitoring, budgeting, and human resource management.
Knowledge andl experience in essential public health services.
Demonstrated knowledge of health policy issues. Proven professional writing skills
and experience in grant writing. Experience in Bioterrorism and Disaster Response.
Please apply on-line at https://jobs.myflorida.com.
Refer to requisition number 64029893.
Closing date: June 27, 2005. EOE/AA/VP Employer.


MAGAZINES- 1 ou. n jorl-
ed titles. $50 for all,
(863)467-0987.


BUILDING SALE! "Rock Bot-
tom Prices!" 20x30 Now
$2900. 30x40 $5170.
40x50 $8380. 40x60
$10,700. 50x100 $15,244.
Others. Ends/accessories
optional. "Priced to Sell!"
Pioneer (800)668-5422.
Steel Arch Buildings! Genuine
SteelMaster Buildings,
factory direct at HUGE Sav-
ings! 20x24, 30x60, 35x50.
Perfect Garage/Work-
shop/Barn. Call
(800)341-7007. www.Steel-
MasterUSA.com.


BuSil'
Materals I5l40


FLOOR TILE includes tile
cutter, 50pcs, 12x12, light
grey $60 (863)467-2112
GARAGE DOOR- 16x8, good
condition, $250,
(863)467-1717.
METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$
Buy Direct From Manufactur-
er. 20 colors in stock with all
Accessories. Ouick turn
around! Delivery Available
Toll Free (888)393-0335.
SLIDING PATIO DOORS (2)
4'x7', tinted glass, $100 for
both (239)246-3549
STEEL BUILDING- 30'x40'
Heritage Bought it, Now its
not needed $6000
763-4149/561-758-4337,
VINYL SIDING- 1 full box,
covers 200 sq ft, color is
Sunny Maize, $100 or best
offer. (863)635-0433.


-t hlde'
Viem 0555


BABY ITEMS boys clothes,
toys, too many to mention
$100 for all or will separate
(863)357-2863
TEDDY BEAR LARGE
Light brown w/ red! heart says
"I love you" Perfect condition
$20 (863)763-8149


Mnfii~^^^I i
China Glasware


ROSENTHAL- 8pl setting,
Made in Germany, wheat de-
sign, gold trim, 50 yrs old,
never used $400
(863)357-2233.


I -ll ble


A COLLECTORS FIND
Polished, like new Farberware
set w/ percolator (works!)
$45 (663)763-8149
ELVIS RECORD & SOUVENIR
COLLECTION: Approx. 44
yrs. old. Rare items. $2500
all. 863)824-3358


HENDRY REGIONAL
MEDICAL CENTER
Registered Nurses
L C ,," _-" r ",'n 'T ,; ". ."--r- '- .* "
r J L e Pc.. I(
LPN i & 11
-e.-,. F. r T,.-.- P r. ,.
O.R. Staff Nurse
Respiratory Therapist
- 0,=;-n C/T -.,, ^J: T rct.C.;--, G ....-- ,'-,, -.--, -(., "
Per Diem Pbharmacy, Techlnician
_: 1 :. .r i J,_ -A,- 7c ii -r. =i,, '-,,= .p .1,. : -,
Full Tune Patient Account Representative
fr':',. ,{,. .. c p S:-:,../ .._- .- ,', --, -.
FuUl Timre Certified Dietary Manager
l 't _. I .-.' ., '1 l. f l.. l , 1^1, r .2 r'
1 ,,. '. ,, ,:- .. ,-- r- -
Director of Quality Improvement
-. = C:.. c a, ,r / ,,'-,' m-,,:*i',.. r '-, -, "/ :: *. ,- ,
,' ,:-d.- C .Cr.. ",. .

Co.nmpLiet. -' .-.ar, *, Excellent r. '. t- .
Clinical Ladder Program Education Assistance
Phone: 863-902-3079 or Fox resume to: 863-983-0805
Drug Free Workplace EOE


-ob
Ingformaion 022


A -
LABOR FINDERS

DAILY WORK DAILY PAY
SAll Types of Work Available
$ Si 202 E. Sugarlaid Hwy. $
S. (Across from Clewiston Inn)
S(863) 902-9494 )


FOOTBALL, BASKETBALL &
BASEBALL CARD
COLLECTION: $1500 for all.
Call (863)763-8943
RUBY RED STEM WARE- as-
sorted sizes, asking $50.
(863)467-8050.



DELL COMPUTER- Windows
XP 256 MB Ram, Monitor,
Keyboard, Mouse & Lots of
games $150 863-843-0158.



COMMERCIAL'KILN & Pour-
ing table. $550 for all, will
sep. (863)467-8177
;Furiture 6151


ANTIQUE COUCH
circa late 1800's, needs some
work $150 (772)418-0018
BOXSPRING & MATTRESS
Very Good Condition $50
(863)675-0969
COFFEE TABLE, 2-End tables
& Sofa table, chrome &
brass w/glass tops.
$300./all. (863)674-0467.
DAYBED- Cherry Sleigh bed
style, $300 or best offer.
(863)634-4200.


TREADMILL: Pro-Form, Cross
over performance. Spd adj.
Walk Length 42". Pd $510
Asking $250 (863)946-1896


ROOF CARRIER: For Luggage.
Hard. 15 cu. ft. Good condi-
tion. $75 (863)610-0732


HOSPITAL BED- Invacare,
electric, new matt, plus air
matt w/pump incld. $900-
neg. (863)655-3436.

WHEEL CHAIR LIFT, dual mo-
tors for vans, like new, ask-
ing $1500. (863)357-8788


AFFORDABLE HEALTH BENE-
FITS From $89.95 A Month
Entire Family! Including Doc-
tor, Hospital, Vision, Rx.
Anyone Accepted! Call Now!
Toll Free! 24 Hours!
(866)697-3739,

HAND PUMP- $80, water w/o
electric, complete w/steel fit-
ting & brass valves to install.
(863)467-4389 mornings.


Emlomnt
FulTm e 0205^


DESK, Wooden. Great for
computer. $40
(863)697-6464
DESKS (3), 1 Gray Computer,
1 Brown, 1 Childs Adjustable
Desk. $85 will sep. Local
delivery. (561)723-6753
DINING ROOM CHAIRS (4)
Light oak, good condition $75
(863)675-8760
DINING ROOM SET
Table w/ four matching chairs.
Good cond. $225
(863)467-6550
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
6' long, light oak color, $85
(863)357-2863
HIGH BACK Wicker Chairs, (3)
Good condition, $36 will sell
separately. (863)467-5477.
LR SUITE- used, fair condi-
tion, color pattern, $100.
(863)675-4912.
MATTRESS- California King
size, good condition, paid
$800 asking $100
(863)675-0104
SOFA, Chair, Coffee Table &
glass top table, $250.
(863)635-4478
SOFA, SLEEPER SOFA, LOVE-
SEAT, blue, good condition,
all for $275.
(863)675-0998.
TABLE & 4 CHAIRS- antique
style, pecan, nice condition,
$100 (863)357-4532.
WATERBED- King Size, mo-
tion free, mattress, liner and
*heater. $50.
(863)357-4463.


BABY CHINCHILLA- gray, 12
weeks old, $75.
(863)357-6825,
BULLDOG PUP- Male, no pa-
pers. $200. (863)634-7108
COCKATIEL'S- for sale, $50
(863)357-6825
DWARF RABBITS (6) $15 &
up (863)610-0843 after 5 p
EXOTIC FAINTING GOAT-
$150. Call evenings,
(863)675-4098.
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS-
AKC reg., 5-males, Ready
June 9th $325. Cash only.
(863)357-3026
JACK RUSSELL (f) for breed-
ing, Rottweiler (f) asking
$250 for both will sell sep.
(863)357-2494.
PARROLET, 1 year old female,
Banded. $100.
(863)357-0476
SIBERIAN HUSKY, Solid
White (F), 1 yr. old & Black &
White(M) 3 yrs. old. $500
both, will sep. 863)610-9812


BATHTUB & SINK
From travel trailer $20 for both
(863)675-8760
PORT-A-POTTY
New in box never been used
pd $80 sell for $50
(863)675-4361 after 5pm



SPA, Portable, Jade, Seats 5.
$1800. (863)983-2234 after
6pm.
-eIl
|jaghgne|H0700


SEW MACH TABLE- portable,
1 drawer, legs can be re-
iTinoved for iran'por iing,
24 8 wainiuli .
863.i-i67- 74'04


--mu ,


S (863)441 4722 2
KEY MACHINE
w/ blank keys, priced rea-
sonably at $400
(863)674-0296
Run your ad STATEWIDE!!!
For only $450 you can place
your 25 word classified ad
in over 150 newspapers
throughout the state reach-
ing oyer 5 MILLION readers.
Call this newspaper' or Ad-
vertising Networks of Florida
at (866)742-1373. Visit us
online at www.florida-classi-
fieds.com. Display ads also
available.


Okeechobee Livestock
Market Sales every
Mon. 12pm & every
Tues. 11am. 763-3127.


-ack


SADDLE- McCellan Repro-
duction, almost new cond.,
w/bridle & blanket, asking
$200. (863)675-4098.


VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
For Dolly Hand Cultural Arts
Center. If interested please call
561-993-1160


GENERATOR- Coleman, 5000
watt, 10 HP, new in box,
wheel kit included. $600.
(863)763-0944.
GENERATOR: Small. $500 or
best offer. (863)357-3388
PAINT SPRAYER, SPX Graco,
Hose & Gun. Used once.
Cleaned w/preservatives.
$700 (863)763-2692


S-- -----
I~ys & Gyame


MINI CHOPPER- Excellent
condition. 6 mo. old $500.
Firm.(863)697-1702
863-467-4041
One man's trash is
another man's treas-
ure. Turn your trash
to treasure with an ad
in the classified.


l~ante to B


WANTED: FL ART
A.E. Backus, H. Newton,
Highwaymbn Art
(772)562-5567

Agriculture


Rentals


Apartments 905
Business Places 910
Commercial
Property 915
Condos/
Townhouses Rent920
Farm Property -
Rent 925
House Rent 930
Land Rent 935
Resort Property -
Rent 945
Roommate 950
Rooms to Rent 955
Storage Space -
Rent 960


I


The Complete
L,,Jid.jiloi of DL-; Corp
SAT-KJUNE 25-10-30 lM
, Evensville,TN
.insl e-n-t'y5l r senl
. ,-Lt F!
Tractors Trailers
SHe.,,, Equipment
Logging Equipment
Farm Implements
*Complete Machine
Shop w/ Tools & Equip,
701ACRE FARM
(sells with Miserme)
*11 Tracts: 5 to 300 Ac.
400 A,. of Tillble Laid
Forer CCommeIrcial
Vegetable Farm
Beautiful Views
Great HomeSites.
2 Ponds
112 Mile Paved Roads

I II S Ill i \
) ,


cal80-841-940
,Se Pht. 'lat
an is OfAltm
ww I-dsn


Time to clean out the
attic, basement and/or
garage? Advertise
your yard sale in the
classified and make
your clean up a breeze!


HOME & LAND, Appraised @
$85,000. Selling for $86,000.
Keller Williams, World Class
Realtors. (239)839-9368
LABELLE- 3br, 2ba, Family
Room, on corner lot, large
oak trees, 1 acre of land, 2
garage. carports, 2 sheds,
screened porch, 1046 No-
bles Rd. Ser. Inq. Only!
(863)675-1172. for appt.
LABELLE, Very Nice Area,
Beautiful 3BR w/hard firs. 1
BA.w/surrounding tile firs.
Kit., IP C i' r,,j i */laundry
rm. ednhjiUi Oii Oaks,
Palm, Citrus.- About 1/2
acre. $179,900. By Owner.
(863)675-8038.

LAKEPORT- Canal front, 2
story, 2br, lba, 24x24 gar-
age, 1st floor, 2br, 2ba on
2nd floor, 2300 sq ft total,
$260,000 (321)593-2739.
Nice, Large, CBS home, fine
neighbors, w/2 extra Ig. lots,
$95,000 neg.
(561)924-6022 for details.
REDUCED-Must Sell! 2/1, w/
new roof, plumbing, elec.,
kitchen cabinets, plus c/a,
$66,500. (561)602-8000


Sportsmans Paradise Yearly
Memberships. Hunting, fish-
ing, lodging and meals con-
veniently located in White
Springs, Florida. Sign up be-
fore rates increase. For in-
formation call:
(800)655-6661.


Do-It-Yourself Ideas


1,2 &3 BR HOUSES &
APARTMENTS FOR RENT.
No pets.
Call (863)983-4436.


Christmas Trees 745
Farm Equipment 805
Farm Feed/Products 810
Farm Miscellaneous 815
Farm Produce 820
Farm Services
Offered 825
Farm Supplies/
Services Wanted 830
Fertilizer 835
Horses 840
Landscaping
Supplies 845
Lawn & Garden 850
Livestock 855
Poultry/Supplies 860
Seeds/Plants/
Flowers 865


TRACTOR, 3430 w/Bush Hog,
Mint Condition. $7500 or
best offer. (863)673-3790


Port LaBelle, 2BR, 1.5BA,
single family house, w/gar-
age, $750 mo. plus sec.
dep. 863-634-2975.


*,, omm1i1


CHICKEN COOPS (4) 10X10,
all pressure treated, $3500
value will sell $1200 you
move,. (863)467-5906


ROOMMATES WANTED: Male
or Female, No children, Pets
neg. $450 mo. + util.
(863)228-3887 LaBelle


Gazebo Sandbox
Here's a great looking do-it-
yourself project that com-
bines a big hexagonal sand-
box with a classic gazebo, so
it's not only fun, but it makes
a handsome addition to any
yard. The sandbox measures
5rft. wide by 7 ft. tall.
Gazebo Sandbox plan
(No. 792)... $9.95
Playhouses/Structures Pack
4 plans incl. 792
(No. C 104) ... $24.95
Catalog (pictures hundreds
of projects)...$2.00
Please add $3.00 s&h
(except catalog-only orders)
To order, circle item(s). clip
and send with check to:
U-Bild, P.O. Box 2383,
Van Nuys, CA 91409.
Please be sure to include
your name, address, and the
name ofr this newspaper.
Allow 1-2 weeks for delivery.
Or call (800) 82-U-BILD
u-bild.com
Money Back Guarantee


BUSH ALL -5' Brand New
$400 (863)801-1666
FINISH MOWER, 6 ft., ,h-
new, used one seas :,r
$ 9 0 0 ..
(863)675-1914/673-1846
FLY MOW LAWN MOWER,
Good condition. $75
(863)675-8168 ,
LAWN TRACTOPSWEEPER-
STX38 John Deere, needs
new belts & pulleys, $300.
(863)357-4532.
RIDING MOWER- John Deere
180 & Husky mower. $600.
ea. (863)763-4149 or
561-758-4337
RIDING MOWER-MTD Garden
Tractor, 18h/p B&S engine,
46" cut, gd tires, needs trans
axle $160 (863)697-9704
ROTO TILLER -Yard Man,
rear tine, like new, $500 or
best offer (863)697-9704
SCREEN ROOM- w/insulated
roof, 12x26, $500 you must
remove. (772)486-1914.


Musical
Instruments 066


PIANO, Gul Bransen, real ivory
keys, perfect tuning, $600 or
best offer (863)467-6693 or
(863)634-1636


Thursday, June 16, 2005


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


REGISTERED HORSE SALE
Saturday, June 25th
Okeechobee Agri-Civic Center
11:00 am @ Tack
1:00 pm@ Horses.
Consiqnments Welcome
478-627-2727 or
850-532-9229
SLN#2120
SPOTTED WALKER FILLIE
2 1/2 yrs old, green broke, viey
sweet, $1500(
(863)843-2495.
THOROUGHBRED GELDING-
11 yr old, black w/ while
face, papers, $1801B
(863)467-9212,
CBBawn &H
:Garden 085


Real Estate



Business Places -
Sale 1005
Commercial
Property Sale 1010
Condos/
Townhouses Sale1015
Farms Sale 1020
Houses Sale 1025
Hunting Property 1030
Investment
Property Sale 1035
Land Sale 1040
Lots Sale 1045
Open House 1050
Out of State -
Property Sale 1055
Property Inspection1060
Real Estate Wanted 1065
Resort Property
Sale 1070
Warehouse Space 1075
Waterfront Property 1080

Sle 1020':


JetH ISie


l^oses- Sle 02


Fivestock


Books &
Magazines


IT^ckesi


m^Bi^


ShedsBuildings &
0537


iboHBs


Huntn^^H
Proper] -1030


Job--
Inforatio 022


I


Farm ^M
Eqimeiiin^^t i


lQouse Ren


t Farm
Miscellaneous 0815


r








22 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee Thursday, June 16, 2005


IEHe


5.'~
Nov
1'


P-ig e A n n ( z .a o


*3BR, 1BA Home in
Hooker's 'Point Area
$112,000
* 3BR,-2BA, MH on man-
made lake $70,000
* New construction on
Bayberry Loop, 4 BR,
2BA, Many Upgrades
$275,000
* 4BR, 2BA, MH, Sherwood
S/D New Upgrades$84000
MONTURA
* Lots Available Call for Details


*River View Lots available on
Caloosahatchee River
Call for Details
LAKEPORT
* Listings Needed
ACREAGE IAND & LOTS
* Farm Land Available
Call for Details
COMMERCIAL
* Office & Retail Space available
in Shopping Center
Call for Details.


~4T1V ZDr'ESS
LIC. REAL ESTATE BROKER
A 420 E. SUGARLAND HWY
-. ..... (863) 983-6663 (863) 983-9770
WEBSrTE: DYESSREALESTATE.COM EMAIL: ANN@DYESSREALESTATE.COM
Se Habla Espafiol
AFT-?ER HOU-RS:
ANN DYESS FAYEKELTING LAURA SMITH TRAVIS DYESS KATHY GARCIA
(863) 983-8979 (863) 677-0707 (863)599-1209 (863)228-2215 (863) 228-4798


RESIDENTIAL 3B]jS l]kjV* ntW900 ACREAGE
2BR, 2BA New Condo MO'IO1NURA 9.9 acres Sears Rd. under
$184,900 LOTS AVAILABLE Citrus SOLD!r $94,900
5 New Homes CIAf 'its SOL $94,900
UnderContract CallforD 4BSDBetaislTB M Na1rOo 5 aSAS iNDffDI .0oo
3 o5ABjg,2jSofi'D i900 CON[ [WcrA Lot in Holiday Isle $27,000
3BR 2BAWD/, $340,000 MCO t1ERCAL. 3 Montura 1.25 $42,000
4BaLWoNDJ0 w/l900 j nly
Under Construction .. 0,00
3 B AerCnsjt.r&4bc q. 9 Commercial Lots on US
ft. 600 27 with Building $400,000 List Your
Moore Haven Yacht Club Building 2476 sq. ft. on
LotSAjpvENDI )O00 US 27 100'xl00'
3BIABIBPEPNDJBX3$000 8 Lots Zoned Ri-B Home Here!
2BRZ BAr.Aebt .80 $400,000
acr sils 10 LotsZoned Conmnerial
2BR, 2BA 150'xlOO' $183,500 $500,000 Marketing To
3BR, 2BA tyrkshop Business Opportunity Every Potential
$340,000 Call for Details Buyer In The
MIOBISEM.XOrMES Ind l + *
3BR, 2Ba, SiBla// $67,500 10O ,. World
3BR, 2BA Easy Life $87,000 Cabinet Shop 4800sq.ft.
3BR, 2BA Seminole Manor & Apt. $173,000 jenday-ladesmmns.com
$87,500


S3PMECIA, NEW IV XSTXINGC
3 Bedroom. 2 Bath on Man Made Lake. Storage Shed.
Call For Details
.-iea r .iate 1.-H H n-.' .d arJ C -l -'e C'.n-.i~ie:. F.,r.t


Your Realtor for *
Western Communities
Teresa Sullivan


Call For Listings


561-795-8533 or 561-996-5623,.


Brian Sullivan

General Contractor

CUSTOM HOMES COMMERCIAL BUDINGS

Call us for all of your new construction needs,

your design or ours.

Visit our new web site

www.briansullivancontractor.com

and look at some of our new homes.


(863)441-4202


Visit ur -esit o thr7 stin--at
www.AWLSEALETAT..CO


C--A XCtAy-., Inic _



Carolyn Thomas 946-2005
MaryLee van Wijck 946-0505


jAnn Donohue 228-0221
D ...... avid Rister 634-2157


Otf S tate
Prpet- l 105


BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROLI-
NA. MUST SEE THE BEAUTI-
FUL PEACEFUL MOUNTAINS
OF WESTERN NC MOUN-
TAINS. Homes, Cabins,
Acreage & Investments.
Cherokee Mountain Realty
GMAC Real Estate, Murphy
www.cherokeemountainreal-
ty.com Call for Free Bro-
chure (800)841-5868.
East Alabama Mountain Prop-
erty For Sale One hour west
of Atlanta in Piedmont, AL
Great for enjoyment or in-
v es t m e n t
15-acres-$54,250.00 512-a
cres-$1,485,000.00 More
information Call Gary
McCurdy (256)239-8001.
The classified are the
most successful sales-
person in town.


N


U-i


(A













a)




0


Grand Opening! LaKetroni
Acreage from $69,900.
Spectacular new waterfront
community on one of the
largest & cleanest mountain
lakes in America! Large, es-
tate-size parcels, gentle
slope to water, gorgeous
woods, panoramic views.
Paved roads, county water,
utilities. Low-financing. Call
now (800)564-5092 xl198.
LAKEFRONT BARGAINS Start-
ing at $89,900. Gorgeous
lakefront parcels. Gently
sloping, pristine shoreline,
spectacular views. Across
from national forest on
35,000 acre recreational
lake in East Tenn. Paved
roads, underground utilities,
central water, sewer, Excel-
lent financing. Call now
(800)704-3145 ext 617,
unset Bay, LLC.
Montana River Frontage, Log
Home, Guest House, Hoise
Barn, +/-4941 acres Win
& Associates Realty, Box
1273, Bozeman MT, Russell
Pederson, Agent.
(406)485-2399 www.Mon-
tanaLandAuctions.com.
NORTH CAROLINA MOUN-
TAINS! Spring is blooming
and is beautiful! A wonderful
time to look for real estate.
See Photos: www.North-
CarolinaMountainRealty.com
or call (800)293-1998. Free
Brochure.
Tennessee Lake Property
from $24,900! 6-1/2 Acre
lot $59,900. 27 Acre Lake
Estate $124,900. Lake Par-
cel and Cabin Package
Available $64,900.
(866)770-5263 ext 8 for de-
tails.
WESTERN NC MOUNTAINS
North Carolina Where there
is: Cool Mountain Air,
Views & Stream, Homes,
Cabins & Acreage. CALL
FOR FREE BROCHURE OF
MOUNTAIN PROPERTY
SALES. (800)642-5333. Re-
alty Of Murphy 317 Peach-
tree St. Murphy, N.C. 28906.
www.realtyofmurphy.com.


-MobieHmes
Sale 202


a ile 'l


III


CLEWISTON COUNTRY ACRES


Modular/Models. From $59,900 & up,
3/4/5BR, 2/3BA, acre & 1/4 available or use
your land as down payment. Financing
available. 863-673-6417 or 561-753-8355


Mobile Homes



Mobile Home Lots 2005
Mobile Home Parts 2010
Mobile Homes -Rent 2015
Mobile Homes Sale 2020


I
F

f


I


Real state
Wanted 'I'll


NEED CASH??'
I Buy Houses, Land, Campers,
Boats or anything, any con-
dition. (863)228-2761.



READING A
NEWSAPlR MAKES
YOU A MORE INFORMED
AND INTERESTING
PERSON,

esm eg mee paaopIr


M







R


IBERGLASS STAIRS- New,
for mobile home, 5 risers,
$250. (863)467-0506.



2 or 3 Bedroom Mobile
Homes For Rent
Stanton Mobile Homes
863-983-8106



Financing Available:
Buy Here, Pay Here.
Stanton Mobile Homes
Marginal Credit O.K.
Call 1-800-330-8106
or 863-983-8106/

New & Used
Mobile Homes:
Land Home Packages
as little as $1,800 down.
Stanton Homes
863-983-8106

USE AREA '02 DWMH
wide, 5br, 2ba, 2000 sq. ft.,
on .48 acres, nicely land-
scaped, $140,000
(863)675-4912 Ive message
Owner Financing
ON MOBILE HOMES
& LAND
Call 863-228-1405
leading a newspaper
helps you understand
the world around you.
No wonder newspaper'
readers are more suc-
cessful people!


CENTRALHowls
OFCLEWSTON

1)VeryNice,
2/ZDW,
Applicances,
Screen Porch,
Extra DW
Carport, 2
Sheds
$74,900


2) Midstate
Loop Special,
3/2 DW,
Fence
Carort, Shed
72,100



Land & Home
Packages in
Sunshine Lake
Estates
NowAvailable

4)Tro pi 50

Ca AC
nces
8,900
2160 W. Hwy.27Clewiston
1.4 Miles N. W of WAL-MART
983-4663
ScHmampion
HOME BUILDERS CO.


Boats 3005
Campers/RVs 3010
Jet Skiis 3015
Marine Accessories 3020
Marine Miscellaneous 3025
Moetorycles 3030
Sport Vehiclss/ATVs 3035


14'V HULL BOAT
Aluminum, w/trailer. $350
(863)675-6652
15'FIBERGLASS BOAT
W/trailer, vinyl top & 35 h/p
Evinrude motor. $1000
(863)675-6652
AIR BOAT 125 LYCOMING'05
Brand new prop but needs
starter. $2500
(863)634-8023 ask for John
AIR BOAT- Aluminum, 15ft,
small block Chevy, good
prop, runs good, trailer.
$2500 (863)763-4643.
AIR BOAT- small, 75HP Frank-
lin Aircraft engine, 5' prop,
needs tune-up, Must sell
$850 (863)675-0254.
BOAT, 14 Ft. Flat Bottom, Alu-
minum. $125
S(863)228-2123
BOAT TRAILER, 14 Ft. Galva-
nized. Good shape. $200.
863-674-1105.
SEA KAYAK, '98 Perception
Eclipse, paddle, $700.
(863)697-3004.

-11. a. II


CAMPER TRAILER, 32 Ft.
Good condition. $1000 or
best offer. (863)763-8261
COACHMAN 5TH WHEEL RV,
'93- 27', excellent cond,
$5000. (863)697-2180.
M/H CAR TOWING HITCH-
Honda, '2000 $100.
(863)675-8168
TERRY FLEETWOOD- '81, 30',
sleeps 6, Fair condition
$1800. 772-287-3602 or
772-486-1914


TROLLING MOTORS (2)ASK-
ING $75 for both.
(321)593-2739.
Motorycle 303


BOAT & TRAILER
Galvanized rocket boat trailer
w/home made boat. $150
(863)763-3822
Harley Davidson 1200
Sportster, '97, new tires,
12k mi., never reg. in Fla.
Call Don bet. 5-8.
(561)992-9491


- IVhicles/
A s I'll^


ATV 400 Polaris
Excellent shape $2500
(863)801-1666
BOMBADEER DS650 Baja,
'03, very few hrs., $4500.
(863)675-0939
YAMAHA 350, '86, blue, new
tires, good condition, $1100
or best offer (863)673-8741

Automobiles


Automobiles 41005
Autos Wanted 4010
Classic Cars 4015
Commercial Trucks 4020
Construction
Equipment 4025
Foreign Cars 4030
Four Wheel Drive 4035
Heavy Duty Ttucks 4040
Parts Repairs 4045
Pickup Trucks 4050
Sport Utility 4055
Tractor Trailers 4060
Utility Trailers 4065
Vans 4070


lAutomobil


CADILLAC ELDOADO'79
Biarritz, 350 V8, only 78K mi,
$3,900 (863)612-0046
HONDA CIVIC, '04- low miles,
call for details,
(863)983-7415.
PONTIAC BONNEVILLE 92
Auto, Cold A/C, Good trans-
portation/gd tires $3000 863-
467-6577/357-1426.
SATURN WAGON 1993, 4
cyl., Auto., PW, A/C, Looks
& Runs great. $1500 or best
offer. (772)461-2629
TOYOTA TERCEL 1983,
4 cyl. Gas saver. Very clean
car. $900 or best offer.
(863)675-2598 Lv. msg


OLDSMOBILE TORONADO'85
Totally rebuilt, new tires, low
miles. Runs great! $6500 or
good offer. (863)824-0884



FORD EXPLORER SPORT '97,
4X4, Loaded, 2 Dr., Needs
motor work. $2500
(863)634-4104
JEEP Grand Wagoneer- '84,
Camo paint job runs & looks
good '$2500.
(863)673-0920.
Gol Cas 4 3T


CLUB CAR GOLF
w/charger,
(863)467-1518.


CART-
$600.


*gd .^ i
1 F---


Camper Shell, aluminum, for
short bed, full sz. pickup,
$350. (863)634-2975
FLATBED, 8 Ft., Comes w/2
tool boxes. Painted Diamond
Plate. $350. (863)228-2123
HITCH, Reese, 5th Wheel,
Easy Slide w/mounting rails.
$250. (772)285-8405 \
TIRE, Brand New Michelin &
Ford Wheel. $85
(863)674-1105
TRUCK CAP, Leer, High Top,
Fits full size Chevy. Pd.
$1300,,Asking $300.
(302)264-1301
TURBO HYDROMATIC TRANS
Installation avail. $250 or best
offer (863)467-8856


CHEVY Z71- '94, 1/2 Ton, 4x4
Ext cab 350, auto, $2500.
(863)412-2504
DODGE 250 RAM 1981: 318
engine, 130K. Has electrical
short. $500 (863)763-5392
FORD 1986, 308, V8, 4x4,
manual shift.. $150,0
(863)763-5392
FORD F150 P/U 1989, Needs
motor. $1200
(863)634-4104
GMC S15 PU, '88- red, runs
good, $1500. neg.
(863)763-1751.
TOYOTA PU, '87- drk. blue, 5
spd, w/fibergalss canopy,
$1000, (863)697-3004.


a.pot Ut l


CHEVY S-10 1992, Good con-
dition, needs repair. $2000
Call Jewel @
(863)751-1358
FORD BRONCO '86
Full size, 4x4 $600 ask for
Michael (863)967-6632
HUNTING PACKAGE $8500
Jeep '88, Cobra trlr, tripod, 2
htrs, 2 tree stands, climber.
Call Natalia (954)304-4915
ISUZU TROOPER '91
V-6, A/C, good condition, runs
good $1000 or best offer
(239)657-4348


l~tility Tr ier


UTILITY TRAILER
w/ running boards & tires
$150 (863)675-0969


CHEVY VAN, '89- w/windows,
asking, beige w/ brown
stipe, runs good, $2500
neg.. (863)763-1751.


FORD AEROSTAR VAN, '92
runs well, good shape,
$1500. (863)467-6423.
FORD HANDI CAPPED 1993,
Fully equipped. After 8pm
call (863)357-3534 $3800.
PLYM. VOYAGER 1988, Good
engine, no. rust, good tires,
power steering leaks. $795
neg. (863)612-0111
PLYM VOYAGER, '87- V6,.
AC/PS/CD, new tires, hitch,
runs great, low miles, $1500
(863)763-6205.
How do you find a job
in today's competitive
rnarket' In the
employment section
of the classified


Public Notices


Public Notice 5005
State Public -
Legal Notice 5500


LEGAL NOTICE
The following vehicle will be sold at pub-
lic auction on June 28 at 8:00 a.m. at
2190 NW 16th St., Belle Glade, FL:
1986 Honda 4ODR
VIN #1 HGBA7429GA107886
62613 CGS 06/16/05

^^^3^II


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR
HENDRY COUNTY, FLORIDA
FILENO.2005-068-CP
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
JAMES MARTIN DOLES,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
JAMES MARTIN COLES deceased,
File Number 2005-068-C is pending
in the Circuit Court for Hendlr County,
Rodrida, Probate Division, the address
of which Is 25 E. Hickpochee Ave.,
LaBelle, Florida 33935.
The names and addresses of the person-
al representative and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth
below.
All Creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedents estate, including
unmatured, contingent or unliquidated
claims, on whom a copy of this notice
is served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE,
OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or de-
mands against decedents estate, in-
cluding unmatured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THIS
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice
is June 9,2005.
Personal Representative
RomaJ. Vanse
16589 78th Drive North
Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418
Attorney for Personal Representative:
.Joseph DeGance, Esquire
Attorney
Florida BarNo. 155360
3471 N. Federal Hwy. #300
Ft. Laderdale, FL 33306
954-566-1531
59576 CGS 6/9,16/05


PuI cH N B ti c


IiVIrIsUwIIU IUU
Notice is hereby given that the District School Board of Hendry County, Florida, will
receive bids until 3:00 p.m. on June 21, 2005 at the Hendry County School
. Board's Finance Office, at which time they will be opened and tabulated.
Project Tide: Central Elementary School Restroom Renovation
Project-2005
Project Location: Central Elementary School
1000 South Deane Duff Avenue
Clewiston, FL 33440
Name of Owner: Hendry County School Board
25E. Hickpochee Ave.
LaBelle, FL 33935


Project Scope:

Site Examination:


Furnish all labor and materials required to complete
the renovations of the designated restrooms at
CentralElementary School
The site may be examined by contacting the
School Principal, Ms. Anna Jo Springfield at 863-
983-1550 and scheduling the time of a site visit


Place for Receipt of Bids: Al bids shall be delivered to: Hendry County
School Board's Finance & Purchasing Office,
111 Curry Street, LaBelle, FL, or maied to: Hendry
County School Board's Finance & Purchasing
Office, PO. Box 1980, LaBelle, FL 33975.


Obtaining Bid Documents:


Bidders may obtain documents, including com-
plete drawing and specifications, by contacting
the office of Jay Ammon Architect, Inc., 3246
Lakeview Oaks Drive, Lonwood, Florda, 32779
telephone number (407)333-1977. All requests
for plans and specifcations must be accompan-
ied y a refundable deposit of$50.00 per set,
with checks payable to Jay Ammon Architect,
Inc.


All bids must be enclosed in a sealed envelope plainly marked an the outside 'Cen-
tral Elementary School Restroom Renovation Project 2005. Bid Date: 6/21/05,
3:00 p.m." The School Board of Hendry County reserves the right to reject any
and all bids received, and to waive any and all rreguladIes In regard thereto. No
bids may be withdrawn after the scheduled closing time for receipt for bids for a
period of sixty (60) calendar days without consent of the Board,
Hendry County School Board'
Richard Murphy, Chairman
62638 CGS/CB 06/16/05


V


.Ho -a lIe


S40 Years Experience
LICENSED & INSURED PRE-SALES INSPECTION


CHEROKEE
HOME INSPECTIONS, INC.
1I .fff-tif-^ff' ^


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J .,'7.* .. ,1;
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(863)465-1371


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M-,Sale


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Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 16, 2005


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thursday, June 16, 2005


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


h liNS ti


NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING OF LANDOWNERS OF
HENDRY-HILLIARD WATER CONTROL DISTRICT
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to call of the Board of Supervisors of Hendry-
Hillard Water Control District, and in accordance with Chapter 298, Florida Stat-
utes 1941, and law amendatory tbereto, the Annual Meeting of Landowners ol
Hendry-Hilliard Water Control District, for the year 2005, will be held at the office
of Hilliard Brothers of lorida, Ltd., 5500 agoleRoad, Clewiston,Flda ondaon Fri-
day, June 17,2005 at 1:00 RM., for the purpose of:
1. Electing one (1) supervisor for a term of three (3) years.
2. Receiving annual reports and taking such action with respect thereto as the land-
ownemrs may determine.
3. Transacting such other business as may properly come before the meeting.
Additionally, this notice advises that, if a person decides to appeal any'decision
made by the Hendry-Hilliard Water Control District Board of Supervisors, with re-
spect to any matter considered at this meeting, he will need a record of the pro-
ceedings and that, for such purpose. He may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Board of Supervisors
Hendry-Hilliard Water Control District
By: Joe Marlin Hilliard
President
61026 CGS 6/9,16/05


PAHOKEE HOUSING AUTHORITY, INC.
NOTICE
INVITATION FOR BID
BID NO. LM0605
TO PROVIDE LAWN MAINTENANCE SERVICES
Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the Pahokee Housing Au-
thority, until 3:00 p.m., Wednesday, June 22, 2005, local time, at which time
they will be publicly opened and read for furnishing of all labor, materials and
equipment, and performing all work necessary and incidental to Lawn Mainte-
nance Services for L.L. Stuckey Homes; McClure Village; Padgett island Homes;
and Fremd Village, in accordance with the Pahokee Housing Authority's plans,
specifications and contract documents.
Thteservices for LL Stuckey and McClure Village consist of removing litter; mow-
ing; edging; spraying; and weed eating of driveways and common areas.
The services for Padgett Island Homes and Fremd Village consist of removing litter,
mowing, spraying, weed eating, and edging of common areas and individual
yards; and edging of individual walkways and driveways; trimming of perimeters
of individual units.
Bids shall be delivered and addressed to the Pahokee Housing Authority, 465
Friend Terrace, Pahokee, FL 33476, and shall be labeled "Lawn Maintenance, Bid
No. LMO6/05; 3:00 p.m.,; June 22, 2005.' Any Bidder who wishes their bid to be
considered is responsible for making certain that their bid is received in the Pa-
hokee Housing Authoritys office by the proper itme. No oral, telegraphic, elec-
tronic, facsimile, or telephonic bids of modifications will be considered unless
specified. Bids must bear original signatures and figures. Specifications may be
examined and obtained at no charge by calling Julla Hale, Executive Director, at
(561) 924-5565.
Award will be made to the lowest responsible bidder whose bid meets the require-
ments of the Invitation for bids. Pahokee Housing Authority reserves the right to
reject any or all bids and to waive any Informality in bids, wherever it is in the
test interests of the Pahokee Housing Authority. Any late bids or bids received
after the scheduled deadline will be returned unopened. Pahokee Housing Au-
thority is an Equal Opportunity Employer and promotes a Drug-Free Workplace.
61335 CGS 6/16,23/05


SOUTH FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
PUBLIC NOTICE OF WORK PLAN
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to 'The Water Rights Compact Among the
Seminole Tnbe of Florida, The State of Florida, and The South Florida Water Man-
agement District", the 2nd Amendment to the 17th Annual Work Plan of the
Seminole Tribe of Florida has been submitted to the South Florida Water Manage-
ment District.
The Seminole Tribe of Florida, 6073 Sliding Road, Hollywood, FL 33024, has sub-
mitted, on June 6, 2005, the 2nd Amendment to the 17th Annual Work Plan to
include the following projects: Big Cypress Reservation: Big Cypress Rock
Quarry Building construct a proposed office building at the Big Cypress Rock
Quarry (S8/T48S/R35E). Brighton Reservation: Brighton Water Treatment Plant
construct a water treatment plant (S18-20/T39S/R33E). Immokalee Reserva-
tion: Immokalee Lake Drainage install a gravity control structure to help allevi-
ate flooding of the Immokalee Lake during the rainy season (S10/T47S/R29E).
Other: Coconut Creek Seminole Casino Expansion Phase 1 proposed expan-
sion of the existing casino building located on Trust lands. The proposed project
is located on Tract D, owned by the Seminole Tribe but not Trust land, at the

Interested pe: n m: ci .mment : pon t'ihe W: Pl:n. r. i''i : '.. Jiten rej.
WeII la'n by wi IIlIeg to: E irne e IT|.|)II|.UI cIe'lli iton Sieth ledda Waii 1

te r Management District. Pl 1 460 J l:Wet 'PalmBeach, FL '33416-46"0;


,,lll:, i"N r ..i received witin 3 days Inure the dte o .
i t jr i Tjiln i .r ,I i:iii r ,u, ,: l h in,,.ri ) I t.. i. l ... i i ri',]! j
..,u,,rv l.: r, 'rnl, J *.,,j]r F ir,(,.-. i". :u j: TI',- lnli ii:,:,, l ]: || ,

Interested persons may comment upon the Work Plan or submit a written request
for a copy of the Staff .Report containing proposed agency action regarding the
Work Plan by writing to: Environmental Resource Regulation, South Honda Wa-
ter Management District, PO Box 24680, West Palm Beach, FL 33416-4680;
IJ:. lirr1iWi,'ij'l t. iri :i r.i; received within 30 days from the date of

N ,.1i h in,'[, .,' l,,Jb ," r.-: i r.[ i u .1 i ] i ', j ir a. ]n/.u lif.'l ru .i lpy: OIa r,:


t, l ," C r.I I-. le.


Water, water everywhere for the rainy season


By MaryAnn Morris
Water is a big subject in South
Florida's rainy season. For newcom-
ers, the "rainy season", extends from
late spring through early fall, roughly
from May or June through October or
November, depending on the year.
Daily rainfall on the relatively flat land
of South Florida means that water can
be a problem.
Government water'managers, such
as the South Florida Water Manage-
ment District, local drainage districts,
such as the Coquina Water Control
District, cities and county govern-
ments and homeowners associations
have the responsibility to manage
rainfall runoff for their areas, canals,
ditches and lakes, as their codes and
charters require. Property owners,
ranchers, farmers and individuals are
also responsible for the runoff from


the land they own.
Dished medians in interstate high-
ways, roadside ditches and swales
along lot lines and residential roads all
work to drain water away from roads
we drive on and the buildings where
we work and live.
Sometimes water can be drained
off through public ditches, canals and
swales, or caught in ponds and partial-
ly contained in swales until it soaks in
or evaporates over time.
Nothing seems to cause more con-
tention than changing things on your
property that in some way changes
the water situation on your neighbor's
property. In short, you are expected to
keep your water and keep the ditches
flowing. This issue is known as "lot
drainage".
"Lot drainage in new subdivisions.
is addressed as part of the review


process," said Jennifer Busbin, plan-
ner for the Okeechobee County Plan-
ning and Development Department.
When roads and homes are built, the
areas covered with concrete, roofs or
paving no longer allow rainwater to
soak in. Plans must be made so that
no one is hurt by the new construc-
tion.
"On existing properties," continued
Ms. Busbin, "neither may the drainage
flow be blocked nor may the lot be
changed in such a way to cause water
to flow onto or stand on neighboring
property."
So, what can you do?
Be you own best water manager.
Be sure that you understand the path
water takes as it leaves your property.,
Don't block swales or ditches by plant-
ing in them or allow leaves, mulch
and other yard waste and sediment to


*.


remain. Don't plant in swales and
ditches. Even tree trunks can interfere
with drainage. Older swales should
periodically be dug out to remove
accumulated sediment in the bottom
and sloped, if needed so that water
will flow to catch basins or soak into
the soil.

When changes on neighboring
property cause water problems on
your land, it can become a code
enforcement issue.

- "If, for instance, you wish to build
higher than your neighbor, you can
where permitted, but you must keep
your water on your land with a swale.
You may not change drainage to
adversely impact your neighbor," said
Ms. Busbin, "Problems with existing
homes can be an issue for the Code
Compliance Department."


m.
5 '


,,
. .. .- .

We<~


Staff photos/MaryAnn Morris
Tickseed, said to have been
used by the Seminoles for heat
prostration is blooming almost
,everywhere a mower hasn't
touched.


Di


Pale Meadow Beauty is a little F^,1,',.. ...' ^ '.^ 1 .
flower, sometimes blooming with ,-- .< W,,,.V .
Tickseed in open prairie. Its petals Spike Rush grows in ditches Yellow Colic-root's leaves form a
fall off easily, especially in the and marshes, often near or distinctive rosette at its base, mak-
afternoon. among ,Pickerel Weed ing it easy to identify.


REQUEST FOR BIDS (RFB) CN051024,
S-65A EROSION REPAIRS, OSCEOLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
The South Florida Water Management District will receive sealed bids through the
Procurement Office, 2nd Floor,-B-1 Bldg., 3301 Gun Club Road, West Palm
8i,', Fji:,,;,Ji ~J~ f,:,,' .-65A Erooll Repj;r, Osceoia Countr FL un
Wedinedil ii Jue ,9 20it'5 312 30 pm i.' ii i.T l i l ,I' [, ,,iim, L;ulmn,,i
r.n yl1 r.- l.,I.l n.,., Jl,) f ,ul,ll l .j ,] 1 |I. ,',ii'l'l : 1 .' .llh r n' .. 1, jlll-l
l'-|||:1.1||..1- l-l-ii'lhJ 1"l'J rill Iru ,'I i riyl:pr i, ul. l 'll li, lfo .' il f I .I',II'" T".: 'il I
r .l iij -]--1l-ir,-' vIt II: u .I',., 11-,, : l\r\v Lij Mr 1 i i -in :l, =, : i .i ri' ,-n i :.l ,l.v r
.,I:| T| : .'j:hl .1 ji j n ,n-j ,jlk i h: ,fi:r l.-r'lii :P''.I-I : Ac, L i' mi J l.
''i L ip i,,n ::rii hj 'i .11 ,,, T,,: L l'
i:.i( l ',. 9I AWe r .n wil lmn'dia'leiy ii 010
All bids must confomo to the instructions in the Request for Bidders (RF). Inter-
ested respondents may obtain a copy of the complete RFB by downleading It for
free from our webslte wtol.md.ggy. by obtaining a set for $40.00 at the
above address, by calling (561) 682-6391, or by calling the 24-hour BID HOT-
LINE 800-472-5290. The public is invited to attend the bid opening. Information
on the status of this solicitation can be obtained at our web site -
ww.sfwmd.gov.
61670 CS 6/16/05 .

PUBLIC NOTICE
ir. H,:,',d,V i, u',,ir hijl' L,,, C,- Hi, ,,. 1,',,, ,I- j ,u '.,'l M i j .I '.
IT. M .inlii Jii,, O j11 INh irj ,: 1.TV Hjill 1 .:,.Tiri: :1.6",' I'r,)M N.:i. I V l I

* Review and consider the Hendry County Public Library Annual Plan of Service
for 2005, and
* Review and considerthe Hendry County Public Library Cooperative Annual
Budgetfor2005.
All citizens and interested parties are encouraged to attend this public meeting, Any
person requiring a special accommodation to participate in the meeting because
of a disability or physical impairment, including speech or hearing impairments,
should contact the Hendry County Library Cooperative Board Coordinator at
(863) 983-1493 at least five calendar days prior to the scheduled meeting.
Christopher Kuechmann, Cooperative Coordinator
31889 CGS 6/16/05


mn~i~rimi nuonc us- iidtAntOMu INin


AUCTION on Friday, July 1,2005
at 9:00 a.m. at 1233 N.W. Avenue L,
Belle Glade, Florida
Property of Tamica McRae:
living room set, chest of drawers, stereo
with speakers, misc. items
62653 CGS 6/16,23/05

NOTICE
AUCTION on Friday, June 17,2005
at 9:00 a.m. at 1233 N.W. Avenue L,
Belle Glade, Florida
Property of LaTonya Canty
Clothes, toys, basinet, baby tb and
misc. items.
60031 CGS 6/9,16/05

NOTICE OF BUDGET WORKSHOP/
SPECIAL MEETING
The Board of Supervisors for the Central
County Water Control District will hold
a budget workshop/special meeting
on Wednesday, June 22, 2005 at 5
p.m., the purpose of this workshop
will be to discuss the Districts budget,
security needs and its right of way
policy.
All interested persons are invited to at-
tend and be heard with respect to the
proposed budget Interested persons
may appear on their own behalf or by
agent or attorney. If an one decides to
appeal a decision made by the Board
with respect to any matters c to insure
that a verbatim record of the proceed-
ing is made, which record includes the
testimony and evidence upon which
the appeal Is to be based. .
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: IF YOU RE-
QUIRE SPECIAL AID OR SERVICES AS
ADDRESSED IN THE AMERICAN
DISABILITIES ACT, PLEASE CONTACT
THE DISTRICT CLERK'S OFFICE AT
(863)983-5797, NO LESS THAN FIVE
(5) DAYS PRIOR TO THE ABOVE
STATED HEARING DATE.
CENTRAL COUNTY WATER
CONTROL DISTRICT
59813 CGS 6/15/05
NOTICE TO PUBLIC
The Hendry County Hospital
Authority Financial Commit-
tee will conduct their month-
ly business meeting on
Thursday, June 30 at 10:00
a.m. in the Conference
Room at Hendry Regional
Medical Center, 500 West
Sugarland Highway, Clewis-
ton, Florida.
62398 CGS 6/16/05
Your next job could be in
today's classified. Did
you look for it?


NUlICi: UE" REBULAR MEETING
OF THE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS
OF THE CENTRAL COUNTY WATER
CONTROL DISTRICT,
You are hereby notified that the Regular
Meeting of the Board of Supervisors of
the Central County Water Control Dis-
trict will be held on Wednesday, June
22, 2005 at 7 p.m. at the Montura
Clubhouse, Montura Ranch Estates,
State Road 833, Clewiston, Florida.
T.ll :.,:li i ,. iT 4,I ii, ,,,, iI i
son decides to appeal the decision of
the Board of Supervisors with respect
to any matter considered at the public
meeting or hearing herein referred he
or she may need to insure that a ver-
batim record of the proceedings is
made, which record includes the testi-
mony and evidence upon which the
appeal is based.
59805 CGS 6/15/05
PUBLIC NOTICE
Lakeside Condo Association of Pahokee,
Florida Is seeking bids for lawn main-
tenance. Bid should include weekly
mowing, weedeating, edging, spraying
as needed, biyeadry front hedge trim-
ming and putting down mulch, and
some yearly trimming. For information
contact Mrs. Burroughs at
561-261-3992. Mail bids to Lakeside
Condo Association, #40 Lakeside Cir-
cle, Pahokee, FL 33476. Closing date:
6/30/05
61680 CGS 6/16/05
PUBLIC NOTICE
Public notice Is hereby given that Fergu-
son Towing will sel at public Auction,
free from all prior liens, the following
vehicles that remaining unclaimed in
storage with charges unpaid, pursuant
to Florida Statutes 713.78, to the high-
est bidder at 12065 Lakeshore Drive,
Canal Point, FL 33438'on June 20,
2005 at 9:00 A.M.
1991 Ford (van) Red
VIN# 1FMDA11U9MZA27314
1992 Isuzu (4-door) Red
VIN# 452CG58Z2N4353451
1986 Builck(2-door)B lu
VIN#1G4GM4 A7GP231421)
2002 Chevrolet (4-door)Whl
VIN# 2G1WF52E729376033
1991 Mercury (2-door)l Bro
VIN#1 MEPM6047MH623839
1999 Daewo 4-door) Grn
VIN# KLAJAS2Z7XK237343
1983 Ford (Pickup) Grn
VIN# 1FTEF14G3DNA42155
60955 CGS 6/9,16/05


Grab a bargain from your
neighbor's garage, attic,
basement or closet in
today's classilled,.


Okeechobee's, Many



Wildflowers; we lucky few


Tiny Shoe Buttons, also called Hat Pins looks like a tiny "pop" of
white fireworks on the slopes of ditches.


By MaryAnn Morris
Here in Okeechobee County, devel-
opment has not pushed the farms and
open space back and back and back. In'
other, more developed areas where
many wildflowers once grew, now only
the Periwinkle and some never-say-die
Lantana survive as traffic blasts by. Here
\ve are lucky.
This time of year the roadsides and
ditches in Okeechobee County,sparkle
with color. Wildflowers come popping
up year after year asking nothing, brush-
ing up, stretching up, and reaching for
us.
A riot of deep yellow Mohr's Susan
pops up with nodding heads behind the
bands of lighter yellow Tickseed.


Ditch bottoms bloom in a prolifera-
tion of wild abandon with cobalt blue
Pickerel Weed, white Spike Rush and
the interesting little white plant called
Hatpins, or Shoe Buttons up the side of
the ditch. It reminds of a tiny burst of
white fireworks exploding on the
ground.
Roadside ditches often have a lacey
edge of yellow Tickseed to add to the
color palette. If you're out for a quiet
stroll or not driving too fast, you may
even see little Pale Meadow Beauty or
the delicate spikes of Yellow Colic-root.
Yes, here we are lucky.
Reference: Florida Wildflowers in
their Natural Communities by Walter
Kingsley Taylor


Researchers declare victory against invasive mole cricket


GAINESVILLE After a quarter-
century fight aai1nsi three invasive
insects from South America, Universi-
ty of Florida researchers are declaring
victory against the pests that caused
$94 million in damage to turf and pas-
tures each year.
The successful battle against mole
crickets is a prime example of how
biological control agents can be used
to manage pests without conventional
pesticides, said Howard Frank, a pro-
fessor of entomology at UF's Institute
of Food and Agricultural Sciences. '
He said the release of three benefi-
cial organisms wasps, nematodes
and flies imported from South Ameri-
ca that attack mole crickets has
reduced mole cricket populations in
the Gainesville area by 95 percent, and
the control is spreading throughout
Florida.
"Reductions increased during the
past 12 years as populations of the
introduced natural enemies increased
and began to have a spectacular effect
on the mole cricket pests," said Frank,
who has coordinated the mole cricket
research program since 1985.
Frank said four species of mole
crickets are found in Florida: North-
ern, short-winged, southern and
tawny.
The northern mole cricket, which is
indigenous to the state, is not closely
related to the three South American
invaders, and it is not troublesome
because native wasp and nematode
species in Florida keep it under con-
'trol. Unfortunately, the three invasive
mole cricket species are not affected
by native wasps and nematodes in
Florida, he said.
Accidentally introduced to the
southeastern United States more than
75.years ago, the pest mole crickets
first became a problem for Florida
vegetable growers and were poorly
controlled with arsenic baits. The
0


invasive pests became a nuisance
again in the 1970s when the Environ-
mental Protection Agency banned
chlordane and similar pesticides.,
"When the three invasive mole
crickets left their natural enemies
behind, there was nothing to stop
their population boom here," Frank
said. "These pest mole crickets, which
tunnel into the ground and ,feed on
plant roots, are now found from North
Carolina to Texas, and they continue
to spread north and west."
Of the three, the tawny mole crick-
et is the most destructive, eating grass
roots in Florida pastures and turf as
well as the roots of tomatoes, cab-
bages, eggplants and bell pepper.
seedlings, Frank said.
He said the pest crickets have a real
affinity for bahiagrass,. Florida's most
common pasture grass, which covers
more than 2.5 million of the state's 35-
million acres. Like the pest crickets,
bahiagrass was imported from South
America, and it provides the insects
with an almost endless food source.
They also eat Bermudagrass on Flori-
da golf courses.
"Early research on the three inva-
sive pests showed how mole crickets,
like.moles, burrow into soil around
plant roots and prevent them from
absorbing water," Frank said. "We
also realized that permanent control
of these pests could only be achieved
with a classical biological control pro-
gram, and we began looking for natu-
ral enemies in South America."
A BENEFICIAL WASP,
In Brazil, researchers found a
native wasp (Larra bicolor) that
attacks the pest mole crickets. After
the Brazilian wasp stings the pest
mole cricket and lays an egg, the wasp
grub (larva) begins feeding on the
mole cricket and kills it within two
weeks.
In 1981-1983, the Brazilian wasp


was released at several South Florida
locations,, but it did not thrive and
failed to provide effective control of
the pest mole crickets.
Undaunted, UF researchers found a
tougher strain of the same wasp in the
higher elevations of Bolivia, releasing
it in the Gainesville area during 1988
and 1989. It attacks all three pest mole
cricket species, but does not threaten
Florida's native northern mole cricket.
"By late 1993, it was evident that
the Bolivian strain of the wasp had
become established," Frank said.
"Four years later, the population had
spread at least 20 miles east and west
of Gainesville. By 2002, it seems to
have spread 135 miles northwest and
perhaps as far south. In time, it is likely
to occupy all of Florida."
A BENEFICIAL NEMATODE
Next stop in thle battle against the
mole cricket invasion was Uruguay
where a parasitic nematode a tiny,
worm-like animal was found and
brought to Florida for mass-rearing
and release.
"While other mole cricket natural
enemies live above ground, nema-
todes dwell in the soil where mole
crickets do most of their damage -
that's the real advantage of this para-
site," said Grover Smart, a professor of
nematology who brought the nema-
tode to Florida in 1985. "The nema-
tode does not affect Florida's native
northern mole crickets, but it does
attack all three invasive mole cricket
pests."
Once the parasitic nematode
(Steinrernema scapterisci) enters the
body of a mole cricket to mature and
reproduce, it kills the cricketwithin 48
hours, Smart said. Young nematodes
emerge from the dead cricket about a
week later to seek new hosts. Once
infected, mole crickets can spread the
nematode to new areas by flying,
crawling or burrowing. .


Between 1989 and 1992, scientists
working on the mole cricket research
program released more-than 16 billion
nematodes in 21 Florida counties.
"We just don't see a lot of mole crick-
ets anymore in areas where we have
released this parasite," Smart said.
UF holds three patents on the
organism, which is now available
commercially as a biopesticide mar-
keted as Nematac-S by MicroBio, a
biotech firm owned by Becker Under-
wood Inc. in Ames, Iowa.
"If the nematode has not spread to
your land, it will eventually get there,"
Frank said. "If you want to speed up its
arrival, apply the biopesticide. It will
kill a large portion of your pest mole
crickets year after year."
A BENEFICIAL FLY
The third effective biocontrol is a
beneficial fly from Brazil (Ormia
depleta) that is attracted to two
species of the pest mole crickets by
the sounds they make.
"Like little guided missiles, the flies
home in on singing crickets and lay
their larvae on or near the singer,"
Frank said. "The larvae burrow into
the crickets and feed, killing the host
within a week."
He said the mole cricket research
program found and reared the Brazil-
ian fly, releasing a few hundred flies in
Gainesville and Bradenton in 1988.
Between 1989 and 1992, researchers
released more than 10,000 flies across
the state in, cooperation with golf
courses and the Florida TurfGrass
Association. By 1994, the fly had
spread to 38 of Florida's 67 counties,
but the tropical insect does not seem
to survive permanently north of the
Orlando area.
"In counties where the fly is estab-
lished, surveys show significantly less
damage by pest mole crickets on golf
courses," Frank said.


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